Dr. Brenda Wilson with her crew of volunteers from Women in Computing at the Tent City - 2011 Homecoming

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  • In the cloud, code doesn't need developers

    JULY 24, 2013

    Automated approaches to development are gaining ground, but have their limits and won't render professional developers obsolete

    By Paul Krill | InfoWorld

    Codeless development environments, which rely on models and templates for building applications rather than strict coding, are gaining a foothold. But they are limited and won't render professional developers obsolete, observers of these technologies say.

    Platforms from companies such as OutSystems and Mendix have emerged in this development niche, and with them comes growing interest in codeless tools, says analyst David Norton of Gartner. "We're seeing SMBs who are trying to lower costs" by looking at high-productivity, model-driven environments, he says.

    Also driving interest is frustration with IT and business units that want to handle their own development....

    (Read the whole story here)



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  • Cyberthieves Looted A.T.M.’s of $45 Million in Just Hours

     Yet, in two precision operations that involved people in more than two dozen countries acting in close coordination and with surgical precision, the organization was able to steal $45 million from thousands of A.T.M.'s in a matter of hours.

    In New York City alone, the thieves responsible for A.T.M. withdrawals struck 2,904 machines over 10 hours on Feb. 19, withdrawing $2.4 million. 
     Yet, in two precision operations that involved people in more than two dozen countries acting in close coordination and with surgical precision, the organization was able to steal $45 million from thousands of A.T.M.'s in a matter of hours.

    In New York City alone, the thieves responsible for A.T.M. withdrawals struck 2,904 machines over 10 hours on Feb. 19, withdrawing $2.4 million. 
     Yet, in two precision operations that involved people in more than two dozen countries acting in close coordination and with surgical precision, the organization was able to steal $45 million from thousands of A.T.M.'s in a matter of hours.

    In New York City alone, the thieves responsible for A.T.M. withdrawals struck 2,904 machines over 10 hours on Feb. 19, withdrawing $2.4 million. 

        It was a huge bank heist – but a 21st-century version in which the robbers never wore ski masks, threatened a teller or set foot in a vault. 

        Yet, in two precision operations that involved people in more than two dozen countries acting in close coordination and with surgical precision, the organization was able to steal $45 million from thousands of A.T.M.'s in a matter of hours.

        In New York City alone, the thieves responsible for A.T.M. withdrawals struck 2,904 machines over 10 hours on Feb. 19, withdrawing $2.4 million. 

    Click this link for the rest of the story

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  • Buying Their Way to Twitter Fame

    [Linked on April 9, 2013; Published Aug 22, 2012]

    AS a comedian, Dan Nainan was blessed with fans, millions of YouTube views and, once, an audience with President Obama. But one thing was missing.

    “The number of Twitter followers I had in relation to how many people in the world know about me was woefully inadequate,” he said. So in June he bought a small city’s worth for $424.15, raising his Twitter follower count from about 700 to more than 220,000.

    Read the whole story

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  • How Marissa Mayer Figured Out Work-At-Home Yahoos Were Slacking Off

    Nicholas Carlson, Business Insider

    Last week, Yahoo banned employees from working from home.

    How did CEO Marissa Mayer decide to make such a controversial decision?

    According to a source, the only way Mayer is comfortable making any decision: with the help of data.

    Read the whole story here

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  • Anonymous hacks US Sentencing Commission, distributes files

    By Violet Blue for Zero Day | January 26, 2013 -- 11:33 GMT (03:33 PST) 

    Hacktivist group Anonymous took control of the U.S. Sentencing Commission website Friday, January 25 in a new campaign called "Operation Last Resort."


    The first attack on the website was early Friday morning. The second - successful - attack came around 9pm PST that evening.

    By 3am PST ussc.gov was down (it has since been dropped from the DNS), yet as of this writing the IP address (66.153.19.162) still returns the defaced site's contents.

     

    Read the rest of the story here

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  • The UK Government Shows How to Design for Simplicity

    The UK government is leading the way in using design to create simpler digital services for its citizens.

    Sample layout for Gov.uk


    A 2010 report commissioned by the government made a series of strong recommendations, including creating a single ‘front end’ for all government digital services, releasing API’s to government data, creating a central team with absolute control over all interaction experiences for digital services, and appointing a CEO of Digital with absolute authority over user experiences across all digital channels.

     

    (Get the whole story here)

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  • You too can get a job as a developer!

    by Eric Knorr

    Last time I looked, the U.S. unemployment rate was 8.1 percent. Yet as InfoWorld's Andrew Oliver noted a couple of weeks ago in "Is a computer science degree worth the paper it's printed on?" the unemployment rate among developers is more like 5 percent -- which is considered pretty close to full employment.

    My, how things have changed. What happened to the hue and cry of just a few years ago that offshoring would eventually gobble up every last U.S. programming job?

     

    [Read the whole story here]

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  • How Apple and Amazon Security Flaws Led to My Epic Hacking

    By Mat Honan | August 6, 2012 | 8:01 pm |

    In the space of one hour, my entire digital life was destroyed. First my Google account was taken over, then deleted. Next my Twitter account was compromised, and used as a platform to broadcast racist and homophobic messages. And worst of all, my AppleID account was broken into, and my hackers used it to remotely erase all of the data on my iPhone, iPad, and MacBook.

    In many ways, this was all my fault. My accounts were daisy-chained together. Getting into Amazon let my hackers get into my...

    [Ed: Not sure of the veracity, but seems plausible enough to warrant a warning to others]

    Go here for the rest

     

     

    More evidence that this really happened: Amazon Quietly Closes Security Hole After Journalist’s Devastating Hack

    Previously, Amazon allowed people to call in and change the email address associated with an Amazon account or add a credit card number to an Amazon account as long as the caller could identify him or herself by name, email address and mailing address — three bits of personal information that are easily found online.

    On Tuesday, Amazon handed down to its customer service department a policy change that no longer allows people to call in and change account settings, such as credit cards or email addresses associated with its user accounts.

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  • Microsoft Outlook.com moves Hotmail to the trash

    One of the most famous internet names is on its way out. Last night, Microsoft confirmed the demise of Hotmail. The major internet brand will soon be replaced by Outlook.com.<<snip>>

    Microsoft took a couple of shots at Google in announcing Outlook.com. Microsoft's service, the company said, will not show ads in your personal conversations or connect you to a social network without your permission. Google, of course, does both of those things; the latter in an attempt to encourage usage of its Google+ social service.

    Click here for the full story

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  • Dutchman flies like a bird with homemade wings (Update: * Hoax*)

    (If it is too good to be true, it probably is! Read the update below)

    If Red Bull doesn't actually give you wings, maybe this guy can.


    Dutch mechanical engineer Jarno Smeets recently posted a video of his first successful flight with his homemade bird wings. Smeet's efforts take cloud computing to a (literally) whole new level, as the wings rely on an Android-powered HTC Wildfire S smartphone to process arm acceleration and compute the motor output.

    The phone is connected to a microcontroller that is, in turn, connected to a Nintendo Wii Remote to measure acceleration and other flight parameters.

    Read all about it here

    Update: You're looking at the Internet Bird Man, who captivated the web's attention for dozens of hours and divided us between skeptics and the faithful. It was a hoax! It turns out he even made up his name.

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