Academic Programs
4

 
In this chapter...
Degrees 
Definitions of Area, Major and Minor
General Degree Requirements
MSU Academic Progress (MAP) Reports
Educational Goals
University Studies Program
Special Degree Programs
Academic Regulations
Grades

 
Degrees
Murray State University confers the following degrees:
• Associate:  Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.), Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), and Associate of Science in Vocational-Technical Education (A.S.V.T.E.);
• Baccalaureate:  Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Arts in Business (B.A.B.), Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.), Bachelor of Independent Studies (B.I.S.), Bachelor of Music (B.M.), Bachelor of Science (B.S.), Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.), Bachelor of Science in Business (B.S.B.), Bachelor of Science in Vocational-Technical Education (B.S.V.T.E.), Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.), and Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.);
• Master:  Master of Arts in Education (M.A.Ed.), Master of Professional Accountancy (M.P.Ac.), Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), Master of Music Education (M.M.E.), Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.), Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.), Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Arts (M.A.), and Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.);
• Specialist:  Specialist in Education (Ed.S.).

A student who completes three years (96 semester hours) of appropriate pre-professional courses at Murray State and then enters an accredited professional school to pursue an advanced degree in dentistry, engineering, medicine, optometry, theology or veterinary science may apply the courses from the first year of professional school (up to 32 semester hours) toward a Murray State baccalaureate degree. All MSU University Studies, departmental and other graduation requirements must be met.

Definitions of Area, Major and Minor
 The University approved academic programs of study listed in the collegiate chapters in this bulletin are the only ones that may be declared by students eligible to follow this catalog. The minimum number of hours indicated below must be unduplicated for each.
 Courses may not be shared between a minor and a major or a minor and an area or multiple minors or multiple majors and areas to meet the minimum requirements for each.
• Area. An area is an approved program of study that requires no fewer than 48 hours of credit in addition to University Studies courses, and can be completed in lieu of a major-minor combination.
• Major. A major is an approved program  of study that requires no fewer than 30 semester hours of credit in addition to University Studies courses and must be accompanied by a unique minor or second major.
• Minor. A minor is an approved program of study of no fewer than 21 semester hours of designated work that must be completed in conjunction with at least a major to apply toward a degree.

General Degree Requirements
Degree Credit. The following do not count toward the credit hours required for graduation but are included in calculating GPAs. Other courses may be added in the future. ENG 095, ENG 100, ENG 109, ENG 110, GUI 096, GUI 097, INT 110, MAT 100, MAT 105, MAT 118, REA 095, REA 100; courses in which a student earned a grade of E, I, X, or WE; BIS courses, if the student does not complete a BIS degree; and multiple enrollments in a course that exceed the number of permissible attempts specified in the course description of a course that may be taken more than once for credit. Note:  Prior to a degree being conferred, if a student repeats a course for the purpose of improving a grade, the following rules apply:  1) the grade in the first attempt is removed from the record and does not count in the GPA; 2) any one subsequent attempt may apply toward graduation requirements if the grade received meets the graduation requirements for that course and the student’s program; 3) although no other attempts apply toward graduation requirements, they are used in calculating a student’s GPA. The GPA that is calculated at the time a degree is conferred and recorded will not be changed by subsequent coursework, including repeated courses. Grades of I or X must be changed within two weeks of grade time for students seeking graduation or else graduation will be delayed until the next semester. Student choosing to graduate with incomplete grades will not be able to change them after the degree is conferred. The following do not count toward the credit hours required for graduation, and are not included in GPA calculations:  audited courses; courses with a grade of R, W, or WP; courses approved for Academic Second Chance; and courses taken at another institution that are determined to be nontransferable.
Residence Credit for Graduation. Undergraduate residence credit is any academic credit awarded by Murray State University and placed on students’ transcripts after they enroll with Murray State University. Nonresidence credit is any academic credit which Murray State accepts as transfer credit from another college or university, including credit through the National Student Exchange and the International Student Exchange programs. (See section on Transfer Credit.)

Associate Degree. A candidate for an associate degree must complete a prescribed, planned specialty program with 18 semester hours chosen from the University Studies component. The minimum amount of credit required for an associate degree is 64 semester hours with an overall grade point average of 2.00. A minimum of 24 semester hours must be earned in residence at Murray State. Ten of the last 16 hours must be earned in residence at Murray State. The associate degree candidate must have a scholastic standing of at least 2.00:  (1) in credits presented for graduation whether earned at Murray State or elsewhere; (2) in all credits completed at Murray State; (3) in the courses completed for the planned specialty program; and (4) in the courses completed at Murray State for the planned specialty program.

Second Associate Degree. A student who has earned or is seeking an associate degree from Murray State may earn a second degree in a different planned specialty program upon meeting course requirements for that degree and upon completing at least 24 additional hours in residence at Murray State, over and above requirements for the first degree. The student may be required to complete additional University Studies courses if they are specifically required for the intended second degree. Nine hours must be completed toward a new planned specialty program and a 2.00 grade point average must be earned for all course work presented for the degree. 

All students seeking a second degree must apply for admission/re-admission to Murray State University and must get a specific program plan pre-approved by the department chair and dean of their new area or major and by the Registrar’s Office. Failure to seek approval in advance from these three parties will likely result in a second degree not being awarded as not all areas and majors will be possible for those seeking the second degree. Graduation honors are not posted for associate degrees.

Baccalaureate Degree. A candidate for a baccalaureate degree must complete a minimum of 128 degree credit semester hours. A minimum of 32 hours must be earned in residence at Murray State and at least 20 of the last 32 semester hours required for graduation must be earned in residence at Murray State. 

At least 42 semester hours of the 128 hours required for a baccalaureate degree must be earned in courses at the 300 level or above. Course credit level for transfer work is based on the course level at the sending institution. No more than nine hours in cooperative education courses will apply toward minimum graduation requirements (some departments have further restrictions). Other courses with limits on their application toward graduation are so designated in their course descriptions.

A student completing a degree in a field that is a non-AACSB accredited business program may not take more than 25 percent of the total hours required for that degree in any combination of the following business prefixes:  ACC, BPA, CIS, FIN, MGT, MKT, OSY, RES or LST 240 and LST 540.

All students seeking a baccalaureate degree must complete the University Studies requirements as outlined later in this chapter. Transfer students, especially those who have completed an associate degree, should refer to the transfer section in Chapter 2 of this Bulletin for important information on University Studies courses. Also, each candidate for a baccalaureate degree must complete either a major of at least 30 semester hours plus a minor of at least 21 semester hours, or an area of at least 48 semester hours. Courses of an appropriate nature may apply toward University Studies requirements and either a major or a minor without additional courses being required in that major or minor. A minimum of nine hours in the major and six hours in the minor, or 15 hours in the area, must be in upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State. 

The baccalaureate degree candidate must have a scholastic standing of at least 2.00 :  (1) in all credits presented for graduation whether earned at Murray State or elsewhere; (2) in all credits completed at Murray State; (3) in the courses for each major, minor or area; and (4) in the courses taken at Murray State for each major, minor or area.
Second Baccalaureate Degree. Students who have earned or are seeking a baccalaureate degree may earn a second baccalaureate degree in a different major or area.  The student must complete a minimum of 32 semester hours in residence at Murray State University, exclusive of hours taken toward requirements of the first degree, including any specific departmental requirements, prerequisites, and co-requirements.  A student completing a new major toward a second degree is not required to complete a new minor.    Fifteen semester hours of upper-level courses must be earned in completion of the new area or major.  The student may be required to complete additional University Studies courses if they are specifically required for the intended second major or area.  A minimum grade point average of 2.00 or above must be earned for all coursework presented in the new program.  (Some areas or majors may require a higher GPA for graduation.)  Cumulative GPAs are not posted to the transcript of a student completing a second baccalaureate degree or any other work subsequent to the first degree. 

All students seeking a second degree must be appropriately admitted/readmitted to Murray State University and must get a specific program plan pre-approved by the department chair and dean of their new area or major and by the Registrar’s Office.  Failure to seek approval in advance from these three parties will likely result in a second degree not being awarded as not all areas and majors will be possible for those seeking the second degree. 

Students seeking an honors designation for their second degree must additionally follow the honors requirements for a first degree, including the completion of a total of 45 new hours, 32 of which must be upper-level. Be sure to see the “Academic Honors for Graduation” listing for complete information. Since a second degree is not possible without the first degree, all undergraduate hours completed (including transfers) will be included in the GPA calculations for the second degree honors notation.

Master’s and Ed.S. Degrees. Consult Murray State’s Graduate Bulletin.

MSU Academic Progress (MAP) Report
The MSU Academic Progress (MAP) report is available to undergraduate students seeking associate or first baccalaureate degrees to clarify the steps and courses needed to achieve a degree. This report incorporates the requirements found in this Bulletin, and presents updated information as courses and requirements change after the Bulletin is published.

The MAP reports are prepared for individual students and use file information and transcript courses to monitor a student’s progress toward any specific degree program. MAP reports are distributed each semester prior to pre-scheduling to provide students with a current statement of remaining requirements for graduation. They are powerful advising tools which are also available on request as students wish to explore the requirements needed should they change degree objectives or add or delete areas, majors, minors, or teacher education.

MAP reports should be used in conjunction with information from the student’s advisor and the Undergraduate Bulletin to insure that all graduation requirements are being met. It is the student’s responsibility to verify that all requirements have been completed.

Graduation Requirements
A student must pay all fees due the University and be recommended for the degree to the Board of Regents of Murray State University before any degree is conferred. Graduation requirements for a student are defined by one specific catalog. A student is assigned to the latest catalog in effect at the time they apply for admission but may choose to move to a more current catalog. Each catalog expires in August of the seventh year from the year of publication. No student will be graduated under the requirements of a catalog that has expired. This Bulletin expires in August 2010.
Degrees are awarded in December, May and at the end of the summer term. Students must apply to graduate. 

Students planning to graduate in December must apply in April; May graduates must apply in November; and summer graduates must apply in March. (See the University Calendar in the Schedule of Classes for specific dates.) Formal commencement exercises are held at the end of the spring and fall semesters. August graduates may participate in the graduation ceremony in May or December of the same year. The names of the August graduates will appear only in the December program. Necessary academic attire may be purchased at the University Store.

All candidates for undergraduate degrees are expected to make formal application and pay a $20 degree fee by the deadline specified for each term in the University Calendar. The student is expected to complete a graduation packet which is to be checked and signed by the student’s advisor(s), and submitted to the Registrar’s Office by the deadline posted. A notice of graduation status is furnished to the student and advisor by the Registrar’s Office after each packet is checked. If a student applies for a degree but does not complete the requirements by the term indicated, the applicant must contact the assistant registrar to change the expected completion date. A $5 degree reinstatement fee will be assessed. Once a degree is conferred the GPA of record will not be altered by any grade changes or subsequent coursework, including repeated courses.

Academic Honors for Graduation:  Baccalaureate degree candidates are considered for graduation honors if they have earned a minimum of 45 semester hours at Murray State University, 32 hours of which must be in upper-level courses, and also must have earned the required GPA indicated below as calculated (1) on Murray State course work alone, (2) on all transfer work, and (3) overall. Summa cum laude - minimum of 3.80. Magna cum laude - 3.60 - 3.79. Cum laude - 3.30 - 3.59.

Students graduating in August will have their honors status announced at December Commencement. Students graduating at the end of the fall semester will have their honor status announced at December Commencement. These students may purchase at the University Store an honors cord to wear at the ceremony. Academic honors for graduation will be recorded on the student’s record at the time the degree is posted.

Honors Day:  Each year an Honors Day program is held to recognize scholastic excellence and achievement by students in various colleges, departments, and organizations. Numerous awards are presented to students making significant contributions to Murray State University.

Departmental Requirements
Individual departments, with the appropriate university approval, may set admission or graduation standards which are higher (but not lower) than the minimum university-wide standards. It shall be the responsibility of the department to inform students of these more stringent requirements, to publish them in the Bulletin,  and to monitor their completion.

Graduation Rate
Information on Murray State University’s graduation rate for entering freshmen is available in the Registrar’s Office, first floor, Sparks Hall or on the Registrar’s webpage.

Educational Goals
In 1990-91, in response to the strategic plan, the faculty of Murray State University developed the following statement of educational goals for graduates of the institution. Following approval by the academic council, the president, and the board of regents, it serves as the foundation for review of the University Studies program and all baccalaureate degree programs, and for the University’s ongoing Quality Enhancement Plan. The QEP committee represent faculty, staff, and students and work with these populations to document, assess, and enhance all aspects of Murray State’s educational environment.

Characteristics of the Murray State University Graduate
The excellence of a university’s baccalaureate program is ultimately best demonstrated by the qualities, characteristics, and performance of its graduates. Murray State University sets as its goal a baccalaureate experience which ensures graduates who:
1. Engage in mature, independent thought and express that thought effectively in oral and written communication;
2. Understand the critical and scientific methodologies academic disciplines employ to discover knowledge and ascertain its validity;
3. Apply sound standards of analysis and evaluation to reach logical decisions;
4. Understand the role and applications of technology and science in the solution of the problems of a changing world;
5. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the world’s historical, literary, philosophical and artistic traditions;
6. Understand the dynamics of cultural diversity, of competing economic and political systems, and of complex moral and ethical issues;
7. Understand the nature of responsible citizenship and pursue an active role in a democratic society; and
8. Demonstrate mastery of their chosen field of study in preparation for a successful, productive life.
To ensure that Murray State graduates exemplify these characteristics, the university commits itself to programmatic and budgetary priorities which promote academic and student life experiences of the highest quality.

University Studies Program
In keeping with a long tradition for universities and colleges, Murray State University asks students to share a common learning experience designed to ensure that they develop basic skills and become broadly educated in their own culture and traditions as well as the culture and traditions of others with whom they will interact during their lives. This attention to common knowledge and skills and this breadth of study are what distinguish a university education from other forms of postsecondary education. A common learning experience, here consisting of selected, required courses, as well as the other selected elective courses which compose University Studies, are designed to help students prepare for their whole lives — their civic duties, their leisure time, and their working hours. The need for a deliberate, selective University Studies program has been reinforced in our own time by the volatility and unpredictability of the modern marketplace, one in which many college graduates will find themselves making a number of job or career changes during the course of their working lives. Such unpredictability has made it more important that educated men and women acquire skills and knowledge useful beyond the borders of a particular job or even profession. University Studies courses begin, but do not complete, the process of helping students develop competencies in communication and critical thinking skills as well as providing the knowledge base necessary for success in a rapidly-changing world. By helping students begin to develop the “Characteristics of the Murray State University Graduate” listed above, University Studies will help them become thoughtful, educated persons and professionals able to adjust to the social, political, economic and technological changes facing all of us in the 21st century.

Murray State University’s University Studies curriculum is, therefore, an integral part of the total baccalaureate experience, crucial to ensuring that Murray State graduates are able to demonstrate the qualities described in the “Characteristics” statement above. Indeed, seven of the eight “Characteristics of the Murray State University Graduate” are addressed in the courses that compose University Studies at Murray State. All University Studies courses are designed to guarantee that Murray State graduates have the opportunity to expand their knowledge of themselves and of the world while developing specific expertise in their chosen major field of study. All courses in the curriculum are also designed to challenge students to think and learn actively.

University Studies required courses offer students a common experience that is coherent and comprehensive, one which stresses the development of important personal and interpersonal learning skills of writing, speaking, critical reading and thinking, and logical argumentation. These courses also help students acquire the historical, cultural and ethical knowledge and awareness necessary to be an educated person and an informed citizen able to be a lifelong learner. In these required courses, students are presented with information and learning techniques which they can develop, expand and practice, regardless of their major or profession, throughout college and their lives. Indeed, the statement of the “Characteristics of the Murray State University Graduate” has served as a guiding principle in the design of the University Studies core.

Elective courses in University Studies are also designed to promote the development of the specific learning skills (clear, cogent written and oral communication, development of the ability to analyze and evaluate problems logically) referred to in the “Characteristics” statement. In addition, elective courses introduce students to fundamental concepts in various disciplines (ways of knowing) in the arts, humanities, social and natural sciences. Elective courses in the University Studies curriculum are also designed, not as introductions to majors, but to meet both of these broader goals.

Students seeking teaching certification are required to complete specific University Studies courses. For detailed information concerning University Studies courses for teacher certification, see Chapter 6, College of Education.
Transfer students (especially those who have completed an associate degree) should refer to the section on transfer of credits in Chapter 2 for important additional University Studies information.

Mandatory Developmental Courses
All Kentucky state-supported colleges and universities are required by the Council on Postsecondary Education to enroll freshmen in a subject-specific developmental course when the student’s ACT score in English or mathematics or reading is 17 or below. At this time, we are permitted to pull scores from multiple ACT testings. MSU meets this mandate with the following courses:

ENGLISH - Students under Admitted with Restrictions status must enroll in ENG 095; all other MSU students with an English ACT score below 18 must enroll in ENG 100.
MATH - All students with a mathematics score below 18 must enroll in MAT 100; MAT 105 is still strongly recommended for students with a mathematics score of 18 or 19.
READING - Students under Admitted with Restrictions status must enroll in REA 095; students with a reading ACT score below 18 must enroll in REA 100 and REA 120. 
NOTE: Credit earned in ENG 095, ENG 100, MAT 100, MAT 105, REA 095, or REA 100 does not apply toward the hours required for graduation but letter grades received in the appropriate classes will count in a student’s grade point average.
University Studies Electives
The courses listed below are approved as electives for the University Studies curriculum. This list may be revised as the University Studies Committee considers proposals for courses to be included in the curriculum.
Courses marked with * have been added since the publication of the 2001-2003 Undergraduate Bulletin and may apply only to the University Studies requirements for students who are following programs and graduation requirements in the 2003-2005 bulletin.
Note: Only students admitted to the Honors Program may enroll in HON courses.
Check course descriptions for specific limitations or prerequisites.

Communication and Basic Skills Category/Hrs
COM  161 Introduction to Public Speaking  3
COM  181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3
CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology 3
ENG  224 Writing in the Professions 3
FRE  101, 102, 201,202(French)  3
FRE 110 Basic Conversational French 3
FRE 203 French for the Working World*   3
FRE 210 Intermediate French Conversation 3
GCM  253 Electronic Imaging  3
GER  101, 102, 201,202 (German)  3
GER 110 Basic Conversational German 3
GER 203 German for the Working World*  3
GER 210 Intermediate Conversational German 3
JPN  101, 102, 201, 202 (Japanese) 3
JPN 110 Basic Conversational Japanese 3
JPN 210 Intermediate Conversational Japanese 3
MAT  117 Mathematical Concepts 3
MAT  130 Technical Math I  5
MAT  135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics  4
MAT  140 College Algebra   4
MAT  145 Trigonometry   3
MAT  150 Algebra and Trigonometry  5
MAT  220 Business Calculus   3
MAT  230 Technical Math II. 5
MAT  250 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I  5
PHI  103 Introduction to Logic 3
SPA  101, 102, 201, 202 (Spanish) 3
SPA 110 Basic Conversational Spanish 3
SPA 203 Spanish for the Working World*  3
SPA 210 Intermediate Spanish Conversation 3

Fine Arts Category/Hrs
ART 105 Studio Art for Non-Majors 3
ART 121 Art Appreciation 3
ART 211 Introduction to the History of Art I    3
ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II    3
HON 161 Honors Seminar in Visual Arts 3
HON 162 Honors Seminar in Music 3
HON 163 Honors Seminar in Theatre 3
HON 164 Honors Seminar in Arts and Culture Abroad 3
MUS 104 History and Appreciation of Jazz 3
MUS 105 History and Appreciation of Music 3
MUS 109 Introduction to Music Theory*   3
THD 101 Dance Appreciation 3
THD 104 The Theatrical Experience 3

Humanities Category/Hrs
ENG 201 Appreciation of Literature 3
ENG 213 Film and Literature 3
ENG 243 Literary Masterpieces: 
     Fantasy, Myth and Legend 3
ENG 245 African American Literature 3
ENG 250 Contemporary World Literature 3
FRE 105 Introduction to French Culture 3
GER 105 Introduction to German Culture 3
JPN 105 Introduction to Japanese Culture 3
MCG 201 Introduction to Multicultural, Class, and Gender Studies*   3
MLA 104 A Cultural Introduction to Languages 3
PHI 201 Introduction to Philosophy 3
PHI 202 Ethics 3
RGS 200 Introduction to Religious Phenomena 3
SPA 105 Introduction to Hispanic Culture 3

Mathematics Category/Hrs
 Note:  A student may have credit for only one of the   following:  MAT 130, 140, 150; and only one of the following :MAT 130, 145, 150.
MAT 117 Mathematical Concepts 3
MAT 130 Technical Math I 5
MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics 4
MAT 140 College Algebra 4
MAT 145 Trigonometry 3
MAT 150 Algebra and Trigonometry 5
MAT 220 Business Calculus 3
MAT 230 Technical Math II 5
MAT 250 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 5
MAT 308 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 5
MAT 309 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4
MAT 330 Technical Math III 3

Science Category/Hrs
AST 199 Introductory Astronomy 4
BIO 101 Biological Concepts 4
BIO 116 Biological Inquiry and Analysis  3
BIO 221 Zoology:  Animal Form and Function 4
BIO 222 Botany:  Plant Form and Function 4
CHE 101 Consumer Chemistry 4
CHE 105 Introductory Chemistry I  4
CHE 106 Introductory Chemistry II  4
CHE 201 General College Chemistry 5
CHE 202 General Chemistry/Qualitative Analysis 5
CHE 210 Brief Organic Chemistry*   3
CHE 215 Organic Chemistry Laboratory*   1
GSC 101 The Earth and the Environment 4
GSC 102 Earth Through Time 4
GSC 199 Earth Science 4
PHY 120 General Physics I  4
PHY 121 General Physics II  4
PHY 125 Brief Introductory Physics*   4
PHY 126 Brief Introductory Physics Lab*   1
PHY 235/236 Mechanics, Heat and Wave Motion/Lab 5
PHY 255/256 Electricity, Magnetism and Light/Lab 5
SCI 101 Introduction to Science I, The Earth System 4
SCI 102 Introduction to Science II, Systems of Communications 4

Social Sciences Category/Hrs
ANT 140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3
ARC 150 Introduction to Archaeology 3
ECO 140 Contemporary Economics 3
ECO 230 Principles of Macroeconomics 3
ECO 231 Principles of Microeconomics 3
EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development*   3
GSC 110 World Geography 3
HIS 201 Modern Europe 3
HIS 221 American Experience to 1865 3
HIS 222 American Experience since 1865 3
POL 140 American National Government 3
POL 250 Introduction to International Relations 3
POL 252 Contemporary Political Systems 3
PSY 180 General Psychology 3
SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology 3
SOC 231 Social Problems 3

Enrichment Electives Category/Hrs
AGR 199 Contemporary Issues in Agriculture 3
CET 199 Environmental Science and Technological Concepts 4
EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education*   3
FIN 230 Personal Financial Planning 3



Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs
All Bachelor of Arts degree candidates should follow the course of University Studies instruction indicated below. The list of University Studies electives is provided above. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 6 hrs
 ENG 101 3
 ENG 102 3
 [or honors course ENG 104 3*]

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin.

•Science and Mathematics: 7-10 hrs
 One science course with lab from 4-5
    list of University Studies electives
 One mathematics course from 3-5
    list of University Studies electives

•Humanities and Fine Arts: 12 hrs
 HUM 211 [or honors course HON 251] 3
 HUM 212 [or honors course HON 252] 3
 Two courses from list of University Studies 6
    electives, Humanities or Fine Arts categories

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3
 One social science course from 3
    list of University Studies electives

•Foreign Language: 12 hrs
The 12 hours must be in one language (excluding 105). If the language is one taught at MSU, college credit can be granted for previously acquired knowledge of a language. The credit will be based on (1) the results of the placement test administered by the Department of Modern Languages, and (2) earning an A or B for the initial language course taken at Murray State. Also refer to the statement in this Bulletin on departmental challenge examinations.
•University Studies Elective: 3 hrs
Choose one course from any category on the list of
   University Studies electives.



Bachelor of Science (B.S., B.S.A., B.S.N., B.S.V.T.E.)

University Studies Requirements 46-51 hrs
All Bachelor of Science degree candidates should follow the course of University Studies instruction indicated below. The list of University Studies electives is printed earlier in this chapter. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 9 hrs
 ENG 101 3
 ENG 102 3
 [or honors course ENG 104 3*]

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin.
 and
 One course from list of University Studies 3
   electives, Communication/Basic Skills or 
 Mathematics categories

•Science and Mathematics: 10-15 hrs
 One science course with lab from 4-5
    list of University Studies electives
 One mathematics course from 3-5
    list of University Studies electives
 One science or mathematics course 3-5
    from list of University Studies electives

•Humanities and Fine Arts: 9 hrs
 HUM 211 [or honors course HON 251] 3
 HUM 212 [or honors course HON 252] 3
 One course from list of University Studies 3
    electives, Humanities or Fine Arts categories

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3
 One social science course from 3
    list of University Studies electives

•University Studies Electives: 9 hrs
Choose from the list of University Studies electives. (No more than two courses from any one University Studies category and no more than one course from the “Enrichment Electives” category.)



Requirements for Other Degrees

Bachelor of Arts in Business (B.A.B.)

University Studies Requirements 53-54 hrs
All Bachelor of Arts in Business degree candidates pursuing an AREA program and all candidates for bachelor’s degrees with a MAJOR in business administration should follow the course of University Studies instruction indicated below. The list of University Studies electives is printed earlier in this chapter. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 6 hrs
 ENG 101 (with a C or better) 3
 ENG 102 (with a C or better) 3

 [or honors course ENG 104 (with a C or better) 3*]

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin.

•Science and Mathematics: 8-9 hrs
 One science course with lab from 4-5
    list of University Studies electives
 MAT 140 4

•Humanities and Fine Arts: 12 hrs
 HUM 211 [or honors course HON 251] 3
 HUM 212 [or honors course HON 252] 3
 Two courses from list of University Studies 6
    electives, Humanities or Fine Arts categories

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3
 ECO 230 3 
•Foreign Language: 12 hrs
The 12 hours must be in one language (excluding 105). If the language is one taught at MSU, college credit can be granted for previously acquired knowledge of a language. The credit will be based on (1) the results of the placement test administered by the Department of Modern Languages, and (2) earning an A or B for the initial language course taken at Murray State. Also refer to the statement in this Bulletin on departmental challenge examinations.
•University Studies Electives: 6 hrs
 ANT 140 or PSY 180 or SOC 133 3
 ECO 231 3

Additional Requirements: 17 hrs
 CIS 243 Business Statistics I 2
 CIS 343 Business Statistics II 2
 COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking 3
 CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology 3
 ECO 310 Issues in the Global Economy 3
 FOR 099 Freshman Orientation 1
 MAT 220 Business Calculus 3



Bachelor of Science in Business (B.S.B.)

University Studies Requirements 44-45 hrs
All Bachelor of Science in Business degree candidates pursuing an AREA program and all candidates for bachelor’s degrees with a MAJOR in business administration should follow the course of University Studies instruction indicated below. The list of University Studies electives is printed earlier in this chapter. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 9 hrs
 ENG 101 (with a C or better) 3
 ENG 102 (with a C or better) 3

 [or honors course ENG 104 (with a C or better) 3*]

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin.
 COM 161 3

•Science and Mathematics: 11-12 hrs
 One science course with lab from 4-5
    list of University Studies electives
 MAT 140 4
 MAT 220 3

•Humanities and Fine Arts: 9 hrs
 HUM 211 [or honors course HON 251] 3
 HUM 212 [or honors course HON 252] 3
 One course from list of University Studies 3
    electives, Humanities or Fine Arts categories

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3
 ECO 230 3

•University Studies Electives: 6 hrs
 ANT 140 or PSY 180 or SOC 133 3
 ECO 231 3

Additional Requirements: 20 hrs
 CIS 243 Business Statistics I 2
 CIS 343 Business Statistics II 2
 CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology 3
 ECO 310 Issues in the Global Economy 3
 FOR 099 Freshman Orientation 1
 Non-business electives 9



Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

University Studies Requirements 43-46 hrs
All Bachelor of Fine Arts degree candidates should follow the distribution requirements outlined below. Courses for each category should be chosen from the list of University Studies electives, printed earlier in this chapter. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 9 hrs
 ENG 101 3
 ENG 102 3
 [or honors course ENG 104 3*]

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin. 
 Communication and Basic Skills elective 3

•Science and Mathematics: 7-10 hrs
 One science course with lab from 4-5
    list of University Studies electives
 One mathematics course from 3-5
    list of University Studies electives

•Humanities and Fine Arts: 9 hrs
 HUM 211 [or honors course HON 251] 3
 HUM 212 [or honors course HON 252] 3
 ART  211 3

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3
 One social science course from 3
    list of University Studies electives

•University Studies Electives: 9 hrs
ART 212 3
Two courses chosen from the list of University 6
   Studies electives (no more than one course from
   the “Enrichment Electives” category and no more
   than one course from the “Fine Arts” category).



Bachelor of Music  (B.M.) - Performance Option

University Studies Requirements 30-32 hrs
All Bachelor of Music Education degree candidates should follow the distribution requirements outlined below. Courses for each category should be chosen from the list of University Studies electives, printed earlier in this chapter. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 12-14 hrs
A student with an enhanced English ACT score of 16 or less must enroll in ENG 100. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements.
 ENG 101 3
 ENG 102 3
 [or honors course ENG 104*]
 COM 181 3
 One mathematics course from 3-5
    list of University Studies electives

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin. 

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3

•Foreign Language: 12 hrs
The 12 hours must be in one language (excluding 105). If the language is one taught at MSU, college credit can be granted for previously acquired knowledge of a language. The credit will be based on (1) the results of the placement test administered by the Department of Modern Languages, and (2) earning an A or B for the initial language course taken at Murray State. Also refer to the statement in this Bulletin on departmental challenge examinations.

Bachelor of Music (B.M.) - Certification Options
University Studies Requirements 37 hrs
All Bachelor of Music degree candidates should follow the distribution requirements outlined below. Courses for each category should be chosen from the list of University Studies electives, printed in this chapter before the outlines of all degree programs.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 12 hrs
 ENG 101 31
 ENG 102 31
 [or honors course ENG 104*]
 COM 161 32
 CSC 199 32

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin. 

•Humanities and Fine Arts: 6 hrs
 HUM 211 [or honors course HON 251] 3
 HUM 212 [or honors course HON 252] 3

•Science and Mathematics: 7 hrs
 One science course with lab from list of University
    Studies electives 4
 One mathematics course from list of University Studies
    electives courses 32

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3
 PSY 180 3

•University Studies Elective: 6 hrs
 Required elective from list of University Studies 3

 1Certification requires a grade of B or better in one composition course.
 2Certification requires a grade of C or better in the specific courses and in one University Studies math course.



Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)

University Studies Requirements 49-55 hrs
All Bachelor of Social Work degree candidates should follow the course of University Studies instruction indicated below. The list of University Studies electives is printed earlier in this chapter. Students pursuing the B.S.W. degree have the option of taking a Foreign Language as part of their University Studies electives. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

•Communication and Basic Skills: 6-9 hrs
 ENG 101 3
 ENG 102 3
 [or honors course ENG 104 3*]

*ENG 104 (Honors Composition and Research) completes the university composition requirement but must be supplemented with three credit hours earned by (1) examination or placement credit for ENG 101 or by (2) completing any other elective University Studies course. An enrolled student with a minimum enhanced English ACT score of 27 will be considered for three credit hours for ENG 101 if they write an essay to be assessed by the Department of English and apply for the credit through the departmental challenge procedure explained elsewhere in this Bulletin. 

 One course from the list of University Studies electives. A communication/basic skills course is required if the
  student is not taking the Foreign Language option.

•Science and Mathematics: 10-15 hrs
 BIO 101 4
 One mathematics course for the list of University
    Studies electives 3
 One science or mathematics course from the list of
    University Studies electives  3
 (if the student is not taking the Foreign Language
    option).

•Humanities and Fine Arts: 9-12 hrs
 HUM 211 [or honors course HON 251] 3
 HUM 212 [or honors course HON 252] 3
 One course from the list of University Studies electives,    Humanities or Fine Arts categories    3
 (if the student is not taking the Foreign Language 
  option).
If the student is taking the Foreign Language option (12 hours in one language), he/she must take:
 Two courses from list of University Studies 6
    electives, Humanities or Fine Arts categories

•Social Sciences: 9 hrs
 CIV 101 [or honors course HON 151] 3
 CIV 102 [or honors course HON 152] 3
 ECO 140 3
All of the following are required, but only two of these may count toward University Studies Electives.
 POL 140 3
 PSY 180 3
 SOC 133 3

•Foreign Language: (optional) 12 hrs
The 12 hours must be in one language (excluding 105). If the language is one taught at MSU, college credit can be granted for previously acquired knowledge of a language. The credit will be based on (1) the results of the placement test administered by the Department of Modern Languages, and (2) earning an A or B for the initial language course taken at Murray State. Also refer to the statement in this Bulletin on departmental challenge examinations.

•University Studies Electives: 3-9 hrs
 Choose from the list of University Studies electives. (No more than two courses from any one category, and no more than one course from the “Enrichment Electives” category.) If the student is taking the Foreign Language option, he/she takes 3 hours of University Studies electives; if the student is not taking the Foreign Language option, he/she take 9 hours of University Studies electives.



Special Degree Programs

Associate Degree Programs
Programs of study leading to associate degrees are offered through the departments in the following colleges. Please see the appropriate collegiate section of this bulletin for additional details.

Associate Degrees (A.A., A.S., A.A.S., and A.S.V.T.E.) 
 A minimum of 18 semester hours of University Studies courses must be completed for all associate degrees. These must include ENG 101 and 102 and at least one course from each of the following University Studies categories:  Science and Mathematics, Humanities and Fine Arts, Social Sciences, and one additional course from any of the University Studies categories. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

Center for Continuing Education and Academic Outreach
 A.A. General Studies

College of Business and Public Affairs
 A.A.S. Telecommunications Systems Management
•Department of Management, Marketing and Business Administration 
A.A. Business Administration
A.A. Office Systems - Legal Assistant
A.A. Office Systems - Office Information Systems

College of Education
 •Department of Early Childhood and Elementary Education
A.S. Child Development
•Department of Adolescent, Career and Special Education 
A.S. Vocational Technical Education Trade and Industrial

College of Science, Engineering and Technology
•Department of Industrial and Engineering Technology
A.A.S. Telecommunications Systems Management
A.S. Civil Engineering Technology
A.S. Drafting and Design Technology 
     Architectural/Construction Option
A.S. Drafting and Design Technology 
     General Option
A.S. Environmental Engineering Technology
A.S. Graphic Communications Technology
A.S. Industrial Technology  Industrial Option
A.S. Industrial Technology
     Industrial Processes Option
A.S. Mechanical Engineering Technology

School of Agriculture
 A.S. Agricultural Science and Technology


Bachelor of Independent Studies (B.I.S.) Degree
The Bachelor of Independent Studies (B.I.S.) serves experienced adult students whose opportunities to attend classes are limited. Correspondence, television, portfolio and departmental challenge credits may be earned.

The B.I.S. degree provides exposure to a liberal arts curriculum supported by research methods and completion of a field of study project. At the completion of studies, the adult student will be one who has “learned how to continue learning” through exposure to liberal studies and by demonstrating methods for acquiring knowledge. The B.I.S. degree represents the Murray State University philosophy of serving the adult learner with programs which help eliminate barriers to participation in traditional higher education curricula. To apply for this program, a student must have at least 60 semester hours of degree credit or permission of the dean of Continuing Education. Transfer and readmission requirements are specified in Chapter 2 of this Bulletin. 

Bachelor of Independent Studies (B.I.S.)

 See Chapter 11 for full details on this nontraditional degree program. Refer to the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses found earlier in this chapter for additional required courses.

Baccalaureate Curriculum Combined with Dentistry, Engineering, Medicine or Veterinary Science
A student who completes three years (96 semester hours) of appropriate pre-professional courses at Murray State and then enters an accredited professional school to pursue an advanced degree in dentistry, engineering, medicine or veterinary science may apply the courses from the first year of professional school (up to 32 semester hours) toward a Murray State baccalaureate degree. All Murray State University Studies, departmental, and other graduation requirements must be met. 

Liberal Arts 
 The Liberal Arts major is a response to the needs of our society for leaders who can think creatively across the lines of traditional disciplines. It also addresses the growing demand of leaders in business, industry and the professions for broadly educated students who have a command of interpersonal skills, analytical and writing abilities, as well as technical skills necessary for particular jobs.

The program is designed to help students who are interested in investigating connections between two traditional liberal arts fields. Liberal Arts majors take core courses in ethics, art history, sociology and biology. Following this, students select concentrations in two of seventeen possible fields of study in the arts, sciences, social sciences, or humanities. Students selecting a Liberal Arts major are expected to write a senior thesis in which they address their subject from the perspective of their chosen areas of study.

Graduates with a major in Liberal Arts will be able to:
•Demonstrate an ability to read and interpret texts from several disciplines and to write prose that is clear, correct, convincing and of high quality; demonstrate an ability to speak clearly, correctly, and persuasively in both formal and informal group settings;
•Demonstrate an ability to listen to others, an openness to new ideas and to cultural diversity, a tolerance of ambiguity, and an ability to think critically in real-life problem-solving situations;
•Demonstrate leadership ability an appropriate interpersonal skills and ability to interact knowledgeably with a global community;
•Demonstrate a knowledge base in chosen fields of study that includes an awareness of how those disciplines have developed in their historical, cultural, literary, and/or philosophical contexts;
•Demonstrate an ability to think, write, and speak comparatively and analytically across disciplines; demonstrate an ability to apply what he or she has learned to the occupation or vocation he or she intends to pursue. 



MAJOR:
Liberal Arts

Bachelor of Arts Degree
CIP 24.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

University Studies selections must include:
•Fine Arts:
MUS 105 Survey of Music History and Literature 
 or
THD 104 The Theatrical Experience
•Humanities:
ENG 201 Appreciation of Literature 
 or
RGS 200 Introduction to Religious Phenomena
•Mathematics:
MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
•Sciences:
CHE 105 General College Chemistry 
 or
GSC 101 The Earth and the Environment
•Social Sciences:
ANT 140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 
 or
HIS 222 American Experience Since 1986 
 or
PSY 180 General Psychology

Core Courses 13 hrs
ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II
BIO 101 Biological Concepts
PHI 202 Ethics
SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology

Major Concentrations(1)  36-40 hrs
 Choose two concentrations from the six areas listed below. No more than one concentration can be taken from the same area. Courses in each concentration are on file in the Registrar’s office.

•Fine Arts
 Art History 18 
 Music 19
 Theatre 18

•Humanities
 English 18
 Modern Language (one language) 18
 Philosophy 18

•Natural Science/Mathematics
 Biology 18
 Chemistry 19
 Geosciences 19-20
 Mathematics 19-20
 Physical Science 18-21

•Social Science
 Economics 18
 History 18
 International Affairs 18-19
 Political Science 18
 Psychology 18-19
 Sociology 18

•Multicultural, Class and Gender Studies  18

•Interdisciplinary Studies  18
 With the approval of a faculty advisor, the director of the program, and the Dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, a concentration will be created such as European Studies, Rural Studies, or Race and Gender Studies, using in each case courses designated within each liberal arts concentration.

Required Course 3 hrs
LBA 438 Seminar in Liberal Arts

Internship 0-6 hrs
 Liberal Arts majors are strongly encouraged to arrange an internship, to be approved by the faculty advisor and by an interdisciplinary committee of three faculty members selected by the Director of the Liberal Arts Program. This internship will help the student further develop leadership skills by working in a business, industry, or government setting that requires strong written and oral communication and interpersonal skills, good judgement, and careful analysis.

Foreign Study 3-6 hrs
 Liberal Arts majors are required to participate in one of the study abroad programs or take advantage of other pre-approved, explicitly cross-cultural experiences offered by or at Murray State; this is designed to increase the student’s cross-cultural and global awareness, self-confidence, and leadership ability.

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-144

 1At least 42 hours must be taken at the 300-500 level.


Telecommunications Systems Management 
 Telecommunications systems are networks of leading-edge technologies such as fiber optic systems, satellites, wireless, telephony, and cable, which are connected to computers that allow organizations and individuals throughout business and industry to communicate instantaneously around the world. Telecommunications systems provide the architectural structure for such activities as electronic commerce, electronic banking, video teleconferencing, distance learning, telemedicine, data interchange, on-demand video, and a host of other traditional and new uses for business and industry.

The Baccalaureate program provides students specialization options within the curriculum. Students in the Baccalaureate program will have the insight and ability to function in all areas of Telecommunications Systems Management (TSM) but will choose a program option that will support the aspect of management which interests them most - the physical system and its components, the software that drives the system, or the business structure and operations that depend on the system. In addition, they will be prepared to move on to the Master of Science in the field of Telecommunications Systems Management if they so choose.

The Associate of Applied Science Degree and the Bachelor of Science Degree with an area in Telecommunications Systems Management are interdisciplinary programs drawing upon the strengths of the College of Business and Public Affairs and the College of Science, Engineering and Technology. These programs which are jointly administered by the two colleges provide students a unique opportunity to develop both technical expertise and management expertise in this dynamic field.


AREA:
Telecommunications Systems Management

Bachelor of Science
CIP 11. 0401

University Studies Requirements 49 hrs
(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:
•Communication and Basic Skills:
COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking
•Science and Mathematics:
MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
MAT 150 Algebra and Trigonometry
PHY 120 General Physics I
•Social Science:
ECO 231 Principles of Microeconomics
•University Studies Electives:
CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology

Required Courses 59 hrs
ACC  200 Principles of Accounting I
ACC 201 Principles of Accounting II
CIS 304 Principles of Information Systems Analysis 
     and Design
CIS 307 Database Design and Implementation
CSC 135 Programming for Business and Industry
 or
CSC 145 Introduction to Programming I
ECO 335 Economics and Public Policy of Telecommunications Industry
FIN 330 Principles of Finance
MGT 350 Fundamentals of Management
MKT 360 Principles of Marketing
TSM 099 Freshman Orientation-Introduction to the Profession
TSM 118 Telecommunications Electronics I
TSM 120 Introduction to Telecommunications
TSM 132 Network Technical Support
TSM 218 Telecommunications Electronics II
TSM 232 Network Operating Systems
TSM 241 Network Essentials and Hardware
TSM 343 Protocol Analysis
TSM 380 Internship1
 or
TSM 488 Cooperative Education1
TSM 443 Telephone Technology
TSM 450 Telecommunications Policy and Strategies

 1Maximum of three hours Internship or Cooperative Education counts toward a degree.

Selected Emphasis 24 hrs
 Select two of the following emphases:

Business Technology and E-Business Applications
BPA 355 Information Systems and Decision Making
CIS 430 Systems Planning
MGT 443 Management of Operations and Technology
MKT 475 Marketing Strategies in E-Commerce

Communications Electronics
TSM 210 Electronic Systems II
TSM 341 Communications Electronics I
TSM  342 Communications Electronics II

Industrial Networking
EMT 310 Programmable Logic Controllers
EMT 312 Industrial Instrumentation
EMT 455 Manufacturing Control Systems

Network Security
TSM 340 Information Security Management
TSM 352 System Security
TSM 353 Network Security
TSM 440 Information Policy and Security Auditing

System Administration
CSC 310 Database Administration
CSC 360 Scripting Languages
CSC 560 UNIX System Administration
TSM 411 Network Design, Operations, and Management

Total Curriculum Requirements 132 hrs


ASSOCIATE:
Telecommunications Systems Management

Associate of Applied Science Degree
CIP 11. 0401

University Studies Requirements  28-29 hrs
(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)
University Studies selections must include:
•Communication and Basic Skills:
COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking
•Science and Mathematics:
MAT  135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics
MAT 150 Algebra and Trigonometry
PHY 120 General Physics I
 or
PHY 235 Mechanics, Heat and Wave Motion
 and
PHY 236 Mechanics, Heat and Wave Motion Laboratory
•Social Science:
ECO 231 Principles of Microeconomics

Required Courses 34 hrs 
ACC 200 Principles of Accounting I
CSC 135 Computer Programming for Technology 
ECO 335 Economics and Public Policy of
     Telecommunications Industry
ENG 224 Technical Writing for Industry Technology
TSM 099 Freshman Orientation-Introduction to the Profession
TSM 110 Electrical Systems
TSM 120 Introduction to Telecommunications
TSM 210 Electrical Systems II
TSM 219 Electronic Skills Lab
TSM  241 Network Essentials and Hardware
TSM  242 Network Operating Systems

Electives  3 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 65-66 hrs 

Telecommunications Systems Minor 21 hrs
TSM 120, 241, 242 plus one of the following options:  Systems-CSC 135, 235, 508, 560 and TSM 511; E-Commerce-CSC 135, 235, MKT 360, 475, TSM 325 and 425; or Business-ACC 200, 201, FIN 531, MGT 443 and MKT 475. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State.


General Studies
The Associate of Arts in General Studies is a degree for special populations and includes the following course requirements. 


ASSOCIATE:
General Studies

Associate of Arts Degree
CIP 24.0101

University Studies Requirements 45 hrs
(see Chapter 4 for approved University Studies selections and the section on Mandatory Developmental Courses.)

ENG 101 Composition
ENG 102 Composition and Research
(or honors course ENG 104)

Select the courses from the categories indicated below from the approved list of University Studies courses in Chapter 4. No more than two courses in any one discipline may be taken within any one University Studies category  for the purpose of fulfilling University Studies requirements.

•Science and Mathematics: 12
•Humanities and Fine Arts: 12
•Social Sciences: 12
•Elective from any University Studies category 3

Approved Electives 19 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 64 hrs
 

Pre-Professional Curricula
The university offers baccalaureate programs that serve as pre-professional curricula for the professional areas listed below. Students interested in the details of a specific program should consult with the advisor listed.
• Architecture:  William Whitaker, Professional Engineer, Department of Industrial and Engineering Technology.
• Dentistry:  Dr. Timothy Johnston, Department of Biological Sciences, and Dr. Ricky Cox, Department of Chemistry.
• Engineering:  Dr. Stephen Cobb, Professional Engineer, Department of Physics and Engineering; Dr. Steven Schneiderman, Professional Engineer, Department of Industrial and Engineering Technology.
• Law:  Dr. Frank Julian or Dr. Joseph Chaney, Department of Government, Law and International Affairs; Dr. Ken Wolf, Department of History.
• Medical Technology:  Dr. James Stuart, Department of Biological Sciences.
• Medicine:  Dr. Sterling Wright, Department of Biological Sciences; and Dr. Ricky Cox, Dr. Jin Liu, and Dr. Robert Volp, Department of Chemistry.
• Pharmacy:  Dr. Leon Duobinis-Gray, Department of Biological Sciences; Dr. David Owen, Department of Chemistry.
• Physical Therapy:  Dr. Terry Derting and Dr. Claire Fuller, Department of Biological Sciences.
• Speech-Language Pathology:  Dr. Jo Ann Hammons, Department of Wellness and Therapeutic Sciences.
• Veterinary Medicine:  Dr. Terry Canerdy, School of Agriculture.

Teacher Certification
Requirements for teacher certification in all subject areas are determined by the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board (KEPSB). Changes in state regulations frequently occur after the printing of a Bulletin and thus may supersede statements contained herein. Students are cautioned to consult with appropriate advisors in planning academic programs to be sure of adhering to current state certification standards. Students in all teacher certification programs are required to be formally admitted to teacher education. The office of Teacher Education Services, 2101 Alexander Hall, manages this process. Most students will initiate the process of admission by enrolling in EDU 103. Transfer students can initiate the process directly through Teacher Education Services immediately after enrolling at Murray State University.

Students planning to be certified in any area may prepare for admission to teacher education by completing the following prerequisites: (1) taking the ACT examination or other state-approved examination to demonstrate general academic proficiency; (2) completing an introduction to psychology course (PSY 180); (3) completing the personal health requirement (HEA 191); (4) completing composition course with B or higher (ENG 101 or ENG 102); (5) completing basic public speaking course with C or higher (COM 161); (6) completing MAT 117 (or higher level math course) with C or higher; (7) completing a general introduction to computing course with a C or better (CSC 199); (8) earning a minimum grade point average of 2.45* (4.00 grading scale). More specific information on teacher certification can be found in Chapter 6, College of Education.
*A grade point average of 2.45 is rounded to 2.50 by adhering to the Kentucky Education Professional Standards Board’s (EPSB) rounding policy.

Other Academic Programs
Community College
The purpose of the Murray State Community College is to further the objectives of Murray State University by providing quality programs of technical and University Studies. Specialized programs of study directly applicable to professions in both technical and highly skilled fields are offered through the community college.

These programs lead to the associate degree and are designed for high school graduates who consider it desirable to pursue a program of this nature. Associate programs require two years for completion and are designed to give the student the necessary skills that are needed in today’s commercial world.

General information. Students enrolled in associate degree programs have the same privileges as other undergraduate students. Students are eligible for financial aid in the form of loans, work study grants, and in some cases special scholarships. Students receiving associate degrees are eligible to apply their work taken at Murray State toward a baccalaureate degree.

Entrance requirements for students enrolled in the community college are the same as those that apply to other undergraduate students.

For detailed information write Murray State Community College, PO Box 9, Murray KY 42071-0009, or contact the academic college or department offering the degree.

Cooperative Education
As a complement to the placement process, the Career Services Office offers to qualified students an opportunity to participate in the cooperative education program. This program is designed to provide students with specific periods of work experience related to their chosen education and career objectives. The extension of classroom study to practice in a profession adds a unique dimension to the student’s preparation for entering a career. Cooperative education assignments assist students in developing an understanding of human relationships involved in the work setting.

By participating in the co-op program, students have the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge learned in the classroom to actual on-the-job experience while gaining up to three hours of course credit. A co-op must be a full-time, paid, career-related position. A student can elect to co-op for a summer, a semester or an academic year. To be eligible for a co-op a student must have at least a 2.3 cumulative GPA and be enrolled at MSU the semester prior to the co-op work assignment. Enrollment in cooperative education courses must be concurrent with employment. For placement information, see Chapter 1.

Cooperative education assignments are made in businesses, industries, research organizations, educational institutions, and governmental agencies located throughout the United States. The university makes no guarantee as to practice assignments or earnings, but makes every effort to place students to their best educational advantage. No more than nine hours credit in cooperative education courses will apply toward minimum graduation requirements with further restrictions in some programs.

Service Learning Program
 Murray State University students may pursue a special designation on their transcripts indicating that they have been involved in community service through Service Learning.

Service Learning uses experiential learning techniques to combine community service with specific learning objectives in a course. Through Service Learning students  perform meaningful service to the community while engaging in a study that is related to that service. Philosophically, service learning reflects the belief that education should be connected to values, character, and social responsibility.
· Students learn and develop through active participation in carefully organized service experiences that meet actual community needs and that are coordinated in collaboration with the school and the community.
· The instructional method is integrated into the academic curriculum and provides time for students to reflect on their activities through small group discussions, class activities, and journal writing.
· Students have opportunities to use newly acquired knowledge and skills in actual community situations.
· The lessons taught in the classroom and extended into the communities help students develop a sense of caring and responsibility for others (National Community Service Act, 1990).

Service Learning Scholars Designation. For students to earn recognition as a Service Learning Scholar they need to complete twelve (12) hours of credit in Service Learning designated courses. Additionally, the student must have an overall GPA of 2.75 and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the designated classes. This designation will be recognized on the student’s transcript and the students will receive Service Learning Scholar recognition on Honors Day.

Honors Program
The Honors Program offers a unique educational experience designed to teach able students how to learn, how to think critically and creatively, and how to communicate effectively. Students with evidence of high achievement may qualify for the Murray State Honors Program. This program has been designed to provide future social and professional leaders with exceptional thinking and communication skills, an appropriate breadth and depth of knowledge, and a sense of cultural and social responsibility.

Entering freshmen with an ACT/SAT composite score of 26 or above and exceptional high school records are invited to apply for admission to the Honors Program. Acceptance is based on such factors as standardized test scores, grade point average, evidence of creative and leadership abilities as displayed in extracurricular interests and activities, and faculty recommendations.

Accepted students must participate in at least one Honors Seminar a semester until the sequence is complete unless arrangements are made with the honors director. In order to receive an honors diploma, an honors student must complete the honors sequence described below, fulfill the required competencies, maintain a 3.2 grade point average and satisfy all Murray State graduation requirements including the completion of an area or a major and minor. In the programs they choose, honors students will be expected to select the more challenging courses offered.

The Honors Program encourages intellectual exchange among students, professors, and visiting scholars. Ample opportunity is provided for dialogue.

The hallmarks of the Honors Program are small class size and the resulting individual attention available to its students. Professors and guest lecturers are readily available to all students in developing a full understanding of the course materials. The faculty are selected partly on the basis of their commitment to fostering productive, interactive intellectual contact with students.

Honors Sequence
 Important:  Read course descriptions for specific course limitations.

ENG 104  Honors Composition and Research 3 hrs
Note:  This course is required even if a student receives credit for ENG 101-102. ENG 204 or ENG 404 may be substituted for the above with permission of the Honors Program director.

HON 151-152 Honors Seminar in Social Science 6 hrs
(fulfills a University Studies requirement)

Two of the following four courses: 6 hrs
HON 161  Honors Seminar in Visual Arts* 
HON 162 Honors Seminar in Music*
HON 163 Honors Seminar in Theatre*
HON 164 Honors Seminar in Arts and Culture Abroad*
*Fulfills six hours University Studies elective credit in the
 fine arts category.

HON 251-252 Honors Seminar 
  in Literature and Philosophy 6 hrs 
(fulfills a University Studies requirement)

HON 261-262 Honors Seminar in Science 4 hrs
(Prerequisites:  Two courses from the science category as listed in the University Studies electives or their AP or CLEP equivalents.)

HON 351  Honors Seminar in International Affairs 2 hrs

Year, Semester, or Summer Study Abroad Program 3 hrs

If circumstances make the honors student unable to comply with this requirement, an alternative program of interdisciplinary international studies will be developed.

Senior Honors Thesis 3 hrs

Honors students must maintain a 3.20 cumulative grade point average to remain enrolled in the program and to graduate with Honors after fulfilling all requirements.

Honors Competencies
Mathematics. The student is expected to complete the mathematics University Studies requirement as identified in the student’s major discipline.
Foreign Language. The student must have credit for a 12-hour sequence (excluding 105) in one foreign language. 
Meeting the competencies in mathematics and foreign languages through Murray State courses or challenge exams will provide 7-15 hours University Studies credit.

International Programs
 International Education Policy. The mission of Murray State University includes as a priority the commitment to international education in order to prepare students to function in an increasingly interdependent world. Through its Institute for International Studies and related efforts, the university supports and encourages the development of international content across the curriculum, the provision of opportunities for international experience for both students and faculty, the active and continuous exploration of international issues on campus, and the meaningful involvement in the life of the university of international students and scholars.

Institute for International Studies. The Institute for International Studies (IIS) was designated in 1998 for the unified coordination of international programs and activities at Murray State University. Evolving from the separately created Center for International Programs (1981) and the English Language Institute (1993), IIS supports Murray State’s commitment to international education as an integral dimension of the university experience. IIS provides the following services to students, faculty and the community:
· Assistance to International Students and Scholars. A full-time international student advisor provides assistance in addressing the academic, personal, intercultural, and immigration needs of international students. Additionally, IIS provides students, research scholars and visiting faculty with orientation programs, immigration advising; and cultural enrichment activities. The International Student Organization offers an active, caring community of support for almost 500 students from more than 60 countries.
· Information Clearinghouse. The institute maintains a library of materials on study, work, research, teaching and travel abroad. IIS publishes brochures and announcements of study and teaching abroad opportunities, and newsletters on international programs. An international speakers bureau serves as a resource to regional public schools in support of KERA, while events are publicized by press releases and the web site’s calendar.
· Special Program Development. IIS is involved in initiating special programs with an international emphasis. Internal and external groups can work to develop programs to support their specific interests. These have ranged from lecture series to longer curricular programs designed for language study, ESL training, or professional development.
· Curriculum Support. With IIS support, the university has also developed and refined a international affairs curriculum on campus, initiated an English-as-a-Second-Language Program, created professional development seminars abroad, supported the development of a graduate TESOL program, and worked toward the creation of degree programs abroad. 
· English-as-a-Second Language Program. The ESL Program prepares nonnative speakers of English for full-time study at Murray State or other North American schools. Through careful assessment, intensive instruction, and out-of-class activities such as field trips, seminars, and a mentoring program, international students receive the personal attention they need to advance their English skills. For more information, see the section on International Student Admission in Chapter 2.
· Study Abroad. Through IIS, Murray State University maintains cooperative agreements with institutions in 10 countries as well as consortial membership with three organizations, which provide international experience and education for its students. Each year, through these various venues, MSU students may select from over 30 study abroad program sites. Because new programs are always being reviewed and added, students interested in study abroad may inquire at any time at IIS for information, or they may visit the Study Abroad Resource Room (170 Woods Hall) at their leisure.

Cooperative Center for Study Abroad (CCSA). As a member of CCSA, MSU provides several options for study in English-speaking countries including winter break, summer, and fall semester programs. These programs involve formal academic coursework, excursions and independent travel.
International Business Seminars (IBS). Business students may participate in one of several multi-country business seminars in Europe. The seminars, offered during  winter and summer academic breaks, focus on marketing and management.

Kentucky Institute for International Studies (KIIS). Murray State is headquarters of the Kentucky Institute for International Studies. KIIS provides students with several options for study in non-English speaking countries including summer sessions and semester sessions in both the fall and spring. These programs involve formal academic course work, independent study, travel and the option for language study. Students on campus may visit KIIS offices in 312 Faculty Hall.

Kentucky Virtual University
 Murray State University participates in the Kentucky Virtual University, a consortium of Kentucky institutions providing courses and degree programs via the Internet. For more information, call toll-free:  877-588-5288, or use the web site:  www.kyvu.org.

National Student Exchange
The National Student Exchange program provides a wonderful opportunity for MSU students to attend another college or university in the United States, Puerto Rico or the Virgin Islands for up to one full calendar year. This unique program allows students to take classes at a host campus and place those same classes on their MSU transcripts following the exchange. Although students register at Murray State and pay tuition at the Murray State rate, the courses taken are transfer credit. Contact the Career Services Office for more details.

Presidential Scholars Studies Program
Those students designated as presidential scholars may follow an interdisciplinary studies major to satisfy degree requirements. This program is structured to the individual student’s needs and may not necessarily conform to the standard curricular requirements. The individual student’s program must be approved by the Honors Program director as well as the departmental advisor.

Scholarships. This program is for graduating high school seniors of exceptional ability. Applicants should rank in the upper ten percent of their class and have a minimum ACT composite score of 28. In addition to excellent academic records, they must have demonstrated leadership abilities. An on-campus interview is required as part of the final selection process. This scholarship includes instate tuition (no course/health fees), 10 -meal board plan, and a semiprivate residential college room. This award is renewable for three additional years or graduation , provided specified academic standards are met. Before graduation, a Presidential Scholar must enroll in and successfully complete at least one Honors seminar each semester. A Presidential Scholar is not required to complete the University Studies requirements but is required to complete the Honors Seminar sequence, the prerequisites for HON 261-262, and the courses required within his or her major. However, any student who gives up or loses their Presidential Scholarship, must complete University Studies requirements for graduation. Presidential Scholars must maintain a 3.20 grade point average in order to retain the scholarship. They are also expected to live on campus. They are encouraged to earn the Honors Diploma and are permitted to develop less structured, more challenging programs of study that will increase their opportunities for achievement. They must complete five hours of volunteer service hours per week.

University Scholars
Approximately fifty scholarships, each a four-year full-tuition (no course/health fees) award, are offered to qualifying students. Recipients must be National Merit Semi-Finalists or have a minimum enhanced composite ACT score of 27 and rank in the top ten percent of their class. University Scholars are eligible to participate in the Honors Program.

Academic Regulations
Academic Honesty
(Adopted by Board of Regents, February 14, 1975)
Cheating, plagiarism (submitting another person’s material as one’s own), or doing work for another person which will receive academic credit are all impermissible. This includes the use of unauthorized books, notebooks, or other sources in order to secure or give help during an examination, the unauthorized copying of examinations, assignments, reports, or term papers, or the presentation of unacknowledged material as if it were the student’s own work. Disciplinary action may be taken beyond the academic discipline administered by the faculty member who teaches the course in which the cheating took place.
Note:  Faculty reserve the right to invalidate any examination or other evaluative measures if substantial evidence exists that the integrity of the examination has been compromised.

Attendance
 Students are expected to attend all classes in which they are enrolled for credit or audit purposes. An instructor may establish attendance policies for each class so long as they: (1) are clearly published in the course syllabus, (2) distinguish between excused and unexcused absences and (3) are consistent with university policies as outlined in this Bulletin.

Excused absences fall into two broad categories: 
 1. Absence due to personal illness or death in the immediate family or other extraordinary personal circumstance. Faculty may require appropriate authentication or documentation. 
 2. Absence due to student participation in a University Sanctioned Event in which the student serves as a representative of the institution. 
 University Sanctioned Events shall include those officially scheduled activities (practice and training sessions NOT included) related to intercollegiate athletics, performing groups, and teams who represent the university in debate, forensics or other academic competitions. Other activities and events may be added to this listing upon recommendation of the Sanctioned Events Committee and approval by the Provost. This committee shall consist of the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Director of Athletics, the Faculty Senate President,  a student appointed by the President of the Student Government Association, and the Provost or his designee. The official list of approved, sanctioned activities and events shall be maintained in the Office of the Provost.
 Attendance and participation in class activities is essential to success in college. Absences, for whatever purposes, can potentially undermine the shared goal of student learning. In cases where student absences are clearly unavoidable, it is essential that students and faculty alike approach the resolution of the difficulty with a clear commitment to the mutual goal of student learning.
 Responsibilities of Students: Students missing class(es) as a result of activities covered above shall notify the instructor in writing at the beginning of the semester and, in the case of scheduled events, this notification shall not be less than one week prior to the absence. Students with excused absences are excused from class attendance but are not excused from work assigned or expected as a part of that class period. Students, in conjunction with each course instructor, are required to develop a plan for alternative assignments or the make-up of all work missed and must complete this work within a time frame mutually agreed upon with the instructor.
 Responsibilities of Faculty:  Faculty are expected to plan with students who have excused absences to develop alternatives and make-up assignments. Such alternatives are not expected to diminish faculty expectations of students, nor may they reduce opportunities for students to demonstrate performance.
 Responsibilities of Others: Deans and department chairs share the responsibility for insuring proper orientation of all full and part-time faculty regarding the provisions of this policy. Administrators, sponsors and coaches of various student activities share an important role in ensuring that students understand their responsibilities with respect to this aspect of student performance. Specific guidelines and procedures should be developed for each sport or activity to ensure timely communication between students and faculty. Advance lists of varsity/participating students along with schedules of away or off-campus activities or matches should be provided to students so that they, in turn, can share this information with faculty at the beginning of the semester.
 Questions and Appeals:  In the event of questions or concerns regarding the implementation of this policy in specific classroom situations, students and faculty should be guided by the following:
 1. If there is a question regarding whether a specific activity is an officially sanctioned event for which terms of this policy might apply, the inquiry should be addressed to the Office of the Provost.
 2. In the event a student is concerned with the implementation of this policy in a specific course, the student should try to resolve the matter by discussing it first with the instructor, then with the department chair, and if resolution is still not reached, then with the collegiate dean. If the matter is not settled through this process, the student may seek resolution through the appropriate collegiate grievance/appeal process.
 3. Instances of student abuse or violation of the terms of this policy should be reported to the dean or director responsible for the sanctioned event and to the Vice President for Student Affairs.

Term
Murray State University operates on a semester system, with one hour of credit equal to 15 50-minute sessions of lecture or 30 50-minute sessions of laboratory. Each academic year consists of a fall term which begins in August, a spring term which begins in January, and a summer term which begins in May and includes several sessions of varying durations.

Grades
The following system of grades is used for the evaluation of course work, with a 4.00 grading scale used to determine grade point average:
A Exceptionally high quality; valued at four points for each credit.
B Good; valued at three points for each credit.
C Satisfactory; valued at two points for each credit.
D Poor; valed at one point for each credit
E Failure, no credit; valued at no points but counted as hours attempted.
P Pass; credit valued at no points and no hours attempted. (Used only for departmental challenge and officially approved pass/fail courses as stipulated in the course description section of this bulletin).
AU..Audit; no credit. (Requires instructor’s approval).
I Incomplete; computed as hours attempted and no quality points.
R A grade to be used in restricted approved instances in specific approved courses to denote either completion of a course for which credit is deferred until additional course work is completed, or that the course must be repeated.
X Absent from final examination; computed as hours attempted and no quality points.
W Withdrawn; no hours attempted and no quality points. (Only may be assigned to eligible students who have officially dropped courses or withdrawn from MSU by published deadlines).
WP..Withdrawn Passing; no hours attempted and no quality points. (Only assigned to applicable students who completed withdrawal from MSU after the last day to receive a W).
WE..Withdrawn Failing; computed as hours attempted and no quality points. (Only assigned to applicable students who completed withdrawal from MSU after the last day to receive a W).

Students may not complete extra work in order to changes a grade of A, B, C, D, or E once the grade has been recorded.
Grades of E, WE, I, or X affect a student’s grade point average negatively. A student who receives I or X grades and fails to enroll at Murray State within one calendar year from the end of the term in which such grades were received will forfeit the privilege of making up the incomplete course work or examinations for those courses.

A grade of I (incomplete) means that some relatively small part of the term’s work remains undone because of sickness or other reason satisfactory to the instructor. This work must be completed within the first semester after the student reenters the institution if credit for the course is to be gained. The deadline for the instructor to come to the Registrar’s Office to change an I is the last day of classes for the term within which the work must be completed. This procedure is not applicable to incompletes recorded for individual study such as graduate research or thesis.

A grade of X may be changed by special examination within the first four weeks (two weeks during summer term) after the student reenters the institution if credit for the course is to be gained.

Candidates for degrees who have I or X grades in any courses required for graduation must complete all work and have the grades changed by the instructors prior to the end of the semester in which they are to graduate. If such grades are received for courses taken during the final semester and the work is not completed, the graduation will be delayed until the next date for degree conferral. A $5 degree reinstatement fee will be assessed.

Academic Honors:  Public announcement is made after each fall and spring semester of all full-time undergraduate students who have attained a term grade point average of 3.50 or above for that semester. This requirement must be met at the time grades are prepared. Grades of I or X may prevent a student from being placed on the Dean’s List. The statement “Dean’s List, Academic Excellence” is placed on the student’s permanent record, below the listing of that semester’s courses and grades.

Outcomes Assessment:  Outcomes assessment, while not having impact on a student’s grade point average or graduation status relative to the student’s test performance, is nonetheless a required activity.

Auditing of Courses:  An auditor is one who enrolls and participates in a course without expecting to receive academic credit. An audited course is not applicable to any degree or certificate program. For information on registering to audit a course, see the section on auditing in Chapter 4 of this Bulletin.

Regular class attendance is expected of an auditor. Students interested in auditing courses must secure written permission from the instructors and discuss course requirements prior to enrolling. Failure to meet course requirements may result in an auditor receiving a failing grade at the request of the instructor. A successful audit will be recorded on the transcript with the designation AU. It is permissible for a student to take a course for credit after having audited it or to audit a class after having received credit for the course, but an audit grade will not replace/remove an earlier grade.

Quality Points:  These are points earned per credit hour that are used to calculate a student’s grade point average. The number of points received for each course is determined by the grade earned and the grading scale used. Since Murray State uses the 4.00 grading system, each credit hour of A receives four quality points; each credit hour of B receives three; each credit hour of C receives two; and each credit hour of D receives one. For example, a student who earns an A in a four-hour course will receive 16 quality points.

Grade Point:  The grade point standing of a student is defined as the ratio of the total number of quality points to the total number of hours attempted, truncated (no rounding) to the decimal points. For example, a 3.9999 calculation would be stated as a 3.99 GPA. Cumulative GPAs are posted to a student’s permanent record until completion of the first baccalaureate degree. For example, a student who earns a grade of B in all courses for a total of 128 semester hours would have 384 quality points and a standing of 3.00.

Academic Warning:  An undergraduate student who has less than a 2.00 cumulative GPA and who is not on probation is under academic warning. A student on academic warning may enroll in no more than 16 hours a semester. Academic Warning is noted on the transcript.

Academic Probation:  An undergraduate or irregular student whose cumulative grade point average falls below the following scale will be placed on academic probation.

Earned Credit Hours - GPA
Freshmen/Special High School* 0-29  1.75
Sophomores* 30-59 1.90
Juniors* 60-89 2.00
Seniors/Post-Baccalaureate* 90+ 2.00
*Visiting and non-degree students must meet the requirements for the appropriate number of earned credit hours.

To be able to continue enrolling, a student who is on academic probation at the end of a semester must meet the criteria for Academic Probation Continued or Removal from Probation at the end of the next term enrolled. This includes summer terms. A student on academic probation may enroll in no more than 16 hours a semester. Academic Probation and Academic Probation Continued are noted on the transcript.

Academic Probation Continued:  A student on probation must increase their cumulative grade point average to be continued on probation. A student continued on probation may enroll in no more than 16 hours a semester.

Removal from Probation:  A student on probation who achieves a cumulative grade point average at or above the appropriate GPA on the scale indicated above will be removed from probation.

Academic Suspension:  Academic suspension occurs when (1) a new freshman has term hours attempted and earns a “0.00” term GPA for his/her first semester at Murray State, or (2) any student who is on probation fails to increase their cumulative GPA. One full semester separation from the university is required of a student on academic suspension, after which a readmission application must be filed with Admissions. A student suspended at the end of the spring semester will not normally be permitted to enroll for the following fall semester. A student on academic suspension may not receive credit for any courses taken at another college during the period of suspension. See the section on appeals. Academic Suspension is noted on the transcript.

Academic Dismissal:  Two full calendar years of separation from the university are required of a student who was previously suspended, reenrolled, and failed to be removed from probation or to be continued on probation. After the lapse of two years, a written request to be considered for readmission must be made to Admissions. A student on academic dismissal may not receive credit for any courses taken at another college during the period of dismissal. See the section on appeals.

Repeating Courses:  An undergraduate student may, for the purpose of raising a grade, repeat a course for credit no more than twice. The grade in the first attempt in which the student earned a grade of A, B, C, D, E, P, X, I, or WE will be removed from the record by the next attempt in which a student earns a grade of A, B, C, D, E, P, X, I, or WE.  Grade(s) and hours beginning with the latter attempt will be used in the grade point computation. However, hours for only one of the repeated attempts will be allowed to count toward the minimum number of hours required for graduation. It is the responsibility of the student to notify the Registrar’s Office of any repeated courses. This can be done through RACER-TOUCH scheduling or drop/add, or in person in the office on the first floor of Sparks Hall.
Courses that may be taken more than once for credit are so designated in the course descriptions, with any limits specified. If a student exceeds the maximum attempts indicated, the grade of the first attempt in which the student earned a grade of A, B, C, D, E, P, X, I, or WE will be removed from the record. Any limits on the number of attempts that apply toward graduation will also be enforced.

Courses taken at Murray State may not be repeated at another institution, by correspondence, by departmental challenge, or other tests for credit, with the intention of replacing the earlier grade. The GPA at graduation is permanent and will not be recalculated if additional courses are taken after graduation.

Graduate courses may not be repeated for the purpose of removing grades. All graduate grades remain on the transcript.

Academic Good Standing:  Students who are not on warning, probation or academic suspension or dismissal are considered in good standing. If a student is not in good standing but requests that a verification of good standing be sent to another institution, the verification will state that the student is eligible to re-enroll if applicable.

Appeals:  A student who has been academically suspended or dismissed may appeal in writing to the Registrar’s Office for special consideration when a repeated or lengthy illness or family emergency has been the cause of excessive absences from class and when the absences have been beyond the control of the student. All appeals must be on file at least 14 days before the first day of class of the relevant term. 

Associate Degree Admission Status:  A restrictive admission status used from the fall of 1986 through the spring of 1995. Students admitted under this status who did not meet baccalaureate degree status may be readmitted under the current admission requirements if they have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale on all classes, including transfer courses.

Preparatory Status:  A restrictive admission status used from the fall of 1986 through the spring of 1994. Students admitted under this status who had not completed the requirements to have the restrictions lifted were converted to associate degree status in the summer of 1994.

Pre-Baccalaureate Status:  A restrictive admission status used from the fall of 1995 through spring of 2003. Students under this status who have not met all of the requirements are now re-evaluated under the new admission guidelines in Chapter 2 of this bulletin.

Community College Status:  A restrictive admission status used from the fall of 1998 through the spring of 2003. Students under this status who have not met all of the requirements are now re-evaluated under the new admission guidelines in Chapter 2 of this bulletin.

Transcripts
Murray State transcripts will be released at the signed written request of the student and in conformity with existing state and federal statutes pertaining to the release of student academic records. There is a fee for this service. Copies of records from any other institution will not be issued.

The official academic record is the property of the university. Consequently, the university reserves the right to withhold the release of an official transcript of that record if the student has an obligation to the university, and reserves the right to maintain the information contained in the permanent record according to established practice and in compliance with state and federal laws.

Documents received from third parties (including high school and college transcripts, test scores, etc.) are the property of Murray State University. These documents cannot be released by Murray State to other institutions or agencies nor can they be returned to the student. Students needing to send high school transcripts, other school transcripts, test scores, etc., should contact the original source. 

Name and Address Changes
After registration, a student who has a name or address change is expected to notify the Registrar’s Office in writing, and will be held responsible for any communication from university offices sent to the address last given, and may not claim indulgence on the plea of having changed lodgings or name and therefore of not having received the communication. The original demographic information from the student’s initial admission to the university remains on the transcript, and any approved changes are added to the permanent record when the proper legal documents are presented to the Registrar’s Office.

Grade Change Policy 
Recording of Grades. Grades are recorded in the Registrar’s Office as reported by the faculty at the end of each term. No grade filed in that office may be changed except upon a written statement signed by the instructor certifying an error has been made.

When an error is made in reporting a grade, the instructor may make the necessary change in the Registrar’s Office within the next regular semester following the recording of the grade. A grade will not be changed after a degree is conferred. Students may not complete extra work in order to changes a grade of A, B, C, D, or E once the grade has been recorded.

The policy concerning the changing of X and I grades is addressed earlier.

Grade Appeals Policy
Murray State University recognizes that differences of opinion or interpretation may arise between students and faculty members regarding the assgnment of course grades. The university urges that a student first seek resolution through informal discussion with the appropriate faculty member. The following policy has been adopted as a formal avenue for the resolution of a student grievance or appeal, in the event that such differences cannot be resolved informally. The university recognizes the right of a student to present a grievance to an established committee and to have that grievance considered on its merit by an expeditious and orderly process. It should be noted that situations involving academic misconduct should be directed to the University Judicial Board.

Definitions. Complainant:  one who files a grievance, complaint or appeal within the scope of this policy.
 Respondent:  one against whom a grievance is filed.
 Days:  counted when classes or exams are scheduled, excluding Saturdays.
 Faculty:  all persons, whether full or part-time, who are responsible for, assist in, or administer the instructional program. (See Sec. 2.1 of the Faculty Handbook for a complete definition.)
 Grievance:  a written allegation or complaint that there has been a violation, misinterpretation, or improper application of existing policies, rules, regulations, practices, and/or procedures which a student believes to be unfair, inequitable, or a hindrance to that student’s effective performance.

Limitations. A grievance procedure must be initiated within the first twenty (20) days of the semester immediately following the semester or term during which the incident of grievance is alleged to have occurred, exclusive of summer session. Any special circumstance or request involving the time limitation set forth above will be considered and evaluated by the appropriate academic dean. Documentation of any revision of the time limitation will be included with the grade appeals form. Under no circumstances will an appeal of a grade be accepted after one year from the end of the semester in which the grade was received.

A faculty member has the responsibility to retain all course material and/or records not left in the student’s possession which contribute to the final course grade. These materials must be kept for the 20-day period of the following semester during which a student may appeal a grade, or in the event of an appeal, until conclusion of the appeal process.

Procedures. Step 1. Before a formal grievance may be filed with the Academic Appeals Board, the complainant should first seek resolution through informal discussion with the instructor. In the event that the instructor is a teaching assistant, the faculty supervisor should also be present during these discussions.
Step 2. Should the matter not be resolved to the satisfaction of the complainant, informal discussion should be sought with the appropriate department chair. In the event that the chair is the respondent of the grievance, informal discussion will be held with the academic dean.
Step 3. Should the informal discussions as outlined in Steps 1 and 2 not prove satisfactory to the complainant, informal discussion should be sought with the appropriate academic dean, if the dean has not been previously consulted.
Step 4. Once all means of informal resolution on the collegiate level have been exhausted, the complainant should present a completed grade appeals form to the Registrar within fifteen (15) days of the initial discussion with the instructor. Grade appeals forms are available in the registrar’s office and in the office of each collegiate dean.
Step 5. The registrar shall immediately forward the grade appeals form to the chair of the Academic Appeals Board who in turn will notify the faculty member/respondent that a formal grievance has been filed. The faculty member/respondent will be provided a copy of the completed grade appeals form.
Step 6. The chair of the Academic Appeals Board shall convene that committee within twenty (20) days of the receipt of the grade appeals form. (The Academic Appeals Board is defined in Section 1.6.3.1. of the University Committee System.)  Prior to the hearing, both complainant and respondent may elect to choose an advisor for the purposes of collecting data and/or presenting that individual’s position to the board. Complainant and respondent have the right to be accompanied by their advisors during any open meeting of the board at which the board’s agenda includes that particular grievance. The board holds the prerogative to call for pertinent testimony from any party involved in the grievance, or any party whom the board believes could clarify the grievance.
Step 7. Unless an extension of time is sought by the board, the written recommendation of the Academic Appeals Board shall be forwarded to the provost for final disposition. Copies of the recommendation shall also be sent to the appropriate academic dean, the complainant, and the respondent, within ten (10) days of the completion of the hearing. Telephone notification to the complainant of the availability of the recommendation shall fulfill the terms of this requirement. The text of the recommendation and all pertinent testimony and gathered data shall be kept in confidence.
NOTE:  If at any point in this process, the student alleges that actions have taken place that may be in violation of Murray State University Non-Discrimination Policies, this process must be suspended and the matter directed to the Office of Equal Opportunity.

Academic Second Chance
Academic Second Chance (ASC) is an appeal procedure for an undergraduate student to request academic forgiveness for Murray State courses. It applies to a single semester or a continuous series of semesters within which a student earned grades lower than a C. If approved, those terms would be excluded when calculating the student’s grade point average. No courses taken during the period approved for ASC would apply toward requirements for a degree.

A student who wishes to petition for ASC must have been separated from all institutions of higher learning for a minimum of five consecutive calendar years.

A petition may be submitted by an enrolled student after the student has reentered Murray State University and has earned a minimum of 12 degree credit hours at Murray State University with a minimum GPA of 2.50 on all hours since re-enrolling. No petitions will be considered after the student’s first application for a baccalaureate degree. The petition must be submitted in writing to the Registrar’s Office, specifying the terms for which ASC is requested.
ASC terms will remain a part of the transcript. The forgiven semesters in their entirety will not be used in calculating the student’s GPA. A statement on the record will indicate that the grades from the forgiven semesters are not figured into the student’s GPA.

The new GPA is the official GPA of the university. Students need to be aware that some agencies, academic areas, organizations, and scholarship programs may not recognize or allow ASC. ASC may be declared only once, applies only to MSU credits, and may not be revoked.