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Department of Theatre Policy:

Commitment to Avoiding Conflicts of Interest Due to Personal Relationships

A. Policies regarding the employment of relatives, found at Policy II F of the Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual and Policy 2.3.4 of the Faculty Handbook, will be observed. The provisions of KRS 164.360(2) address the employment of the relative of a Regent by the University.

B. Faculty and staff members in the Department of Theatre shall not engage in relationships of an amorous or intimate nature with individuals such as subordinates or students whom they currently supervise, have an instructional responsibility for, or have the responsibility to evaluate.

1. The fact that one individual may exercise authority or supervisory responsibilities over or be in a position to evaluate the other raises the question whether the relationship is, in fact, consensual.

2. If such a supervisory relationship develops, the employee in the supervisory position or the faculty member must give notice to his/her supervisor and the chair of the Theatre department.  If the chair is involved in such a relationship, the dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts must be notified.  Appropriate steps shall be implemented to ensure a fair evaluative process.[1]

3. Because supervisory roles of faculty and staff can change over time, employees are strongly urged to avoid amorous or intimate relationships that may reasonably also become supervisory relationships later.[2]

4. Murray State University reaffirms its condemnation of sexual harassment, and any employee who believes he or she is a victim of sexual harassment is encouraged to contact the Office of Equal Opportunity.

5. Faculty and staff refers to all full- or part-time employees of the Department ofTheatre.



[1] Such steps include, but are not limited to, a student being advised to avoid enrolling in a course, a student being transferred to another section, removing the employee from a position of authority over the student, or transferring the student to a different advisor.

[2] There are too many types of relationships to provide an exhaustive list of those than can be reasonably expected to become supervisory at a later date, but some examples are a student who is not currently in a specific professor’s class but is enrolled in a program in this department, a student who might request direction of a research project or thesis, students who are research or teaching assistants, and students who are employed by the department but are under a different supervisor.

Image Reproduction Release Form

Student

I, ________________________________, give permission for the

            (Please Print Name Here)

Department of Theatre, the College of Humanities & Fine Arts, and Murray

State University to use my image for promotional and marketing purposes.

This permission will remain in effect for 10 years after my graduation unless

I indicate, in writing, to the Chair of the Department of Theatre, that I would

no longer like my image to be utilized by the Department, College, and

University.

My signature below binds this agreement with the Department of Theatre, the

College of Humanities & Fine Arts, and Murray State University.

__________________________________

Print Name Here

_______________________________                                 _______________

Signature                                                                                                    Date

Department of Theatre        Murray State University

Theatre Student Handbook

Purpose of Handbook

This Handbook has been designed to help you gain the most out of your education within the Department of Theatre at Murray State University. It is intended as a resource regarding general information, policies, procedures, expectations, and requirements. You are expected to read and understand all information in this Handbook--not just that which apparently pertains to you.

Mission Statement

The Department of Theatre will provide: excellence in theatre instruction through classroom and production events; an outlet for our regional community to experience excellent theatre productions and theatrical support; and, innovative approaches to promote life-long, creative ventures for our students after graduation.

Full Time Faculty

David Balthrop, Chairman, 106 Fine Arts, 270-809-4421, david.balthrop@murraystate.edu

Cindi Gullixson, Administrative Assistant, 106 Fine Arts, 270-809-4421, cindi.gullixson@murraystate.edu

Brent Menchinger, Designer, 203 Fine Arts, 270-809-4637, brent.menchinger@murraystate.edu

Lissa Graham, Directing, 106 Fine Arts, 270-809-4635, lissa.graham@murraystate.edu

Heidi Ortega, Designer, 705 Fine Arts, 270-809-4639, heidi.ortega@murraystate.edu

Justin Walsh, Technical Director, 204 Fine Arts, 270-809-4661, jwash2@murraystate.edu

Daryl Phillipy, Acting/Voice, 706 Fine Arts, 270-809-5089, dphillipy@murraystate.edu


Department Requirements for BA/BS

University Studies Requirements                                                               41-47 hrs

Required Courses

THD098         Theatre Attendance and Assembly             0 Credit

                        Seven Semesters required for major

THD099         Transitions                                                     1 Credit

THD111         Acting 1                                                          3 credits

THD120         Play Analysis                                                  3 Credits

THD221         Performance Theory                                                3 Credits

THD240         Theatre Production                                      4 Credits

THD241         Theatrical Makeup                                        3 Credits

THD250         Basic Theatre Design                                                3 Credits

THD310         Acting II                                                          3 Credits

One Design Course                                                               3 Credits

Choose from:             THD350 Scene Design Or THD351 Or Lighting Design

Or THD352 Costume Design Or THD358 Sound Design

Or THD341 Advanced Theatrical Makeup and Design

THD392         Professional Theatre Engagement              1 Credit

THD430         Directing I                                                      3 Credits

THD465         Directing II                                                     4 Credits

Total Required Credits                                                                                         34

Required Limited Electives  (choose from the lists below)                                  24


Foundation of Theatre

Choose 6 hours from the list below

THD103         Foundations of Theatre

THD220         Creative Dramatics

THD225         Children’s Theatre Touring Company

THD260         Musical Theatre Dance I

THD262         Jazz Dance I

THD320         Playwriting

THD330         Theatre Management and Arts Leadership

THD322         International Studies in Theatre

THD360         Musical Theatre Dance II

THD362         Jazz II


Acting/Directing

Choose 6 hours from the list below

THD110         Movement for the Actor

THD210         Voice for Performance

THD312         Advanced Movement for Actors

THD346         Acting Shakespeare

THD400         Special Topics

THD401         Special Topics in Performance

THD410         Acting III

THD590         Directed Independent Study in Theatre Arts (Maximum 6 hours of DIS can be applied towards graduation)


Design/Technical Theatre

Choose 6 hours from the list below

THD230         Stage Management

THD341         Advanced Theatrical Makeup and Design

THD348         Advanced Costume Construction

THD349         Advanced Stagecraft

THD350         Scene Design

THD351         Lighting Design

THD352         Costume Design

THD358         Sound Design for the Theatre

THD402         Special Topics in Technical Theatre

THD590         Directed Independent Study in Theatre Arts (Maximum 6 hours of DIS can be applied towards graduation)


Theatre History and Literature

Choose 6 hours from the list below

THD    420     Theatre History I

THD    421     Theatre History II

THD    422     Contemporary Theatre

THD    466     Theatre Literature


Required Minor                                                                                             21

Total Hours                                                                                                    120


Theatre Minor

THD098         Theatre Attendance and Assembly             0 Credit

                        Four Semesters Required

THD111         Acting 1                                                      3 Credits

THD120         Play Analysis                                              3 Credits

THD221         Performance Theory                                    3 Credits

THD240         Theatre Production                                      4 Credits

THD250         Basic Theatre Design                                   3 Credits

One Design Course                                                             3 Credits

Choose from:

THD350 Scene Design Or THD351 Lighting Design Or

OR THD352 Costume Design

THD392         Professional Theatre Engagement              1 Credit

THD430         Directing I                                                  3 Credits


Total Credits for Theatre Minor                                         23 Credits


Department Information

Advising

Theatre students are assigned an advisor.  Academic advising/advanced scheduling takes place on a schedule based on class rank. The Registrar will announce this schedule and you should arrange a meeting with your advisor. You are encouraged to prepare for your advisement meeting by examining the Master Schedule and establishing a tentative plan for the ensuing semester. You should also be familiar with the general education requirements as found in the MSU Bulletin.

You should meet with your advisor:

  • When you wish to discuss any matter that affects your academic performance.
  • When you wish to add or drop a class, take a class pass/fail, etc.
  • When you are having trouble in your coursework.
  • When you wish to share academic successes.
  • When you wish to improve your study skills.
  • If you are considering changing your major.
  • If you're interests and/or goals have changed.
  • To check-in periodically to say hello.
  • When you don't know where else to go for help.

Although the university provides extensive advising and counseling services, it is ultimately your responsibility to monitor your own progress, and to understand and follow university standards for academic performance.

To maintain good standing, it is a Theatre student's responsibility to:

  • Collect all relevant decision-making information (master schedule of classes, academic catalog, etc.)
  • Stay up to date with all university policies and procedures.
  • Maintain all personal copies of grade reports, degree progress reports, and all other pertinent information.
  • Always come prepared to advising appointments with proper information, forms, etc.
  • Build a schedule free of conflicts that allows time for the many departmental responsibilities and expectations.
  • Become familiar with all of the services available you.

ASK QUESTIONS!

Alpha Psi Omega

Alpha Psi Omega was organized as an honorary dramatic fraternity for the purpose of providing an honor society for those doing a high standard of work in dramatics and, through the expansion of Alpha Psi Omega among the colleges and universities, to provide a wider fellowship for those interested in the college theatre. The fraternity is not intended to take the place of the regular dramatic club or other producing groups, but as students qualify, they are rewarded by election to membership in this society.

Membership Eligibility:

A regularly enrolled student of the college, of satisfactory scholarship, who has participated in a major role of one long play, or two one-act plays, staged by the institution or acceptable organizations, and has done work of such merit and quality as to be approved by the dramatic director.

A student who has written a play that has been produced.

Efficient work as business manager, stage manager, or student director for two long plays.

Staff work such as carpenter, prop man, electrician or work in scene painting, costume making and designing.

Minor speaking parts in four full-length plays or five one-act plays.

Honorary and faculty membership may be conferred.

A point system may be substituted for these provisions.  MSU generally utilizes a point system that has been established by the local chapter.  Please seek out the president of the organization to discover information concerning this point system.

Taken from Constitution and By-laws of the Alpha Psi Omega Fraternity

Awards

Every year, the Department of Theatre presents several awards to outstanding students at the Department of Theatre Banquet.  There are several freshman awards and many upperclassmen awards and applications for those awards are generally published in January for pick up in the Department Office.

Communication

Department Call Board--The Call Board is used for announcements of auditions and internships, posters from graduate theatre programs, and so on. You are encouraged to check this board periodically for career and educational opportunities. Of particular interest are the announcements for regional audition/interviews such as SETC, MWTC, U/RTA, etc.

The board is to be used strictly for items pertinent to Department productions posted by the Production Stage Manager, Director, Department Administrative Assistant, or Faculty/Staff member.

Costume Shop Bulletin Board--The Costume Shop Bulletin Board is to be utilized for notices pertinent to work in the Costume Shop.

Mailboxes--Important hardcopy items will be placed in student mailboxes. You are encouraged to check your mailbox several times a day.

Shop Bulletin Board--The Shop Bulletin Board is to be utilized for notices pertinent to work in the Scene Shop.

Stage Manager Reports

Daily Rehearsal Reports--The production Stage Manager will generate Daily Rehearsal Reports for each rehearsal.  These reports will be the primary method of communication for the entire production team during the rehearsal process. They will include updates on production needs as they arise between weekly Production Meetings. Everyone in the cast, crew and those with positions of responsibility should check e-mail and/or the Callboard each day.

Design Meeting Reports--The Stage Manager generates Design Meeting Reports for each meeting, or places them in the daily report.

Rehearsal/Performance Notes--Once the show opens, the production Stage Manager will generate Running Notes for each rehearsal/performance.  These notes will be a primary method of communication for members of the production team during the running of the production. They will include updates on production needs as they arise. It is imperative that everyone in the cast, crew and those with positions of responsibility check e-mail and/or the Callboard each day.

All notices posted on any Bulletin board should be typed or computer printed when possible.

Professional Engagement

The Department is very interested in placing students in "internship" or "apprenticeship" opportunities with local, regional, or national theatres. After graduation, prospective employers value professional or other non-college work experience on an applicant's résumé. We encourage students to pursue theatre work outside of the Department as long as such work does not interfere with course work or Departmental responsibilities. Internships may be paid or unpaid.

Credit-bearing Internships are administered through the Office of Career Services. All internships are intended to enable college students to integrate classroom studies with actual professional experience, while providing off-campus employers with a cost-effective staffing option. Interested students should contact a Faculty member and visit the Office of Career Services for a packet that includes information and application forms.  Always consult with the Department Chairman when adventuring into the realm of internships and/or apprenticeships.

All Theatre majors and minors are required to perform a semester of community engagement utilizing their theatre skills.  The Chairman must approve assignments.

Scholarships

  • The Department of Theatre awards several scholarships to incoming students every year.  The receipt of these scholarships is based on an audition/interview process.
  • Available to full-time Theatre Majors
  • Theatrical audition/interview before Theatre Faculty required
  • Award based on demonstrated talent
  • Passing grades in THD098 required to renew Theatre Scholarship
  • Must maintain at least a 2.5 G.P.A. To renew Theatre Scholarship
  • Renewable up to eight full-time semesters

Student Workers (Work-Study)

There are numerous opportunities to earn money working in the department's offices and shops. If you qualify, you may work on the shop crew through the University's work-study program. Such work includes but is not limited to, the scene shop, the costume shop, and the main office areas.

The faculty member serving as the mentor in each area administers the hours.  For example, the Costume Designer is responsible for maintaining the hours utilized by his/her student workers.

Time sheets--Time sheets are typically due every other week during the academic year--specific times TBA each semester. Time sheets are available online only. You must fill out your time sheet and have it approved by your Faculty/Staff supervisor by 4:30 on the day before it is due.

The Department subscribes to several services such as ArtSEARCH and SETC Job Bulletin that list job announcements in theatre. Additionally, the Department receives job announcements directly from prospective employers. These announcements will be placed on the callboard, and many job search materials are located in the Library.

Department Policies

Production Expectation

All Theatre majors are expected to participate actively in every production. If a student receiving a Theatre Scholarship does not fulfill this expectation, the Theatre Scholarship will be withdrawn.

Class Attendance

In accordance with the MSU Bulletin, the Faculty of the Department of Theatre subscribes to a policy requiring students to attend class regularly. It is vital for theatre artists to establish professional work habits, especially punctuality. Therefore, it is expected that Theatre students will attend each and every class and be consistently on time. Illness, religious holidays, or participation in athletic or University sponsored activities are usually acceptable reasons for absences, but the student should make notification and arrangements with the instructor.

Faculty establish, publish, and enforce attendance policies for their classes. Faculty take attendance and report absences to the registrar. Faculty may request reasonable documentation or verification of claims regarding absences. Students may be administratively withdrawn from class because of excessive absences.

Repeated unexcused absence or tardiness in Theatre courses demonstrates a lack of commitment to the program and may result in the recommendation to change majors.

Comp Policy

In general, all members of the cast and crew receive one complimentary ticket to that production in addition to the one ticket to which they are entitled as a MSU student.  Please reserve your comp seats early.

Costume/Scene Shop

Since the Shops are continually thrown into disarray despite periodic reorganization, students are not to enter the Costume Shop or Scene Ship without express permission of the faculty member in charge of each space. ABSOLUTELY NO ONE is to remove a costume or prop without the express permission. If you would like to borrow any materials from either shop, you must ask the supervisor of each space.  Not all costumes, props and furniture will be available to you, but you should be able to find appropriate items. Failure to ask prior to borrowing any item will result in the immediate forfeiture of the costume(s) and/or prop(s) in question, may jeopardize future ability to borrow items, and may result in a penalty in a class.  Finally, if you rummage through the stock of costumes or props, make sure you return the room to the same condition in which you found it (or better). Do not leave costumes lying on the floor, flung over rods, or piled on the table. Return props to their proper place so the next student may find what he or she is looking for.

Department Calendar

At the beginning of each academic year, a calendar of the productions, etc., will be available to each theatre major or minor.  Please examine this calendar carefully. It will contain important information, dates, and deadlines. Note especially dates and times of scheduled Load-ins and Strikes, performances, and any other required activities. Keep in mind the dates on this calendar are targets--things unavoidably get behind schedule, unforeseen circumstances arise, and planning is an imperfect art. If and when changes need to be made on the Calendar, announcements will be made, notices will be posted, and memos placed in Theatre student mailboxes. Please remain flexible and willing to accommodate necessary changes.


Time management is extremely important in academic theatre, as it is in the wider theatre world. We post the Department Calendar to provide you with the opportunity to plan your work, studies, and social life more effectively. Please take advantage of this opportunity. Realize that during tech and performance weeks your time will be at a premium, especially if you have a major role on or backstage. Examine the syllabi in your classes to determine what projects, exams, etc. will be due or will take place during our busiest times so you may be prepared ahead of time. Do not use participation in a production as an excuse for skipping classes or asking for extensions on course work.


Dress Code

Work Calls--Always wear work clothes and heavy shoes or boots to all Work Calls. Avoid loose clothing and jewelry that might become tangled in machinery or tools. You never know when you may be painting or working with materials that may permanently soil your clothing, so you should dress accordingly.


Front of House Personnel/Ushers--All Front of House personnel should wear appropriate professional attire. Men should wear dress slacks, dress shoes, and a button-down type shirt. Women may wear dress slacks or skirts with blouses, or dresses, with dress shoes. Front of House personnel are the first contact a patron has with the Department of Theatre and should therefore strive to project a professional, businesslike image.


Run Crew--All Run Crew members (including Stage Managers and Board Ops) should dress in black pants, black shirt (with no writing or artwork), or black dress/skirt and top with black hose, and dark thin-soled shoes. High heels are not appropriate. Crew members who will be seen by the audience during scene changes, etc. should not wear any clothing that could prove distracting. Using black gaff tape to cover logos or to create instant black shoes is not appropriate. If you are financially unable to provide appropriate clothing, please contact a faculty or staff member.


Eating

There will be no eating or drinking in the Dressing Rooms, Costume or Scene Shops without the express consent of a Faculty/Staff member (i.e. Strike Snacks, use in a scene, etc.). Actors must never eat or drink while in costume unless required for a scene. Cast and crew may have water backstage during rehearsal and performance. This policy does not apply to the tech table during Tech week.


Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call

During every performance, a faculty or staff member or delegate will either be on duty (on site) or on call. This faculty or staff member or delegate is a resource for trouble shooting or making decisions beyond the scope of the Stage Manager, House Manager, et al. The Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call will contact the Stage Manager and/or House Manager in advance explaining how to contact him/her. If on site, the Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call may circulate backstage and front of house, or may be found in his/her office. Typically, the Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call would have a cordless headset or cell phone. If off site, the Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call will leave a phone number or other instructions on how to reach him/her. The Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call should be contacted with any emergency situations (equipment failure, smell of smoke, severe weather) and any issues involving irresolvable patron ticket problems, patron belligerence, intoxication, unruliness, etc. In the case of life threatening emergency, the House Manager or Stage Manager notifies Campus Police and takes charge of implementing proper procedures. 

Dry ice fog may be safely used in productions with some reasonable precautions.  Persons responsible should wear gloves to handle the dry ice, in order to prevent skin burns.  Dry ice fog (CO2) does reduce the content of oxygen. Caution should be used if actors are blocked, to be covered, or immersed in dry ice fog. If an actor's head is not visible above the fog, unconsciousness and possible brain damage can result due to lack of oxygen. Chemical foggers and hazers may be used in Johnson Theatre and the Studio Theatre in supervised, controlled situations.

Signs should be posted outside any production using chemical fog/haze with the following:  "This production uses a non-harmful chemical fog/haze. It poses no short or long term health dangers, although it may be irritating to or cause allergic symptoms in some persons with allergenic sensitivity." Chemical fog and haze should not be used in any other campus buildings.

Preparation for Class

Majoring in Theatre requires extensive work outside of class preparing scenes and monologues for acting, voice, and directing courses, completing projects for design and technology courses, and preparing for academic courses. Successful balancing of all the demands placed on Theatre students requires a great deal of personal discipline and strong time management skills. In order to receive the most benefit from work in class, students must devote the time outside of class. Ill-prepared scenes and projects will not be tolerated.

Furthermore, work (rehearsal or project work) should not be put off until the last possible minute. Creative work takes time to incubate--rarely can the process be rushed successfully. Steady consistency throughout the semester is another important work habit to cultivate.

Smoking

Smoking is not allowed in any MSU building.  'Smoking' means the carrying or holding of a lighted cigarette, cigar, pipe, or any other lighted smoking equipment, or the inhalation or exhalation of smoke from any lighted smoking equipment.  'Smoking' does not include the burning of incense."

We have consulted administrators on campus and they have approved the following:

The Department of Theatre will utilize means other than tobacco-based products to represent smoking on stage.  Electronic cigarettes, cigarettes based on products other than tobacco, and “chew” substitutes will be used in place of any tobacco based products.  The Department does not condone the use of tobacco products and hopes it’s students will consider the many reasons for quitting the use of these products.  Actors must never smoke while in costume.

Production

Some Faculty-directed Theatre productions are presented on the main stage of the Robert E. Johnson while others are presented in the Studio Theatre, 310B Wilson Hall. There are usually five or more such productions per year. Directors demonstrate, through their varied approaches, the dramatic and production synthesis that should contribute to the students' total theatre education. Each theatre is truly considered another classroom or laboratory complementing the academic course work in Theatre. The Faculty makes season selection with input from students, alumni, other faculty and staff.

Main stage Venues

The Robert E. Johnson Theatre is a traditional proscenium arch configuration and includes fly, wing, and backstage space. This theatre is used for larger scale productions, usually, but not exclusively Faculty directed.  The theatre seats 344 patrons.

Actor’s Studio Theatre

The Actor’s Studio Theatre, seating approximately 60, is a black box-style space. It is utilized as a classroom, for Faculty directed productions, to showcase acting and directing scenes, and for student generated performances such as Student Directed Projects and original works.

Sign-out of Space--Since the Studio Theatre, FA111, FA2010 and the Johnson Theatre is used by a great number of people, sign-out sheets will be maintained by the Department’s main office. Due to the great demand for the Johnson Theatre space, scheduling time will be extremely difficult if not impossible. Anyone interested in using Johnson Theatre should check with the Technical Director.  Only Theatre majors are allowed to sign our theatre spaces.

Student Directed Productions

Theatre students who have successfully completed Directing I and II may apply to the Faculty/Staff to direct a short (30 minutes or less) one act or ten-minute play in the Studio Theatre.  The faculty and staff choose the productions based on the strength of the proposal, the balance of the evening (length of individual projects, comedy/drama, etc.), and appropriateness of the individual pieces for the student directors.  Working closely with members of the Faculty and Staff, the student will select, cast, and direct the play and supervise the lighting, design, and construction for the production. These productions will receive minimal technical support from the Department and a budget to secure scripts, rights, royalties, costumes, props and any other production elements. Student directors are responsible for initiating the process of obtaining rights and paying royalties on their productions.

Auditions/Call for Crew Members

Auditions for Faculty directed productions would usually be held in the first weeks of each semester or as announced on the callboard. These auditions are open to the Murray State University community. Theatre majors are expected to perform prepared monologues unless otherwise noted in the audition notices posted on the Callboard.  Non-majors without prepared monologues will be given cuttings to read. Callback lists will be posted on the Callboard. Roles are cast to facilitate the educational growth of the performers as well as to meet production demands. Supplementary auditions throughout the semester will be held as needed.

Anyone interested in working on any crew for a production should be encouraged to stop by the Technical Director’s office.  Crew assignments will be made at the beginning of each semester to insure that all students are able to adjust schedules accordingly.

Cast Contract

At the discretion of the director, cast members may be asked to sign a contract. This contract gives cast members guidance regarding minimal expectations. By signing this contract, cast members agree to abide by those expectations.

Cast/Crew Professional Behavior

No cast or crew member is allowed in Box Office area after 6:50 p.m. on performance nights (1:45 p.m. for matinees). All cast members must be out of costume and make-up before meeting family and friends in lobby areas. The only exception is the performance prior to photo call. Actors may visit with their family and friends in costume/make-up in the lobby briefly prior to the beginning of photo call.


NO ONE is ever to walk through the proscenium before or after a performance once the house is open--everyone must travel through the exterior to and from the lobby areas. The only exception is cast members meeting family and friends in costume before photo call.  In Studio Theatre productions, no crew members should be seen in the hallway leading to the Theatre, and especially not in the main hallway outside the Studio Theatre. The House Manager has a headset that should be used to communicate any needs to that area.


All electronics (cell phones, laptops, iPods, Blackberries, etc. etc. etc.) must be turned completely off backstage.  Turning cell phones to "silent" is not sufficient. These devices disrupt the sound and headset equipment and are an unnecessary distraction to cast and crew. 

Design Applications

Students may apply to design Student Directed Productions in the Studio Theatre. Advanced students in design are encouraged to apply to design for faculty directed and/or main stage productions. Student Designer application deadlines are announced in the Department Calendar. These applications will usually consist of an initial Design Application submitted by the student followed by an interview by the Faculty (and Director).

Strike

All Theatre majors are required to attend Strike. In order to benefit from the complete theatre experience, theatre minors are encouraged to participate in at least one Strike.  Strikes will usually (but not always) occur immediately following the last performance. Strike is traditionally a rather chaotic affair, so every effort must be made to insure safety and efficiency. The Faculty/Staff and production staff will work together coordinating tasks to facilitate a safe and smooth strike. You must remain alert and continue to take initiative--the more effective each individual is, the sooner everyone can go home. Make sure to sign in and out on the Strike Sign-in/Out Sheet.  Students who miss part or all of a Strike are required to make up the hours missed.  Contact the Technical Director in advance of the missed Strike to make these arrangements. 

Postmortem

Postmortem occurs during the Theatre Production meeting immediately following the final performance of a production. It is an opportunity to review what went right and what went wrong during the preparation and implementation of that production. All cast, and crew members are encouraged to participate. All, with the exception of the Director and faculty/staff, are given two minutes to share their perspectives on the production. This is not the place for "thank you's," unproductive complaints, or personal attacks. It is intended to help make future productions more efficient.

Crew Requirements

In addition to the regular course requirements, a major in Theatre demands a significant commitment of time and energy to production work. All Theatre majors are required to participate in all work calls and strikes.  Attendance is required. If you must miss due to illness, a doctor's excuse must be obtained and given to the Technical Director as soon as possible. Other excused absences must be arranged with Stage Management and the Technical Director in advance.

Unexcused absences from mandatory calls must be made-up at a two-for-one rate (for every hour missed, two must be made up).

Weekly Production Meetings

It is the policy of the Department of Theatre to hold production meetings weekly.  Everyone is welcome to attend production meetings.  Production staff members must attend and meetings must be scheduled at available times for all staff members.

Rehearsal/Performance Etiquette

Two cardinal rules of the theatre are to be on time and to be prepared. If you are not at least ten minutes early for rehearsal or a work call, you are late. Chronic tardiness is grounds for removal from a production or crew. Although the assumption is that everyone will be on time and ready to work, there may be isolated instances when a cast or crew member is late.  Tardiness is defined as not being signed in by the announced deadline whether or not the person is actually present.

Not only must you be present at every rehearsal and work call for which you are called, but you are also expected to be prepared. In performance, this is particularly applicable to the memorization of lines. One of the basic requirements of acting is to have your lines down cold--no real work can happen in rehearsal until this is accomplished. Preparation for calls includes wearing appropriate clothing for the task at hand.


If you move seats out of the audience area in the Studio Theatre, make sure you replace them in the exact spot from whence they came.  Police the area before departure to insure that the classroom set up is as it was before you used the space.


As a common courtesy, any rehearsal furniture or props set up or brought into a theatre space must be struck and the room returned to its original condition (or better). You are expected to clean up after yourself--do not leave furniture or a mess for the next person to remove. A cluttered environment leads to an atmosphere of disarray and unprofessionalism.


There will be no extraneous talking, eating, or drinking during rehearsal. It is rude and distracting to those working onstage. After checking with the Stage Manager, go elsewhere to review lines or talk during rehearsal. However, you are expected to be aware of when your scene is coming up and to be attentive and prepared when called. Crew members present during rehearsal must abide by these same policies.


During all rehearsals and performances, headset chatter should be kept to a minimum. The purpose of headsets is to facilitate communication. Excessive talking about nonessential topics interferes with the communication process and must be avoided.  Stage Managers may set their own individual policies regarding penalties for continued excessive headset chatter.


Always bring your scripts and a pencil to rehearsal. You are expected to review blocking, character work, and any changes that occur during rehearsal prior to the next rehearsal of that scene. You are encouraged to go over the work done in rehearsal immediately following that rehearsal to set it in your mind and again immediately prior to rehearsing the material the next time so it is fresh.


Do not give other actors "coaching" nor should you seek such advice from your friends. If you have a suggestion or feel strongly about an issue in rehearsal, bring it to the Director's attention. It is unprofessional to "direct" others in the cast, or to change your blocking or performance based on advice from friends, relatives, or critics.


During production, NO ONE is to tamper with any production elements without express Faculty or Staff approval. During performance, do not disturb any prop or costume that is not your responsibility.

Any production costume pieces that require laundering must be hung up on the designated rack in the Costume Shop immediately following rehearsal or performance. Any production costume pieces that require mending must be brought to the attention of a member of the costume crew and a note should be placed on the comment sheets in the dressing rooms.


Make-up is a personal responsibility for all cast members of Department productions, and majors are required to obtain their own full make-up kits. This should include personal brushes, sponges, pencils, etc. To maintain good hygiene, do not share pencils, make-up brushes, sponges, etc., and wash out all brushes and sponges after each use. Make up kits are available from local costume shops, theatrical supply houses, and through the costume shop personnel during performance processes.


Do not leave valuables in Dressing Rooms during performance--the Stage Manager will collect them. To ease this responsibility, please leave all unessential valuables at home during performance.


All cast and crew members are required to sign in for all rehearsals and performances. You are only to sign yourself in. The Director and Stage Manager will establish a policy of penalties for tardiness.


Headset Etiquette

There should be no talking over the headsets during rehearsals or performances with the following exception: when the Stage Manager gives a stand-by cue, all crew members on headset should reply with "standing" or "standing by." * There should be NO talking when a cue is in standby * Cues should not be taken until the Stage Manager gives the "go" command. * If requested, crew members may notify the Stage Manager when a cue has completed by saying, "cue X complete" or similar. * There should be no discussion about a cue until after the cue has been taken. * Everyone on headsets should be aware that they can be heard by anyone else picking up a headset or even walking near an unused headset with the volume turned up. Crew members should take into consideration this public nature and should refrain from derogatory comments, profanity, etc.


Technical Rehearsal Definitions

There are a number of different kinds of rehearsals that are (or may be) scheduled during the final phase of a production's rehearsal process. Please refer to the following chart to determine which rehearsals you are required to attend.


First run through--the first rehearsal in which the cast runs through the entire show, usually mid-way through the rehearsal process. Designers and crew members are encouraged to attend

Run through/Crew View--Just prior to Tech Weekend, most directors will hold one or more run through rehearsals in which the cast performs long sections (acts or the entire play), without interruption. This is an opportunity for those working backstage, front of house, designers, faculty, staff, et al., to see the show in its entirety prior to the beginning of technical rehearsals.


Paper Tech or “Dry Tech”--a meeting in which the Stage Manager and director meet with various designers and tech personnel to go over cues without actors. It is an opportunity to talk through the cues and for the Stage Manager to pencil cues into her/his prompt book. Paper tech should be scheduled several days before the first Technical Rehearsal (Dry Tech, Cue to Cue, Tech/Run) in order to give the Stage Manager time to prepare her/his prompt book.  Dry Tech can also be a technical rehearsal without actors specifically to set and rehearse cues and other technical elements without the actors. Not every production will include a dry tech.


Cue to Cue (Q2Q)--a technical rehearsal with actors, but not costumes or make-up. The entire production company works through the play one cue at a time, skipping portions of the dialogue in which there are no technical cues or events.


Shift Rehearsal/Scene Shift Rehearsal--a rehearsal for the stage management team and the crew to rehearse scene changes.


Tech/Run--a rehearsal putting together all of the technical elements except costumes and hair/make-up. The cast performs all the dialogue and blocking, not just that surrounding cues.


Dress/Tech (Dress Rehearsal)--the final rehearsals prior to opening in which all technical elements including costumes and hair/make-up are included. Usually, these rehearsals are run without interruption as if an audience were present.


Preview(s)--the final rehearsal(s) just prior to opening night that includes an audience for the first time. This may be an invited audience of family and friends, or a public performance free of charge or at a reduced rate.


Job Descriptions

Faculty/Staff Job Descriptions

The following are provided to clarify job responsibilities within the department. Obviously, Faculty/Staff members have duties not listed here--these descriptions are intended to address duties related to productions, especially those that interact with student positions of responsibility.

Chairman—produces the play (pays for it), watches over the entire production and intervenes only to help solve problems.

Department Administrative Assistant—maintains the box office, hires the box office and house managers.

Director—overall artistic visionary responsible for the total production.

Technical Director—responsible for all technical aspects of the production from build to strike.  Runs all tech rehearsals, trains crew members, serves as the technical liaison between the director, artistic staff, and technical staff.

Scene Designer—responsible for drawing, painting, and completing all scenic aspects of the production.

Costume Designer—same for all costumes, makeup, and wigs for a production.

Lighting Designer—same for all aspects of the lighting for a show.

Makeup Designer—same for all aspects of the makeup/wigs for a show.

Sound Designer—same for all sound aspects of a show.

Voice or Movement Coach—responsible for helping complete the necessary acting style components on certain productions.


KC/ACTF

The Chairman, in collaboration with the Theatre faculty and staff, determines if a production will be entered into the Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival, and if so, at what level. The Chair then insures that the KC/ACTF is notified of a production's entry. The Chair acts as the departmental liaison with the ACTF state chair and individual respondents in matters related to the adjudication of a production. These duties include arranging the site visit, making restaurant and/or motel reservations as necessary, meeting respondents, facilitating responses, etc.


Recruiting

Many of the Chair’s main responsibilities lie in the area of recruiting new students. The Chair is responsible for creating all recruiting materials. Currently, this includes letters, mailings, and web site presence (including online forms). The Chair is usually the first departmental contact with a prospective Theatre student. The Office of Admissions forwards requests for theatre scholarship auditions, meetings with Theatre faculty, and requests for information to the Chair.  The Chair is then responsible for maintaining the contact management database and creating follow-up contacts including mailings, telephone calls and emails. The Chair also receives copies of all web inquiries posted from the Department of Theatre website and generates follow-up as required: campus visit, audition/portfolio presentation, complimentary tickets, etc. When prospective students visit campus, the Administrative Assistant is usually the Department of Theatre contact, setting up meetings with the prospective students and families and taking them on tours of the facilities. If the student has arranged a scholarship audition/portfolio presentation, it is typically the Chair who audits the performance. The Chair attends recruiting events as needed.


Website/Email Maintenance

The Chair, or his/her designee, is responsible for web site maintenance, insuring that the website remains current. This includes posting production photos, cast lists, special notices, etc. The Chair, or his/her designee, is responsible for maintaining the Theatre Student and Theatre Alumni listservs.

The Chair:

Gives report during the Postmortem.

Attends and gives report at weekly Production Meetings as needed

Maintains the Department Key List (This is actually in the hands of the administrative assistant.

Everyone who requires a key must fill out a Key Request Form and abide by the terms set forth in it. Student Managers are issued keys on a per-production basis. You must return your keys immediately after completion of your assigned duties, usually during the post-strike week. You will be issued other keys for your next position.


Student Manager Job Descriptions

All Student Managers will submit a report for each meeting, rehearsal, and performance they attend.

All Student Managers are expected to keep regularly scheduled shop or office hours during which they will be in their respective areas. These office hours will be posted near the appropriate area (e.g. on the Costume Shop door, on the Shop doors, etc.).  Everyone should realize that the Student Managers are fulfilling important obligations for the department and the current production while performing their other student duties. Keep in mind that the duties of a particular production will run more smoothly and efficiently if the Student Managers maintain their shop or office hours even during the final weeks of a build and during tech.


There will be significant overlap of Student Manager duties, especially in some areas. The Student Managers should cooperate fully with the entire production staff for a particular production. Student Managers should consider themselves resources for the timely completion of production duties and there will be times when a Student Manager will be called upon to work on a production. However, a Student Manager should not be expected to fulfill all the duties of a staff position without prior agreement.


Managers should, in preparation for a strike, insure that all portable drills are in good working order and that all batteries are fully charged. Another example of being prepared might be Costume Shop Student Managers who anticipate the needs of a dress rehearsal and make arrangements for racks to be available as needed for storage. The more the Student Managers anticipate and plan ahead, the more smoothly all aspects of the Department will run.  Costume Shop Student Managers


The Costume Shop Student Managers are responsible for supervising all usage of costumes and the Costume Shop. The Costume Shop Student Managers are responsible for keeping the Costume Shop and Storage areas neat and clean.

The Costume Shop Student Managers are responsible for insuring that all costumes and accessories are stored in good condition ready for use in productions.

The Costume Shop Student Managers are responsible for maintaining equipment such as sewing machines, irons, etc.

The Costume Shop Student Managers should notify, in writing, Costume Designer of items needing repair/work.

The Costume Shop Student Managers inventory costumes and accessories at the beginning and end of each semester and on an ongoing basis.

The Costume Shop Student Managers insure that all equipment, costumes, and accessories (as appropriate) are labeled "Murray State University Department of Theatre."

The Costume Shop Student Managers are responsible for establishing and implementing a system for checking in/out costumes and accessories.

Anyone who desires to borrow a costume from the Costume Shop must contact one of the Costume Shop Student Managers, preferably during posted office hours.

In addition, the Costume Shop Student Managers should be available for any telephone calls from outside organizations regarding borrowing or lending of costumes or accessories.

The Costume Shop Student Managers will also oversee any deposits on checked out costumes and update the rental agreement located in the Costume Shop. When someone leaves a deposit for borrowed items, the Costume Shop Student Managers will collect the money, update the rental agreement and take the money to the Department Office.

The Costume Shop Student Managers maintain a Costume Shop Road Box for use backstage during productions in the Wilson Hall Studio Theatre.  The Costume Shop Student Managers coordinate with the Costume Designer on stocking the Costume Shop Road Box with items specific to the particular production.

The Costume Shop Student Managers inventory and restock the Costume Shop Road Box after each production.

Such supplies include, but are not limited to: cloth tape measure, several pairs of scissors, needles, various colors of thread, seam ripper, miscellaneous buttons, snaps and other closures, Velcro, and, of course, gaff tape.

The Costume Shop Student Managers are responsible for supervision, inventory, set-up, and upkeep of costumes for departmental productions. The Costume Shop Student Managers work with the Costume Designer to insure safe and proper equipment usage for theatre performances.

The Costume Shop Student Managers collaborate with the Designer of the production in finding and pulling costume pieces from stock and acting as a resource for locating other costume sources.

The Costume Shop Student Managers should keep a record of all items pulled from stock.

During Strike, The Costume Shop Student Managers will collaborate with the Costume Designer and Wardrobe Crew in returning costumes to storage and insuring all items are returned in good repair and clean condition.

In the case of rented or borrowed costumes, the Costume Designer and Costume Crew for the particular production are responsible for cleaning, repairing, checking off, packing up and returning all costumes.

For participating ACTF productions, the Costume Shop Student Manager will assist the Costume Designer in storing costumes for possible travel to festival.


Front of House Student Manager

The Front of House Student Manager is responsible for assisting the Department of Theatre Administrative Assistant in department publicity and front of house.

Publicity duties may include but are not limited to: writing biographies for department productions, posting posters around campus, creating a performance showcase for the Ransburg lobby, and maintaining the departmental display board.

The Front of House Student Manager may be asked by the Department of Theatre Administrative Assistant to help with departmental mailings or other clerical duties.

He/she may be asked to cover temporarily for the Department of Theatre Administrative Assistant in the case of illness or absence on performance dates.

Faculty and Staff will forward these materials to the Front of House Student Manager as they are received.

The Front of House Student Manager is also responsible for recruiting and training ushers for every production, and is expected to coordinate with the Box Office Student Manager.

He/She coordinates with the Department Administrative Assistant and Introduction to the Theatre instructors in the recruitment of ushers.

Posts and maintains the Ushers Sign-up sheets on the Callboard.

Insures enough ushers are available for each performance.

Contacts each usher by email and/or phone at least 24 hours prior to the performance to confirm and to reiterate the dress code and behavior expectations.

The Front of House Student Manager distributes complimentary cast/crew tickets.

The Front of House Student Manager consults with the Chair in setting up portable display board (if needed),

During the run of each show, the Front of House Student Manager is responsible for the space in the lobby and the auditorium.  It must be picked up daily following each performance.

To be eligible for L/P credit for a performance, a crew person must be present for the entire performance.

The Front of House Student Manager submits this list to the Department Administrative Assistant and to Myra Maxwell.

The Front of House Student Manager will be issued keys necessary to perform these duties.


Scene Shop Student Manager

The Scene Shop Student Managers are responsible for supervising all usage of the Scene Shop. The Scene Shop Student Managers are responsible for keeping all scene shop areas and work areas neat and clean

The Scene Shop Student Managers are responsible for insuring that all shop equipment is in good working condition ready for use in productions and events in the theatre spaces.

The Scene Shop Student Managers should notify, in writing, the Technical Director of items needing repair/work.

During most if not all scheduled office hours, the Scene Shop Student Managers will endeavor to perform the numerous ongoing duties related to the upkeep and maintenance of the shop. Work for the duties or those related to a single production should be budgeted for times other than scheduled office hours if at all possible.

The Scene Shop Student Managers should consult with the Technical Director for a "to-do" list of projects for improvements to the spaces.

The Scene Shop Student Managers inventory shop equipment at the beginning and end of each semester and at the beginning and end of each theatre project.

The Scene Shop Student Manager insures that all equipment and materials (as appropriate) are labeled "Murray State University Department of Theatre."


Positions of Responsibility Job Descriptions

Scenic Designer

The Scenic Designer is responsible for the design and implementation of all scenic elements of a production in a timely manner and within budgetary limits.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play; attends first production conference at which Director presents his/her interpretation of the play. Discusses possible scenic treatments with the Director.

Does research on architecture, furniture and decor of the period as well as the locale of the setting and style of the play.

Generates thumbnail sketches for presentation to the Director by the deadline established on the Generates ground plans, color samples and/or models in collaboration with Director. Revises sketches and scale ground plan for final approval.

Rehearsal Period:

Explains designs, sketches, or models to cast and crew at first rehearsal. Discusses in detail what each item of furniture and set dressing should look like.

Makes complete working drawings and painters' elevations for Construction and Painting Crews.

Works with Stage Manager in taping out the ground plan on the floor of the stage or rehearsal hall.

Meets with Lighting Designer to discuss color choices and practicals, and to coordinate lighting and scenic elements.

Assists the Stage Manager in placing and spiking furniture, rugs, etc.

Is available for consultation during any Scene Shift rehearsals.

Attends first run through.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

Dress Rehearsal Period:

Attends all rehearsals as necessary.

Makes notes of any details yet to be completed.

After Final Performance:

During Strike, the Scenic Designer will collaborate with the Technical Director in returning material to storage and insuring all items are returned in good condition.

For participating ACTF productions, the Scenic Designer will assist the Technical Director in storing material for possible travel to festival.

All Designers will make copies of all of their designs, portfolio photographs, paperwork, rough sketches, etc. and submit to the Chair.

Gives report during the Postmortem.

Lighting Designer

The Lighting Designer is responsible for the design and implementation of lighting design including all design, cueing, and paperwork.  The Lighting Designer is ultimately responsible for the hanging, focusing, and upkeep of the lighting design.


Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play; attends first production conference at which Director presents his/her interpretation of the play.

Rehearsal Period:

Works with ground plan and elevations provided by Scenic Designer to create lighting design and generates the Light Plot.

Works closely with Scenic Designer and Costume Designer to coordinate color choices and other scenic and costume elements.

Works closely with Technical Director in hanging, cabling, and focusing during the light hang.

Lighting Designer creates all paperwork necessary for implementing the design.

Collaborates with the Director and in setting cues.

Attends first run through.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

Submits weekly Production Budget Reports to the Staff Production Manager/Technical Director.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

After Final Performance:

During Strike, the Lighting Designer will collaborate with the Technical Director in returning equipment to storage and insuring all items are returned in good condition.

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Costume Designer

The Costume Designer is responsible for the design and implementation of all elements of costume design including designing, building and/or acquisition of all costumes in a timely manner and within budgetary limits.  The Costume Designer is also ultimately responsible for the upkeep, repair and running of all costumes.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play; attends first production conference at which Director presents his/her interpretation of the play. Discusses possible costume treatments with the Director.

Does research on costumes of the period as well as the style of the play.

The Costume Designer collaborates with the Director and the other designers in choice of color, texture, fabric, line, and so on.

Keeps track of the source of costumes: pulled from Costume Shop; borrowed from cast, crew or friends in the community; built in shop; borrowed from merchant; etc.

If not bought, built or pulled from stock, Costume Designer makes sure the source is thanked in the program.

Rehearsal Period:

The Costume Designer attends production conferences with Director and insures that the costume design is complete in a timely manner.

The Costume Designer attends the first read through to take all measurements using the Costume Measuring sheets.

The Costume Designer is responsible for obtaining or building all costumes for the production.

Attends first run through.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

The Costume Designer is responsible for scheduling costume fittings.  These fittings will be scheduled through the Stage Manager. They may take place during a rehearsal only if they do not interfere with that rehearsal.



After Final Performance:

During Strike, the Costume Designer will return costumes to storage and insure all items are returned in good condition.

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Hair/Make-up Designer

The Hair/Make-up Designer is responsible for make-up design, assisting performers with make-up application as necessary, setting up make-up area, insuring adequate make-up supplies are available for the run of the production, procuring needed supplies, keeping make-up area clean and sanitary, and supervising any Hair/Make-up Crew members.

The Hair/Make-up designer will be responsible for hair design, assisting performers with implementing this design, insuring adequate hair supplies are available for the run of the production, and procuring needed supplies.

Consults with the Costume Faculty member.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play and does research on hair of the period as well as the style of the play.

Discusses possible make-up and hair treatments with the Director and discusses hair design with Costume Designer.

Creates make-up design utilizing the Hair/Make-up Worksheet.

Rehearsal Period

In consultation with Stage Manager, coordinates make-up calls, especially for large cast shows.

Attends first run through.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

The Hair/Make-up Designer is responsible for scheduling any necessary Hair/Make-up training sessions with the cast.

The Hair/Make-up Designer is responsible for having all Hair/Make-up ready by the First Dress/Tech rehearsal.

The Hair/Make-up Designer is not a member of the Run Crew. The Hair/Make-up Designer should train the actors in the implementation of the Hair/Make-up design in advance so that the actors may apply their own make-up and style their own hair.

If extensive or specialty hair/make-up is part of the design, the designer may be called upon during the run to assist the actors in implementing the design: e.g. prosthetics, wigs, complicated hairstyles, quick changes, etc.

Takes note of any details yet to be completed.

After Final Performance

During Strike, Hair/Make-up Designer is responsible for cleaning and storing make-up supplies and cleaning make-up area.

Attends and gives report at weekly Production Meetings.

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Sound Designer

Responsible for the sound design and the implementation, loading-in, maintenance, and striking of the sound equipment necessary for a particular production.

Rehearsal Period:

Reads and studies the play. Discusses sound design with the Director.

Gathers all sound effects and/or music required for the production for approval by the Director.

Creates a sound tape, cd, mini-disc, computer files or plot.

Collaborates with the Director in setting cues and sound levels.

Provides the Stage Manager with preliminary sound cues.

Determines if voice and/or musician reinforcement is necessary and consults with the Technical Director regarding type and placement of microphones and speakers.

Learns computer sound program.

Attends first run through.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

The Sound Designer insures the safe and efficient cabling and dressing of all speakers, headsets, boards, monitors, and other equipment, and trains the Sound Board Operator if necessary.

The Sound Designer insures that all headsets are setup, tested, and in good working order prior to the first Technical Rehearsal.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

Insures that all sound effects, sound tapes/CDs/Minidiscs/computer files, and music are ready.

Provides Sound Board Operator with Sound Cue Sheets.

Insures that all mics have fresh batteries.

Once all sound cues, special effects, and so on have been established, the Sound Designer records a master sound tape/minidisc/CD/computer back-up which is to be kept in a safe place. This master can be used in the event of an emergency such as a show tape breaking, a CD being scratched, computer crash, etc.

Makes notes of any details yet to be completed.

After Final Performance:

During Strike, the Sound Designer will return sound equipment to storage and insure all items are returned in good condition.

The Sound Designer is responsible for striking all sound equipment, cables, speakers, headsets, microphones, and so on.

Gives report during the Postmortem.

Assistant Director

The duties of the Assistant Director are quite flexible and will vary from production to production and director to director. Sometimes a director will expect the Assistant Director to perform duties normally assigned to the Stage Manager and vice versa. Communication and negotiation are important in clarifying the assignment of these duties. The Assistant Director will typically act as another set of eyes and ears and as a sounding board for the Director at auditions, rehearsals, and performances. When asked, the Assistant Director will offer constructive suggestions to the Director regarding all elements of the production from design to performances. It is important to keep in mind that the Director should be the only person communicating these suggestions with the production team including performers. The Assistant Director should restrict comments to the Director in order to avoid confusing or possibly contradictory messages. It is also important to realize that the Assistant Director position is one of trust and confidentiality--the Director may share thoughts or concerns that should not be common knowledge. The Assistant Director position is an opportunity for students to learn firsthand an individual director's process and the production process as a whole. The following are some of the duties and responsibilities a Director may require of an Assistant Director.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play; discusses interpretation and production concept with the Director.

Attends all production conferences.

Rehearsal Period:

Assists the Director as needed. Sits in on all rehearsals, taking notes and actively watching and listening. Communicates regularly with the Director regarding the progress of the production.

Is in complete charge of rehearsals in absence of the Director. Director may also ask Assistant Director to run special rehearsals such as line-throughs, speed-throughs, etc.

Although typically the Stage Manager's duty, the AD may be asked to walk through scenes for an absent actor.

Some Directors may ask the Assistant Director to take blocking, line, and/or dialect notes. The Assistant Director should always be prepared for such duties.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

Makes notes of any details yet to be completed.

The Assistant Director may be asked to take rehearsal notes during final run through, Technical and Dress Rehearsals. These notes should be shared with the Director who may communicate them to the cast and/or crew.

The Assistant Director may be asked to type up any rehearsal notes taken by the Director for distribution to the cast and/or crew.

After Final Performance:

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Stage Manager

Responsible for the smooth and efficient running of rehearsals and performances. The Stage Manager is responsible for keeping the master prompt script, setting up rehearsal space prior to each rehearsal and striking rehearsal furniture and props as necessary, running and calling show, posting Cast/Crew Sign-in sheets, collecting and securing valuables during performance, taking and posting Production Meeting Reports, Daily Rehearsal Reports, and Running Notes, and coordinating the production run crews. Reports and Notes should be posted on both Callboards and the Theatre Students listserv. By filling out and submitting these online forms, the information is automatically emailed to the Theatre Student listserv. The Stage Manager may then print out the email and post the hard copy on both Callboards.

Consults the Stage Manager Pre-Production Checklist and the Stage Manager Production Checklist. These are meant as examples--each production will have specific requirements.

Rehearsal duties, to be negotiated with Director, include recording blocking, prompting, taking Line Notes, contacting absent or tardy actors/crew members, calling cast/crew members in from breaks, etc.

The Stage Manager also maintains a Stage Manager's Box. You may use the Department's SM box or your own. See the Technical Director for details. The SM box should be stocked with supplies including, but not limited to:

stop watch, pencils, pencil sharpener, erasers, highlighters, Wite-Out, Post-it notes, Band-Aids, aspirin/acetaminophen, cough drops, tissues, hard candy, cigarette lighter, stapler, paper clips, bobby pins, safety pins, hair bands, tape measure, chalk, flashlight, batteries, rubber bands, 3 hole punch, paper reinforcements, scissors, tape, spike tape, and, of course, gaff tape.

The Stage Manager should be aware of the location of telephones and fire extinguishers for use during an emergency, and be well versed in fire evacuation and tornado procedures.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play; discusses duties and responsibilities with the Director.

Attends all production conferences.

Assists the Director at auditions. Distributes and collects Audition Forms, emphasizes to auditioners the need to list all conflicts, keeps track of the order of auditioners, keeps audition flowing smoothly, ushers auditioners into theatre, and announces them as per the Director's instructions.

Assists the Scenic Designer in taping out the ground plan on floor of stage and/or rehearsal hall as needed.

If Director requests, the Stage Manager generates a rehearsal schedule and makes copies for all cast, crew, and the Callboard.

Rehearsal Period:

Places and spikes furniture, rugs, etc. as established by the Director.

Obtains and maintains any rehearsal props called for by the Director. Rehearsal props are substitutes of comparable size and weight used by actors until the final props are available.

The Stage Manager runs weekly Production Meetings, and takes Production Meeting Report notes. The Stage Manager will then generate Production Meeting Reports. These notes are posted on both the TheatreStudents listserv and Callboards. Submitting the form automatically sends it to the Theatre student listserv. The Stage Manager may then print out the message and post the hard copy on the callboards. These reports will be a primary method of communication for the entire Department. They will include updates from each of the faculty and staff, Student Managers, positions of responsibility, et al.

At first read through, the Stage Manager obtains the cast's names, addresses, and telephone numbers, and then generates a contact sheet that is distributed to cast and production team.

Stage Manager makes sure that every actor receives a rehearsal schedule and keeps cast advised of any changes.

Posts any and all changes, additions, or deletions that arise during daily rehearsals. These changes could include the addition of a prop, a question to a designer, a change in rehearsal schedule, etc. This will be a written record of such requests and changes to facilitate the timely completion of tasks and to insure that all members of cast and crew receive notification of schedule changes and so on. Submitting the form automatically sends it to the Theatre student listserv. The Stage Manager may then print out the message and post the hard copy on the callboard.

Arrives at least ten minutes early for every rehearsal to set stage furniture and any rehearsal. Stage Manager insures that ALL stage furniture and rehearsal props are struck and stored after each rehearsal.

Walks through scenes for any absent actor or assigns a delegate to do so. Attempts to contact any missing or unexcused actors.

The Stage Manager insures that all actors are in place prior to the beginning of each scene.

Records in Stage Manager's book all blocking, intentional pauses, stage business, and all light, sound, music, special effects, and curtain cues, etc.

Prompts the actors precisely and corrects mistakes to the extent that the Director wishes. It is important for the Stage Manager to keep up with the script during rehearsals and is ready to prompt an actor immediately upon receiving a "Line" request. Takes line notes of dropped lines, jumped lines, etc. and distributes to the cast.

Taking down blocking OR prompting actors/taking line notes may be delegated to the Assistant Stage Manager at the Stage Manager's discretion.

After all rehearsals and performances, the Stage Manager insures that all doors are properly secured, and lights are turned off. Lights to be checked and turned off by every Stage Manager include all lights in the Studio Theatre, Make-up Room, Costume Shop, Prop Shop, Light Booth, Main stage, and Scene Shop (with the exception of the night circuit/ghost light).

Stage Manager collaborates with the Lighting Designer, Light Board Operator (if needed), Sound Designer, Sound Board Op (if needed), Costume Designer (if needed), ASM/Deck Captain, Director, and Technical Director in holding a dry tech prior to tech weekend. This has often been on the Friday afternoon before Tech Weekend, but must be prior to Cue-to-Cue Rehearsal.

During dry tech, the Stage Manager is responsible for penciling in all light, sound, fly, actor, and scene shift cues. The Stage Manager is responsible for obtaining cue sheets from the designers in enough time to prepare the prompt book.

The Stage Manager prepares for Cue-to-Cue Rehearsal in order to facilitate the efficient and smooth running of the rehearsal.

The Stage Manager is the primary person responsible for communication among production staff, cast and crew.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

Once performances begin, the prompt book containing blocking notes, lighting cues and sound cues should be locked in the booth or another safe place so that it is accessible in the event that the Stage Manager cannot run a performance. The Stage Manager should create a second book to be kept with him/her that contains any information that may be needed during the day, such as contact lists, schedules etc.

The Stage Manager must be familiar with all Emergency Policies such as tornado warnings, fire, smoke, etc. The Stage Manager will contact the Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call for any emergency situations (equipment failure, smell of smoke, severe weather). In the case of life threatening emergency, the Stage Manager notifies Security and takes charge of implementing proper procedures. The Stage Manager should print a copy of the safety procedures as outlined in this handbook and place a copy in the Stage Manager Prompt Book.

The Stage Manager should generate a Run List for crew a member that lists specific duties before, during and after each performance.

The Stage Manager should familiarize the Assistant Stage Manager with the production book during the dress rehearsal period in the unlikely event that the Stage Manager is unable to call the show due to illness or other emergency. 

Takes note of any problems, unfinished details, painting touch ups, and/or changes and communicates these to the proper designer or production team member.

Stage Manager, or delegate, insures the safety and sanitation of all props and consumables.

Stage Manager is responsible for setting up and labeling any and all prop tables necessary for a production. Non- or semi-valuable props may be stored in the locked, rolling Props Road Box. The Stage Manager should be responsible for locking and unlocking the Road Box before and after rehearsals and performances. No extremely valuable or delicate props, or weapons (especially firearms) should be stored in the Road Box. These items can be stored in the Technical Director’s office.

The Stage Manager should generate a props list and location of such props for the crew members. These should indicate where every prop is preset on stage (a photo is often helpful) and/or where every prop is moved on or off stage during the run of the show.

Stage Manager is responsible for presetting all props both on and backstage prior to each Technical and Dress Rehearsal, and every Performance. These duties may be delegated to the Assistant Stage Manager or a member of the Run Crew, but the Stage Manager should confirm that all props are properly preset and that hand props are dealt with. Performers are responsible for checking their own individual props prior to each performance, and the Stage Manager is ultimately responsible that all props and furniture are correctly preset.

Performers should pick up props from the props table(s) or designated area backstage and return them there, and are responsible for presetting any personal props in pockets, etc. If an actor wants to assume responsibility for keeping such personal props between rehearsals and performances, this should be negotiated with the Stage Manager or Assistant Stage Manager.

Performers are responsible for bringing to the attention of the Stage Manager or ASM any items needing repair.

The Stage Manager posts and checks the Cast/Crew Sign-in sheet and attempts to contact any absent or tardy cast or crew member(s). Any member of the cast/crew deemed tardy will be required to stay after the rehearsal or performance with the Stage Manager until the SM leaves. Tardiness in such cases is defined as not being signed in by the announced deadline.

Stage Manager prepares all equipment for performance. The Stage Manager should establish a check off list of duties including those that must be accomplished prior to opening the house and those that must be accomplished prior to curtain.

Stage Manager insures that all work lights are turned off and front exit doors are unlocked.  If the stage is to be swept and/or mopped, the Stage Manager assigns this task to a Run Crew member and insures its completion prior to the house opening.

The Stage Manager has the ultimate responsibility that the stage is set correctly and that all elements and members of the production team are ready for the performance. This typically requires a walkthrough of the entire stage and backstage area prior to the house opening.

The Stage Manager gives the following calls to cast and crew: one hour; half hour; house open (after House Manager notifies SM); fifteen minutes; ten minutes; five minutes; and places (at two minutes). The Stage Manager cannot give the "places" call until given the go-ahead by the House Manager at three minutes.

During Dry Tech, Cue to Cue and Tech/Run Rehearsals, the Stage Manager may stop rehearsal if necessary. The Stage Manager merely says, "stop." The cast and crew should hold quietly in place while the Stage Manager and the production team addresses the reason for stopping. The Stage Manager is responsible for choosing an appropriate restarting point in the script and restarting the rehearsal. The Stage Manager will inform the cast and crew where the rehearsal will restart (a line or cue) on the Stage Manager's command. The Stage Manager restarts the rehearsal by simply saying, "Go please."

At intermission, the Stage Manager insures that any necessary work lights are turned on backstage, that no visitors are allowed backstage, and that any changes are accomplished.

The SM follows the calling procedure from the top of the show including the following calls: ten minutes; five minutes; places (at two minutes). The Stage Manager cannot give the "places" call until given the go-ahead by the House Manager at three minutes.

The Stage Manager is responsible for keeping any times requested by the Director which could include total running time, running time of each act, and running time of scene changes on the Running Notes form.

The Stage Manager is responsible for posting notes on the Callboard following every rehearsal and performance.

After Final Performance:

Gives report during the Postmortem.

Attends and gives report at weekly Production Meetings.


Crew Chief (Master Carpenter, Master Electrician, Hair/Make-up Designer, Costume Supervisor, Scenic Artist)

A crew chief is, in essence, a student assigned to supervise a particular area--electrics, construction, costumes, hair/make-up, and painting. The crew chief is trained to operate safely all power tools, equipment, stage machinery, instruments, and products in a particular area. The crew chief acts as a resource or "charge" person supervising work calls in that particular area. All crew chiefs must undergo a training session.

As soon as possible, crew chiefs should get in touch with their crew members, obtain contact information and class/work schedules.

Having received crew members' schedules, crew chiefs must establish and post reasonable schedules for work calls as soon as possible. This schedule should be as accommodating as possible to members' conflicts without compromising the efficient completion of all tasks.

Although every effort should be made to maintain the posted work call schedule, if changes arise due to unforeseen circumstances, the crew chief must make every effort to notify all crew members affected by that change in a reasonable time frame. Lack of preparation or forethought on the part of a crew chief should not be construed as an excuse to make unreasonable demands on crew members.


Master Carpenter

Responsible for the implementation, loading-in, maintenance, and striking of the scenic design.  The Master Carpenter works closely with the Technical Director during all phases of the theatre build, tech, and Strike.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play. Discusses scenic design and build schedule with the Technical Director.

Rehearsal Period:

The Master Carpenter is responsible for executing the scenic design according to the established plans and budget.

Load-in/Light Hang Period:

The Master Carpenter insures the safe and efficient loading-in of the scenic design.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

The MC insures that all set pieces remain in proper working order throughout the performance period. Stage Manager notifies the Master Carpenter of any set problems or repairs in time for the Master Carpenter to make adjustments or repairs prior to the next rehearsal or performance.

The Master Carpenter attends the first run through.

The Master Carpenter attends technical rehearsals.

After Final Performance:

The Master Carpenter is responsible for striking all scenic elements.

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Master Electrician

Responsible for the implementation, loading-in, maintenance, and striking of the lighting design.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play. Discusses lighting design with the Lighting Designer.

Load-in/Light Hang Period:

The Master Electrician insures the safe and efficient cabling, hanging, focusing and dressing of all lighting instruments according to the paperwork supplied by the lighting designer.

The Master Electrician helps maintain the light room in a safe, neat, and organized manner throughout the rehearsal period.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

The Master Electrician insures that all lighting instruments remain focused and in proper working order throughout the performance period.

The Master Electrician, or delegate (usually the Light Board Operator) performs a dimmer check no later than one hour prior to each dress rehearsal and each performance.

The Stage Manager notifies the Master Electrician of any lighting problems in time for the Master Electrician to make adjustments or repairs prior to the next rehearsal or performance.

Master Electrician is required to attend the first run through.

After Final Performance:

The Master Electrician strikes all instruments, cables, gels, gel frames, and so on.

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Costume Supervisor

The Costume Supervisor is responsible for supervising the Costume Crew, Wardrobe Crew and in assisting the Costume Designer with the implementation, upkeep, repair, running, and striking of all costumes for a particular production.

Rehearsal/Performance Period:

Costume Supervisor assists the Costume Designer in taking measurements.

The Costume Supervisor assists the Costume Designer in costume fittings.

The Costume Supervisor is required to attend the first run through.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

Crew members will take turns with all laundering and repairing costumes, and neatening of the Costume Shop.

Costume Supervisor is responsible for setting up dressing rooms, distributing costumes to dressing rooms, and insuring that all costume pieces are labeled with characters' names.

In the case of rented costumes, the Costume Supervisor collaborates with the Costume Designer in unpacking, checking off, labeling, and distributing costumes to dressing rooms.

Costume Supervisor consults with the Technical Director in establishing dressing areas backstage as necessary. The Costume Supervisor should be sensitive to cast and crew members' modesty.

Performers are responsible for putting all items that need laundering on the designated rack in the dressing area following each performance and are responsible for bringing to the attention of the Costume Supervisor any items needing repair.

Costume Supervisor is responsible for insuring that all laundering, ironing, and repairs are done in time for the next performance.

After Final Performance:

During Strike for each production, the Costume Supervisor is responsible for returning costumes to storage cleaned, in good repair, and suitable for future use.

Gives report during the Postmortem.

Attends and gives report at weekly Production Meetings.


Scenic Artist

Is responsible for all painting, and wall and (painted) floor treatments.

Pre-Production:

Reads and studies the play. Discusses possible scenic treatments with the Scenic Designer.

Rehearsal Period:

The Scenic Artist is responsible for keeping all brushes, pans, sprayers, any other materials, and the paint area clean.

Insures that appropriate people and/or organizations are thanked in the program for their contributions to the production.

Dress Rehearsal/Performance Period:

The Stage Manager and Scenic Designer take note of any details as yet unfinished, changes, or touch ups and communicate them to the Scenic Artist. The Scenic Artist is responsible for any touch up painting.

After Final Performance:

The Scenic Artist makes sure stage floor is painted black.

Cleans paint area in Scene Shop if necessary

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Crews

Crews will be assigned in various areas, depending upon the requirements of the particular production. These crews can include set construction, electrics (lighting), sound, painting, costumes, hair/make-up, audio/visual, publicity, or other specialty areas (i.e. taxidermy).

Crew members will be supervised by a faculty member in each area.

As soon as possible, crew members must provide the crew chief with contact information and a class/work schedule.

Crew members are required to attend all work calls for their crew as established by their crew chief. They must submit any conflicts to their crew chief as soon as requested.

The crew chief will make every effort to maintain the posted work call schedule. However, if unforeseen circumstances require changes, crew members should be as flexible as possible in rearranging their schedules to accommodate those changes.

Crew members must arrive to all work calls on time and dressed appropriately.  Unless prior arrangements are made, crew members should stay for the entire posted work call. Furthermore, crew members are expected to contribute full effort throughout the work call. If an assignment has been completed, the crew member should seek out the crew chief to receive the next project. There may be times during a work call when only a few crew members are actually working while others await a new assignment. Those unoccupied crew members should maintain focus and discipline until they are needed again.

There may be instances where a crew in one area is called upon to help another crew in a different area. Again, crew members should be flexible and accommodating in these circumstances.

Crews will usually include members with a variety of skills and experience, and may include non-majors and/or Theatre Production students. More advanced students should make every effort to assist those less-experienced crew members and make them feel welcome and needed. Production crews are a learning experience for everyone, and should be considered opportunities to be inclusive and collegial.

Keep in mind that other members of your crew may have made prior arrangements to miss a work call, may have had an emergency, etc. Members of other crews may not be visible, but may, indeed, be working on projects of which you are unaware. Refrain from unnecessary gossip and meddling. If you have a concern regarding another member of your crew, discuss the issue with your crew chief.


Assistant Stage Manager/Deck Captain

The ASM/Deck Captain has a twofold responsibility. During the rehearsal period, the ASM/Deck Captain operates as the Stage Manager's assistant helping set up and strike rehearsal furniture and props, taking down line notes, prompting actors, etc. as per the SM's instructions.

During Technical and Dress Rehearsals, and performances, the ASM/Deck Captain is responsible for the smooth and efficient running of the backstage area. The ASM/Deck Captain is stationed backstage and supervises and/or participates in all scenery changes and any props and/or costume changes as needed.

During performance, the ASM/Deck Captain is responsible for striking props during intermission or scene changes and storing all props immediately following each performance. These duties may be delegated to Run Crew members.

The ASM/Deck Captain may be responsible for handing out props directly to actors going onstage and collecting them from actors leaving the stage. These duties may be delegated to Run Crew members.

During scene changes, either the ASM/Deck Captain or a crew member designated by the ASM/Deck Captain is the last crew member to leave the stage and does a final check to insure all props and scenery have been properly set.

Performers are responsible for bringing to the attention of the Stage Manager or ASM/Deck Captain any items needing repair.

The ASM/Deck Captain remains on headset or insures that a Run Crew member is on headset at all times to facilitate communication with the backstage area.

The ASM/Deck Captain is responsible for insuring that all electronics (cell phones, laptops, iPods, Blackberries, etc. etc. etc.) are turned completely off backstage. 

The ASM/Deck Captain is responsible for the clean and orderly upkeep of the entire backstage area.

Gives report during the Postmortem.


Run Crew

Responsible for implementing any scene changes during performance including but not limited to set pieces, set dressing, furniture, etc. and for any flying and some costume changes.

Run Crew members are required to wear black clothing.  During scene shifts, crew members should move with alacrity, but not rush and should never run. Scene changes should be accomplished with polish, professionalism and purpose. No crew members should ever be visible to audience members in hallways, restrooms, and particularly in the theatre proper except in the case of true emergency or if required by a unique production duty.


Costume Crew

The Costume Crew behaves as any other crew (electrics, paint, set construction, etc.) in attending costume work calls held by the Costume Designer. These work calls may include sewing, altering, pulling, or shopping for costumes.

Depending on the production, the Costume Crew and Wardrobe Crew may be combined and crew members would perform all duties of both crews.


Wardrobe Crew

Responsible for the upkeep, repair, cleaning, and running of all costumes during the run of a particular production.

Wardrobe Crew members are required to attend the first run through.

During Dress/Tech Rehearsals and performances, Wardrobe Crew members are on the crew and should wear black.

Wardrobe Crew members will take turns with all laundering and repairing costumes, and neatening of the Costume Shop.

During Strike, Wardrobe Crew is responsible for assisting the Costume Designer in returning costumes and insuring all items are returned in good condition.

Depending on the production, the Costume Crew and Wardrobe Crew may be combined and crew members would perform all duties of both crews.


Hair/Make-up Crew

Responsible for assisting cast members with Hair/Make-up application during the run of a particular production. Actors should apply their own make-up and hair style unless there are special make-up effects or particularly complicated hair styles. Hair/Make-up Crew members are present to assist and facilitate.

During dress rehearsals and performances, Hair/Make-up Crew members are on the Run Crew and may be assigned to assist with quick hair/make-up changes or other backstage duties.

Hair/Make-up Crew members are responsible for helping to keep make-up area clean and sanitary.

During Strike, Hair/Make-up Crew is responsible for assisting Hair/Make-up Designer in cleaning and storing make-up supplies and cleaning make-up area.


Props Crew

Responsible for the upkeep, repair, cleaning, and running of all props during the run of a particular production.  The props crew will have work calls.  These work calls may include building or shopping for props.

During Dress/Tech Rehearsals and performances, Props Crew members are on the Run Crew and may also be assigned other backstage duties.

Props Crew insures the safety and sanitation of all props and consumables during the run of a production.


Light Board Operator

Is responsible for implementing the Light Design during the run of the show. The Light Board Operator is responsible for maintaining any paperwork including Light Cue List for the show.

The Light Board Operator is required to attend all tech rehearsals, dress rehearsals, and performances.


Sound Board Operator

Is responsible for implementing the Sound Design and maintaining all sound equipment for the show. The Sound Board Operator is responsible for safely storing all tapes, master tape, minidiscs, and/or CDs after each rehearsal and performance.  They are also responsible for the care and feeding of the headsets, wireless microphones, and any other equipment necessary for the sound reinforcement of a production.


House Manager

The House Manager is responsible for Supervising Ushers, assembling programs, passing messages, flowers, etc. to cast and crew, seating patrons as needed and cleaning the house before and after performances. The House Manager also trains and/or assists any house personnel.

The House Manage insures that the front of house does not cause a delay in a curtain, that all patrons sit in their assigned seats if appropriate, and that all doors are closed prior to house lights dimming.

The House Manager will remain outside the theatre to hold latecomers to an appropriate moment in the performance as determined by the Director or Stage Manager.

At intermission, the House Manager will open all doors as soon as but no sooner than the house lights rise.

During intermission, the House Manager will insure that no food or drinks are brought into the theatre.

At the end of the performance, the House Manager will open the doors as soon as but not sooner than the house lights rise and will wait until all patrons have exited the theatre to begin tidying up.

For all productions, the House Manager greets the public and may be required to assist in the Box Office if adequate staffing is not available.

All Performances:

Prior to Performances:

The House Manager calls each person on the Usher sign-up sheet to confirm the time and place ushers should arrive, and to inform ushers of the dress code.

This should be done very soon after the person has signed up, and should happen at least several days in advance of the work date.

An additional phone or e-mail reminder the day before their shift may be required.

The House Manager obtains all supplies for the front of house (i.e. usher and house manager badges, cleaning supplies and rags, laminated signs) from the appropriate staff members.

The House Manager should arrive no less than one hour prior to curtain.

The House Manager gives thorough briefing on seating plan, gives instructions on how to seat the audience in an efficient and courteous manner, and makes station assignments.

Ushers should be given the following instructions:

Please sign in.

Greet patrons courteously.

Tear tickets along perforations and keep the larger portion, giving the smaller back to the patron.

Patrons should be told that seating is general except for any specially reserved seats.

Patrons should be asked to turn off all pagers, cell phones and watch alarms or switch them to silent mode.

The House Manager sees that the house is open at half hour to curtain.

The House Manager notifies the Stage Manager when the house is open.

Stage Manager contacts House Manager three minutes prior to the scheduled curtain time.

At this time, the House Manger assesses the house and determines if the show may begin on time.  The House Manager notifies the Stage Manager when the house is ready and the Stage Manager gives the cast and crew a two minute "places" call.

Before curtain, the House Manager makes sure exit doors are closed and lobby lights turned down.

After curtain is up, the House Manager maintains quiet in lobby.

The House Manager should check with the Director to determine the latecomer policy for the individual show.

There may be specific moments at the beginning of the play or following intermission(s) during which it would be inappropriate to seat patrons.

In any case, the House Manager is responsible for insuring that no one enters the theatre during a blackout, especially during afternoon matinees when sunlight spills into the theatre from the outside doors.

At each intermission, the House Manager turns on lobby lights and opens doors.

Patrons should be reminded of the length of intermission.

The House Manager handles any special situations as they arise--doctors who wish to be on call, wheel chair patrons, people in wrong seats, etc. In general, the House Manager looks after comfort and safety in the theatre.

The House Manager remains on duty in lobby or back of the theatre throughout every performance to maintain quiet in the lobby/hallway and deal with any emergencies or special circumstances that arise.

The House Manager must be familiar with all Emergency Policies such as tornado warnings, fire, smoke, etc.

The House Manager will contact the Faculty/Staff on Duty/Call for any emergency situations (equipment failure, smell of smoke, severe weather) and any issues involving irresolvable patron ticket problems, patron belligerence, intoxication, unruliness, etc.

In the case of life threatening emergency, the House Manager notifies Security and takes charge of implementing proper procedures.

Prior to and following the performance, the House Manager will insure that no cast or crew members enter the house or lobby areas until all patrons have exited. The House Manager will insure that no cast members greet family or friends in costume and/or make-up.

After the performance, ushers will help pick up discarded programs and tidy the theatre after the theatre is clear. The House Manager is responsible for collecting pen lights from ushers and removing any programs or trash from the house.

During the run of each show, the House Manager counts the number of remaining programs (including recycled) and helps determine if more programs need to be printed for subsequent performances.

These numbers should be communicated to the Department of Theatre Administrative Assistant

During or following strike for each production, the House Manager ensures that all usher and house manager badges, cleaning supplies and rags, laminated signs, etc. are returned to the appropriate people.


Safety/Emergency Protocol

Emergencies

If there is an emergency during rehearsal or performance between 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., call Campus Police (2222.  Inform Campus Police of the emergency and if they deem necessary, they will call the Fire Department (911).

After 4:30 p.m. and weekends, Campus Police number is (2222). You may have them call the Fire Department for you.


Emergencies During Performance

It is the house manager’s responsibility to maintain a look out for bad weather, fire, etc.  Should anything happen to create an issue, the House manager, the stage manager, and the assistant stage manager must all work together to solve the issue.

Panic should be avoided at all costs. The cast and crew should assist the House Manager or Stage Manager in evacuating the audience by holding doors, helping elderly or physically challenged patrons, and maintaining a sense of calm professionalism.

If a patron suffers an apparent heart attack, has a seizure, or undergoes any similar medical emergency, the House Manager should quickly go to that patron and assess the situation. If the patron desires and is able to leave the auditorium, the House Manager should assist him or her out and then initiate the emergency procedures described above by calling Campus Police and following their instruction. If the patron is unable or unwilling to leave the theatre, the House Manager should contact the Stage Manager to stop the performance and initiate the emergency procedures.  Again, panic should be avoided. In the unfortunate instance that a performance must be stopped, the cast and crew should remain calm and focused in order to be ready to recommence on short notice.


Work Call/Shop Safety/Cleanliness

Cleanup will begin 15 minutes prior to the end of each and every Work Call: all tools, power cords, hardware, and other materials will be put away in their proper locations; uncompleted projects will be neatened and moved to unobtrusive and safe locations in the shop; and the shop floor will be cleared and swept. All students are expected to straighten up their own work space, but also to help with the general cleanup. When working in one of the theatrical spaces, the same rules apply--all tools and materials must be put away and the floor cleared and swept. There is a small closet in the Studio Theatre for temporary storage of tools and materials in use in that space. The Road Box or tool storage area should be inventoried and all tools and equipment accounted for by the Shop Manager or crew chief prior to the end of all work calls. The Shop Manager or crew chief is responsible for the cleanliness and safe condition of the shop and work spaces.

Audition Tips

Auditioning is a talent and a skill to be practiced and developed throughout your career. The following are some suggestions:

Be prepared, be prepared, and be prepared. If the audition calls for a memorized monologue, make sure the monologue is thoroughly researched, memorized, and worked. If you are to sing, make sure you know the music and lyrics cold. If you are doing readings from the script, find a copy beforehand, read it, and study it thoroughly.

To get as much experience as possible, audition whenever and wherever you can.

You are auditioning as soon as you walk in the room. Be courteous, open, honest, friendly, yet professional. Be yourself--your audition is meant to present the best possible you, not someone you would like to be or think the auditors are looking for.

First impressions are important--dress appropriately.

Find your light. As you gain experience, this will come naturally, but in the meantime, as you enter the audition space, note where the brightest light is located and stand in it. You will eventually be able to feel where the "hot spot" is and will be able to stand with your face in it. Auditors do not look favorably on actors who stand in the dark.

Wait patiently for your auditors' attention and then introduce yourself with confidence but not arrogance. Give the name of the play and the character, but not the author unless asked. Do not give a synopsis or other background information--the monologue should stand on its own. This is extremely important: Take a beat (but only a beat) to finish your introduction and to "take the stage" before starting your monologue.

Do not use full stage make-up, extensive costumes or props (except a chair).

If you are speaking to an imaginary scene partner, DO NOT "place" him or her onstage--especially not in a chair on stage. The auditors will look where you look and not at you.

You may consider making eye contact with the auditors, but do not invade their space, and especially do not make physical contact with them. Eye contact is one of the great controversies in audition training. Some believe you should never make eye contact with auditors because it forces them into your scene and an activity in which they do not wish to participate; some believe you should ask the auditors if it is permissible to make eye contact; and others insist eye contact makes the audition more personal. Whatever you decide, be consistent.

Choose a monologue suited to your age and "type." This requires serious self-reflection, self-awareness, and self-analysis on your part.

Do a monologue from a play you have done. Try piecing together a monologue from dialogue--delete the other characters' lines and you may find a unique monologue.

Be very wary of doing pieces from monologue books. Remember there are hundreds of other actors doing this same material. Never do a monologue from a book of monologues without reading and studying the entire play.

Clarify the requirements--for instance, if you are requested to do a classical piece ask, "When you say `classical' do you mean verse?"

Be prepared to sing without an accompanist. Always have a tape that is cued-up.

Keep strictly to the time limit--it is better to be under time than to run long. There may be a Stage Manager or Assistant at the audition with a stopwatch who will cut you off at the allotted time. If the limit is two minutes, your piece should be no longer than one minute and fifty to fifty-five seconds.

If you do go up on a line, GO ON. Do not apologize and ask to start again. The auditors have already heard the beginning of your piece once. Pick up from the next line you can remember. If you absolutely draw a blank, thank the auditors for their time; wish them a good day, and exit with confidence. This is particularly true if you blew the audition. There is nothing worse than an actor commenting on an audition. Remember, the auditors are not deaf--they can often hear screams of anguish and crashing furniture from the lobby even in the fifth row of the theatre.

This is extremely important: after finishing your monologue, take a beat to complete the moment. Then come to neutral (stand up if seated) and always sincerely thank the auditors for their time, wish them a good day, and exit with confidence. Remember, you are auditioning all the way out the door as well.

NEVER APOLOGIZE for your work in the theatre. "Don't say `sorry,' just don't do it again."

Have fun. If you are enjoying yourself, the auditors will enjoy watching you.

Code of Ethics

Part of the great tradition of the theatre is a code of ethics that belongs to every worker on the legitimate stage. This code, while tacit, has been observed throughout the centuries and will continue long after us. It is neither superstition, nor dogma, nor a statute enforced by law. It is an attitude towards craftsmanship, a respect for associates, and a dedication toward the audience. This code outlines a self-discipline that, far from robbing one of individuality, increases personal esteem and dignity through cooperation and common purpose. The result is perfection that encompasses all that is meant by "Good Theatre."

  • The Show Must Go On! I will never miss a performance.
  • I shall play every performance to the best of my ability, regardless of how small my role or large my personal problems.
  • I will respect my audience regardless of size or station.
  • I shall never miss an entrance or cause a curtain to be late by my failure to be ready.
  • I shall forego all social activities that interfere with rehearsals and will always be on time.
  • I shall never leave the theatre building or stage area until I have completed my performance.
  • I shall remember that my aim is to create illusion; therefore, I will not destroy that illusion by appearing in costume and make-up off stage or outside the theatre.
  • I will not allow the comments of friends, relatives or critics to change any phase of my work without proper authorization.
  • I will not alter lines, business, lights, properties, settings, costumes, or any phase of the production without consultation with and permission from the director.
  • I shall accept the director's advice in the spirit in which it is given for the director sees the production as a whole and my role as a portion thereof.
  • I shall look upon the production as a collective effort demanding my utmost cooperation; hence I will forego the gratification of ego for the demands of the play.
  • I will be patient and avoid temperamental outbursts, for they create tension and serve no useful purpose.
  • I shall respect the play and the playwright, remembering "A work of art is not a work of art until it is finished."
  • I shall never blame my coworkers for my own failure.
  • I will never engage in caustic criticism of another artist's work from jealousy or an urge to increase my own prestige.
  • I shall inspire the public to respect me and my craft through graciousness in accepting both praise and constructive criticism.
  • I will use stage properties and costumes with care, knowing they are tools of my craft and a vital part of the production.
  • I will observe backstage courtesy and shall comport myself in strict compliance with rules of the theatre in which I work.
  • I shall never lose my enthusiasm for the theatre because of disappointment or failure for they are the lessons by which I learn.
  • I shall direct my efforts in such a manner that when I leave the theatre, it will stand as a greater institution.

(From the C.W. Post/Long Island University Department of Theatre and Film Handbook for Theatre Students, pg. 33)

Recommended Reading List

The following are readings with which every well-educated theatre artist should be familiar. Not every book or article may be readily available in the University Libraries.

Classical

Aeschylus: Oresteia, Seven Against Thebes Aristophanes: Lysistrata, The Birds, The Frogs Euripides: Medea, Trojan Women, Electra Menander: The Grumbler Plautus: The Twin Menaechmi Seneca: Medea Sophocles: Oedipus Rex, Antigone, Oedipus at Colonus Terence: The Brothers

Medieval

Everyman Mystery of Adam Quem Quaeritis Trope Corpus Christi Second Shepherd's Play

1500-1800

Beaumarchais: The Marriage of Figaro Beaumont and Fletcher: The Maid's Tragedy Calderon: Life is a Dream Congreve: The Way of the World Corneille: Le Cid Dryden: The Conquest of Granada Etherege: The Man of Mode Farquhar: The Beaux' Stratagem Ford: 'Tis Pity She's A Whore Gay: The Beggar's Opera Goethe: Faust, Part I Goldoni: The Servant of Two Masters Goldsmith: She Stoops to Conquer Jonson: The Alchemist, Volpone Kotzebue: The Stranger Kyd: The Spanish Tragedy Lessing: Miss Sara Sampson Lillo: The London Merchant Lope de Vega: Fuente Ovejuna (The Sheep Well) Machiavelli: Mandragola (The Mandrake) Marlowe: Dr. Faustus Moliere: The School for Wives, The Misanthrope, The Miser, Tartuffe Racine: Phaedra Shakespeare: Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra, Richard III, Henry IV, Part I, The Merchant of Venice, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Caesar, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, The Taming of the Shrew, The Tempest Sheridan: The Rivals, The School for Scandal Tyler: The Contrast Webster: The Duchess of Malfi Wycherly: The Country Wife

1800-1915

Aiken: Uncle Tom's Cabin Boucicault: The Octaroon, Rip Van Winkle Buchner: Danton's Death Chekhov: The Sea Gull, The Cherry Orchard, Three Sisters, Uncle Vanya Dumas, fils: Camille Hugo: Hernani Gogol: The Inspector General Gorki: The Lower Depths Hauptmann: The Weavers Hazlewood: Lady Audley's Secret Ibsen: Peer Gynt, A Doll House, Ghosts, The Wild Duck, Hedda Gabler, The Master Builder Jarry: Ubu Roi Maeterlinck: The Intruder, The Blue Bird Rostand: Cyrano de Bergerac Sardou: A Scrap of Paper Schnitzler: La Ronde Scribe: A Glass of Water Shaw: Arms and the Man, Man and Superman, Candida, Heartbreak House, Major Barbara, Saint Joan, Pygmalion Strindberg: Miss Julie, The Father, Ghost Sonata, A Dream Play Synge: The Playboy of the Western World, Riders to the Sea Turgenev: A Month in the Country Wilde: The Importance of Being Earnest

1915-Present

Albee: Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? The Zoo Story, The Goat or, Who Is Sylvia? Anderson: WintersetAnouilh: Antigone Apollinaire: The Breasts of Tiresias Auburn: Proof Baraka (Jones): Dutchman, The Toilet, The Slave Barber: Enchanted April Barry: Philadelphia Story, Holiday Beckett: Waiting for Godot, Endgame Brecht: Mother Courage and Her Children, Three-Penny Opera, Good Person of Szechuan, Caucasian Chalk Circle, Galileo Busch: The Tale of the Allergist's Wife, Vampire Lesbians of Sodom, Psycho Beach Party Camus: Caligula Churchill: Top Girls, Cloud 9 Cocteau: The Infernal Machine Coward: Blithe Spirit Cruz: Anna in the Tropics Duerrenmatt: The Visit, The Physicists Fierstein: Torch Song Trilogy Fo: Accidental Death of an Anarchist, We Won't Pay, We Won't Pay Frayn: Copenhagen, Noises Off Friel: Dancing at Lughnasa, Fugard: Master Harold and the Boys, Blood Knot, A Lesson from Aloes Genet: The Screens, The Blacks, The Balcony Giraudoux: The Madwoman of Chaillot Greenberg: Take Me Out Guare: Landscape of the Body, House of Blue Leaves Hampton: Les Liaisons Dangereuses Hansberry: A Raisin in the Sun Hare: Plenty, Map of the World, Pravda, Hellman: Children's Hour, Toys in the Attic Henley: Crimes of the Heart Howe: Painting Churches Hwang: M. Butterfly Ionesco: The Bald Soprano, Rhinoceros Inge: Come Back Little Sheba, Picnic, Bus Stop Kaufman and Hart: Once in a Lifetime Kushner: Angels in America: Millennium Approaches, Angels in America: Perestroika Lavery: Frozen Leight: Side Man Letts: August:Osage County Lindsay-Abaire: Rabbit Hole Lorca: Blood Wedding Lucas: Prelude to a Kiss Ludlam: The Mystery of Irma Vep McDonagh: The Pillowman, The Beauty Queen of Leenane McNally: Master Class, Love! Valour! Compassion!, Corpus Christi Marber: Closer Miller: Death of a Salesman, All My Sons, The Crucible, The Ride Down Mt. Morgan Mamet: American Buffalo, Glengarry Glenross, Sexual Perversity in Chicago, Speed the Plow Medoff: Children of a Lesser God Mrozek: Tango Norman: Getting Out, 'night Mother O'Casey: The Plough and the Stars Odets: Waiting for Lefty Osborne: Look Back in Anger Pinter: The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homecoming, Betrayal, Hothouse Pirandello: Six Characters in Search of an Author, Right You Are, If You Think You Are, Henry IV Rabe: The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel, Sticks and Bones, Streamers, Hurlyburly Rice: The Adding Machine Reza: Art, God of Carnage Saroyan: The Time of Your Life Sartre: No Exit Shaffer: Equus Shanley, John Patrick: Doubt: A Parable Shepard: Buried Child, A Lie of the Mind, Tooth of Crime, Cowboy Mouth, True West, Sherman: Bent Sherwood: There Shall Be No Night Simon: The Odd Couple, Rumors, Barefoot in the Park, Prisoner of Second Avenue, Brighton Beach Memoirs, Biloxi Blues, Lost in Yonkers, Broadway Bound Soyinka: The Bacchae, The Strong Breed Stoppard: Travesties, Hapgood, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Coast of Utopia, Arcadia, The Real Thing Uhry: The Last Night of Ballyhoo, Driving Miss Daisy Vogel: How I Learned to Drive Wasserstein: The Sisters Rosensweig, The Heidi Chronicles Weiss: Marat/Sade Wertenbaker: Our Country's Good Wilder: Our Town, The Skin of Our Teeth Williams: The Glass Menagerie, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, A Streetcar Named Desire Wilson, A.: Gem of the Ocean, Joe Turner's Come and Gone, Ma Rainey's Black Bottom, The Piano Lesson, Seven Guitars, Fences, Two Trains Running, Jitney, King Hedley II, Radio Golf Wilson, L.: The Fifth of July, Hot L Baltimore, Rimers of Eldridge Wright: I Am My Own Wife Zimmerman: Metamorphoses

Appia: The Work of Living Art Aristotle: The Poetics Arnold, Richard: Scene Technology Aronson: American Set Design Artaud: The Theatre and Its Double Avery, et al.: The London Stage, 1660-1800 Ball: Backwards and Forwards Barton: Historic Costume for the Stage Berry: The Actor and His Text Bigsby: Twentieth-Century American Drama Blunt: Stage Dialects Boal: Games for Actors and Non-Actors Brecht: "A Short Organum for the Theatre," "The Modern Theatre is the Epic Theatre" Brockett: A History of the Theatre Brook: The Empty Space Campbell and Quinn: Reader's Encyclopedia of Shakespeare Chinoy and Walsh: Women in American Theatre Clark: European Theories of the Drama Clurman: On Directing Corson: Stage Make-Up Craig: On the Art of the Theatre Craig: Design for the Theatre Crowell Handbook of Classical Drama Crowell Handbook of Modern Drama Davis and Evans: Theatre, Children and Youth Davis and Watkins: Children's Theatre Esslin: Theatre of the Absurd Goldberg: Children's Theatre Gorelick: New Theatres for Old Grotowski: Towards a Poor Theatre Hainaux: Stage Design Throughout the World Horace: The Art of Poetry Jones, R.E.: The Dramatic Imagination Matlaw: Modern World Drama McCandless: A Method for Lighting the Stage McGraw-Hill Encyclopedia of World Drama Mielziner: Designing for the Theatre Nagler: A Source Book in Theatrical History Odell: Annals of the New York Stage Ottemiller: Index to Plays in Collections Oxford Companion to the Theatre Parker and Smith: Scene Design and Stage Lighting Pecktal: Design and Painting for the Theatre Russell: Stage Costume Design: Theory, Technique, & Style Shurtleff: Audition Simonson: The Stage is Set Smith, Ronn: American Set Design 2 Spolin: Improvisation for the Theatre Stanislavsky: An Actor Prepares, Building a Character, Creating a Role, My Life in Art Stern: The Stage Manager's Handbook Strindberg: "Preface" to Miss Julie Styan: Drama, Stage, and Audience Zola: "Naturalism on the Stage"


Résumé/Portfolio

Performers should always have a résumé ready and eventually should have 8x10 black and white or color headshots available. Designers and technicians should have an updated portfolio available. A portfolio is a visual record of your artistic and creative work. You should make photographs of any scenery, props, or costumes you design, build or paint. You should include examples of your drafting, painting, designs, swatches, renderings, etc.

All students will attend an annual evaluation of their work and progress.  At this time, advisors will discuss each student's career plans. Students are responsible for scheduling this review.

Suggested Supplies List

The following are supplies that every Theatre major should own:

Character shoes; Dark rehearsal skirt (women); Dark rehearsal jacket (men); Make-up kit (required);

25' tape measure; Combination square; Crescent wrench; Flat head screwdriver; Hammer; Pencils; Phillips head screwdriver; Scale rule.

The following are supplies that you may want to possess for certain specialties:

Drafting board and supplies; hot glue gun; Stopwatch; Tape recorder.


The Ten Commandments of Theatre

I. The Director is like a God. Thou shalt not take notes from friends or family, coaches or critics.

II. Thou shalt not take the name of thy producer thy angel in vain, for he shall sign thy checks.

III. Remember thou keep holy the half-hour; keep in mind that an actor is never on time, an actor is always early.

IV. Honor thy author and thy composer, for in the beginning were the words and the notes.

V. Thou shalt not kill laughs nor step on lines; still, thou shalt pick up thy cues.

VI. Thou shalt not adulterate thy performance, for thy stage manager is always watching.

VII. Thou shalt not steal scenes nor focus nor props.

VIII. Thou shalt not bear false witness in thy bio nor résumé; indeed, thou shalt be truthful in thy entire performance.

IX. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's lines; for truly, there are no small parts, only small actors.

X. Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's good fortune; for in fact, all actors must pay their dues. This above all: The Show Must Go On

Mary McTigue, Acting Like a Pro (Cincinnati: Better Way Books, 1992) 119

Theatre Organizations

ACTF (American College Theatre Festival)

This is a national organization that involves the viewing and adjudication of college productions as part of a competition at several levels. Outside adjudicators visit colleges to review productions, give feedback, and choose productions to advance to the regional festival held in January (one adjudicator for a nonparticipating production and two for a participating production). Chosen productions are performed at the regional festival where they undergo another round of adjudication. Regional winners travel to Washington, D.C. to perform at the Kennedy Center.

Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship--A school is eligible to nominate at least one actor from the production under consideration for the Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship competition.

You are encouraged to attend the regional festival to participate in workshops, meet other theatre students from around the region, and see productions from other colleges.


ATHE (Association for Theatre in Higher Education)

This is the national organization for Theatre educators. ATHE holds a national conference annually (usually in early August) comprised of workshops, performances, and scholarly paper presentations. There are numerous Focus Groups within the organization that provide programs for special interests such as acting, directing, playwriting, theatre history, etc. ATHE also includes an employment service that brings employers and prospective employees together at the national conference. Members receive a subscription to Theatre Journal.


ECTC (East Central Theatre Conference), MWTC (Midwest Theatre Conference), SETC (South Eastern Theatre Conference) and SWTA (South Western Theatre Association)

These are regional organizations for theatre professionals. They hold annual conventions comprised of workshops, performances, and panels, and sponsors auditions and technical interviews every spring that you are encouraged to attend. Professional and summer stock companies attend these audition/interviews.


Institute of Outdoor Drama

Established in 1963, The Institute of Outdoor Drama is a public service agency in the College of Arts and Sciences of The University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. It is the only organization in the U.S. providing national leadership in fostering artistic and managerial excellence and expansion of the outdoor drama movement through training, research and advisory programs, and it serves as a national clearinghouse for more than 120 constituent theatre companies across the nation.

The outdoor historical dramas are original plays, often with music and dance, based on significant events and performed in amphitheaters located where the events actually occurred. Born in North Carolina, uniquely American and epic in scope, they focus on the people who shaped the heritage of the country, preserving and bearing witness to the great things we've accomplished as a state and nation. They are part of the travel and tourism industry, designed to attract families on vacation.


MidWest Theatre Auditions

Every year, usually in February, the Midwest Theatre Audition/Interviews are held at Webster University in St. Louis. Representatives from summer stock companies, graduate programs, and year-round theatres attend. There are acting, dance, and tech/design opportunities.


Strawhat Auditions

StrawHat is an organization that supports the careers of non-equity actors and technical artists looking to start and continue their professional careers in the theatre. Its main activity is to produce the StrawHat Auditions, which are held in New York every spring. Over three days, over 600 actors, 75 "techies" and staff from over forty theatres attend. Actors audition for available positions in the theatres' summer seasons while technical people interview for positions.


Unified Professional Theatre Auditions

Combined auditions held in Memphis, TN. For performers seeking paid year-round positions, paid internships, paid job-in employment.


U/RTA (University and Regional Theatre Association)

This is a national organization made up of Universities and Regional Theatres around the country. They hold annual audition/interviews for admission into 32 Master of Fine Arts degree programs and producing companies in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles.


USITT (United States Institute of Theatre Technology)

This is a national organization for technical theatre and design artists. USITT holds yearly meetings and includes an employment service. Members receive a subscription to Theatre Technology.


Forms

Forms are available which are intended to facilitate the day to day operations of the Department of Theatre. They are intended to provide continuity and uniformity. Please use them whenever indicated.


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