College of Humanities and Fine Arts
  Sandra Jordan, Dean
  100 Faculty Hall 
  270-762-6937
8

 
In this chapter...
Department of Art
Department of English and Philosophy
Department of Government, Law and International Affairs
Department of History
Department of Modern Languages
Department of Music
Department of Psychology
Department of Theatre and Dance

 
Mission
The College of Humanities and Fine Arts strives to foster awareness and appreciation of the humanities, fine arts, and social sciences among students, the university community, and the public. The College is a learning community dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge and its application through civic and professional leadership. Students and faculty members act as advocates for the humanities, fine arts, and social sciences in a variety of ways, ranging from teaching and scholarly work to performance, exhibition, and consultation. To this end, the College actively promotes research and creative activities among its faculty and students.

The College seeks to provide a personalized learning experience promoting the free and rigorous pursuit of knowledge, respect for differing points of view and cultures, appreciation of personal expression in all its artistic forms, awareness of the role of an educated citizenry in a democratic society, and understanding of the role values play in thought and action. The College aims to develop students who think critically and creatively, communicate effectively, and participate actively in their communities. Thus, the College of Humanities and Fine Arts is committed to preparing well- educated, thoughtful, and contributing citizens of the world.

Programs 
The College of Humanities and Fine Arts consists of the departments of Art, English and Philosophy, Government, Law and International Affairs, History, Modern Languages, Music, Psychology, Theatre and Dance, and the Sociology program. 

Undergraduate degrees offered by the college are bachelor of science, bachelor of arts, bachelor of fine arts, bachelor of music education and bachelor of music. Graduate degrees are master of science, master of arts, master of music education and master of public administration. Murray State University is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and the National Association of Schools of Music.

The College offers programs in the traditional humanities (English, philosophy, history, and modern languages); social sciences (political science and sociology); and behavioral science (psychology). The fine and performing arts (art, music, theatre and dance) offer traditional and contemporary programs in their disciplines through studio and classroom courses, performances, gallery events, and ensembles. Additionally, the college encourages all students to participate in the cultural and artistic life of the campus through the creative writing colloquia, poetry readings, exhibitions, and the participation in music ensembles, marching band, and/or choral groups. The college offers a variety of innovative arts, humanities and social science courses through the institution's University Studies curriculum. English composition and the two interdisciplinary core courses, world civilizations and cultures and humanities, are integral parts of preparing every Murray State student to communicate effectively, to engage in sound analysis and make logical decisions, to understand the world's historical, literary, and philosophical traditions, to understand cultural diversity and competing economic and political systems as well as complex moral and ethical issues, and to become responsible citizens in a democratic society—all of which are desired characteristics of the Murray State graduate.

The college serves as the cultural heart of the university and the region by providing a broad range of cultural and intellectual programs. The campus and regional community members are encouraged to attend the College of Humanities and Fine Arts events. The distinguished college faculty engage actively in teaching, research/creative activities, and service. The college is committed to service to the community through its role in teacher education and involvement with the public schools. Through the Forrest C. Pogue Public History Institute, faculty and students in the college engage in research that contributes to an understanding of the cultural heritage of the region. The English and Philosophy Department sponsors the Jesse Stuart Writing Symposium as well as the MSU Reading Series each academic year. The Department of Government, Law and International Affairs annually sponsors the Harry Lee Waterfield Distinguished Lecture in Public Affairs.

In addition, the college offers students rich opportunities for international study and intercultural experience. The Kentucky Institute for International Studies, sponsored by the college, is a consortium of 13 public and private universities that offers study-abroad programs in Austria, France, Germany, Japan, China, Greece, Brazil, Costa Rica, Italy, Mexico, Spain and Ecuador. Many of the college faculty are involved in foreign travel and study in countries that are English speaking as well. Opportunities to study in the U.K., Ireland, Australia and Canada are available to faculty from the College of Humanities and Fine Arts.

Graduates of the humanities programs in the college pursue a variety of careers. In addition to teaching, graduates are employed in business, communications, government, law, the ministry, psychology, and a variety of private and social agencies as well as international governmental and non-governmental organizations. Careers available in the fields of the Fine Arts include: performance (vocal, instrumental and theatrical), design, web design, graphic communications, and art, museum and theatre management. All programs follow the liberal arts model of preparing students broadly for a rapidly changing job market. The student is prepared to communicate effectively, think critically, develop the analytical skills necessary to solve problems, learn on their own, understand human behavior, and imagine alternative ways of viewing a problem. Several of the programs in the college provide excellent preparation for a career in law. 

The University's Center for Academic Advising is also located in the college. The center provides faculty advisors from the college to guide students through their University Studies course work and assists them in making an informed choice about a specialized program of study.

Liberal Arts
The Liberal Arts major is a response to the needs of our society for leaders who can think creatively across the lines of traditional disciplines. This major addresses the growing demand of leaders in business, industry and the professions for broadly educated students who have a command of interpersonal skills, analytical and writing abilities, as well as technical skills necessary for particular jobs.

The program is designed to help students who are interested in investigating connections between two traditional liberal arts fields. Liberal Arts majors take core courses in ethics, art history, sociology and biology. Following this, students select concentrations in two of seventeen different possible fields of study in the Arts, Sciences, Social Sciences, or Humanities. Students selecting a Liberal Arts major are also expected to write a senior thesis in which they address their subject from the perspective of both of their chosen areas of study.


MAJOR:
Liberal Arts

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 24.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

University Studies selections must include:

Fine Arts:

MUS 105 Survey of Music History and Literature 

or

THD 104 The Theatrical Experience

Humanities:

ENG 201 Appreciation of Literature 

or

RGS 200 Introduction to Religious Phenomena

Mathematics:

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Sciences:

CHE 105 General College Chemistry 

or

GSC 101 The Earth and the Environment

Social Sciences:

ANT 140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

or

HIS 222 American Experience Since 1986 

or

PSY 180 General Psychology

Core Courses 13 hrs

ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II

BIO 101 Biological Concepts

PHI 202 Ethics

SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology

Major Concentrations1 36-40 hrs

Choose two concentrations from the six areas listed below. No more than one concentration can be taken from the same area. Courses in each concentration are on file in the Registrar's office.

Fine Arts
Art History 18 
Music 19
Theatre 18

Humanities
English 18
Modern Language (one language) 18
Philosophy 18

Natural Science/Mathematics
Biology 18
Chemistry 19
Geosciences 19-20
Mathematics 19-20
Physical Science 18-21

Social Science
Economics 18
History 18
International Affairs 18-19
Political Science 18
Psychology 18-19
Sociology 18

•Multicultural, Class and Gender Studies 18

•Interdisciplinary Studies 18

With the approval of a faculty advisor, the director of the program, and the Dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, a concentration will be created such as European Studies, Rural Studies, or Race and Gender Studies, using in each case courses designated within each liberal arts concentration.

Required Course 3 hrs

LBA 438 Seminar in Liberal Arts

Internship 0-6 hrs

Liberal Arts majors are strongly encouraged to arrange an internship, to be approved by the faculty advisor and by an interdisciplinary committee of three faculty members selected by the Director of the Liberal Arts Program. This internship will help the student further develop leadership skills by working in a business, industry, or government setting that requires strong written and oral communication and interpersonal skills, good judgement, and careful analysis.

Foreign Study 3-6 hrs

Liberal Arts majors are required to participate in one of the study abroad programs or take advantage of other pre-approved, explicitly cross-cultural experiences offered by or at Murray State; this is designed to increase the student's cross-cultural and global awareness, self-confidence, and leadership ability.

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-144

1At least 42 hours must be taken at the 300-500 level.
 
 
Department of Art
604 Price Doyle Fine Arts Center
270-762-3784

Chair: Dick Dougherty. Faculty: Beaver, Bishop, Bryant, Dougherty, Hale, Hand, Gutwirth, Johnson, Leys, O'Brien, Sasso, Schrock, Serre, Smetana, Speight. 

The Department of Art provides a broad range of programs and professional opportunities for students preparing to work as practicing artists, craftspersons and designers, for careers in art education, and for graduate study in art, art education and art history.

Students pursuing a degree in art may select a program of study leading to either the Bachelor of Fine Arts, the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree. Teacher certification in art is available to undergraduate students within each degree option. Degree candidates are certified to teach art in kindergarten through grade 12. A minor in art and a minor in art history are also offered to the general college student. Elective courses in art appreciation, art history and studio art are open to non-art majors.

The curricular structure of each degree program is organized to encourage students to study and explore a variety of media and techniques upon which later specialization may be based. Areas of specialization include ceramics, drawing, wood, graphic design, metalsmithing, photography, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. At the intermediate and advanced levels, students are encouraged by faculty to express their own personal direction and ideas and to establish professional standards by the exhibition of their work. The culmination of the student's undergraduate study is the senior exhibition requirement.

The Institute for International Studies, the Kentucky Institute for International Studies and the Cooperative Center for Study in Britain offer a variety of opportunities for MSU art students to study abroad. Through direct exchanges and special international courses, students can study in more than a dozen different countries.

The department operates two galleries on campus. The Clara M. Eagle Gallery and the Curris Center Gallery provide the university and community with significant cultural and educational programs. The exhibition schedule offers work by historical and contemporary artists including MSU faculty, students, alumni and visiting artists. A large portion of the exhibition space is continually used by the students. Department, class and/or individual shows are always on view. Programs include the annual student art show and the visiting artist series.

Studios in all areas are well equipped, providing maximum opportunities for students to pursue their interests. Art facilities are housed primarily in the Price Doyle Fine Arts Center. The Clara M. Eagle Gallery is located on the sixth floor of the Price Doyle Fine Arts Center. The art gallery in the Curris Center is located on the first level.

Scholarships
Scholarships and grants-in-aid are available to qualified art students. For additional information refer to the scholarship section of this Bulletin or contact the scholarship person in the Department of Art.

Accreditation
Murray State University is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). Teacher certification programs are also accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

Credit by Examination
The credit by examination programs in which the MSU Department of Art participates are the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board (APP), the departmental challenge examination, and the non-credit placement examination. Test results are subject to evaluation prior to credit approval. For additional information contact the chair of the Department of Art.


AREA:
Art1

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree

CIP 50.0702

ACCREDITED BY:

National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD)

University Studies Requirements 43-46 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

Humanities and Fine Arts:

ART 211 Introduction to the History of Art I

University Studies Electives:

ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II

Required Foundation Courses 13 hrs

ART 099 Freshman Orientation

ART 101 Drawing I: Introduction to Drawing

ART 111 Two-dimensional Design

ART 112 Three-dimensional Design

ART 201 Drawing II: Life Drawing

Required Art History Courses 9 hrs

One course from each of the following areas:

•Pre-Modern

ART 415 Greek & Roman Art

ART 416 Medieval Art

ART 418 Renaissance Art

ART 419 Baroque Art

•Modern

ART 426 Romanticism to Realism

ART 427 Late Nineteenth-Century Art

ART 429 Art from 1900 to 1960

ART 430 Contemporary Art, 1960 to the Present

One additional Art History course which may be selected from any course listed above or ART 356, 491 or 501.

Required Limited Studio Electives 18 hrs

Select three of the following 2-D courses:

ART 300 Drawing III

ART 330 Introduction to Painting I

ART 350 Introduction to Graphic Design I: Digital Art

ART 379 Introduction to Printmaking I

ART 382 Introduction to Photography I

Select three of the following 3-D courses:

ART 309 Introduction to Metalsmithing I

ART 310 Introduction to Wood I

ART 346 Introduction to Fibers I

ART 360 Introduction to Sculpture I

ART 370 Introduction to Ceramics I

ART 298 Mid-Degree Review1 0 hrs

Studio Electives 15 hrs

Five courses above the introductory level in studio. Electives to be selected in consultation with advisor.

Open Electives 8-11 hrs

Electives should be carefully selected with guidance and approval of the academic advisor.

Area of Emphasis 15 hrs

Five sequential courses from one of the following: drawing, painting, graphic design, printmaking, photography, metalsmithing, wood, sculpture, or ceramics.

B.F.A. Requirements 4 hrs

ART 399 Professional Practices

ART 498 B.F.A. Practicum Exhibition

Total Curriculum Requirements1 128 hrs

1The baccalaureate degree is not awarded automatically upon completion of any required number of courses or units of credit. The progress and status of students in the program is regularly assessed through reviews. All students are required to register for ART 298 the semester after they complete 30 credit hours of ART courses. After passing ART 298, students may form a BFA jury and track in the B.F.A. requirements. A final review, ART 498, is conducted by B.F.A. jury in conjunction with fulfilling the senior B.F.A. Practicum Exhibition requirement. BFA students must maintain a 3.00 GPA in the area of their studio concentration.


AREA:
Art1

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 50.0702

ACCREDITED BY:

National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD)

University Studies Requirements 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

Humanities and Fine Arts:

ART 211 Introduction to the History of Art I

University Studies Elective:

ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II

Required Foundation Courses 13 hrs

ART 099 Freshman Orientation

ART 101 Drawing I: Introduction to Drawing

ART 111 Two-dimensional Design

ART 112 Three-dimensional Design

ART 201 Drawing II: Life Drawing

Required Art History Courses 9 hrs

One course from each of the following areas:

•Pre-Modern

ART 415 Greek & Roman Art

ART 416 Medieval Art

ART 418 Renaissance Art

ART 419 Baroque Art

•Modern

ART 426 Romanticism to Realism

ART 427 Late Nineteenth-Century Art

ART 429 Art from 1900 to 1960

ART 430 Contemporary Art, 1960 to the Present

One additional Art History course which may be selected from any course listed above or ART 356, 491 or 501.

Required Limited Studio Electives 18 hrs

Select three of the following 2-D courses:

ART 300 Drawing III

ART 330 Introduction to Painting I

ART 350 Introduction to Graphic Design I: Digital Art

ART 379 Introduction to Printmaking I

ART 382 Introduction to Photography I

Select three of the following 3-D courses:

ART 309 Introduction to Metalsmithing I

ART 310 Introduction to Wood I

ART 346 Introduction to Fibers I

ART 360 Introduction to Sculpture I

ART 370 Introduction to Ceramics I

ART 298 Mid-Degree Review1 0 hrs

Studio Electives 12 hrs

Four courses above the introductory level in studio. Electives to be selected in consultation with advisor.

B.A./B.S. Degree Requirement 2 hrs

ART 399 Professional Practices

ART 499 B.A./B.S. Practicum Group Exhibition1

Open Electives 22-28 hrs

Electives should be carefully selected with guidance and approval of the academic advisor.

Total Curriculum Requirements1 128 hrs

1The baccalaureate degree is not awarded automatically upon completion of any required number of courses or units of credit. The progress and status of students in the program is regularly assessed through reviews. All students are required to register for ART 298 the semester after they complete 30 credit hours of ART courses. A final review, ART 499, is conducted by a faculty jury in conjunction with fulfilling the senior B.S./B.A. Practicum Group Exhibition requirement.


AREA:
Art/(P-12) Teaching Certification1

Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree

CIP 13.1302

ACCREDITED BY:

National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)

University Studies Requirements 43-46 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

Communication and Basic Skills:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking2

Humanities and Fine Arts:

ART 211 Introduction to the History of Art I

Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

University Studies Electives:

ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology2

Note: Certification also requires a grade of B or better in one English composition course and a grade of C or better in a University Studies math course.

Required Foundation Courses 13 hrs

ART 099 Freshman Orientation

ART 101 Drawing I: Introduction to Drawing

ART 111 Two-dimensional Design

ART 112 Three-dimensional Design

ART 201 Drawing II: Life Drawing

Required Art History Courses 9 hrs

One course from each of the following areas:

•Pre-Modern

ART 415 Greek & Roman Art

ART 416 Medieval Art

ART 418 Renaissance Art

ART 419 Baroque Art

•Modern

ART 426 Romanticism to Realism

ART 427 Late Nineteenth-Century Art

ART 429 Art from 1900 to 1960

ART 430 Contemporary Art, 1960 to the Present

One additional Art History course which may be selected from any course listed above or ART 356, 491 or 501.

Required Limited Studio Electives 18 hrs

ART 330 Introduction to Painting I

Select two of the following:

ART 300 Drawing III

ART 350 Introduction to Graphic Design I: Digital Art

ART 379 Introduction to Printmaking I

ART 382 Introduction to Photography I

Select three of the following:

ART 309 Introduction to Metalsmithing I

ART 310 Introduction to Wood I

ART 346 Introduction to Fibers I

ART 360 Introduction to Sculpture I

ART 370 Introduction to Ceramics I

ART 298 Mid-Degree Review1 0 hrs

Open Elective 3 hrs

Elective should be carefully selected with guidance and approval of the academic advisor.

Area of Emphasis 15 hrs

Five sequential courses from one of the following: drawing, painting, graphic design, printmaking, photography, metalsmithing, wood, sculpture, or ceramics.

B.F.A. Requirements 4 hrs

ART 399 Professional Practices

ART 498 B.F.A. Practicum Exhibition1

Art Education Courses 6 hrs

ART 341 Fundamentals of Elementary School Art

ART 342 Fundamentals of Secondary School Art

Teacher Certification Courses 36 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education2

EDU 403 Structure and Foundations of Education

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar

ELE 421 Student Teaching

HEA 191 Personal Health

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A

Collaborative Approach

Total Curriculum Requirements1 138-141 hrs

1The baccalaureate degree is not awarded automatically upon completion of any required number of courses or units of credit. The progress and status of students in the program is regularly assessed through reviews. All students are required to register for ART 298 the semester after they complete 30 credit hours of ART courses. A final review, ART 498, is conducted by B.F.A. jury in conjunction with fulfilling the senior B.F.A. Practicum Exhibition requirement. BFA students must maintain a 3.0 GPA in the area of their studio concentration.
2With a grade of C or better.


AREA:
Art/(P-12) Teaching Certification1

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 13.1302

ACCREDITED BY:

National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD) and National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)

University Studies Requirements 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

•University Studies selections must include:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking2

Humanities and Fine Arts:

ART 211 Introduction to the History of Art I

Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

University Studies Electives:

ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology2

Note: Certification also requires a grade of B or better in one English composition course and a grade of C or better in a University Studies math course.

Required Foundation Courses 13 hrs

ART 099 Freshman Orientation

ART 101 Drawing I: Introduction to Drawing

ART 111 Two-dimensional Design

ART 112 Three-dimensional Design

ART 201 Drawing II: Life Drawing

Required Art History Courses 9 hrs

One course from each of the following areas:

•Pre-Modern

ART 415 Greek & Roman Art

ART 416 Medieval Art

ART 418 Renaissance Art

ART 419 Baroque Art

•Modern

ART 426 Romanticism to Realism

ART 427 Late Nineteenth-Century Art

ART 429 Art from 1900 to 1960

ART 430 Contemporary Art, 1960 to the Present

One additional Art History course which may be selected from any course listed above or ART 356, 491 or 501.

Required Limited Studio Electives 18 hrs

ART 330 Introduction to Painting I

Select two of the following:

ART 300 Drawing III

ART 350 Introduction to Graphic Design I: Digital Art

ART 379 Introduction to Printmaking I

ART 382 Introduction to Photography I

Select three of the following:

ART 309 Introduction to Metalsmithing I

ART 310 Introduction to Wood I

ART 346 Introduction to Fibers I

ART 360 Introduction to Sculpture I

ART 370 Introduction to Ceramics I

ART 298 Mid-Degree Review1 0 hrs

Open Elective 3 hrs

Elective should be carefully selected with guidance and approval of the academic advisor.

B.A/.B.S. Degree Requirement 2 hrs

ART 399 Professional Practices

ART 499 B.A./B.S. Practicum Group Exhibition1

Art Education Courses 6 hrs

ART 341 Fundamentals of Elementary School Art

ART 342 Fundamentals of Secondary School Art

Teacher Certification Courses 36 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education2

EDU 403 Structure and Foundations of Education

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar

ELE 421 Student Teaching

HEA 191 Personal Health

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A

Collaborative Approach

Total Curriculum Requirements1 128-142 hrs

1The baccalaureate degree is not awarded automatically upon completion of any required number of courses or units of credit. The progress and status of students in the program is regularly assessed through reviews. All students are required to register for ART 298 the semester after they complete 30 credit hours of ART courses. A final review, ART 499, is conducted by faculty jury in conjunction with fulfilling the senior B.S./B.A. Practicum Group Exhibition requirement.

Art Minor 21 hrs
One of the following: ART 101, ART 111, or ART 112. One of the following: ART 121, ART 211, or ART 212. Five additional upper-level Studio courses. At least six hours must be above the introductory studio level and completed in residence at Murray State University. ART 343 does not apply to the studio minor. 

Art History Minor 21 hrs
ART 211, ART 212, and five additional upper-level Art History courses, with advisor approval. At least six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.
 
 
Department of English and Philosophy 
7C9 Faculty Hall
270-762-2401

Chair: Peter Murphy. Faculty: Aguiar, Anderson, Babcock, Binfield, Brown, Cella, Claywell, Cobb, Dawkins, Earnest, Edminster, Gayman, Helton, Hovis, Jha, Johnson, Lorrah, Morgan, Neelon, Robinson, Roulston, Sroda, Steiger, Stone, Trites, Ustinova.

The Department of English and Philosophy helps students explore the world of words and ideas while preparing for a variety of creative and dynamic careers. Students majoring in the department's programs can look forward to success in fields such as creative writing, technical writing, business, publishing, teaching, law, and journalism. Through their studies at Murray State, English and Philosophy majors gain the flexibility of a well-developed mind, a facility with the power of language, and the analytical skills employers want.

To reach their goals, students may choose from a number of areas, options, and minors. Note: Each Option program described below—Literature Option, Creative Writing Option, English Education Option—shares a core of courses.

Literature Program
Students enrolled in the Literature Program examine the fiction, poetry, drama, and film of a wide variety of traditions, from ancient to contemporary. The program helps students develop a broad sense of literature, focusing on both traditional and non-canonical writers in English. A Bachelor of Arts degree in English/Literature is available, as well as minors in literature and rhetoric and composition.

Creative Writing Program
The Creative Writing Program helps students prepare for careers in editing, publishing, law, advertising, journalism, and communications, in addition to helping them grow as practicing poets and/or fiction writers and teachers of creative writing. Students may earn a creative writing degree with an area in English/Creative Writing or a major in English/Creative Writing Option. A minor is offered in creative writing as well.

Professional Writing Program
The Professional Writing Program prepares students to succeed as technical writers in business, industry, and government. The program focuses on developing skills in writing, document design, and the professional practices and theoretical backgrounds of technical communication. Professional writing offerings are a Bachelor of Arts in professional writing, a professional writing minor, and a technical writing certificate. 

English Education Program
The English Education Program helps students develop the skills needed to succeed as teachers in the classroom. The program works in conjunction with the College of Education to prepare students for certification as middle and secondary school teachers. The department offers the B.A. within English/Education area.

Philosophy
Students in Philosophy explore the world by studying approaches taken by ancient and modern philosophers. Skills developed in the study of philosophy have provided majors with the basis for successful careers in a variety of fields. Many students enter graduate study in fields such as law, secondary education, or higher education. A major in English with philosophy as a cognate discipline and a minor in literature and philosophy are offered by the department.

Graduate Programs
Students interested in graduate study in English should examine the MSU Graduate Bulletin for descriptions of the following programs: Master of Arts in English (with options in literature, creative writing, English education, English studies, and English with philosophy as a cognate discipline); and Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).


AREA:
English Education/Secondary Certification (Grades 8-12)

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 23.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: Students are required to take COM 161 (with a C or better) and PSY 180 (also counts as a University Studies elective) for certification. BIO 101 is strongly recommended as the science elective. Certification also requires a grade of B or better in one English composition course and a grade of C or better in one University Studies math course.

Required Courses 25 hrs

ENG 099 Freshman Orientation

ENG 221 Introduction to English Studies

ENG 302 Major American Authors

ENG 334 Shakespeare

or

ENG 534 Shakespeare

ENG 404 Advanced Composition

and one of the following:

ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 224 Writing in the Professions

and one of the following:

ENG 303 English Literature to 1760

ENG 304 English Literature, 1760 to the Present

and one of the following:

ENG 305 World Literature

ENG 306 Contemporary Literature

and one of the following:

ENG 309 History of the English Language

ENG 310 Linguistics and English Grammars

Required Limited Electives 24 hrs

ENG 303 English Literature to 1760

or

ENG 304 English Literature, 1760 to the Present

(whichever was not taken as part of required courses)

ENG 328 Standard English Usage

ENG 329 Teaching English in Middle/Secondary Schools

ENG 435 Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools

ENG 445 Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools

and

Three 300-500 level ENG courses, at least two of which must be in literature, at least one covering writings prior to 1800.

Required for Secondary Certification 32 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments1

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology1, 2

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development3

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education2, 3

EDU 383 Evaluation and Measurement in Education

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar (optional)

HEA 191 Personal Health1

REA 527 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A 

Collaborative Approach

Elective 3 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 142-145 hrs

1This course may be dropped as a requirement. See your advisor before registering for this course.
2With a grade of C or better.
3Counts as a University Studies elective.


MAJOR:
English/Creative Writing Option

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 23.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 25 hrs

ENG 099 Freshman Orientation

ENG 221 Introduction to English Studies

ENG 302 Major American Authors

ENG 334 Shakespeare1

ENG 404 Advanced Composition

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 303 English Literature to 1760

ENG 304 English Literature, 1760 to the Present

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 305 Survey of World Literature

ENG 306 Contemporary Literature

and one of the following writing courses:

ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 224 Writing in the Professions

and one of the following:

ENG 309 History of the English Language

ENG 310 Linguistics and English Grammars

Concentration Required Electives 12 hrs

Concentration in Fiction

ENG 415 Writer's Workshop: Short Story

ENG 521 Forms of Fiction

ENG 560 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

and one of the following courses

ENG 342 Introduction to Poetry

ENG 343 Special Topics in Creative Writing

ENG 416 Writer's Workshop: Poetry

-or-

Concentration in Poetry

ENG 416 Writer's Workshop: Poetry

ENG 520 Forms of Poetry

ENG 561 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

and one of the following courses

ENG 341 Introduction to Fiction

ENG 343 Special Topics in Creative Writing

ENG 415 Writer's Workshop: Short Story

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

Electives 15-21 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1ENG 534 may be substituted for ENG 334.


MAJOR:
English/Literature Option

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 23.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 25 hrs

ENG 099 Freshman Orientation

ENG 221 Introduction to English Studies

ENG 302 Major American Authors

ENG 334 Shakespeare1

ENG 404 Advanced Composition

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 303 English Literature to 1760

ENG 304 English Literature, 1760 to the Present

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 305 Survey of World Literature

ENG 306 Contemporary Literature

and one of the following writing courses:

ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 224 Writing in the Professions

and one of the following:

ENG 309 History of the English Language

ENG 310 Linguistics and English Grammars

Required Limited Electives 12 hrs

ENG 509 Literary Criticism

and one of the following:

ENG 303 English Literature to 1760

ENG 426 Classical Literature

ENG 427 Medieval Literature

ENG 428 Renaissance Literature

ENG 500 Chaucer

ENG 501 Milton

ENG 502 Early English Literature

ENG 504 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century 

English Literature

ENG 511 Non-Shakespearean Elizabethan-Jacobean Drama

ENG 535 Sixteenth-Century English Literature

ENG 536 Seventeenth-Century English Literature

ENG 541 American Literature, 1607 to 1820

and two 300-500 level English courses

Note: Students are encouraged to take at least one course in a genre other than prose fiction (e.g., ENG 316, 413, 511, 537, or 550), and one course with a larger focus than just British and American literature (e.g., ENG 305, 306, 318, 426, 427, or 428).

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

Electives 15-21 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1ENG 534 may be substituted for ENG 334.


MAJOR:
English/Professional Writing Option

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 23.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 25 hrs

ENG 099 Freshman Orientation

ENG 221 Introduction to English Studies

ENG 302 Major American Authors

ENG 334 Shakespeare1

ENG 404 Advanced Composition

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 303 English Literature to 1760

ENG 304 English Literature, 1760 to the Present

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 305 Survey of World Literature

ENG 306 Contemporary Literature

and one of the following writing courses:

ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 224 Writing in the Professions

and one of the following:

ENG 309 History of the English Language

ENG 310 Linguistics and English Grammars

Required Limited Electives 18 hrs

Choose from the following:

ENG 325 Professional Technical Writing

ENG 328 Standard English Usage

ENG 341 Introduction to Fiction

or

ENG 342 Introduction to Poetry

ENG 421 Technical Document Design

ENG 422 Writing for the Web and Electronic Media

ENG 423 Writing for Desktop Publishing

ENG 488 Cooperative Education

ENG 533 Language and Culture

ENG 575 Advanced Technical Writing

Required Minor 21 hrs

Electives 15-18 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1ENG 534 may be substituted for ENG 334.


AREA:
Creative Writing and Literature

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 23.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-52 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 25 hrs

ENG 099 Freshman Orientation

ENG 221 Introduction to English Studies

ENG 302 Major American Authors

ENG 334 Shakespeare1

ENG 404 Advanced Composition

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 303 English Literature to 1760

ENG 304 English Literature, 1760 to the Present

and one of the following surveys:

ENG 305 Survey of World Literature

ENG 306 Contemporary Literature

and one of the following writing courses:

ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing

ENG 224 Writing in the Professions

and one of the following:

ENG 309 History of the English Language

ENG 310 Linguistics and English Grammars

Required Limited Electives 24 hrs

Concentration in Fiction

ENG 415 Writer's Workshop: Short Story

ENG 521 Forms of Fiction

ENG 560 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction

and one of the following courses

ENG 342 Introduction to Poetry

ENG 343 Special Topics in Creative Writing

ENG 416 Writer's Workshop: Poetry

-or-

Concentration in Poetry

ENG 416 Writer's Workshop: Poetry

ENG 520 Forms of Poetry

ENG 561 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

and one of the following courses

ENG 341 Introduction to Fiction

ENG 343 Special Topics in Creative Writing

ENG 415 Writer's Workshop: Short Story

Three 400-500 level literature courses and one additional course in literature or creative writing.

Electives 27-30 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1ENG 534 may be substituted for ENG 334.

English Minor 24 hrs
ENG 302, 303 or 304, 305 or 306, 309 or 310, 509 and three upper-level English courses, at least one of which must be a literature course. At least six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Creative Writing Minor 24 hrs
ENG 201, four courses in creative writing, plus three upper-level English courses. ENG 201 may be taken as a University Studies elective. At least six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

English Rhetoric and Composition Minor 24 hrs
ENG 220, 404, and PHI 103. Two of the following: ENG 309, 310, 328 or 533. Two of the following: ENG 440, 441, 524, 580 or 581. One of the following: COM 251, 357, HIS 300, 301, JMC 330, 390, 400, PHI 202, 351, 353, or 354.

Multicultural, Class, and Gender Studies Minor 21 hrs
MCG 201 and 499. Choose 15 hours of electives. No more than three courses may come from either of the following two categories: Comparative Cultures and Non-Western Studies-ANT 140, 330, 470, ARC 330, ART 211 or 212, 356, COM 387, ENG 250, 533, GSC 110, HIS 309, 340, 350, 370, 550, 551, 555, 572, 574, 581, INT 200, MCG 351 or 412, POL 553, 554 or one of the following: FRE 105, GER 105, JPN 105, SPA 105; or Minority and Gender Studies-ANT 329, 343, 344, 596, ARC 250, ECO 140, ENG 245, 318, 320, 547, HIS 320, 515, 560, MCG 351 or 412, POL 342, 445, PSY 221, 302, 306, SOC 331, 337, 355, or SWK 225. At least six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Professional Writing Minor 21 hrs
ENG 324 or 325 and 575. Two from the following: ENG 421, 422, or 423; and three from the following: ENG 328, 340, 488, 512, 524, or 533. At least six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.


CERTIFICATE:
Technical Writing

CIP 23.1101

Required Courses 15 hrs

ENG 324 Technical Writing

or

ENG 325 Professional Technical Writing

and four of the following:

ENG 421 Technical Document Design

ENG 422 Electronic Technical Documentation

ENG 423 Paper Technical Documentation

ENG 488 Cooperative Education

ENG 575 Advanced Technical Writing


MAJOR:
Philosophy

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 38.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 12-13 hrs

PHI 099 Freshman Orientation 

PHI 103 Logic1

PHI 201 Introduction to Philosophy1

PHI 202 Ethics1

PHI 499 Senior Research Project

Required Limited Electives 18 hrs

PHI electives approved by advisor.

Required Minor 21 hrs

Electives 23-24 hrs

Unrestricted Elective 3 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1Required for major whether or not taken as University Studies elective. 

Literature and Philosophy Minor 24 hrs
ENG 201 and 360, PHI 201, ENG 512 or PHI 550. One of the following: ENG 302, 303, or 304. One of the following: PHI 301, 306, 325, or 340. One of the following: ENG 305, 306, 334, 426, 427, 428, or 534. And one of the following: PHI 310, 351, 353, 354, or 355. At least six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Philosophy Minor 21 hrs
PHI 103, 201 and 202 and 12 hours of approved electives in philosophy. At least six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. Only two of these courses may be shared with University Studies.
 
 
Department of Government, Law and International Affairs
553 Business Building
270-762-2661
government@murraystate.edu

Chair: Farouk F. Umar. Faculty: Armstrong, Chaney, Clingermayer, Daughaday, Garfield, Julian, McCutchen, J. Rose, W. Rose, Umar, Wattier.

Curricula of the department afford enough specialization and career education to prepare students for enrollment in professional and graduate programs, or for participation in various occupational classifications immediately upon graduation. Students completing baccalaureate programs in the department will be granted either the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree. Major programs are offered in political science, international affairs, and sociology. Minor programs are offered in political science, international affairs, legal studies/paralegal, social science and sociology. 

The Department of Government, Law and International Affairs provides several avenues to professional and academic competence. Besides specific courses preparing students for a broad variety of occupational choices in international affairs, politics and public administration, and legal studies, University Studies classes furnish an opportunity for students to become more familiar with the international environment and the American political system. The department functions in close harmony with other academic units across campus and draws from other programs to complement its offerings. Pre-law advising and law school placement services are coordinated by the legal studies component within the department.

The outcome of the above fields of study is that graduates of the programs must demonstrate oral and written communication skills which follow the conventions of standard English usage and meet the criteria for clarity, organization, development and thoughtfulness; must have acquired basic understanding of research methodologies, i.e. the use of statistical analysis and computer applications; and should have acquired an understanding of the basic concepts, systems and problems of their discipline in particular and liberal arts education in general.


MAJOR:
Political Science

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degree

CIP 45.1001

University Studies Requirements 48-50 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

Communication and Basic Skills:

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology

Science and Mathematics:

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Note: See required courses below before selecting social science/University Studies elective courses. A minimum grade of C is required in ENG 101, 102 and POL 140 from freshmen and transfer students majoring or minoring in political science.

Required Courses 17 hrs

POL 099 Freshman Orientation

POL 140 American National Government

and three of the following: 

POL 240 State and Local Politics

POL 250 Introduction to International Relations

POL 252 Contemporary Political Systems

POL 260 Introduction to Political Behavior

POL 370 Introduction to Public Administration

and

POL 360 Principles and Methods

POL 499 Senior Seminar in Political Science

Required Limited Electives 18 hrs

POL electives approved by advisor.

Note: At least 12 hours of the major must be at the 400 or 500 levels. Only six hours of credit toward the major may be received for POL 488, 489, 590 or 595.

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

Unrestricted Electives 19-24 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs


MAJOR:
Political Science/Social Studies Certification (Grades 8-12)

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degree

CIP 45.1001

University Studies Requirements 48-50 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

Communications and Basic Skills:

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology2

Science and Mathematics:

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Social Sciences:

PSY 180 General Psychology

University Studies Elective:

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking

Required Course 17 hrs

POL 099 Freshman Orientation

POL 140 American National Government

and three of the following:

POL 240 State and Local Politics

POL 250 Introduction to International Relations

POL 252 Contemporary Political Systems

POL 260 Introduction to Political Behavior

POL 370 Introduction to Public Administration

and

POL 360 Principles and Methods of Research

POL 499 Senior Seminar in Political Science

Required Limited Electives 18 hrs

POL electives approved by advisor.

Note: At least 12 hours of the major must be at the 400 or 500 levels. Only six hours of credit toward the major may be received from POL 488, 489, 590 or 595.

Required for Secondary Certification 38-41 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education2

EDU 303 Strategies of Teaching

EDU 383 Evaluation and Measurement in Education1,2

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education1,2

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar (optional)1,3

HEA 191 Personal Health

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools1,2

SEC 421 Student Teaching in the Secondary School1,3

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: 

A Collaborative Approach

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

Choose either economics, geography, history, or social

science minor. Social science minor is strongly recommended.

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1Students are required to take this course the semester prior to student teaching.

2Must be admitted to Teacher Education before enrolling in this class.

3All placements for student teaching are made the semester prior to the professional semester. Only students fully admitted to Teacher Education will be considered for placement. (See the Office of Teacher Education Services for admission requirements to teacher education.)


MAJOR:
Public Administration

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degree

CIP 44.0401

University Studies Requirements 48-53 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

Communication and Basic Skills:

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology

Science and Mathematics:

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Social Sciences:

ECO 230 Principles of Macroeconomics

or

ECO 231 Principles of Microeconomics

Note: See required courses below before selecting social science/University Studies elective courses. A minimum grade of C is required in ENG 101, 102 and POL 140 from freshmen and transfer students majoring in public administration.

Required Courses 26 hrs

ACC 501 Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Entities

PLN 521 Geographic Information Systems

POL 099 Freshman Orientation

POL 140 American National Government

POL 240 State and Local Politics

POL 360 Principles and Methods

POL 370 Introduction to Public Administration

POL 499 Senior Seminar in Political Science

POL 573 Public Budgeting and Fiscal Administration

POL 575 Human Resources Administration in Public Sector

Required Limited Electives 9 hrs

Choose from the following:

MGT 354 Techniques of Oral Reporting and Management Briefings

PLN 501 Theory and Practice in Urban and Regional Planning

PLN 523 Problems in Urban Geography and Urban Planning

POL 488 Cooperative Education

or

POL 590 Internship

POL 571 Public Policy

POL 572 Public Planning and Evaluation

YNL 350 Program Administration in Youth and Human

Service Organizations

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

Unrestricted Electives 16-24 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

Curriculum Outline for Pre-Law
Most of the nation's law schools reject the idea of a rigid pre-law curriculum as a means of preparing students for entrance into law school. The undergraduate pre-law student is actually working toward two different objectives: admission to law school and an undergraduate education which will complement the law degree once obtained.

The type of undergraduate degree pursued may depend on the type of law in which you intend to specialize. For example, if you want to become a tax attorney, you might concentrate in accounting and economics. If copyright law interests you, an undergraduate degree in music or art would be beneficial. Those students interested in government service or politics may want to pursue a degree in political science.

Many students do not have a particular field of law identified prior to entering college. For these students a broad liberal arts education, including particularly those subjects which deal with people, such as political science and the other social sciences, is important. Murray State University's commitment to a liberal arts education through its University Studies requirements is appropriate to this objective. All pre-law students should be aware that communications skills are very important, and for this reason, courses in English, speech and foreign languages should be considered.

Electives in Legal Studies

LST 370 Law and Literature

LST 444 Judicial Process

LST 446 Criminal Law

LST 545 Constitutional Law I: Development and Trends

LST 546 Constitutional Law II: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights

International Affairs
Global awareness and cross-cultural skills are increasingly important in a variety of careers. Educational, social service, business, governmental and non-governmental organizations recognize that these skills are important for solving complex problems in a culturally diverse context. The major in international affairs and the minor in international affairs allow students in a variety of disciplines to acquire these skills in support of expertise in their chosen fields.

MAJOR:
International Affairs

CIP 45.0901

University Studies Requirements 50 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

University Studies selections must include:

•Social Sciences:

ECO 231 Principles of Microeconomics

Required Courses 28 hrs

COM 387 Intercultural Communication

ECO 310 Issues in Global Economy

GSC 110 World Geography

HIS 309 Survey of World Religions

POL 250 Introduction to International Relations

POL 252 Contemporary Political Systems

POL 556 American Foreign Policy

or

POL 557 International Law and Organizations

POL 560 Seminar in International Affairs

SOC 250 Global Sociology

or

One of the following:

FRE 105 Introduction to French Culture

GER 105 Introduction to German Culture

JPN 105 Introduction to Japanese Culture

MLA 105 Introduction to Contemporary Culture

SPA 105 Introduction to Hispanic Culture

Thematic Cluster Courses 9 hrs

(Choose one theme and courses with approval of advisor and chair.)

I. Art, Literature and Culture

II. International Development and Communication

III. Regional Area Studies

Africa and Middle East

Asia

Europe

Latin America

Required Minor 21-24 hrs

(Courses taken for the major will not count towards the minor.)

Electives 17-20 hrs

(International education experience or equivalency is required. English counts as second language for international students whose native language is not English.)

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

Sociology
The sociology program is a liberal arts program oriented toward increasing the student's understanding of human society, the groups and institutions of which it is composed, and its impact on human beings. Sociology helps develop one's appreciation of diversity, love of learning, writing and study skills, as well as a knowledge base about human behavior, social research, social organization and culture. Sociology is a potential major for students planning futures in such professions as law, business, education, and politics. Sociology provides a rich fund of knowledge directly concerning each of these fields. But rather than prepare the student for a narrow specialty, sociology prepares the individual for a lifetime of learning and change to meet the challenges and opportunities of an increasingly complex society. The sociology program will provide students with a solid foundation for their chosen careers upon graduation or for more specialized graduate education in such fields as public health, law, social sciences, or a number of other professional fields.


MAJOR:
Sociology

Bachelor of Arts/Science Degree

CIP 45.1101.01

University Studies Requirements 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 14-15 hrs

PSY 300 Principles and Methods of Statistical Analysis

or

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

SOC 099 Freshman Orientation

SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology

SOC 303 Introduction to Research Methods

SOC 400 Senior Seminar

SOC 434 Social Theory

Required Electives 18 hrs

SOC electives approved by advisor.

Required Minor 21 hrs

Unrestricted Electives 23-26 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

Global Studies/International Affairs Minor 25 hrs
ECO 310 or 315 or 410; GSC 110; INT 200, 400; POL 250, 252 and nine hours from one of the following thematic clusters: Art, Literature and Culture, International Development and Communication, or Regional Area Studies. Courses within the thematic cluster must be approved by an advisor in and the chair of the Department of Government, Law and International Affairs. At least six hours of the clusters must be upper-level courses at Murray State University.

Legal Studies/Paralegal Minor 24 hrs
LST 240, 242, 300, 310, 400, 430, 540 plus one LST elective. Only three hours of credit allowed from LST 488, 489, 505 or 595. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. Computer knowledge and a minimum grade of C in ENG 101 and 102 are required of all students (including transfers) pursuing this minor. No substitutions and/or alterations in the above curriculum shall be made without written approval of department chair.

Political Science Minor 24 hrs
POL 140 (minimum grade of C required); two courses (six hours) from POL 240, 250, 252, 260 and 370; and 15 hours of POL electives approved by a department advisor. Only three hours are allowed from POL 488, 489, 590, 595. At least nine hours must be 400 or 500 level and six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. A minimum grade of C in ENG 101 and 102 is required of all students (including transfers) minoring in political science. No substitutions and/or alterations in the above curriculum shall be made without written approval of department chair.

Social Science Minor 24 hrs
Open only to majors in economics, history, or political science who seek secondary certification in social studies. ECO 231, GSC 110, HIS 221, 222, POL 140, SOC 133; and six hours of upper level courses (300 or above) from the social science disciplines with approval of advisor. Courses required for a major may not be counted toward the minor; substitutions must be from a social science discipline other than the major and be approved by the advisor; and requirements for certification for teaching secondary school social studies, grades 8 through 12 through the College of Education must also be met.

Sociology Minor 21 hrs

SOC 133, 434, plus 15 hours of electives. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.
 
 
Department of History
6B Faculty Hall
270-762-2231

Chair: Ken Wolf. Faculty: Beahan, Beasley, Belue, Bierwirth, Bolin, Carpenter, Edwards, Fuhrmann, Gannon, Mulligan, Schell, Strieter, Whidden, Wolf.

Department of History course offerings support the university's University Studies requirements, provide concentrations in American, European and Third World studies for a major or minor, and offer programs leading to the Master of Arts degree in history.

The department contributes substantially to the interdisciplinary world civilizations and culture courses and offers an elective, The American Experience, which meets University Studies requirements in social science. These University Studies courses encourage students to appreciate the diverse paths humans have taken to the present as well as their own distinctive cultural heritage.

Specialized instruction for undergraduate majors and minors in history is intended to develop knowledge of the past and the skills of critical inquiry necessary for careers in teaching, the professions, government and business. Many students are currently combining a major in history with a major in other fields. The department provides a Master of Arts degree program for teachers in schools and community colleges, for those who wish to pursue advanced study at the doctoral level, and for students interested in history-related careers other than teaching.

The Department of History also maintains the Forrest C. Pogue Institute for Public History. The institute provides expertise and works with state and federal agencies, community leaders, and local interest groups to preserve and interpret for the public the region and state's historic past. It also contributes significantly to the department's Master of Arts major field option in public history by engaging students in projects that supplement academic training with experiential learning in the fields of museum studies, historic site interpretation, historic preservation, and oral history collecting.


MAJOR:
History

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 45.0801.01

Note: B.A. degree is required unless specifically exempted by department chair.

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 19 hrs

HIS 099 Freshman Orientation

HIS 201 Modern Europe

HIS 221 American Experience to 18651

HIS 222 American Experience Since 18651

HIS 300 Introduction to Historical Studies2

and one of the following:

HIS 309 Survey of World Religion

HIS 340 The Far East in Modern Times

HIS 350 History of Latin America

HIS 355 Islamic Middle East

HIS 370 History of Africa

and

HIS 400 Senior Seminar

Required Limited Electives 15 hrs

HIS upper-level courses approved by advisor (not including HIS 361); at least one must be a 500-level course.

Required Minor 21 hrs

Electives3 24-26 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1Required for major. May not be taken as University Studies elective.
2Prerequisite for 500-level courses. May be waived with permission of department chair.
3At least one three-hour free elective must be chosen from outside History and may not be counted as a University Studies requirement.


MAJOR:
History/Social Studies Certification (Grades 8-12)

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 45.0801.01

Note: Students are required to take COM 161 (with a grade of C or better) and PSY 180 for certification. Certification also requires a grade of B or better in one English composition class and a grade of C or better in one University Studies math course. B.A. degree is required unless specifically exempted by department chair.

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 19 hrs

HIS 099 Freshman Orientation

HIS 201 Modern Europe

HIS 221 American Experience to 18651

HIS 222 American Experience Since 18651

HIS 300 Introduction to Historical Studies2

and one of the following:

HIS 309 Survey of World Religion

HIS 340 The Far East in Modern Times

HIS 350 History of Latin America

HIS 355 Islamic Middle East

HIS 370 History of Africa

and

HIS 400 Senior Seminar

Required Limited Electives 15 hrs

HIS upper-level courses approved by advisor; at least one must be a 500-level course requiring a research project (guidelines provided by course instructor).

Required for Secondary Certification 36-38 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology4

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education

EDU 383 Evaluation and Measurement in Education

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar (optional)

HEA 191 Personal Health

HIS 361 Teaching History3

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A

Collaborative Approach

Required Minor 21 hrs

(economics, geography or political science)

or

Social Science Minor (recommended) 24 hrs

Open only to majors in economics, geography, history, or political science who seek secondary certification in social studies. ECO 231, GSC 110, HIS 221, 222, POL 140, SOC 133, and six hours of upper level courses (300 or above) from the social science disciplines with approval of advisor. Courses required for a major may not be counted toward the minor; substitutions must be from a social science discipline other than the major and be approved by the advisor; and requirements for certification for teaching secondary school social studies, grades 8 through 12 through the College of Education must also be met. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Total Curriculum Requirements 140 hrs

1May not be taken as a University Studies elective.
2Prerequisite for 500-level courses. May be waived with permission of the chair.
3Does not count toward a history major.
4With a grade of C or better.
5Courses required for a major may not be counted toward a minor; appropriate alternative courses will be Selected from a social science discipline other than the major with approval of the advisor.

History Minor 21 hrs
HIS 201, 221, 222, plus 12 hours of upper-level electives (excluding HIS 361), at least one at the 500 level. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Religious Studies Minor 21 hrs
Courses listed or cross-listed RGS, to include one course at the 100 or 200 level; nine credit hours at the 300 level or above from courses approaching religion historically, philosophically, from the viewpoint of a social science, or from a critical study of literature or art, three hours of which must be earned in each of three of these categories; and nine hours of approved electives. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.
 
 
Department of Modern Languages
4A Faculty Hall
270-762-2501

Chair: Meg Brown. Faculty: Bodevin, Brown, Ebert, Grimes, Hatakeyama, Howe, Medina, Morgan, Saint Paul, Waag.

The Department of Modern Languages provides an important facet of the liberal education of all students by offering a variety of courses in French, German, Spanish, Japanese, and the cultures and literatures of those countries where these languages are spoken. These courses increase the cultural and linguistic awareness of students, help them fulfill the University Studies and B.A. requirements, and prepare them for language examinations in graduate school. Modern language courses develop skills and provide information and experience that help prepare students for citizenship in a rapidly changing world.

The Modern Language major is designed to train students to communicate effectively with native speakers of the language studied; read and appreciate the cultural and historical significance of important works of native literature; and understand fundamental cultural characteristics of another part of the world. All students take a common core of courses as well as several electives and a senior seminar. Student progress in language skills is measured according to standards established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in order to ensure an appropriate level of proficiency in the various skills.

The department strongly recommends that all language majors and minors study abroad for at least one summer session. The Kentucky Institute for International Studies offers programs in a number of countries. Other study-abroad opportunities are available through the department and the Institute for International Studies.

The department also strongly recommends that all language majors take more than the required number hours in order to attain increased proficiency in the language.

Those who pursue a language as a major or minor may apply their language training to careers in various fields of endeavor. The study of modern languages and cultures opens the door to a cosmopolitan world which any educated person should be able to understand and appreciate. It gives the student significant practical advantages in the modern world of employment and magnifies humanistic insight which is of incalculable value in successful living.

The department strives to keep pace with the changing needs and interests of students and society and with the most current teaching methods. Creativity, flexibility and individual attention characterize its programs. The department's facilities include modern offices and classrooms and the Language and Culture Resource Center, a multi-media lab providing students with computer assisted learning tools as well as e-mail, Internet and World Wide Web access.

The Graduate Bulletin contains information on the Master of Arts in English, the Master of Arts in education, and the Master of Arts in TESOL, which accept modern language courses as part of the curriculum.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirement. All Bachelor of Arts candidates must complete 12 hours of course work in a single foreign language. Credit may be granted for high school study of the same language based on the departmental challenge process (see Credit by examination, below) and students may begin language study at the level indicated by their placement exam (see Placement, below). Some departments require the Bachelor of Arts degree in the College of Humanities and Fine Arts.

Placement. All students new to the language programs at Murray State (who have not received prior course credits from another college or university) are required to take a placement exam to determine at which level of their language they should begin (102, 201, 202, 301, etc.). This exam will be required of all students with prior language experience, including native speakers. We strongly advise students to begin to fulfill their language requirement during the first 30 hours of their undergraduate degree at MSU.

Credit by Examination. If a student has previously acquired knowledge of French, German, Spanish or Japanese (the languages regularly taught at MSU), a maximum of 12 college credits, up to and including the level of 301, may be awarded. The awarding of credit will be based on the applicant's success in either of the following options:

Option (1):The Departmental Challenge Process. The Departmental Challenge Process consists of the student taking the Placement Exam and completing the appropriate course (102 or higher) determined by the score on the Placement Exam, with the grade of A or B. The Placement Exam score must be current (within the calendar year). The student then must complete an "Application of Challenge Credit" available in the department office and file the approved application with the Admissions & Registrar's Office. There is a fee of $5.00 per credit hour for each hour of credit awarded. It is the responsibility of the student to apply for Challenge Credit and application must be made while the student is enrolled at MSU.

Option (2): The CLEP Examination. Students may take the CLEP examination which is administered by the Counseling and Testing Center on campus. Credit is awarded based upon the student's score on the CLEP examination. CLEP examination scores must be recent (within the calendar year) to be eligible for credit. Fees are required for the CLEP examination.

Option (3): The Advanced Placement (AP) Examination. Credit is awarded based upon the student's score on the Advance Placement Examination in Language and/or Literature.

Support Courses for Language Majors
Each language major must select one course from the following list of approved courses.

ANT 330 Contemporary Latin American Cultures (Spanish majors)

ANT 450 History of Anthropological Thought

ARC 321 Ancient Civilizations

ART 428 Nineteenth-Century Art

ART 429 Early Modern Art

BPA 396 International Business Seminar

BPA 515 Communicating in the International Business Environment

BPA 596 International Business Seminar

COM 387 Intercultural Communication

ECO 311 European Economic History

ECO 460 International Trade and Finance

ENG 309 History of the English Language

ENG 427 Medieval Literature

ENG 428 Renaissance Literature

ENG 508 Modern Fiction

HIS 350 History of Latin America (Spanish majors)

HIS 501 The French Revolution (French majors)

HIS 502 Nineteenth-Century Europe

HIS 503 Europe since 1914

HIS 507 Iberia: Modern Spain and Portugal (Spanish majors)

HIS 511 Modern France (French majors)

HIS 512 Modern Germany (German majors)

JMC 400 International Mass Communications

MGT 557 International Management

MKT 396 International Marketing Seminar: Europe

MKT 568 Global Marketing Management

MUS 370 Music History and Literature I

MUS 371 Music History and Literature II

MUS 530 Special Topics (must relate to major)

PHI 353 Modern Philosophy

PHI 355 Contemporary Philosophy

POL 462 Modern Political Thought

POL 551 Government and Politics of Western Europe

POL 553 Government and Politics of Latin America  (Spanish majors)

POL 557 International Law and Organizations

PSY 326 Psychology of Language

RGS 309 Survey of World Religions


MAJOR:
French

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 16.0901

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: Intermediate level modern language courses completed as part of the major or minor also satisfy modern language requirements for the B.A. All majors and minors, including those who score above the 302 level on the Placement Exam will be required to take FRE 302 as a gateway course to the culture and literature courses.

Required Courses 16 hrs

MLA 099 Freshman Orientation 

FRE 201 Intermediate French I

FRE 202 Intermediate French II

or

FRE 203 French for the Working World

FRE 301 Conversation and Composition I

FRE 302 Conversation and Composition II

MLA 400 Senior Seminar

Note: Students may receive credit for FRE 201 and 202 after taking the Placement Exam and completing the departmental challenge process. Credit for FRE 101 and 102 may not be used for the major but will be counted for graduation.

Limited Electives 6 hrs

Select from the following literature courses:

FRE 401 Survey of French Literature I

FRE 402 Survey of French Literature II

FRE 421 Topics in French Literature

FRE 441 Topics in French Cultural Studies

FRE 450 Literary Masterpieces in French

FRE 460 Studies in a Genre

FRE 501 Middle Ages Literature

FRE 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature

FRE 505 Nineteenth-Century Literature

FRE 507 Twentieth-Century Literature

FRE 521 Topics in French Literature

Approved Electives in French 12 hrs

Select from FRE courses beyond FRE 302.

Note: Each student must submit a senior research project.

Required Support Courses French Major 3 hrs

One related course outside of the Department of Modern Languages, selected from the approved list given in the departmental introduction.

Note: The department strongly recommends that majors study abroad for at least one summer.

Required Minor 21 hrs

Electives1 21-23 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-132 hrs

1At least one three-hour free elective must be chosen from outside Modern Languages and may not be counted as a University Studies requirement.


MAJOR:
French/Teaching Certification (Grades P-12)

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 16.0901

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: Students are required to take COM 161 (with a grade of C or better) and PSY 180 for certification. Certification also requires a grade of B or better in one English composition class and a grade of C or better in one University Studies math course. All majors and minors, including those who score above the 302 level on the Placement Exam will be required to take FRE 302 as a gateway course to the culture and literature courses.

Required Courses 25 hrs

MLA 099 Freshman Orientation

FRE 201 Intermediate French I

FRE 202 Intermediate French II

or

FRE 203 French for the Working World

FRE 301 Conversation and Composition I

FRE 302 Conversation and Composition II

FRE 323 French Culture and Civilization

or

FRE 324 Contemporary French Culture and Civilization

FRE 331 Advanced Grammar

MLA 400 Senior Seminar

MLA 514 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages

Note: Students may receive credit for FRE 201 and 202 after taking the Placement Exam and completing the departmental challenge process. Credit for FRE 101 and 102 may not be used for the major but will be counted for graduation.

Limited Electives 6 hrs

Select from the following literature courses:
FRE 401 Survey of French Literature I

FRE 402 Survey of French Literature II

FRE 421 Topics in French Literature

FRE 441 Topics in French Cultural Studies

FRE 450 Literary Masterpieces in French

FRE 460 Studies in a Genre

FRE 501 Middle Ages Literature

FRE 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature

FRE 505 Nineteenth-Century Literature

FRE 507 Twentieth-Century Literature

FRE 521 Topics in French Literature

Approved Electives in French 6 hrs

Select from FRE courses beyond FRE 302.

Note: Each student must submit a senior research project.

Required Support Course 3 hrs

One related course outside of the Department of Modern Languages, selected from the approved list given in the departmental introduction.

Note: The department strongly recommends that majors study abroad for at least one summer.

Required for Secondary Certification 36 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology1

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education1

EDU 303 Strategies of Teaching

EDU 383 Evaluation and Measurement in Education

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education

HEA 191 Personal Health

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A 

Collaborative Approach

Required Minor 21 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 146 hrs

1With a grade of C or better.


MAJOR:
German

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 16.0501

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: All majors and minors, including those who score above the 302 level on the Placement Exam will be required to take GER 302 as a gateway course to the culture and literature courses.

Required Courses 16 hrs

MLA 099 Freshman Orientation 

GER 201 Intermediate German I

GER 202 Intermediate German II

or

GER 203 German for the Working World

GER 301 Conversation and Composition I

GER 302 Conversation and Composition II

MLA 400 Senior Seminar

Note: Students may receive credit for GER 201 and 202 after taking the Placement Exam and completing the departmental challenge process. Credit for GER 101 and 102 may not be used for the major but will be counted for graduation.

Limited Electives 6 hrs

Select from the following literature courses:
GER 401 Survey of German Literature I

GER 402 Survey of German Literature II

GER 421 Topics in German Literature

GER 441 Topics in German Cultural Studies

GER 450 Literary Masterpieces in German

GER 460 Studies in a Genre

GER 501 Literature before 1600

GER 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature

GER 505 Nineteenth-Century German Literature

GER 507 Twentieth-Century Literature

GER 521 Topics in German Literature

Approved Electives in German 12 hrs

Select from GER courses beyond GER 302.

Note: Each student must submit a senior research project.

Required Support Course 3 hrs

One related course outside of the Department of Modern Languages, selected from the approved list given in the departmental introduction.

Note: The department strongly recommends that majors study abroad for at least one summer.

Required Minor 21 hrs

Electives1 21-23 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-132 hrs

1At least one three-hour free elective must be chosen from outside Modern Languages and may not be counted as a University Studies requirement.


MAJOR:
German/Teaching Certification (Grades P-12)

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 16.0501

Note: Students desiring teaching credentials in German must also have a major in or minor in a frequently taught subject, according to state guidelines. English, history, mathematics, or science are suggested choices.

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: Students are required to take COM 161 (with a grade of C or better) and PSY 180 for certification. Certification also requires a grade of B or better in one English composition class and a grade of C or better in one University Studies math course.

Intermediate level foreign language courses completed as part of the major or minor also satisfy foreign language requirements for the B.A.

All majors and minors, including those who score above the 302 level on the Placement Exam will be required to take GER 302 as a gateway course to the culture and literature courses.

Required Courses 25 hrs

MLA 099 Freshman Orientation

GER 201 Intermediate German I

GER 202 Intermediate German II

or

GER 203 German for the Working World

GER 301 Conversation and Composition I

GER 302 Conversation and Composition II

GER 323 German Culture and Civilization

or

GER 324 Contemporary German Culture and Civilization

GER 331 Advanced Grammar

MLA 400 Senior Seminar

MLA 514 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages

Note: Students may receive credit for GER 201 and 202 after taking the Placement Exam and completing the departmental challenge process. Credit for GER 101 and 102 may not be used for the major but will be counted for graduation.

Limited Electives 6 hrs

Select from the following literature courses:

GER 401 Survey of German Literature I

GER 402 Survey of German Literature II

GER 421 Topics in German Literature

GER 441 Topics in German Cultural Studies

GER 450 Literary Masterpieces in German

GER 460 Studies in a Genre

GER 501 Literature before 1600

GER 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature

GER 505 Nineteenth-Century German Literature

GER 507 Twentieth-Century Literature

GER 521 Topics in German Literature

Approved Electives in German 6 hrs

Select from GER courses beyond GER 302.

Note: Each student must submit a senior research project.

Required Support Course 3 hrs

One related course outside of the Department of Modern Languages, selected from the approved list given in the departmental introduction.

Note: The department strongly recommends that majors study abroad for at least one summer.

Required for Secondary Certification 36 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology1

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education1

EDU 303 Strategies of Teaching

EDU 383 Evaluation and Measurement in Education

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education

HEA 191 Personal Health

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A 

Collaborative Approach

Required Minor 21 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 146 hrs

1With a grade of C or better.


MAJOR:
Spanish

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 16.0905

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: Intermediate level modern language courses completed as part of the major or minor also satisfy modern language requirements for the B.A. All majors and minors, including those who score above the 302 level on the Placement Exam will be required to take FRE 302 as a gateway course to the culture and literature courses.

Required Courses 16 hrs

MLA 099 Freshman Orientation (entering freshmen only)

SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I

SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II

or

SPA 203 Spanish for the Working World

SPA 301 Conversation and Composition I

SPA 302 Conversation and Composition II

MLA 400 Senior Seminar

Note: Students may receive credit for SPA 201 and 202 after taking the Placement Exam and completing the departmental challenge process. Credit for SPA 101 and 102 may not be used for the major but will be counted for graduation.

Limited Electives 6 hrs

Select from the following literature courses:

SPA 401 Survey of Spanish Literature

SPA 403 Survey of Spanish-American Literature

SPA 421 Topics in Spanish Literature

SPA 422 Topics in Spanish American Literature

SPA 441 Topics in Spanish Cultural Studies

SPA 450 Literary Masterpieces in Spanish

SPA 460 Studies in a Genre

SPA 503 Golden Age Literature

SPA 504 Don Quixote

SPA 505 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature

SPA 507 Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature

SPA 511 Spanish-American Short Story

SPA 512 Spanish-American Novel

SPA 521 Topics in Spanish Literature

SPA 522 Topics in Spanish-American Literature

Approved Electives in Spanish 12 hrs

Select from SPA courses beyond SPA 302.

Note: Each student must submit a senior research project.

Required Support Course 3 hrs

One related course outside of the Department of Modern Languages, selected from the approved list given in the departmental introduction.

Note: The department strongly recommends that majors study abroad for at least one summer.

Required Minor 21 hrs

Electives1 21-23 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128-132 hrs

1At least one three-hour free elective must be chosen from outside Modern Languages and may not be counted as a University Studies requirement.


MAJOR:
Spanish/Teaching Certification (Grades P-12)

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 16.0905

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: Students must take COM 161 (with a grade of C or better) and PSY 180 for certification. Certification also requires a grade of B or better in one English composition class and a grade of C or better in one University Studies math course.

Intermediate level modern language courses completed as part of the major or minor also satisfy requirements for the B.A.

All majors and minors, including those who score above the 302 level on the Placement Exam will be required to take SPA 302 as a gateway course to the culture and literature courses.

Required Courses 25 hrs

MLA 099 Freshman Orientation

MLA 400 Senior Seminar

MLA 514 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages

SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I

SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II

SPA 301 Conversation and Composition I

SPA 302 Conversation and Composition II

SPA 323 Spanish Culture and Civilization

or

SPA 325 Spanish-American Culture

SPA 331 Advanced Grammar

Note: Students may receive credit for SPA 201 and 202 after taking the Placement Exam and completing the departmental challenge process. Credit for SPA 101 and 102 may not be used for the major but will be counted for graduation.

Limited Electives 6 hrs

Select from the following literature courses:

SPA 401 Survey of Spanish Literature

SPA 403 Survey of Spanish-American Literature

SPA 421 Topics in Spanish Literature

SPA 422 Topics in Spanish American Literature

SPA 421 Topics in Spanish Literature

SPA 422 Topics in Spanish American Literature

SPA 441 Topics in Spanish Cultural Studies

SPA 450 Literacy Masterpieces in Spanish

SPA 460 Studies in a Genre

SPA 503 Golden Age Literature

SPA 504 Don Quixote

SPA 505 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature

SPA 507 Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature

SPA 511 Spanish-American Short Story

SPA 512 Spanish-American Novel

SPA 521 Topics in Spanish Literature

SPA 522 Topics in Spanish-American Literature

Approved Electives in Spanish 6 hrs

Select from SPA courses beyond SPA 302.

Note: Each student must submit a senior research project.

Required Support Course 3 hrs

One related course outside of the Department of Modern Languages, selected from the approved list given in the departmental introduction.

Note: The department strongly recommends that majors study abroad for at least one summer.

Required for Secondary Certification 36 hrs

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology1

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education1

EDU 303 Strategies of Teaching

EDU 383 Evaluation and Measurement in Education

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education

HEA 191 Personal Health

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching in the Secondary School

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A 

Collaborative Approach

Required Minor 21 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 146 hrs

1With a grade of C or better.

French Minor 21 hrs
FRE 201, 202 or 203, 301, 302, and nine hours of approved electives. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. The department strongly recommends that minors study abroad for at least one summer.

German Minor 21 hrs
GER 201, 202 or 203, 301, 302, and nine hours of approved electives. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. The department strongly recommends that minors study abroad for at least one summer.

Spanish Minor 21 hrs
SPA 201, 202 or 203, 301, 302, and nine hours of approved electives. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. The department strongly recommends that minors study abroad for at least one summer.
 
 
Department of Music
504 Price Doyle Fine Arts Center
270-762-4288

Chair: Pamela Wurgler. Faculty: Almquist, Baker, Bates, Black, Brown, Conklin, Dressler, Erickson, Fannin, Hill, Johnson, Kane, Locke, Murray, Rea, Ripley, Runnels, Scott, Steffa.

The Department of Music at Murray State University strives to provide educational experiences that enhance student's understanding, appreciation, and value of music through performance and curricular offerings; to engender in its students a pursuit of knowledge and wonder for music; to value and strengthen the traditions of music in academia while encouraging innovation; to be a hallmark of musical activity both on campus and in the region; to educate students for careers in performance, teaching, production, management, and other venues where music lives; to build an environment that fosters creativity and productivity among faculty, students, and staff; to serve out art and the community at large in preparing music educators for the future; to refine and extend the skills and knowledge of music students beyond the baccalaureate level; and to provide leadership, enrichment, and resources for the region's music professionals.

It is also an objective of the department to enrich the cultural life of the university, local and state communities through educational and performance activities.

Undergraduate degrees offered in the department are the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and the Bachelor of Music. The Bachelor of Music degree program offers options in either performance or music education. An academic minor in music is also available.

The degree programs reflect a core of basic musicianship and general study needs common to all musicians. The attendant specialized courses help students develop and refine competencies toward careers in teaching and performing as well as other specific interests.

The general college student (non-music major) is encouraged to continue or develop music interests and involvements through participation in performance groups, attendance at performances, and by taking a wide variety of courses open to the non-major.

Music facilities in the Price Doyle Fine Arts Center include recital halls, rehearsal halls, computer-lab and digital synthesis, keyboard laboratories, practice rooms, repair facilities, recording facilities, specially equipped classrooms and storage facilities.

Note: Performance proficiencies in applied music must be passed after the second and fourth semesters of study to remain in the program and to progress to the next level of applied lessons. A grade of C or better must be achieved in all music coursework required for the music degree sought.

Admission
In addition to admission to the University, prospective music major and minor students must be admitted to Department of Music academic programs through a qualifying audition in their performance area. Contact the Department of Music for further information.

Degree Requirements
In addition to the requirements listed with each music degree, a grade of C or better is required for graduation in all courses, including ensembles, specifically required by the music degree being pursued.

Scholarships
Grants-in-aid and scholarships are available to the music major and, in some cases, for non-major music participation. For information refer to the scholarship section of this Bulletin or write to the Department of Music.

Accreditation
The Department of Music has been an institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music since 1936. Degree programs are arranged in conformity with the requirements of the National Association of Schools of Music.

Graduate Degree
The Master of Music Education Degree is offered in the department. For additional information refer to the Graduate Bulletin or contact the graduate advisor in music.


AREA:
Music/Music Education P-12 Certification Option/Instrumental Emphasis

Bachelor of Music Degree

CIP 50.0901 

ACCREDITED BY:

National Association of Schools of Music (NASM)

University Studies Requirements 37 hrs

(see Chapter 4, Bachelor of Music degree requirements.)

Required Music/Music Education Courses1 78 hrs

MUS 098 Recital Attendance and Assembly2

MUS 099 Freshman Orientation

MUS 114-118 Applied Lesson3

(two semesters at two credits per semester)

MUS 123 Introduction to Music Education

MUS 131 Percussion Class4

MUS 132 Woodwind Class

MUS 133 String Class

MUS 134 Voice Class

MUS 135 Brass Class

MUS 170 Theory I

MUS 171 Aural Skills I

MUS 172 Functional Keyboard I5

MUS 173 Theory II

MUS 174 Aural Skills II

MUS 175 Functional Keyboard II

MUS 214-218 Applied Lesson

(two semesters at two credits per semester)

MUS 270 Theory III

MUS 271 Aural Skills III

MUS 272 Functional Keyboard III

MUS 273 Theory IV

MUS 274 Aural Skills IV

MUS 275 Functional Keyboard IV

MUS 301 General Music Methods

MUS 302 Choral Methods

MUS 303 Instrumental Methods: Elementary 
and Middle School

MUS 304 Instrumental Methods: Secondary School

MUS 314-318 Applied Lesson

(two semesters at two credits per semester)

MUS 323 Basic Conducting

MUS 327 Instrumental Arranging

MUS 381 Music History and Literature I

MUS 382 Music History and Literature II

MUS 383 Music History and Literature III

MUS 414-418 Applied Lesson

MUS 423 Instrumental Conducting

MUS 490 Senior Seminar

MUS 498 Senior Recital

Theory elective: MUS 511, 512 or 513

Ensembles: Concurrent with each semester of applied study, students are required to enroll in a major performing ensemble (symphonic band, marching band, wind ensemble, or orchestra), involving a student's applied major or secondary area with the approval of the ensemble director.

Wind, brass, and percussion students pursuing the instrumental emphasis must complete no less than two semesters of marching band. Music Education keyboard students follow the emphasis requirement of their chosen applied secondary area. They may be allowed to take accompanying classes (MUS 136 and MUS 336) in place of a major ensemble for two semesters.

Required for Teacher Certification 29 hrs

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 383 Introduction to Educational Measurement

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A

Collaborative Approach

Total Curriculum Requirements 144 hrs

1All music education majors must successfully complete a Basic Vocal Skills Proficiency. Students may take this proficiency upon completion of their sophomore year, at the end of their fourth semester of study, or at any time prior to the completion of their fifth semester. The proficiency must be successfully completed by the middle of their junior year (fifth semester of musical study) in order to continue in the sequence of methods classes.
2Six successful semesters of MUS 098 are required. To successfully complete the course each semester the student must gain credit for 13 approved recital attendances and have no more than one absence from required assembly programs. Attendance may be required at designated departmental recitals and/or events.
3A minimum of seven semesters of specified study to equal 14 hours in applied music is required as are periodic jury and proficiency examinations. A half-recital must be given in the final semester of study. Recital must be completed prior to the semester of student teaching.
4Students may be exempted from one of the technique classes upon satisfactory demonstration of teaching proficiency as determined by the instructor of the course.
5Students are advised into the correct section of Functional Keyboard according to demonstrated ability and achievement.


AREA:
Music/Music Education P-12 Certification Option/Vocal Emphasis

Bachelor of Music Degree

CIP 50.0901

ACCREDITED BY:

National Association of Schools of Music (NASM)

University Studies Requirements 37 hrs

(see Chapter 4, Bachelor of Music degree requirements.)

Required Music/Music Education Courses1 76 hrs

MUS 098 Recital Attendance and Assembly2

MUS 099 Freshman Orientation

MUS 116-117 or 119 Applied Lesson3

(two semesters at two credits per semester)

MUS 123 Introduction to Music Education

MUS 170 Theory I

MUS 171 Aural Skills I

MUS 172 Functional Keyboard I5

MUS 173 Theory II

MUS 174 Aural Skills II

MUS 175 Functional Keyboard II

MUS 216-217 or 219 Applied Lesson

(two semesters at two credits per semester)

MUS 225 English and German Diction for Singers

MUS 226 French and Italian Diction for Singers

MUS 270 Theory III

MUS 271 Aural Skills III

MUS 272 Functional Keyboard III

MUS 273 Theory IV

MUS 274 Aural Skills IV

MUS 275 Functional Keyboard IV

MUS 301 General Music Methods

MUS 302 Choral Methods

MUS 303 Instrumental Methods: Elementary and Middle School

MUS 316-317 or 319 Applied Lesson
(two semesters at two credits per semester)

MUS 320 Vocal Pedagogy for the Music Educator

MUS 321 Choral Repertoire

MUS 323 Basic Conducting

MUS 328 Choral Arranging

MUS 381 Music History and Literature I

MUS 382 Music History and Literature II

MUS 383 Music History and Literature III

MUS 414-418 Applied Lesson

MUS 423 Instrumental Conducting

MUS 490 Senior Seminar

MUS 498 Senior Recital

Theory elective: MUS 511, 512 or 513

Ensembles: Concurrent with each semester of applied study, students are required to enroll in a major performing ensemble (university chorale, or concert choir), involving a student's applied major or secondary area with the approval of the ensemble director.

Vocal Emphasis students must complete no less than two semesters of university chorale. Music Education keyboard students follow the emphasis requirement of their chosen applied secondary area. They may be allowed to take accompanying classes (MUS 136 and MUS 336) in place of a major ensemble for two semesters.

Required for Teacher Certification 29 hrs

EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development

EDU 383 Introduction to Educational Measurement

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools

SEC 421 Student Teaching

SED 300 Education of Students with Disabilities: A Collaborative Approach

Total Curriculum Requirements 142 hrs

1All music education majors must successfully complete a Basic Vocal Skills Proficiency. Students may take this proficiency upon completion of their sophomore year, at the end of their fourth semester of study, or at any time prior to the completion of their fifth semester. The proficiency must be successfully completed by the middle of their junior year (fifth semester of musical study) in order to continue in the sequence of methods classes.
2Six successful semesters of MUS 098 are required. To successfully complete the course each semester the student must gain credit for 13 approved recital attendances and have no more than one absence from required assembly programs. Attendance may be required at designated departmental recitals and/or events.
3A minimum of seven semesters of specified study to equal 14 hours in applied music is required as are periodic jury and proficiency examinations. A half-recital must be given in the final semester of study. Recital must be completed prior to the semester of student teaching. A grade of C or better is required to progress in sequential applied music study.
4Students are advised into the correct section of Functional Keyboard according to demonstrated ability and achievement.


AREA:
Music

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degree

CIP 50.0999.02

ACCREDITED BY: National Association of Schools of Music (NASM)

University Studies Requirements1 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Music Courses 44-48 hrs

MUS 098 Recital Attendance and Assembly2

MUS 099 Freshman Orientation

MUS 114-119 Applied Music 
(two semesters at two credits per semester)3

MUS 170 Theory I

MUS 171 Aural Skills I

MUS 172 Functional Keyboard I4

MUS 173 Theory II

MUS 174 Aural Skills II

MUS 175 Functional Keyboard II

MUS 214-219 Applied Music 
(two semesters at two credits per semester)3

MUS 270 Theory III

MUS 271 Aural Skills III

MUS 273 Theory IV

MUS 274 Aural Skills IV

MUS 314-319 Applied Music 
(two semesters at two credits per semester)3,5,6

MUS 381 Music History and Literature I

MUS 382 Music History and Literature II

MUS 383 Music History and Literature III

MUS 414-419 Applied Music 
(two semesters at two credits per semester)3,5,6

MUS 490 Senior Seminar

MUS 497 Final Project5

or

MUS 498 Senior Recital6

Theory elective: MUS 511, 512 or 513

Ensembles: Concurrent with each semester of applied study, students are required to enroll in a performing ensemble involving a student's applied major or secondary area with the approval of the ensemble director. At least four of the semesters must be in a major ensemble (symphonic band, marching band, wind ensemble, orchestra, university chorale, or concert choir). Keyboard majors may be allowed to take accompanying classes (MUS 136 and MUS 336) in place of a major ensemble for two semesters.

Electives 21-30 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1Six successful semesters of MUS 098 are required. To successfully complete the course each semester the student must gain credit for 13 approved recitals and have no more than one absence from required assembly programs.
2Applied music is studied for eight semesters at two credit hours per semester. Voice majors must register for MUS 225 and MUS 226. A grade of C or better is required to progress in sequential applied music study.
3Non-keyboard majors must study piano or take the appropriate functional keyboard class for two semesters. All keyboard majors must pass the Functional Keyboard IV competency exam. Keyboard majors who have fulfilled the functional keyboard requirement may elect to study another instrument (e.g., organ, harpsichord, voice, etc.) with the approval of the academic advisor.
4Research track. The student more interested in research than applied music has the option of taking applied music instruction for two credit hours each semester for four semesters and then taking one credit hour of instruction for an additional four semesters. The student in the research track will take four credit hours of course work related to his/her area of research with the presentation of a final project (MUS 497) as the culmination of this study.
Research project. In lieu of a recital, the student may propose a scholarly document. The proposal may be presented as early as the beginning of the fifth semester of study and no later than after the sixth semester of study. The proposal is prepared under the guidance of the student's advisor and submitted to a three-member committee.
5Performance track. The student interested in performance has the option of taking applied music instruction for two credit hours each semester for eight semesters. The culmination of study will be the senior recital (MUS 498).
Recital. The student, in consultation with the applied teacher and the academic advisor, makes a preliminary decision at the end of the fourth semester of study toward either the performance or research track. The final decision must be made by the end of the sixth semester of study. If the performance track is chosen, a half-recital of 20 to 30 minutes in length is prepared.


AREA:
Music/Keyboard Studies Option

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Degree

CIP 50.0999.02

University Studies Requirements1 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Music Courses 57 hrs

MUS 098 Recital Attendance and Assembly2

MUS 099 Freshman Orientation

MUS 116 Applied Organ (two semesters at two credits 
per semester if organ is the major instrument)

or

MUS 117 Applied Piano (two semesters at two credits 
per semester if piano is the major instrument)

MUS 170 Theory I

MUS 171 Aural Skills I

MUS 172 Functional Keyboard I3

MUS 173 Theory II

MUS 174 Aural Skills II

MUS 175 Functional Keyboard II

MUS 216 Applied Organ 
(two semesters at one credit per semester)

MUS 217 Applied Piano 
(two semesters at one credit per semester)

MUS 270 Theory III

MUS 271 Aural Skills III

MUS 272 Functional Keyboard III

MUS 273 Theory IV

MUS 274 Aural Skills IV

MUS 275 Functional Keyboard IV

MUS 313 Introduction to Music Synthesis 
(two semesters at one credit per semester)

MUS 316 Applied Organ 
(two semesters at one credit per semester)

MUS 317 Applied Piano 
(two semesters at one credit per semester)

MUS 381 Music History and Literature I

MUS 382 Music History and Literature II

MUS 383 Music History and Literature III

MUS 396 Repertoire/Pedagogy I

MUS 416 Applied Organ (two semesters at two credits 
per semester if organ is the major instrument)

or

MUS 417 Applied Piano (two semesters at two credits 
per semester if piano is the major instrument)

MUS 439 Harpsichord

MUS 490 Senior Seminar

MUS 496 Repertoire/Pedagogy II

MUS 497 Final Project4

or

MUS 498 Senior Recital5

Theory elective: MUS 511, 512 or 513

Ensembles: Concurrent with each semester of applied study, students are required to enroll in a performing ensemble involving a student's applied major or secondary area with the approval of the ensemble director. At least four of the semesters must be in a major ensemble (symphonic band, marching band, wind ensemble, orchestra, university chorale, or concert choir). Keyboard majors may be allowed to take accompanying classes (MUS 136 and MUS 336) in place of a major ensemble for two semesters.

Electives 15-20 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 131 hrs

1Six successful semesters of MUS 098 are required. To successfully complete the course each semester the student must gain credit for 13 approved recitals and have no more than one absence from required assembly programs.
2All keyboard studies majors are expected to fulfill the functional keyboard requirement of completing Keyboard Level IV.
3Research track. The student more interested in research than applied music has the option of taking applied music instruction for two credit hours each semester for four semesters and then taking one credit hour of instruction on the major instrument for an additional four semesters. The student in the research track will take four credit hours of course work related to his/her area of research with the presentation of a final project (MUS 497) as the culmination of this study.
Research project. In lieu of a recital, the student may propose a scholarly document. The proposal may be presented as early as the beginning of the fifth semester of study and no later than after the sixth semester of study. The proposal is prepared under the guidance of the student's advisor and a three-member committee.
4Performance track. The student interested in performance has the option of taking applied music instruction each semester for eight semesters. Theculmination of study will be MUS 498.
Recital. The student, in consultation with the applied teacher and the academic advisor, makes a preliminary decision at the end of the fourth semester of study toward either the performance or research track. The final decision must be made by the end of the sixth semester of study. If the performance track is chosen, a half-recital is prepared of 20 to 30 minutes in length.


AREA:
Music/Performance Option

Bachelor of Music Degree

CIP 50.0901

ACCREDITED BY:

National Association of Schools of Music (NASM)

University Studies Requirements 30 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

•University Studies selections must include:

COM 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication

Required Music Courses 84 hrs

MUS 098 Recital Attendance and Assembly2

MUS 099 Freshman Orientation

MUS 114-119 Applied Lesson

(two semesters at three credits per semester)3

MUS 170 Theory I

MUS 171 Aural Skills I

MUS 172 Functional Keyboard I4

MUS 173 Theory II

MUS 174 Aural Skills II

MUS 175 Functional Keyboard II

MUS 206 Survey of Music History and Literature

MUS 214-219 Applied Lesson

(two semesters at three credits per semester)3

MUS 270 Theory III

MUS 271 Aural Skills III

MUS 272 Functional Keyboard III

MUS 273 Theory IV

MUS 274 Aural Skills IV

MUS 275 Functional Keyboard IV

MUS 314-319 Applied Lesson

(two semesters at three credits per semester)3

MUS 323 Basic Conducting

MUS 381 Music History and Literature I

MUS 382 Music History and Literature II

MUS 383 Music History and Literature III

MUS 396 Repertoire/Pedagogy I

MUS 398 Junior Recital

MUS 414-419 Applied Lesson

(two semesters at three credits per semester)3

MUS 490 Senior Seminar

MUS 496 Repertoire/Pedagogy II

MUS 498 Senior Recital

MUS 499 Concerto Performance

MUS 511 Techniques of Twentieth-Century Music

MUS 512 Counterpoint

MUS 513 Analysis of Musical Form

MUS 530 Special Topics (two semesters)

Electives from the following:

MUS 241 Composition I

MUS 242 Composition II

MUS 313 Introduction to Music Synthesis

MUS 327 Instrumental Arranging

MUS 328 Choral Arranging

MUS 423 Instrumental Conducting

MUS 424 Choral Conducting

Ensembles: Concurrent with each semester of applied study, students are required to enroll in a performing ensemble involving a student's applied major or secondary area with the approval of the ensemble director. At least seven of the semesters must be in a major ensemble (symphonic band, marching band, wind ensemble, orchestra, university chorale, or concert choir). Keyboard majors may be allowed to take accompanying classes (MUS 136 and MUS 336) in place of a major ensemble for two semesters.

Electives5 14 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

1Admission to this degree program is conditional for first year. Continuation in the program is dependent upon advice of applied teacher and departmental chair after assessment of performance talent, achievement and general musicianship. The student in pursuit of the degree is advised to gain an academic minor or minors and/or a companion degree.
2Six successful semesters of MUS 098 are required. To successfully complete the course each semester the student must gain credit for 13 approved recitals and have no more than one absence from required assembly programs.
3Applied music is studied for eight semesters at three credit hours per semester. Periodic jury and proficiency examinations are required. A half-recital (MUS 398) is required in the junior year and a full recital (MUS 498) is required in the senior year. A solo appearance with a performing ensemble approved by the applied teacher and department chair is required (MUS 499). Voice majors are required to take MUS 225 and 226.
4All students in the performance option of the B.M. degree must pass the Functional Keyboard IV competency exam followed by two credit hours of applied secondary study. Students are advised into the correct section of Functional Keyboard according to demonstrated ability and achievement. Vocal majors must complete the additional two credit hours in applied piano. Instrumental majors may complete the additional two credit hours on a secondary instrument in any applied area.
5At least one three-hour course must be an unrestricted elective outside the major.

Music Minor 27 hrs
MUS 104, 114-119, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, and six hours of MUS electives (other than ensembles) approved by department chairman. ENSEMBLES: Students must be in an ensemble four semesters concurrent with applied study; any ensemble offering is acceptable conditional upon audition requirements (if any) being met. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University. Four semesters of applied music study is required.
 
 
Department of Psychology
212A Wells Hall
270-762-2851

Chair: Renae D. Duncan. Faculty: Duncan, Harris, Liljequist, Muller, Posey, Ritter, Royalty, Waddill, Wann.

The Department of Psychology provides a liberal arts oriented program of studies which covers the many topics of the broad discipline of psychology. The curriculum is designed to enable students who major in psychology to (1) become knowledgeable about the basic principles of behavior, (2) acquire research and problem-solving skills, and (3) learn how psychological knowledge can be applied in service settings to promote human welfare. The department also provides a flexible minor which can be combined with majors in other fields to provide students in those fields an appropriate background in psychology.

Completion of the psychology major prepares the student for a variety of activities in occupations in which an understanding of human behavior is important (e.g. public relations, personnel management, social welfare, mental health and child care). Professional careers in psychology normally require graduate training and the undergraduate major constitutes excellent preparation for entry into graduate programs in psychology. This major also serves as a good background for entry into graduate study in a number of other professional fields which have a strong psychological dimension or require a knowledge of behavioral science research techniques. The department offers its own graduate programs in two areas, general psychology and clinical psychology.

The department's physical facilities include laboratories which are equipped for research and a computer laboratory. In addition, the Psychological Center, operated by the department, serves as a training facility for graduate students and as a mental health resource for referrals from university and community agencies. The center, located in Wells Hall, has facilities for psychological testing, counseling, and therapy.

MAJOR:
Psychology

Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 42.0101

University Studies Requirements 49-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Note: University Studies courses in science must include BIO 101 or BIO 221. Mathematics through at least MAT 117 is required.

Required Courses 31 hrs

ENG 204 Advanced Expository Writing

PSY 099 Freshman Orientation

PSY 180 General Psychology

PSY 260 Lifespan Development

PSY 300 Principles and Methods of Statistical Analysis

PSY 301 Principles and Methods of Psychological Research

PSY 303 Social Psychology

PSY 304 Psychology of Learning and Memory

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology

PSY 403 History and Systems of Psychology

PSY 581 Abnormal Psychology

Required Limited Electives 9 hrs

PSY electives approved by advisor.

Required Minor 21 hrs

Unrestricted Electives 16-18 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

Psychology Minor 21 hrs
PSY 180 and 18 hours of PSY electives. A minimum of 12 hours must be upper-division courses (300 level or above). Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.
 
 
Department of Theatre and Dance
106 Fine Arts
270-762-4421

A major in theatre provides training for those who wish to pursue careers or avocations in the theatre or associated businesses, including acting, directing, technical theatre, and dance. The program is competitive with excellent placement records.

Students in theatre may join or be invited to join the following clubs and organizations: Alpha Psi Omega (national honorary drama fraternity), and Sock and Buskin (theatre).


MAJOR:
Theatre

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Degree

CIP 50.0501

University Studies Requirements 46-51 hrs

(see Chapter 4, University Studies Requirements)

Required Courses 28 hrs

THD 099 Freshman Orientation

THD 111 Acting I

THD 120 Play Analysis

THD 210 Voice for Performance

THD 240 Stagecraft

THD 330 Junior Seminar I: Theory

THD 420 Theatre History and Literature

THD 421 Theatre History and Literature II

THD 430 Directing I

THD 465 Directing II

Required Limited Electives 9 hrs

Select from the following:

THD 110 Movement for the Actor

THD 220 Creative Dramatics

THD 230 Theatre and Stage Management

THD 241 Stage Makeup

THD 242 Costume Construction

THD 310 Acting II

THD 320 Playwriting

THD 322 International Studies in Theatre

THD 350 Scene Design

THD 351 Lighting Design

THD 352 Costume Design

THD 380 Junior Seminar II: Professional Development 

THD 410 Acting III

THD 463 Choreography

THD 490 Directed Independent Study in Theatre Arts

THD 590 Directed Independent Study in Theatre Arts

Acting Option:

THD 110 Movement for the Actor

THD 310 Acting II

THD 380 Junior Seminar II: Professional Development 

THD 410 Acting III

and

One performance course per semester

Design/Technical Option:

THD 230 Theatre and Stage Management

THD 242 Costume Construction

THD 350 Scene Design

THD 351 Lighting Design

THD 352 Costume Design

THD 380 Junior Seminar II: Professional Development 

and

One technical performance course per semester

Directing Option:

THD 230 Theatre and Stage Management

THD 311 Period Movement for Actors

THD 380 Junior Seminar II: Professional Development 

choose two from the following:

THD 350 Scene Design

THD 351 Lighting Design

THD 352 Costume Design

and

One performance course per semester

Required Minor 21 hrs

Unrestricted Electives 19-24 hrs

Total Curriculum Requirements 128 hrs

Note: In addition to selected coursework, students must participate in the production aspect of the program. Each major must act in or work on at least four shows per academic year.

Movement Minor 22 hrs
THD 160, 260, 262, 264, 360, 362, 463. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.

Theatre Minor 24 hrs
THD 240, 310, 350, 351, 410, 430, 465 and two hours in performance courses. Six hours must be upper-level courses completed in residence at Murray State University.