College of Health Sciences and Human Services
  Elizabeth G. Blodgett, Dean
  Judy Brookhiser, Assistant Dean
  107C Spplied Science Building   270-762-3590
7

 
 
In this chapter...
Department of Nursing
Department of Occupational Safety and Health
Department of Social Work, Criminal Justice and Gerontology
Department of Wellness and Therapeutic Sciences

 
The College of Health Sciences and Human Services offers an array of exemplary accredited practice-based programs designed to prepare students for careers in some of the nation's most important and rapidly growing fields. The disciplines offered in the college include nursing, occupational safety and health, social work, criminal justice, communication disorders, nutrition, dietetics, and food management, exercise science, athletic training and recreation & leisure services. 

The College of Health Sciences and Human Services is organized into four departments: Nursing, Occupational Safety and Health, Social Work, Criminal Justice and Gerontology, and Wellness & Therapeutic Sciences. 

The Department of Nursing offers a bachelor of science in nursing (BSN); a registered nurse to bachelor of science in nursing (RN-BSN), and a master of science in nursing (MSN). The nursing department is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. The Trover Foundation/MSU program of anesthesia is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Education Programs. Both the BSN and MSN programs have received preliminary approval from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

The Department of Occupational Safety and Health offers a nationally recognized program leading to a bachelor of science degree and master of science degree in occupational safety and health. The Applied Science Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ASAC/ABET). The B.S. degree has options in both occupational safety and health, and environmental safety and health. The department also offers a technical minor in occupational safety and health. 

The Department of Social Work, Criminal Justice and Gerontology offers degree options in three areas. The Council on Social Work Education accredits the bachelor of social work (B.S.W.) program. The Criminal Justice program offers B.A. and B.S. degrees in criminal justice with concentrations in corrections and law enforcement. The department also offers a minor in social gerontology. Students in the degree programs have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience by working in a variety of settings in agencies in the region and the state. The faculty represents a number of disciplinary specializations such as criminal law, police administration, child abuse prevention and crisis intervention. The staff is one of the most ethnically diverse on the MSU campus.

The Department of Wellness and Therapeutic Sciences includes a number of programs that deal with health promotion and therapeutic sciences. The programs include communication disorders, exercise science with wellness and athletic training options, recreation and leisure services with outdoor and therapeutic options, and nutrition, dietetics and food management. A minor in youth and nonprofit leadership is also offered.

Bachelor of science degrees are offered in communication disorders and a master of science degree in speech-language pathology. The program also operates the Murray State University Speech & Hearing Clinic. The clinic offers a full range of speech-language pathology and audiological services to individuals of all ages throughout the western Kentucky area. 

Bachelor of science degrees are offered in exercise science with wellness or athletic training options. A M.S. in exercise and & leisure studies is offered.

Bachelor of science degrees are offered in nutrition, dietetics and food management. The dietetics emphasis prepares graduates to become Registered Dietitians (R.D.) after completing a six-month to one-year internship after graduation. The program offers the post-graduate internship approved by Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education. 

Bachelor of science degrees are offered in recreation and leisure services with outdoor or therapeutic options. Outdoor recreation graduates are eligible to take the national examination to become Certified Park and Recreation Professionals (CPRP) and therapeutic recreation graduates are eligible to take the national examination to become Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists (CTRS). 

The Department of Wellness and Therapeutic Sciences is also home to American Humanics, which sponsors a minor in youth and nonprofit leadership. This program prepares students for leadership and volunteer roles in youth, human service, and nonprofit organizations. American humanics programs are designed to develop the whole person—mind, body, and spirit for service to others.
 
 
Department of Nursing
121 Mason Hall
270-762-2193

Chair: Marcia B. Hobbs. Faculty: Cooper, France, Garth, Hartman, Hobbs, Kearney, Manley, McCall, McKenna, Minor, Myatt, Nygaard, Perlow, Powell, Ridley, Siefker, Webster.

The Department of Nursing offers two degree programs, the baccalaureate program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) and the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.), both of which are accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission and has preliminary approval from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The MSN, Anesthesia Option, is also accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs.

The purpose of the undergraduate nursing program is to prepare: 

• a liberally educated individual; 
• a professional graduate who practices as a generalist; 
• one who is qualified to pursue graduate study in nursing.

Upon completing the program of study, students will be eligible to write the licensing examination for registered nurses (NCLEX-RN)1.

The baccalaureate nursing program is composed of two semesters of pre-nursing and six semesters of full-time study in the arts, sciences, and nursing. Upon completion of necessary prerequisite courses, students may apply for formal admission to the nursing program. This typically occurs the beginning of the sophomore year of study. The student should request the application from the assigned faculty advisor. Proof of up-to-date immunizations and tuberculin testing must be submitted with the application. The prerequisite courses for admission consideration are ENG 101, ENG 102, CHE 105, CHE 106, BIO 101, BIO 228, and PSY 180. The student is responsible for assuring that prerequisites are completed prior to enrolling in any courses. A grade point average of 2.50 and 30 hours completed are the minimum standards for admission into the program. Admission is based on available space. Students are expected to maintain a grade point average of at least 2.00 and may pursue either a full-time or part-time course of study. Licensed practical nurses may apply for NUR 204 credit upon successful completion of NUR 200, 201, and 205.

Students must earn a grade of C or better in all course work. Any course with a grade of less than C must be repeated if it is needed for graduation. Students must pass both theory and clinical practice in all clinical nursing courses or the entire course must be repeated. Once a student has a clinical failure, the student will receive an E for the course and may not withdraw from the course, regardless of the university calendar. If a transfer student earned a D or E in a nursing course, it counts as a first failure in the MSU program. A student who must repeat a course is admitted to future courses on a space-available basis.

If a grade less than C is received in one nursing course, the student may repeat the course as soon as it is offered on a space-available basis. If a grade less than C is received in one nursing course for the second time, the course cannot be repeated and the student is not eligible for readmission. If two nursing courses are failed (less than a C), the student is dismissed from the program, and is not eligible for readmission to the same option (the options are basic B.S.N. and R.N.-B.S.N.).

Prior to admission to clinical experiences, students are responsible for obtaining, maintaining and providing official documentation of professional liability insurance (minimum of one million dollars) and current CPR certification. Admission deadlines are May 1 for fall semesters and the third week of November for spring semesters.

Students are responsible for the purchase of uniforms, miscellaneous equipment and transportation during their program of study. Undergraduate nursing course clinical hours are calculated on a one-credit-hour-to-three-clinical-hour ratio. Clinical courses usually require more clinical hours than are listed in the class schedules. Students are encouraged to check with advisors about the necessary time commitment.

Detailed information about these and other policies, such as academic honesty and confidentiality, is available from the Department of Nursing and in the MSU Student Handbook. The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission is a resource for information regarding tuition, fees and length of program. The address is NLNAC, 350 Hudson Street, New York NY 10014; telephone 212-989-9393.

For further information write: Department of Nursing, Murray State University, 120 Mason Hall, Murray KY 42071-3302.

1Applicants must submit a certified copy of the court record of each misdemeanor or felony conviction and a letter of explanation that addresses each conviction. (201 KAR 20:270).


AREA:
Nursing

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree

CIP 51.1601

ACCREDITED BY:

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC); Preliminary Approval: Commission on 

Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

University Studies Requirements 46 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

•Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

Note: See required courses below before selecting mathematics and science University Studies electives.

Required Courses 79-80 hrs

BIO 101 Biological Concepts1

or

BIO 221 Zoology: Animal Form and Function

BIO 228 Human Anatomy

BIO 229 Human Physiology

BIO 300 Introductory Microbiology

CHE 105 Introductory Chemistry I1

CHE 106 Introductory Chemistry II1

NTN 230 Nutrition

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics1

or

PSY 300 Principles and Methods of Statistical Analysis

or

PSY 591 Statistics

NUR 099 Freshman Orientation (Basic BSN only)

NUR 200 Introduction to Nursing Concepts

NUR 201 Nursing Assessment

NUR 204 Nursing Practice Fundamentals

NUR 205 Pharmacology in Nursing

NUR 303 Nursing Care of Childbearing Families

NUR 304 Nursing Care of Childrearing Families

NUR 311 Nursing Care of Adults I

NUR 312 Nursing Care of Adults II

NUR 314 Introduction to the Process and 
Practice of Professional Nursing (RNs only)

NUR 401 Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing

NUR 403 Community Health Nursing

NUR 404 Leadership and Management in Nursing

NUR 405 The Nursing Profession and 
Health Care Delivery

NUR 406 Introduction to Research in Nursing

NUR 407 Integration Practicum (Basic BSN only)

NUR elective (RNs only)

GUI 592 Group Processes

or one of the following courses:

COM 353 Communication in Small Groups

COM 357 Communication and Critical Thought

COM 384 Communication Skills in Careers

COM 385 Organizational Communication

Unrestricted Electives 3 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1Required for area if not taken as University Studies elective.


AREA:
Nursing/RN to BSN

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree

CIP 51.1699.01

Registered nursing students may complete requirements for the baccalaureate degree in nursing at Murray State University. Selected nursing courses may be earned by validation. The remaining nursing hours are taken from the above nursing area curriculum.
 
 
Department of Occupational Safety and Health
157 Collins Center
270-762-2488

Chair: David G. Kraemer. Faculty: Atieh, Begley, Bernard, Fender, Keller, Kraemer, Mason, Nichols, Purcell.

The Department of Occupational Safety and Health provides related curriculum offerings at the baccalaureate level. Service courses are offered for individuals majoring in other fields such as business, science, health, psychology, education, and engineering technology. The department also offers a technical minor and a Master of Science degree. The degree programs provide the technical and professional knowledge required by individuals pursuing careers in accident prevention, loss-control management and supervision, inspection and control of occupational hazards, industrial hygiene or environmental health and safety.

The occupational safety and health option is designed to provide the technical and professional knowledge required by individuals pursuing professional careers in accident prevention, loss control management and supervision, inspection and control of occupational hazards, and industrial hygiene.

The environmental health and safety option is designed to provide the technical and professional knowledge required by individuals pursuing professional careers in environmental issues and affairs such as water quality, air quality and solid and hazardous waste management.

Program options in the Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in occupational safety and health are accredited by the Applied Science Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ASAC/ABET). 


AREA:
Occupational Safety and Health

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 15.0701

PROGRAM OPTIONS ACCREDITED BY:
Applied Science Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ASAC/ABET).

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

•Communication and Basic Skills:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

•Science and Mathematics:

BIO 101 Biological Concepts

CHE 105 Introductory Chemistry I

MAT 230 Technical Math II

•Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

•University Studies Electives:

CHE 210 Brief Organic Chemistry

CHE 215 Brief Organic Chemistry Laboratory

PHY 125 General Physics I

PHY 126 General Physics II

Required Core Courses50-51 hrs

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology1

ENG 324 Technical Writing for Industry Technology

ITD 120 Manufacturing Processes and Materials

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

or

PSY 300 Principles and Methods of Statistical Analysis

OSH 099 Freshman Orientation

OSH 192 Management and Enforcement of Accident Prevention

OSH 287 OSHA Standards for General Industry and Construction

OSH 299 Professional Development Seminar I

OSH 310 Fire and Emergency Preparedness Preplanning

OSH 311 Hazardous Materials and Emergency Planning

OSH 320 Environmental and Occupational Health Engineering Technology

OSH 353 Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Workplace

OSH 370 Professional Internship I

OSH 420 Industrial Hygiene I

OSH 425 Physical Agents

OSH 452 Systems Approach to Hazard Control

OSH 550 Safety and Health Program Management and Training

OSH 591 Engineering and Technical Aspects of Safety

Required Option Courses 30 hrs

Occupational Safety and Health Option

MGT 350 Fundamentals of Management

OSH 101 Emergency Medical Training

OSH 384 Construction Safety

OSH 545 Loss Control Measurement and Management

OSH 546 Fundamentals of Risk Control

Technical electives: 11 hrs approved by advisor (chosen

from list below)

Environmental Health and Safety Option

CET 341 Water Quality Technology

CET 342 Air Quality Technology

CET 353 Solid Hazardous Waste Technology

OSH 511 Hazardous Waste Site Operations

OSH 523 Occupational Diseases

OSH 527 Air Contaminants and Industrial Ventilation

Technical electives: 12 hrs approved by advisor (chosen

from list below)

Technical Electives (choose from the following)

CET 310 Anatomy of Buildings

CET 341 Water Quality Technology

CET 342 Air Quality Technology

CET 353 Solid Hazardous Waste Technology

CET 385 Construction Estimating I

or

CET 386 Construction Estimating II

CET 480 Construction Planning and Management

CET 483 Construction Materials

CHE 120 Chemical Laboratory Safety

CHE 330 Basic Biochemistry

CHE 352 Basic Chemical Instrumentation

COM 384 Communication Skills in Careers

COM 387 Intercultural Communication

COM 481 Conflict and Communication

CRJ 355 Security in Business and Industry

MGT 350 Fundamentals of Management

MGT 550 Human Resource Management

MGT 555 Training and Development

MGT 575 Labor Management Relations

OSH 101 Emergency Medical Training

OSH 301 Product Liability

OSH 384 Construction Safety

OSH 453 Human Factors in Safety Engineering

OSH 499 Professional Development Seminar II

OSH 511 Hazardous Waste Site Operations

OSH 523 Occupational Diseases

OSH 527 Air Contaminants and Industrial Ventilation

OSH 536 Motor Fleet Safety

OSH 545 Loss Control Measurement and Management

OSH 546 Fundamentals of Risk Control

OSH 571 Problems in Safety and Health

OSH 578 Workshop in Safety and Health

PSY 584 Industrial and Organizational Psychology

Total Curriculum Requirements 129-130 hrs

1CSC 199 can be substituted by another computer related course with advisor's approval.

Occupational Safety and Health Minor 22 hrs
OSH 101, 192, 287, 420, and six hours from OSH 310, 353, 452. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.
 
 
Department of Social Work, Criminal Justice and Gerontology
101S Oakley Applied Science Building
270-762-2506

Chair: Steven H. Jones Faculty: Homa, Jones, Lucko, Miller, Perfetti, Pittman-Munke, Southerland, Wylie.

The Department of Social Work, Criminal Justice and Gerontology offers an area in social work, a major in criminal justice, and minors in social work, criminal justice and gerontology.

Social Work
The primary purpose of the social work program is to prepare students for entry-level professional generalist practice as social workers in a variety of social service agencies and organizations. To accomplish this purpose, a well-developed curriculum is offered which is responsive to the social problems and issues confronting society today, and which provides students a stimulating and provocative approach to preparing themselves for a social work career. The undergraduate social work program is nationally accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

The social work program is designed to meet the career interests of students in such fields as family and children's services, health, mental health, aging, education and corrections. Undergraduate social work practitioners work in such settings as: recreational programs for children; group homes; public and private child welfare programs; public assistance programs; public housing programs; domestic violence shelters; hospitals; nursing homes; home health agencies; programs serving the chronically mentally ill; alcohol/drug rehabilitation and prevention programs; programs serving persons with physical and/or developmental disabilities; senior citizens programs; preschools; elementary and secondary schools; probation and parole; prisons and other court-related programs. Another important function of the program is to provide a sound academic foundation for students entering graduate study in social work or related fields of human service.

Students must earn a grade of C or better in all social work course work. Any social work course with a grade of less than C must be repeated.

Requirements for Admission 

Social Work Program
In order to be admitted to the social work program, a student must (1) have completed 60 semester hours of course work with a minimum GPA of 2.00; (2) have completed SWK 101, 201, 225 and 310 with a minimum GPA of 2.50 and no grades below C; (3) pass an examination designed to assess writing ability; (4) complete an application for admission to the program; (5) take the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory 2; (6) be successfully reviewed by the social work program admissions committee; and (7) sign a statement indicating that he/she has read and will follow the code of ethics of the National Association of Social Workers.

Field Practicum
In order to be admitted to SWK 499 Field Practicum, a student must (1) have been formally admitted to the social work program; (2) have completed SWK 310, 311, 312, 313 and 498; and (3) be successfully reviewed by the social work field education review committee.

Criminal Justice
The criminal justice program affords students a broad-based overview of the criminal justice system and its components as well as the ability to specialize in an area of the student's interest. Through the choice of electives, students can emphasize policing, corrections, law or the nature of crime and crime causation. 

Criminal justice graduates are prepared for a variety of professional careers including policing, corrections and the law. The major is also excellent preparation for law school as well as graduate work in criminal justice.

This program leads to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice. The university studies component provides the necessary liberal arts education, while the criminal justice major further develops the student's oral, written, analytical, leadership, research and problem-solving skills. Internship experiences are available during the junior and senior years in a variety of agencies including Public Defender Offices throughout western Kentucky, the U.S. Secret Service, local police agencies and regional adult and juvenile corrections agencies.

The faculty encourages all students to be actively involved in student organizations, which provide a way for students to network with criminal justice practitioners. Three criminal justice student organizations are available: Lambda Alpha Epsilon, an academic fraternity of the American Criminal Justice Association; Alpha Phi Sigma, the national criminal justice honor society affiliated with the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences; and the Student Law Association.

Gerontology
Through this minor, students learn about the aging process, services for the elderly, and the techniques for working with the elderly. The 21-hour minor in social gerontology combines course work in several disciplines including sociology, social work, psychology and therapeutic recreation. A minor in gerontology provides students with the background they need to provide services to older people.


AREA:
Social Work

Bachelor of Social Work Degree

CIP 44.0701

ACCREDITED BY:

Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)

University Studies Requirements 49-55 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: The social work area requires 12 hours of specific social science selections (see below) in addition to the university requirements of CIV 101 and 102.

University Studies selections must include:

•Science and Mathematics:

BIO 101 Biological Concepts

•Social Sciences:

ECO 140 Contemporary Economics

•University Studies Electives:

POL 140 American National Government

PSY 180 General Psychology

•Additional Required University Studies Electives:

SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology

Required Courses 49 hrs

SWK 099 Freshman Orientation

SWK 101 Introduction to Social Work

SWK 201 Social Work and Social Welfare

SWK 225 Human Diversity

SWK 301 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I

SWK 302 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II

SWK 303 Introduction to Generalist Social Work Research

SWK 310 Social Work Practice I

SWK 311 Social Work Practice Skills

SWK 312 Social Work Practice II

SWK 313 Social Work Practice III

SWK 350 Social Welfare Policies and Services

SWK 498 Senior Seminar

SWK 499 Field Practicum

Required Limited Electives 6 hrs

choose two of the following:

SWK 305 Services to Older Americans

SWK 315 Addiction: Treatment and Society

SWK 336 Family Violence

SWK 345 School Social Work

SWK 355 Perspectives on Women

SWK 365 Crisis Intervention

SWK 375 Social Work in Health Care Settings

SWK 385 Social Work in Mental Health Settings

SWK 395 Substance Abuse Prevention

SWK 405 Child Abuse and Neglect

SWK 415 Child Abuse Interventions

SWK 425 HIV Disease: The Individual and Society

SWK 460 Topical Seminar

SWK 525 Case Management: Theory and Practice

Co-Requirements for Area 18 hrs

BIO 201 Human Biology for Social Workers

PSY 581 Abnormal Psychology

YNL 502 Workshop in Financial Resource Development

and either:

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology

or

OSY 120 Introduction to Information Processing

and two of the following:

ANT 140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

ANT 344 The Black Experience

ANT 596 The Minority Elderly

CRJ 537 Juvenile Justice Procedures

NTN 233 Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle

PSY 261 Child Psychology

PSY 262 Adolescent Psychology

PSY 264 Psychology of Aging

SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I

SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II

SPA 103 Elementary Spanish Conversation I

SPA 104 Elementary Spanish Conversation II

YNL 350 Program Administration in Youth and Human

Service Organizations

YNL 351 Leadership and Support Systems in Youth and 

Human Service Organizations

Unrestricted Elective 3 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-134 hrs

Gerontology Minor 21 hrs
GTY 264, 305, 341, 520, plus nine hours of limited electives. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Social Work Minor 21 hrs
SWK 101, 201, 225, 301, 302, 310, and 311. Social work minors are not permitted to take SWK 312, 313, 498, or 499. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.


MAJOR:
Criminal Justice1

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degree

CIP 43.0104

University Studies Requirements 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

•Communication and Basic Skills:

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology

• Science and Mathematics:

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics2

• Social Sciences:

POL 140 American National Government

• University Studies Elective:

PSY 180 General Psychology

SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology

or

SOC 231 Social Problems

• Additional Requirements:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

Note: A minimum grade of C is required in ENG 101 and 102, from all students (including transfers) majoring or minoring in criminal justice.

Required Courses 28 hrs

CRJ 099 Freshman Orientation

CRJ 140 Introduction to Criminal Justice

CRJ 220 Law Enforcement

CRJ 240 Corrections

CRJ 300 Criminal Offenders Typology

CRJ 320 Juvenile Justice

CRJ 360 Principles and Methods of Research

CRJ 440 Criminal Justice Administration

CRJ 480 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice

One 300 or 400 level criminal law course with advisor

approval

Required Limited Electives 12 hrs

(Approved by advisor.)

400-level CRJ elective (not CRJ 488 or 489)

500-level CRJ elective

Six hours upper level CRJ electives

Note: Only six hours of credit toward the major may be received from CRJ 305, 488, or 489.

Required Minor/Second Major 21-30 hrs

Unrestricted Electives 7-16 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1No substitutions and/or alterations in the above curriculum shall be made without the written approval of a criminal justice faculty advisor.

2Students may take another MAT course and one of the following statistics courses: MAT 135, PSY 300, or CIS 243 and CIS 343.

Criminal Justice Minor 24 hrs
CRJ 140 and 300; two courses from 220, 240, or 320; a 300 or 400 level criminal law course with advisor approval; and nine hours of CRJ electives approved by a department advisor. Only three hours are allowed from CRJ 305, 488, or 489. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. A minimum grade of C in ENG 101 and 102 is required of all students (including transfers) minoring in criminal justice. Students are expected to take necessary prerequisites listed under CRJ course descriptions. No substitutions and/or alterations in the above curriculum shall be made without written approval of a criminal justice faculty advisor.
 
 
Department of Wellness and Therapeutic Sciences
108 Carr Health Building
270-762-6802

The Department of Wellness and Therapeutic Sciences is comprised of five program areas: communication disorders, exercise science, nutrition, dietetics and food management, pre-occupational therapy, and recreation and leisure services. A minor in youth and nonprofit leadership is also offered.

Communication Disorders
The division of communication disorders provides pre-professional undergraduate and professional graduate training leading to certification by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association and to Kentucky certification and licensure in speech-language pathology. Degrees offered in this program include a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in communication disorders. Students must achieve a grade point average of 3.0 in the first four communications disorders courses (CDI 205, 215, 310, and 340) in order to enroll in further CDI coursework. An area grade point average of 3.0 must be maintained to enroll in further CDI courses, with the exception of CDI 452 and CDI 550. In addition, students enrolled in 400 and 500 level courses in CDI are expected to maintain an overall grade point average of 2.75. Each required area course must be passed with a C or better.

Exercise Science
The area in exercise science is enhanced by choosing an area of emphasis from either wellness or athletic training. A cumulative grade point average of 2.5 is required prior to enrollment in several senior-level courses. The 2.5 GPA must be maintained to graduate.

Students who choose the wellness option will work with other health care professionals to provide clients with information designed to manage and prevent health issues associated with physical activity. Job opportunities involve interaction with a variety of health related professions including hospital wellness centers, cardiac rehabilitation, physical therapy, corporate fitness programs, private industry and other wellness related facilities. Students should enjoy working with adults interested in developing healthier lifestyles through a combination of educational programs and exercise. Educational opportunities involve classroom and practical experiences focusing on life sciences and preventive health.

An athletic trainer is a qualified health care professional educated and experienced in the management of health care problems associated with physical activity. In cooperation with physicians and other health care personnel, the athletic trainer functions as an integral member of the health care team in secondary schools, colleges and universities, professional sports programs, sports medicine clinics, and other health care settings. Through a combination of formal classroom instruction and clinical experience, the athletic trainer is prepared to apply a wide variety of specific health care skills and knowledge. 

Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Management
The nutrition, dietetics and food management program is designed for students with an interest in the relationship of food and nutrition to health and wellness or the rapidly growing food industry. The dietetics emphasis prepares students to become Registered Dietitians, certified professionals in food and nutrition. A food management emphasis prepares graduates for careers in the food industry and in food service management. A consumer nutrition emphasis provides a broad education for students who are interested in nutrition but do not want to become Registered Dietitians.

Recreation and Leisure Services
The program in recreation has two emphases: outdoor and therapeutic. The outdoor program prepares professionals for jobs in a variety of settings including local, state, regional and national parks and recreation areas. The therapeutic program prepares professionals for jobs working with persons with disabilities, seniors, and other persons with special needs in a variety of settings including both clinical and community placements.

American Humanics
The American Humanics program prepares students for leadership and volunteer roles in youth, human services, and nonprofit organizations. It is designed to develop the whole person: mind, body and spirit for service to others.


AREA:
Communication Disorders

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree
CIP 51.0204

ACCREDITED BY:

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE); graduate training accredited by American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA)

University Studies Requirements 46-52 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

•Communication and Basic Skills:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

or

COM 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

•Science and Mathematics:

One biological science course

One physical science course

•Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

•University Studies Electives:

ENG 224 Writing in the Professions

Required Courses 51 hrs

CDI 099 Freshman Orientation

CDI 205 Introduction to Communication Disorders

CDI 215 Clinical Phonetics

CDI 310 Anatomy and Physiology

CDI 315 Speech Science 

CDI 325 Communication Disorders I

CDI 340 Speech and Language Development

CDI 345 Communication Disorders II

CDI 405 Audiology

CDI 451 Aural Rehabilitation

CDI 465 Neuroanatomy

CDI 470 Clinical Methods I

CDI 472 Clinical Methods II

CDI 474 Practicum (2 semesters)

CDI 550 Neuromuscular Disorders

CDI 572 Diagnostic Methods

CDI 582 Communication Programming for Individuals

with Severe Disabilities

ENG 310 Linguistics and English Grammars

Required Support Courses 21 hrs

CDI 480 School Services for Communication Disorders

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

or

PSY 260 Lifespan Development

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: 

A Collaborative Approach

SWK 225 Human Diversity

Choose three courses from the following:

CDI 452 Signing Exact English I

COM 357 Communication and Critical Thought

COM 381 Interpersonal Communication

COM 384 Communication Skills in Careers

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education

ENG 328 Standard English Usage

FCS 210 Child Development I

GTY 264 Psychology of Aging

GTY 305 Services to Older Americans

HEA 191 Personal Health

PSY 304 Psychology of Learning and Memory

PSY 322 Motivation

Required Limited Electives 3 hrs

Choose from the following:

GTY 520 Leisure and Aging

PSY 545 Behavior Modification

PSY 581 Abnormal Psychology

PSY 589 Personality

SED 526 Introduction to Early Education of Children with

Disabilities

SED 552 Functional Behavior Analysis

TSL 533 Language and Culture

Required Toward K-12 Certification2 12 hrs

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking3

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology3

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education1

HEA 191 Personal Health4

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development1

Note: A teaching certificate is required to obtain a tenured position as an SLP in Kentucky schools. Specific undergraduate courses must be taken and grade requirements met before a student can meet qualifications for a teaching certificate. Students should meet with academic advisors to ensure they meet these requirements.

Unrestricted Electives 1-7 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1These courses are required only for students pursuing public school certification. Although these courses are taken at the bachelor's level, requirements for certification are completed at the master's level.

2May be taken as a University Studies elective.

3May be taken as a Required Support course.

4Fulfills Teacher Certification requirements.


AREA:
Exercise Science

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 31.0505

University Studies Requirements 48-49 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

•Communication and Basic Skills:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

or

COM 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

•Science and Mathematics:

BIO 101 Biological Concepts

or

BIO 221 Zoology: Animal Form and Function

CHE 105 Introductory Chemistry I

or

CHE 201 General College Chemistry

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and

Statistics or higher math

•Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

•University Studies Electives:

See advisor before choosing electives.

Core Courses 38-39 hrs

BIO 229 Human Physiology

EXS 099 Freshman Orientation

EXS 301 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

EXS 333 Theory and Techniques in Strength and

Conditioning

EXS 375 Biomechanics in Sport and Exercise

EXS 380 Sports Medicine Pharmacology

EXS 400 Measurement and Evaluation in Human Performance

EXS 450 Advanced Exercise Physiology I

EXS 475 Kinesiology

EXS 485 Sport and Exercise Psychology

HEA 570 Education for Drug Abuse Prevention

or

PSY 540 Drugs, Alcohol and Behavior

NTN 230 Nutrition

REC 207 Inclusive Recreation

Area of Emphasis 32-33

(Choose one area of emphasis listed below.)

Athletic Training

BIO 228 Human Anatomy

EXS 250 Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology

EXS 270 Clinical Experience I

EXS 271 Clinical Experience II

EXS 371 Clinical Experience III

EXS 372 Clinical Experience IV

EXS 390 Therapeutic Modalities

EXS 402 Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

EXS 403 Evaluation of the Upper Extremity

EXS 420 Rehabilitation Techniques

EXS 471 Administration of Athletic Training

EXS 472 Clinical Experience V

OSH 101 Emergency Medical Training

Wellness Emphasis

BIO 228 Human Anatomy

or

EXS 250 Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology

EXS 455 Exercise Prescription

EXS 460 Practicum

EXS 470 Professional Experience

HEA 191 Personal Health

HEA 195 First Aid and Safety

YNL 351 Leadership in Youth and Human Service 

Organization

Choose three courses from the following:

BIO 522 Pathophysiology

EXS 420 Rehabilitation Techniques

EXS 465 Advanced Exercise Physiology II
EXS 520 Leisure and Aging

HEA 511 Epidemiology

NTN 532 Advanced Nutrition

YNL 350 Program Administration

Unrestricted Electives 7-9 hrs

(A minor may be substituted in place of electives.)

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs


AREA:
Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Management

Bachelor of Science Degree

CIP 19.0501

Note: The dietetics program is currently granted developmental accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association, 216 W. Jackson Blvd, Chicago, IL 60606-6995, (312) 899-4876. After successful completion of this program students may apply for entry into a supervised practice program required to become a registered dietitian.

University Studies Requirements 47-48 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

•Communication and Basic Skills:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

or

COM 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

•Science and Mathematics:

BIO 101 Biological Concepts

CHE 105 Introductory Chemistry I

•Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

•University Studies Electives:

SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology

Core Requirements 42-44 hrs

BPA 140 Foundations of Business

CHE 210 Brief Organic Chemistry

CIS 243 Business Statistics I

and

CIS 343 Business Statistics II

or

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

or

PSY 300 Principles and Methods of Statistical Analysis

FCS 461 Methods of Teaching Family and Consumer

Sciences

MGT 350 Fundamentals of Management

NTN 099 Freshman Orientation

NTN 230 Nutrition

NTN 231 Principles of Food Science and Preparation

NTN 233 Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle

NTN 235 Quantity Food Production Practicum

NTN 312 Community Nutrition and Health

NTN 332 Meal Management Laboratory

NTN 372 Quantity Food Production and Purchasing

NTN 373 Management of Food Service Personnel and Facilities

NTN 399 Seminar in Dietetics

NTN 432 Experimental Foods

Area of Emphasis 39-40 hrs

(Choose an area of emphasis listed below.)

Dietetics Emphasis 

BIO 228 Human Anatomy

or

EXS 250 Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology

BIO 229 Human Physiology

BIO 300 Microbiology

CHE 330 Basic Biochemistry

NTN 434 Clinical Dietetics Practicum

NTN 440 Clinical Dietetics

NTN 532 Advanced Nutrition

NTN 535 Medical Nutrition Therapy and Disease

NTN 536 Methods in Medical Nutrition Therapy

SOC 303 Introduction to Research Methods

or

Other approved research methods course

SWK 311 Social Work Practice Skills

or

Other approved counseling course

Electives (6 hrs)

Food Management Emphasis 

ACC 200 Principles of Accounting I

ECO 230 Principles of Macroeconomics

MGT 550 Human Resource Management

MKT 360 Principles of Marketing

NTN 234 Food Service Management Practicum

Choose 9 hours from the following:

ACC 201 Principles of Accounting II

CSC 125 Internet and World Wide Web Technologies

FCS 597 Trends and Issues in Family and Consumer Studies

MGT 551 Organizational Behavior

MGT 553 Human Resource Selection

MKT 361 Principles of Selling

MKT 565 Marketing Research

NTN 488 Cooperative Education

Electives (15 hrs)

Consumer Nutrition Emphasis 

BIO 228 Human Anatomy

or

EXS 250 Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology

BIO 229 Human Physiology

HEA 191 Personal Health

NTN 532 Advanced Nutrition

SOC 303 Introduction to Research Methods

or

Other approved research methods course

SWK 311 Social Work Practice Skills

or

Other approved counseling course

Electives (20 hrs)

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-132 hrs


MAJOR: 
Recreation and Leisure Services/Outdoor Recreation Option

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 31.0301

University Studies Requirements 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: At least a C average is required in ENG 101 and 102.

University Studies selections must include:

•Communication and Basic Skills:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

or

COM 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

•Mathematics:

MAT 117 Mathematical Concepts (or higher)

•Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

•University Studies Electives:

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology

Required Courses 46 hrs

REC 099 Freshman Orientation

REC 101 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services

REC 202 Recreation Program Planning

REC 207 Inclusive Recreation

REC 304 Community Leadership

REC 401 Research and Evaluation in Recreation

REC 403 Managing Recreation Areas and Facilities

REC 405 Organization and Administration of Recreation 

REC 411 Principles of Challenge Education

REC 421 Professional Experience

REC 450 Recreational Use of Natural Resources

REC 476 Natural Resources and Park Management

REC 499 Senior Seminar

REC 520 Leisure and Aging

REC 565 Interpretive Services in Park Management

Required Limited Electives 10-11 hrs1

HEA 191 Personal Health

HEA 195 First Aid and Safety

REC 102 Camp Counseling and Camp Crafts

or

REC 311 Outdoor Adventure Activities

or

REC 350 Wilderness and Canoe Camping

REC 490 Outdoor Recreation and Rural Tourism

Consortium

or

3 activity courses selected with approval of advisor

Required Minor 21 hrs

Unrestricted Electives 0-4 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1Approved by advisor.


MAJOR:
Recreation and Leisure Services/Therapeutic Option

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 31.0301

University Studies Requirements 47-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: At least a C average is required in ENG 101 and 102.

University Studies selections must include:

•Communication and Basic Skills:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

or

COM 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

•Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

Required Courses 48 hrs

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

HEA 099 Freshman Orientation

PSY 581 Abnormal Psychology

REC 101 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services

REC 202 Recreation Program Planning

REC 207 Inclusive Recreation

REC 400 Survey of Therapeutic Recreation

REC 401 Research and Evaluation in Recreation

REC 403 Managing Recreation Areas and Facilities

REC 405 Organization and Administration of Recreation

REC 421 Professional Experience (internship)

REC 450 Recreational Use of Natural Resources

REC 475 Therapeutic Recreation Programming

REC 515 Leisure Education in Therapeutic 

Recreation Services

REC 520 Leisure and Aging

Required Limited Electives 10-11 hrs

BIO 228 Human Anatomy

or

EXS 250 Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology

HEA 191 Personal Health

HEA 195 First Aid and Safety

REC 120 Beginning Swimming

or

REC 121 Techniques of Swimming

Activity course selected with approval of advisor

Unrestricted Elective 3 hrs

Required Minor 21 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-134 hrs
 

Recreation and Leisure Services Minor 23 hrs
REC 101, 202, 207, 405, 450 and eight hours from the following: REC 150, 304, 311, 400, 401, 403, 411, 440, 475, 476, 490, 499, 515, 520, and 565. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Youth and Nonprofit Leadership Minor 25 hrs
YNL 290, 350, 351, 400, 450, 502 and six hours of limited electives. A student may choose an emphasis in youth program administration or community program administration. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.