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T. Wayne Beasley Memorial History Scholarship Banquet

T. Wayne Beasley Memorial History Scholarship Banquet

Fourth Annual Beasley Scholarship Banquet
March 29, 2014 7:00 pm

Ballroom, Curris Center, Murray State University

Guest Speaker: Joe Lee
Professor of Irish Studies; Director of Glucksman Ireland House
New York University

“Michael Davitt: Between Two Worlds”


Description: Photo: Prof. Joe LeeProfessor Joe Lee came to New York University in 2002 from University College Cork, where he chaired the History Department and served for periods as Dean of Arts and as Vice President. Educated at University College Dublin, the Institute for European History in Mainz, Germany, and Peterhouse, Cambridge, he has also been a Fellow of Peterhouse, and held Visiting Fellow/Professor appointments as Senior Parnell Research Fellow in Irish Studies at Magdalene College, Cambridge; the Austrian Academy, Vienna; the European University, Florence; the University of Edinburgh, Mellon Professor, University of Pittsburgh, Distinguished Professor of World Peace, LBJ Graduate School of Public Affairs, U. Texas at Austin, and Exchange Prof. of Government at Colby College.    

His books, The Modernization of Irish Society, 1848-1918 (Dublin, 1973, 2008) and the prize-winning Ireland, 1912-1985: Politics and Society (Dublin, 1989), continue to generate lively debate. Professor Lee’s op-ed columns for the Sunday Tribune have been collected and published as the Shifting Balance of Power: Exploring the 20th Century (Dublin, 2000), and he edited, with Marion R. Casey, Making the Irish American: The History and Heritage of the Irish in the United States (NYU Press, 2006).

Lee served sixteen years as Chair of the Fulbright Commission for Ireland, 1980-96, and four years as an elected Independent member of the Irish Senate and of the British-Irish Parliamentary Committee from 1993-97. Elected a Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 1986 and an Eisenhower Fellow in 1989, he succeeded the inaugural director of Glucksman Ireland House, Professor Bob Scally, in 2002. Under his directorship, Glucksman Ireland House has established itself as a center for Irish-American oral history and started a new Master's Program in Irish & Irish-American Studies in 2007. Awarded an Honorary D. Litt by the National University of Ireland in 2006, Professor Lee’s current research focuses on nineteenth-century Irish nationalist Michael Davitt on nationalism and on Irish and Irish-American historiography in a trans-national context.

    All proceeds from the banquet will benefit the T. Wayne Beasley Memorial History Scholarship. The Beasley Scholarship is given to the outstanding rising senior history major. Dr. Beasley taught British and European history in the Murray State Department of History from 1965 to 2008.  One hallmark Beasley was known for was a strong commitment to undergraduate students. His colleagues created the scholarship after his death in 2008 to honor the memory of a dedicated teacher and colleague. The fund has grown quickly due to support from Wayne’s daughters, former students, and colleagues.
The cost of the banquet is $40 per person; reservations are required by March 24. For reservations or to make a contribution to the scholarship, please contact the MSU Department of History at 270-809-2234 or msu.deptofhistory@murraystate.edu.


Third Annual Beasley Scholarship Banquet & Lecture

March 30, 2013 7:00 pm

Curris Center Ballroom

James Epstein,

“Scandals of British Colonial Rule” 

James Epstein is a historian of modern Britain, specializing in late eighteenth and nineteenth-century political culture.  He is Distinguished Professor of History at Vanderbilt University.  He is author of The Lion of Freedom: Feargus O’Connor and the Chartist Movement (Croom Helm Ltd, 1982), which re-evaluates the national character of the Chartist movement and its main leader.  He is co-editor, with Dorothy Thompson, of The Chartist Experience: Studies in Working Class Radicalism and Culture, 1830-1860 (Macmillan, 1982), which is a collection of essays emphasizing the cultural and lived experience of those involved in what was the largest and most sustained movement for democratic rights in Britain during the first half of the nineteenth century.  Professor Epstein has also authored Radical Expression: Political Language, Ritual, and Symbol in England, 1790-1850 (Oxford University Press, 1994), which explores the ways in which plebeian radicals gave expression to their political beliefs. Radical Expression won the British Council Prize in the Humanities for the best book in British studies, 1800 to the present, published in either 1993 or 1994. Professor Epstein’s article Understanding the Cap of Liberty: Symbolic Practice and Social Conflict in Early Nineteenth-Century England,” published in Past and Present (1989), was awarded the Walter D. Love Prize by the North American Conference on British studies.   More recently, Professor Epstein is author of In Practice: Studies in the Language and Culture of Popular Politics in Modern Britain (Stanford University Press, 2003). In Practice offers a series of responses to the changing terrain of historical studies, sustaining an argument about the terms governing the production of political meaning, and about how these terms can be negotiated without collapsing the “logic of practice” into the logic of language itself.  His new book, Scandal of Colonial Rule: Power and Subversion in the British Atlantic during the Age of Revolution (Cambridge University Press, 2012), opens in 1806 with the trial of General Thomas Picton, Britain's first governor of Trinidad, for the torture of a free woman of color named Louisa Calderon.  The book uses the trial to open up a range of issues explored in subsequent chapters, including colonial violence and norms of justice, the status of the British subject, imperial careering, visions of colonial development, slave conspiracy, and the colonial archive. Professor Epstein has held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Newberry Library, the National Humanities Center, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Huntington Library.

A

ll proceeds from the banquet will benefit the T. Wayne Beasley Memorial History Scholarship. Once endowed, the Beasley Scholarship will be given to the outstanding rising senior history major. Dr. Beasley taught British and European history in the Murray State Department of History from 1965 to 2008.  One hallmark Beasley was known for was a strong commitment to undergraduate students. His colleagues created the scholarship after his death in 2008 to honor the memory of a dedicated teacher and colleague. The fund has grown quickly due to support from Wayne’s daughters and former students.

The cost of the banquet is $40 per person; reservations are required by March 25.

For reservations or to make a contribution to the scholarship, please contact the MSU Department of History at 270-809-2234 or msu.deptofhistory@murraystate.edu.

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