Courses
13
 
 
All of the courses herein are offered by Murray State University for undergraduate and/or graduate credit. The university reserves the right to make any adjustments in the Bulletin which are deemed necessary. Students desiring graduate credit for a 500-level course must be admitted to graduate status before enrolling in the course.

NOTE:  Repeated 099 (Freshman Orientation) courses (regardless of course prefixes or departmental requirements) will be treated as duplicate courses, with only one course allowed to count toward graduation requirements.
 
Accounting
(ACC)
ACC 200 Principles of Financial Accounting (3). An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of financial accounting, including the accounting cycle and the communication of financial information to external users. The course focuses on the nature and measurement of assets, liabilities, equities, dividends, revenues, and expenses. Emphasis is placed on the proper preparation and understanding of the financial statements.

ACC 201 Principles of Managerial Accounting (3). The application of accounting to business management with emphasis on planning, control of operations, and decision-making, including study of cost behavior; the use of cost data in job order, process and standard cost systems; the application of differential analysis to decision making; the use of overhead allocation methods; the preparation and interpretation of budgets; and the study of pricing methods.  The course also introduces topics such as the statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis. Prerequisite:  ACC 200. Co-requisite: ACC 202 (Students enrolled in accounting programs.)

ACC 202 Accounting Applications Laboratory (1). A study of basic accounting applications with emphasis on the use of spreadsheets in analyzing and solving accounting problems and making business decisions. The course focuses on the process of building models for generating and evaluating accounting information. Specific accounting applications include depreciation schedules, revenue and expense distribution analysis, inventory management and profit maximization.  Prerequisite:  ACC 200 and CSC 199. Co-requisite: ACC 201.

ACC 300 Intermediate Accounting I (3). A review of the fundamental processes of accounting; the measurement of financial position and periodic revenues and expenses; and an introduction to selected, more advanced accounting issues. Some of the topics studied include standard setting processes; the accounting cycle; the income statement and balance sheet; cash and receivables; inventories; acquisition and disposition of property, plant and equipment; depreciation and depletion; intangible assets; and liabilities and contingencies. Prerequisites: junior standing; ACC 200, ACC 201 and ACC 202 with a minimum grade of C in each.

ACC 301 Intermediate Accounting II (3). Intensive study of the theory and methods of financial accounting with a focus on the impact of business transactions on financial reporting. Some of the course topics include liabilities, stockholders equity, dilutive securities, investments, revenue recognition, income tax allocation, pensions and post-retirement benefits, leases, accounting changes and error analysis, and cash flows. Prerequisite:  junior standing; ACC 300.

ACC 302 Federal Income Tax (3). Federal income tax fundamentals under the latest amendments to the Internal Revenue Code; rates, credits; inclusions in and exclusions from gross income; recognition of and basis for gain or loss; capital gains and losses; dividends; deductions; with emphasis on individual income tax returns. Prerequisite:  junior standing; ACC 200 and 201 with a minimum grade of C in each.

ACC 303 Cost Accounting (3). The study of financial and nonfinancial accounting information for strategic and operational decision making. Topics include traditional and contemporary product/service costing; planning; control; performance measurement; and nonroutine managerial decisions. Prerequisite:  junior standing; ACC 200, ACC 201,  and ACC 202 with a minimum grade of C in each.

ACC 304 Managerial Accounting (3). A comprehensive study of accounting information as applied to the management decision process. Includes the study of cost behavior and cost analysis with emphasis on the uses of accounting data by management personnel within an organization, continuing exposure to business ethics, and the implications of operating in a global environment. Prerequisite:  junior standing; ACC 201. (Not open to accounting majors.)

ACC 308 Accounting Information Systems (3). Principles of accounting systems design and installation. Transaction processes, fundamental control concepts, types of computerized accounting systems, general and application controls in a computerized environment, data modeling, normalization theory, and form and report design are among the topics covered. Students use a database management system to create database objects as part of a project required in this class. Prerequisites: junior standing; ACC 200, ACC 201 and ACC 202 with a minimum grade of C in each; and CSC 199.

ACC 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

ACC 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ACC 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ACC 490 Survey of Accounting (3). Designed for graduate students who have an inadequate background in accounting. Covers the same material covered in ACC 200 and 201 or the equivalent. Not open to students who have credit for ACC 200 and 201 or the equivalent.

ACC 500 Advanced Accounting (3). A comprehensive examination of some of the most complex accounting problems including consolidated financial statements, partnerships, foreign subsidiaries, estates and trusts, and consignment and installment sales. Prerequisite:  ACC 301.

ACC 501 Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Entities (3). Accounting and reporting principles, standards and procedures applicable to (1) state and local governments, including counties, cities, townships and villages; (2) the federal government; and (3) other not-for-profit institutions such as universities and hospitals. Prerequisite:  ACC 200, ACC 201 and ACC 202 with a minimum grade of C, or ACC 490 with a minimum grade of C.

ACC 502 Advanced Income Tax (3). Continued study of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations with emphasis on the advanced aspects of income; deductions, exclusions and credits, especially as they are related to the tax issues of individuals, corporations, and partnerships. Prerequisite:   ACC 302.

ACC 503 Advanced Cost Accounting (3). The study of selected advanced cost accounting topics including cost management, discretionary cost control, inventory management, capital budgeting, transfer pricing, performance evaluation and reward structures. Traditional and contemporary operational environments are emphasized. A business simulation requires the use of cost and managerial accounting models in planning, control, performance evaluation, decision making and product costing. Prerequisites:  ACC 303 and 308.

ACC 506 Principles of Auditing and Assurance Services (3). An introduction to internal and external auditing and audit-related services. The nature and purposes of audit, attestation, assurance and compilation services are studied. Other topics include:  reporting, professional ethics, legal liability, engagement planning, materiality and risk assessment, internal control, and operational audits.  Prerequisites:  ACC 300 and ACC 308.

ACC 507 Professional Issues (1). Study of contemporary issues in accounting. Topics include professional certifications, emerging practices, career preparation, and professional development. Restricted to accounting area students. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  ACC 301.

ACC 509 Accounting Theory (3). Designed as a critical examination of relevant AICPA literature, especially Accounting Research Bulletins, Accounting Principles Board’s Opinions and Statements, and the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Statements. Contemporary developments are examined in the accounting literature and through reports. Prerequisite:  ACC 301.

ACC 511 Survey of Accounting Principles for the Nonprofit Organization (3). Fundamentals of accounting procedures are discussed in detail. Concepts unique to accounting systems in nonprofit/volunteer organizations, such as types of funds and account groups are introduced. Budgeting, internal control and related tax issues are also discussed. Extra assignments will be required of graduate students.

ACC 595 Special Problems (3). Research by students in fields of special interests. Includes project research studies and intensive reading programs, accompanied by conferences with professors in fields involved. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


Adult Education
(ADE)
ADE 199 Workshop in Adult Education (1-3). This course covers workshops conducted for paraprofessionals, persons employed by local school districts to visit home-bound adult students. Accumulated workshop credits are not allowed to exceed six credit hours.

ADE 550 Adult-Community Education in a Changing Society (3). Study of the concept of community education and the fast-developing and emergent field of adult education as they relate to designing and implementing a program of total and lifelong education for the community.

ADE 551 Creative Adult Learning (3). An analysis of the adult as a learner. The process of aging, its implications for learning occupations, effect on families, and social views are considered. Actualizing conditions for relationships between personal developments and a free society.

ADE 555 Foundations of Adult and Community Education (3). Provides a historical understanding of adult and community education and how these two concepts evolved in modern twentieth century education theory, with particular emphasis on related aspects of progressive education as first envisioned and as revised and refined in recent years.

ADE 599 Workshop in Adult Education (1-3). This course covers workshops conducted for certified teachers who additionally work with adults in evening adult education classes. Accumulated credits are not allowed to exceed six credit hours.


Agricultural Education
(AED)
AED 380 Agricultural Education, Extension and Leadership (3). Essential aspects and fundamentals of career preparation, entry, adjustment and advancement in agricultural education, extension, and youth leadership careers. Prerequisite: Six prior credit hours in agriculture discipline.

AED 421 Student Teaching in Agricultural Education (8). The student teaches in a center selected by the university agricultural education staff and approved by the Kentucky Department of Education. Graded pass/fail. (Spring)

AED 580 Methods in Teaching Agricultural Education (3-6). Philosophy and objectives of teaching agricultural education in a comprehensive program. Course concepts include preparing and delivering lesson plans that involve problem-solving method, lecturing, and laboratory based modules. Additional methods include instruction in supervising occupational experience programs and coordinating FFA programs. Learning theory, multicultural education and education of the exceptional child are also included. Field and clinical experiences are also employed. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: AED 380.

AED 581 Instructing Out-of-School Groups (3). Philosophy of vocational education for out-of-school youth and adults in agricultural occupations. Application of principles and techniques for organizing, conducting and evaluating instructional programs. Field-clinical experiences. (Spring)

AED 582 Supervision in Agricultural Education (3). Application of principles and techniques of supervising individuals and groups in the field of agricultural education. (With sufficient demand)

AED 583 Practicum in Agricultural Education, Extension, and Public Service Leadership (3). Comprehensive course including topics of instructional and operational methods for the discipline, extension field tours and mentoring experiences, supervised visits in an educational or public service setting or agency, and completion of practicum/professional clinical hours. Prerequisites: AED 380 or six hours of discipline specific courses within agriculture.


Agriculture
(AGR)
AGR 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Required of all entering freshmen. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Fall)

AGR 100 Animal Science (3). This is a basic course in animal science including the importance and place of livestock in agriculture; types, market classes and grades of beef, sheep, poultry and swine; origin and characteristics of breeds; and the judging of beef, sheep and swine.

AGR 101 Basic Horsemanship (3). Designed for students with no previous experience in the handling of horses. It includes instruction in grooming, saddling, bridling and mounting, and the development of basic riding skills at the walk, trot and canter.

AGR 102 Beginning Hunt Seat Equitation (1). Designed for beginner riders in their first year and for riders that are considered safe to ride an unfamiliar horse in a group at a canter. Heavy emphasis is placed on developing a competent rider with proper hunt seat equitation skills. Weekend participation in Intercollegiate Horse Show Association horse shows is mandatory. Participation in weekend riding clinics is required. Prerequisite: approval of instructor.

AGR 103 Intermediate Hunt Seat Equitation (1). Designed for intermediate riders in their first or second year of riding and for riders that are considered safe to ride an unfamiliar horse in a group at a canter. A higher degree of proficiency at the walk, sitting trot, posting trot, two point, and canter is required more than in AGR 102. Emphasis is placed on learning suppling exercises for horse and rider in addition to developing a competent rider with proper hunt seat equitation skills. Weekend participation in Intercollegiate Horse Show Association horse shows is mandatory. Participation in weekend riding clinics is required. Prerequisite: AGR 102 or approval of instructor.

AGR 104 Advanced Hunt Seat Equitation (1). Designed for advanced riders that are considered safe to ride an unfamiliar horse in a group at a canter and gallop. A higher degree of proficiency at the walk, sitting trot, posting trot, two point, center and gallop is required more than in AGR 103. Emphasis is placed on the correct application of riders natural aids, suppling of the horse, collection and riding on the bit. To develop competent riders with professional equitation skills. Weekend participation in Intercollegiate Horse Show Association horse shows is mandatory. Participation in weekend riding clinics is required. Prerequisite: AGR 103 or approval of instructor.

AGR 105 Introduction to Rodeo (2). An introduction to rodeo designed to develop a better understanding of the events and rules of the sport through lectures, demonstrations, rodeo films, and hands-on practice. The course will include instructions in equipment care and preparation and mental and physical training using weights, calisthenics, etc. May be repeated once for additional credit.

AGR 106 Beginning Stock Seat Equitation (1). Designed for beginner riders in their first or second year of riding and for riders that are considered safe to ride an unfamiliar horse in a group at a lope. Emphasis is placed on developing a competent well-rounded stock seat rider with proper stock seat equitation skills. Weekend participation in Intercollegiate Horse Show Association horse shows is mandatory. Participation in weekend riding clinics is expected. Prerequisite: approval of instructor.

AGR 107 Intermediate Stock Seat Equitation (1). Designed for the intermediate rider in their first or second year of riding and for riders that are considered safe to ride an unfamiliar horse in a group at a canter. A higher degree of proficiency at the walk, jog or lope is required more than in AGR 106. Emphasis is placed on learning suppling exercises for horse and rider in addition to developing a competent rider with proper stock seat equitation skills. Weekend participation in Intercollegiate Horse Show Association horse shows is mandatory. Participation in weekend riding clinics is required. Prerequisite: AGR 106 or approval of instructor.

AGR 108 Advanced Stock Seat Equitation (1). Designed for the advanced rider that is considered safe to ride an unfamiliar horse in a group at a lope. A higher degree of proficiency at the walk, jog, and lope is required more than in AGR 107. Emphasis is placed on the correct application of the riders natural aids, suppling of the horse, collection, and riding on the bit. In addition to developing a competent stock seat equitation rider. Prerequisite: AGR 107 or approval of instructor.

AGR 130 Agricultural Economics (3). A study of fundamental principles of economics as applied to agriculture. Attention is given to resource use, economic growth, production fundamentals, economic institutions and agriculture in relation to national and world economics.

AGR 133 Field Applications for Agriculture (2). Course will teach students methods of solving many application problems that will be encountered in the field of agriculture using applied mathematical and logic skills. The emphasis will be to use practical mathematical skills already acquired from secondary education to address agricultural situations involving computations that are necessary for upper level courses in agriculture. Some knowledge of agricultural situations may be required. Possible field trips to the university farms during class time. Prerequisite: Declared area or major in agriculture or consent of instructor.

AGR 140 Plant Science (3). A study of general plant science principles including basic plant anatomy, physiology and interactions with the surrounding environment.

AGR 160 Horticultural Science (3). A study of the practical principles and practices used in horticulture.

AGR 170 Introduction to Agricultural Systems Technology (3). An introduction to agricultural systems including: power and machinery, electricity, precision agriculture, soil and water engineering, metallurgy and fabrication, and safety. Emphasis is placed on understanding the technology involved in operating, maintaining, and managing these systems.

AGR 180 Skill Development in Horticulture (3). Course will document that students can demonstrate the competencies and skill necessary for occupations in the landscaping industry, turf and lawn management, nursery management, and/or vegetable and flower production areas. Credit will be by challenge exam only according to university policy and will be granted upon successful completion of the state horticulture skills standards test and completion of a career major in horticulture at the secondary school level.

AGR 181 Skill Development in Agriculture Production (3). Course will document that students can demonstrate the competencies and skill necessary for occupations in production agriculture. Emphasis will be placed on the development of scientific knowledge and skills pertaining to management of the land and its effect on food and fiber production. Also included will be knowledge and skills pertaining to livestock identification, election, nutrition, reproduction and genetics, health management, and marketing of one or more species of farm animals. Credit will be by challenge exam only according to university policy and will be granted upon successful completion of the state horticulture skills standards test and completion of a career major in horticulture at the secondary school level.

AGR 199 Contemporary Issues in Agriculture (3). A course designed to increase the understanding, awareness, and critical analysis of contemporary agricultural issues and their effect upon the social, political, economic and cultural aspects of society. Topics will include environmental, bio-technology, animal, crop, career, economy and trade, agricultural policy, food quality/safety and international agriculture issues.

AGR 200 International Agriculture Experience (3).  A course designed to enhance students’ understanding of international agriculture and how it relates to the overall impact on world food processing and production through travel/study abroad. An emphasis is placed on experiences which have the potential to impact and add value to American/Kentucky agriculture, as well as those which hold key relationships to U.S. based agricultural trade and food development. Prerequisites:  AGR 130 and at least one subject specific agriculture technical course.

AGR 201 Intermediate Horsemanship (3). Designed for students with previous experience in the handling of horses. Deals with instruction in hunt seat and stock seat with emphasis placed on equitation skills. Prerequisites: AGR 101 and approval of instructor.

AGR 223 Introduction to Artificial Insemination for Cattle (3). The primary objective of this course is to instruct students in artificial insemination in cattle. Topics will include reproductive system, herd health and nutrition, semen handling, and estrus detection and synchronization.

AGR 233 Statistics for Food and Agriculture (3). A course designed to enhance the quantitative skills of agriculture students. Techniques include descriptive statistics, probability, analysis of variance, and regression analysis. Discussion, examination and use of these techniques will cover and be limited to agriculturally related topics.

AGR 240 Crop Science (3). A study of the fundamental principles underlying the production of agricultural crops. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours per week.

AGR 247 Tobacco Production (3). An agriculture course designed for students who desire to expand their knowledge of tobacco production. Students will be introduced to the practical aspects of tobacco production in the Kentucky tobacco types.

AGR 250 Soil Science (3). A general study of soil properties including classification development, use of fertilizers, and conservation.  

AGR 251 Soil Science Laboratory (1). Consists of a number of lab exercises that support the course material in AGR 250. Co-requisite: AGR 250.

AGR 261 General Pomology (3). General principles and practices involved in handling home and commercial planting of the major fruit crops. (Spring, even years)

AGR 262 Vegetable Crop Production (3). A study of the fundamental principles underlying commercial and home garden production of vegetables. (Spring, odd years)

AGR 263 Woody Plant Materials I (2). The identification and use of woody deciduous plant materials in the landscape.

AGR 269 Introduction to Forestry (3). A general introduction to the many aspects of forestry including dendrology, silvics, silviculture, and wood utilization. Some emphasis will be placed on the management of forest lands for recreation and wildlife purposes. (Fall, odd years)

AGR 300 Principles of Animal Nutrition (3). A study of digestion, absorption and utilization of nutrients, characteristics of feedstuffs, nutritional disorders and nutrient requirements of animals. Prerequisite:  AGR 100.

AGR 301 Livestock Judging and Evaluation (3). A study of types of purebred and commercial beef cattle, sheep and swine, both market and breeding classes. Special emphasis is placed on writing and giving oral reports. Prerequisite:  AGR 100. (Fall)

AGR 302 Horse Science (3). Involves a study of the role of the light horse and the development of an equine vocabulary. Topics covered include the basic nutritional, housing and health requirements of the light horse. (Fall)

AGR 303 Advanced Horse Science (3). Deals with various topics of interest to the horseman including psychology, evaluation, anatomy and health care. Prerequisite: AGR 302. (Spring)

AGR 304 Advanced Stock Seat (3). This course is concerned with basic training techniques and the development of equitation skills using the western seat. Prerequisites: AGR 201 and approval of instructor. (Fall)

AGR 306 Advanced Forward Seat (3). This course presents equitation skills and techniques utilizing the forward seat. Included in the course are hunt seat, show seat, and other methods of English style equitation. Principles of schooling the jumping horses are emphasized. Prerequisites: AGR 201 and approval of instructor. (Spring)

AGR 308 Equine Practicum (3). Practical application of management principles involving health, nutrition, grooming, and training of horses. Prerequisite: AGR 302.

AGR 310 Applications in Animal Technology (3). The study of animal technology involving management, nutrition and health of small and large animal species. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite:  AGR 100. (Fall)

AGR 311 Beef Science (3). A study of the history and importance of the beef cattle industry; phases of beef production, selection, breeding, feeding, and management of beef cattle. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisites:  AGR 100. (Spring)

AGR 312 Dairy Science (3). A study of dairy breeds, calf raising, herd replacements, milk production, nutrition and management of dairy herds. Prerequisites:  AGR 100 and 300. (Spring)

AGR 313 Livestock Production Management Systems (3). Study of production management, nutrition, and breeding of farm animals. Will include on-the-farm training with livestock. Prerequisite: AGR 100.

AGR 316 Dairy Cattle Selection and Evaluation (3). Origin, characteristics and developments of major breeds of dairy cattle. Improvement programs. Apply the principles involved in herd improvement to the selection of breeding animals for dairy herds. Fundamental aspects of evaluation of dairy cattle. Comparative terminology, decision-making and presentation of oral reasons. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite:  AGR 100. (Fall)

AGR 321 Poultry Science (3). An introductory study of the various phases of poultry production, diagnosis and treatment of diseases, nutrition, processing and management practices for commercial poultry operations. Prerequisite:  AGR 100. (Spring)

AGR 322 Veterinary Laboratory Principles (3). An introductory course to the veterinary laboratory for the animal health technologist. Laboratory safety, microscopy, blood collection and analysis from various species along with familiarization with other laboratory equipment and techniques are taught for development of proficient laboratory skills. Prerequisite: AGR 310. (Spring)

AGR 325 Small Animal Science (3). A study of the history and importance of the small and exotic animal industry; breeds, selection and management are topics which will be covered;  Prerequisite:  AGR 310. (Fall)

AGR 326 Swine Science (3). Basic principles and their application in pork production — breeding, selection, nutrition, housing, equipment and economic management. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite:  AGR 100. (Fall)

AGR 329 Veterinary Hematology and Microbiology (4). This course is designed to introduce the animal health technology student to basic concepts, theories and techniques of veterinary hematology and microbiology. Basic normal values of various species of animals will be covered with common microorganisms of animal diseases. Prerequisites:  AGR 310 and 322. (Fall)

AGR 330 Principles of Agribusiness (3). The organization of agribusiness, its development in local communities, and the roles played by farmers, farm suppliers, processors, wholesalers, retailers, consumers and government. Analysis of the job opportunities in agribusiness. (Spring)

AGR 331 Small Animal Diseases (3). A study of the more common and important diseases of dogs and cats. The clinical signs, life cycles of pathogenic organisms, progression of symptoms and control of the diseases will be discussed. Prerequisite:  AGR 310. (Fall)

AGR 332 Animal Nursing and Radiography (4). Skill development in (1) handling, restraint and nursing techniques of small and large animals; (2) utilization of radiographic equipment and positioning exposures. Two lectures weekly and two hour laboratories twice per week. Prerequisites: AGR 310, 322, and 329. (Spring)

AGR 333 Agribusiness Records and Analysis (3). Fundamental principles necessary to keep farm and agribusiness firm accounts and to analyze these accounts for profitability. Budgeting, amortization, depreciation and the application of microcomputer technology to the management and financial control of the agribusiness firm. (Fall)

AGR 335 Farm Systems Management (3). This course focuses on the business aspects of production agriculture. Emphasis is on balance sheet and income statement analysis, capital and credit use, enterprise, partial and whole farm budgeting, and investment analysis. Economic principles and cost concepts as they relate to agriculture are also discussed. The student will learn to apply these tools to develop a farm management plan.

AGR 336 Agricultural Marketing and Price Analysis (3). A study of the nature of food and fiber consumption and demand, production and supply of farm products, marketing margins and price determination for specific agricultural commodities. (Fall, odd years)

AGR 337 Agricultural Sales and Merchandising (3). A course designed to enhance the students’ abilities to sell agriculturally related products. An emphasis is placed on agricultural customer and market knowledge and the skills required satisfying customer needs. Students are required to contact and spend time with agricultural sales professionals.

AGR 338 Rural Economic Development (3). An examination of the basic principles underlying the economic development of rural areas. The impact and role of agricultural and community organizations and their influence on the rural economy will be studied. Each student will make a special socioeconomic study of his/her community including a resource inventory and plan for economic development. (Summer, with sufficient demand)

AGR 339 Computer Applications for Agriculture (3). A course designed to develop an understanding and practical knowledge of the use of computers with respect to their application to problem-solving within agriculture. Students will receive hands-on experience in applying a variety of agriculture specific software to problems in agriculture and agricultural business management.

AGR 340 Veterinary Laboratory Sciences (3). This course is divided into four sections:  veterinary science, toxicology, necropsy and laboratory animal science. Course is designed to acquaint the student with basic pharmacology and toxicology, submission of tissue samples to diagnostic laboratories, necropsy techniques and common practices associated with laboratory animals. Prerequisites: AGR 310; CHE 105 and 106 or CHE 201 and 202. (Fall)

AGR 341 Seed Production and Technology (3). Special emphasis is given to the production and processing of seed, evaluation and testing for quality, and the study of viability during storage. (Spring)

AGR 342 Seed, Crop and Grain Analysis (3). Skills related to the evaluation of crops for quality relative to certification, viability, and marketing will be taught. The subjects that will be taught include seed analysis, plant and seed identification and grain grading. Prerequisite:  AGR 240.

AGR 350 Soil Survey (3). Principles of soils origin and classification including field mapping. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite:  AGR 250. (Spring)

AGR 355 Soil Judging (2). Emphasis on recognition, description and classification of soil horizons in a soil profile and then placing this soil in the U.S. Classification System. This course is designed for those interested in conservation and teaching careers. May be repeated for a maximum of four credits. (Fall)

AGR 360 Greenhouse Production and Management (3). A study of producing plants under transparency. Includes greenhouse management problems; heating, cooling, and humidity control; also cultural practices of several different crops. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. (Fall, odd years)

AGR 361 Horticulture and Greenhouse Management Practicum (3). A hands-on work study course that allows for the management and maintenance of all university greenhouse and horticultural components. Prerequisite:  AGR 360 and permission of instructor.

AGR 362 Floral Design (3). Operation and management of a retail florist establishment with emphasis on floral design. (Fall, even years)

AGR 363 Woody Plant Materials II (2). The identification and use of woody evergreen plant materials in the landscape.

AGR 364 Nursery Management (3). A study of establishing and managing a nursery practice including field grown container stock, wholesale and retail nursery business practices, and employee management practices. Prerequisite:  AGR 160.

AGR 365 Herbaceous Plant Materials (2). A study of characteristics, requirements, and potential uses of herbaceous ornamental plants in the landscape.

AGR 367 Residential Landscape Design (3). The application of principles of design to landscaping the home grounds. The identification, use and maintenance of ornamental plants and lawn grasses. Special attention will be given to the use of native plants for home beautification. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours; field trips. Prerequisites:  AGR 263 and 363. (Spring)

AGR 368 Landscape Construction (3). Understanding the process of landscape construction from initial planning stages to the actual installation of structures utilized within a landscape design. Prerequisite:  AGR 160

AGR 371 Agricultural Buildings and Construction (3). Introduction to technical design, selection of materials, and modern construction techniques used in the agriculture industry. Emphasis on concrete and erection of pole frame and steel buildings.

AGR 372 Agricultural Metal Processes (3). Basic theories involving metallurgy and the metal working processes. Includes SMAW, GMAW, brazing, OA welding and cutting, and plasma arc process. Skill development emphasized.

AGR 376 Agricultural Chemicals (3). This course deals with the major weeds and insects, which attack field crops and stored grain and the associated herbicides and insecticides. An understanding is developed of how and why herbicides function.

AGR 377 Agriculture Safety (3). Study of the hazards, methods of injury prevention, safety education, regulations and advancing safety and health in the agriculture industry.

AGR 378 Agricultural Environmental Management Systems (3). Study of animal waste, pesticide, and nutrient management practices in agriculture to reduce and control soil and water pollution and comply with Federal and state regulations.

AGR 379 Field Equipment Technology Management (3). Course designed to develop a solid foundation of knowledge that can be used to make efficient field equipment technology management decisions and to help keep a farm enterprise competitive.

AGR 380 Veterinary Laboratory Rotation (1). The student will observe and participate in the daily routing of each laboratory department at Breathitt Veterinary Center including histology, serology, virology, bacteriology, necropsy, toxicology and clinical pathology. Practical experience will be gained and laboratory skills will be applied in a clinical setting. Graded pass/fail.

AGR 399 Professional Development Seminar I (1). Seminar for agriculture students focusing on the job search process, employment opportunities, and related problems. Recommended for students in the sophomore or junior year. Graded course.

AGR 400 Veterinary Microbiology (5). Orientation to the veterinary diagnostic laboratory environment, including familiarization with basic techniques in veterinary bacteriology and mycology, veterinary virology, and clinical serology and immunology. Lecture two hours; laboratory, six hours. Prerequisites:  AGR 329, BIO 101 or 221, CHE 105 and 106 or 121 and 122.

AGR 401 Equine Breeding and Management (3). A comprehensive study of the reproductive anatomy and physiology of the stallion and brood mare, as well as the care of the foal from birth to weaning. Special attention is given to current management concepts prevalent in the equine industry today. Prerequisite: AGR 302. (Spring)

AGR 402 Advanced Livestock Judging (3). Provides the student with guidelines for evaluation and selection procedures as applied to breeding and market swine, beef cattle and sheep. Special emphasis is placed on training students for livestock judging team. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

AGR 405 Breaking and Training (3). Fundamental methods of breaking and training the young horse. All students are assigned a horse for application of techniques. Prerequisites:  AGR 304 or 306, and approval of instructor. (Spring)

AGR 407 Equine Selection and Evaluation (3). Basic study of selection and evaluation of horses for various uses, including halter and performance. Prerequisite: AGR 302. (Fall)

AGR 410 Advanced Veterinary Hematology (4). Concepts of hematopoiesis and the effect of disease on blood cells will be covered. Cell counting, identifications of normal and abnormal blood cells, bone marrow examination, cytology, coagulation, and special hematology skills will be taught. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours. Prerequisites:  AGR 322 and 329.

AGR 420 Veterinary Clinical Chemistry (2). Basic concept of clinical chemistry in animals as it related to organ systems and specific diseases will be covered in lecture. The laboratory will emphasize clinical chemistry assays utilizing automated and manual techniques as well as urinalysis and use of laboratory equipment. Prerequisites: AGR 300 and 322; CHE 105 and 106 or 121 and 122.

AGR 430 Veterinary Parasitology (2). Basic concepts of parasitology including life cycles and mechanisms of pathogenicity will be covered during lecture. The laboratory portion will emphasize methods of identification of parasites in fecal, blood, and skin specimens. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, four hours for half a semester. Prerequisite: AGR 322.

AGR 433 Farm Management (3). A study is made of the management functions and economics of farm organization and operation, including input-output relationships, enterprise combination, and budget analysis. Assignments are given which assist the student in applying economics and management principles to an individual case farm operation.

AGR 435 Interpretation of Agricultural Research (2). Students will access, analyze, evaluate and interpret agricultural research for occupational work. The course is oriented towards all fields within the agricultural sector.

AGR 436 Undergraduate Research in Agriculture (3-6). Agricultural research projects arranged individually with faculty members who agree to direct the research. A written plan of research must be filed with the school within two weeks of the beginning of the semester. May be repeated once for a maximum of six hours.

AGR 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

AGR 439 Software Applications for Agriculture (3). A course designed to develop an enhanced understanding of software programs and techniques in a hands-on environment. Software studied will enhance student skills in farm, nutrient and livestock management as well as customer profiling, billing for custom application and technical communication. Prerequisite:  AGR 399.

AGR 444 Purebred Livestock Management & Marketing (3). A study of the management techniques unique to the purebred livestock industry including, but not limited to, animal selection and development, records, measures of performance and preparation for marketing. In addition, the course will include an in-depth look at advertising and marketing techniques common to the livestock industry. Field hours required. Field trips outside of class time required. Prerequisites: AGR 100

AGR 455 Soil Management (3). The control of erosion, organic matter maintenance, effects of fertilizer on the environment, evaluating fertility and fertilization of major crops are emphasized. (Spring)

AGR 460 Professional Experience in Horticulture (3). Designed to provide on-the-job training in various horticultural enterprises such as golf courses, florist shops, greenhouse operations and garden centers under supervision of a horticulture professor. May be repeated once if approved by faculty advisor. (Fall, Spring or Summer)

AGR 461 Plant Propagation (3). A study of the methods of propagating horticultural plants. Includes cutting, grafting, budding, layerage and seed propagation. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. (Spring, even years)

AGR 462 Fine Turf Management (3). A detailed study of varieties of fine turf grasses and establishment and maintenance of fine turf, including soil and turf relationship, fertilizing and liming, and drainage and irrigation. Lecture two hours; laboratory, two hours. (Spring, even years)

AGR 463 Horticultural Therapy (3). Exploring the therapeutic modality that focuses on improving human health and functioning though the use of horticultural programs. The profession of horticultural therapy is based on medical model and is used both nationally and internationally. This course studies the different client populations that benefit from the therapy and how to set treatment goals based on a client’s need.

AGR 470 Soil and Water Engineering (3). Surveying, mapping, and determining areas of farm land; designing farm drainage systems; farm ponds; controlling water erosion with terraces and other mechanical structures. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. (Fall)

AGR 471 Applications in Precision Agriculture (3). Designed to understand the acquisition and analysis of geographically referenced data for the management of crop production systems, data formats, geographic information systems, grid sampling, soil fertility and physical properties, herbicide management, combine yield monitoring, variable-rate application, crop modeling and economics. Prerequisite:  AGR 339.

AGR 477 Agricultural Power Units (3). A study of small power units relative to agriculture. Includes servicing, maintenance, repair, use, types and applications of electrical motors, pumps, and small internal combustion engines. (Fall, even years)

AGR 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

AGR 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

AGR 499 Leadership/Professional Development Seminar II (1). Seminar for agriculture students focusing on the leadership development and the transition to the world of work and related problems. Recommended for students in the junior or senior year. Graded course. May be repeated up to 3 hours.

AGR 501 Diseases of Livestock (3). Distribution, general nature, methods of dissemination, sanitation, prevention and eradication of common infectious and parasitic diseases of domestic animals; hygiene and preventive medicine, with emphasis on the transmissible diseases. (Fall)

AGR 502 Advanced Nutrition (3). A study of physical and chemical properties of feeds. Digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients and factors affecting these functions are emphasized. The nutrient requirements of farm animals and effects of nutrient deficiencies are also studied. (Fall)

AGR 503 Animal Breeding (3). Study of hereditary traits in livestock, breeding designs, progeny testing and herd analysis. (Spring)

AGR 506 Reproductive Physiology (3). A study of the reproductive processes in mammals with primary emphasis on domestic farm animals. Will include the anatomy, endocrinology, behavior and general physiology of the reproductive processes. Artificial insemination, estrous control, ova transplants and other practical production practices will be covered. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours.

AGR 510 Animal Anatomy and Physiology (3). Deals with the anatomy of body systems, how these systems interrelate, and the physiology of body organs. Species covered include porcine, bovine, equine, canine and feline. Three one-hour lectures per week. Prerequisite:  AGR 310. (Spring)

AGR 511 Animal Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory (2). Deals with the anatomy of body systems, how these systems interrelate, and the physiology of body organs. Species covered include porcine, bovine, equine, canine and feline. Two hour laboratories twice per week. Prerequisite:  AGR 310. (Spring)

AGR 512 Beef Cattle Management Systems (3). A study of beef production, forage management and marketing systems. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Prerequisites:  AGR 100 and 311. (Fall)

AGR 514 Teaching Students Horsemanship (3). Designed for students interested in teaching techniques of teaching horsemanship. Course includes preparation and application of lesson plans. Prerequisite:  AGR 304 or 306. (Fall)

AGR 523 Artificial Insemination Techniques for Cattle (3). Designed to train students to become competent A.I. technicians. Topics discussed will include reproductive processes, health, nutrition, facilities and management of breeding herd. Techniques concerning semen handling, heat synchronization and heat detection will be taught. Laboratories will be designed to give students actual experience in inseminating cattle. Prerequisites:  AGR 100 and AGR 311 or consent of instructor. (Summer, with sufficient demand)

AGR 530 Advanced Agricultural Prices (3). Methods of price analysis and forecasting. Index numbers, time series data commodity flows and statistical techniques as applied to price analysis. Special emphasis will be placed upon the use of commodity futures markets in estimating cash prices and in protecting producers from cash price fluctuations. (Fall, even years)

AGR 531 Agricultural Finance (3). A study of the needs and problems of financing farm and farm service businesses, including a study of credit institutions serving American agriculture. (Fall)

AGR 532 Farm and Land Appraisal (3). A study of the methods and procedures of land and farm property valuation with attention to appraisal programs of the credit and farm service institutions. Prerequisite:  AGR 130. (Fall)

AGR 533 Seminar in International Agriculture Systems (3). A course designed to enhance student’s understanding of international agriculture systems and how they relate to the overall impact on world food processing and production. An emphasis is placed on systems which have the potential to impact and add-value to American agriculture, as well as those which hold key relationships to U.S. based agricultural trade and food development.

AGR 534 Types and Systems of Farming and Agribusiness (3). Includes a general statistical analysis of U.S. agriculture with attention to major agricultural regions of the nation and types of farming areas of Kentucky. Special emphasis is given to the organization of West Kentucky and regional farms and agribusinesses. Field trips, interviews and financial analysis of successful firms. (Summer, with sufficient demand)

AGR 535 Agricultural Policy (3). The history, principles, setting objectives and means of policy as applied to agriculture in our society. Prerequisite:  AGR 336. (Spring)

AGR 536 Quantitative Methods for Agribusiness (3). A study of the use and theory of mathematics as it applies to the fields of agriculture, finance and economics. Attention is given to the elementary uses of algebra, matrix algebra and the calculus as they apply to optimization problems in resource use efficiency. The same mathematics will be applied to time value of money topics. Prerequisites: ECO 230, 231 and MAT 140. (Spring, odd years) Must be admitted to graduate studies prior to registering for this course to receive graduate credit.

AGR 537 Seminar in Agricultural Business Systems (2). Course designed to enhance student’s understanding of, and experience in, agricultural business systems. Emphasis will be placed on strategies of managing a successful agribusiness operation and /or farmer-owned cooperatives. Prerequisite: AGR 130. Must be admitted to graduate studies prior to registering for this course to receive graduate credit.

AGR 538 Seminar in Production Agricultural Systems (2). Designed to enhance student’s understanding of, and experience in, production agriculture systems and how they relate to a successful farming operation. An emphasis is placed on systems, which have the potential to impact and add-value to the local, regional and national agriculture economy, through classroom as well as laboratory experiences. Must be admitted to graduate studies prior to registering for this course to receive graduate credit.

AGR 539 Advanced Computer Applications for Agriculture (3). An intensive course designed to enhance the computer skills of agriculture students and to give them the skills necessary to generate useful information and solve a variety of agriculturally specific problems. Students receive instruction on advanced word processing concepts, budget generation, statistical analysis, agribusiness related software and global positioning systems in agriculture. Prerequisite:  AGR 339.

AGR 540 Veterinary Surgery and Anesthesia (4). Clinical principles, practices and procedures involved in the field of veterinary medicine. For animal health technology students with senior standing. Prerequisites:  AGR 310, 322, 329 and 332.

AGR 542 Plant Breeding I (3). Basic principles and methods used in the improvement of important agronomic and horticultural crops. (Fall, even years)

AGR 546 Integrated Pest Management (3). Principles of plant pest control as related to developmental stages of crop plants. Evaluation of pest problems, alternative control methods and effects on the ecosystem. Emphasis on economic control of insect and disease vectors that affect agricultural crops. (Spring, even years)

AGR 547 Crop Management (3). Study of the distribution, economic importance and management of forage, grain crops and tobacco. (Fall)

AGR 548 Crop Physiology (3). Basic principles of crop physiology; the effect of environment and management practice on physiological processes, growth and development of crops. (Spring, odd years)

AGR 549 Weeds and Their Control (3). A study of the introduction, methods of dissemination, reproduction and control of weeds by the most reliable methods and techniques. Prerequisite:  AGR 160 or 240. (Fall)

AGR 550 Applied Pharmacology (3). Advanced clinical principles, practices and procedures in the field of veterinary medicine. Prerequisites:  CHE 105 and 106, or CHE 201 and 202.

AGR 551 Selected Studies in Agriculture (1-3). An intensive study of an agriculture topic that will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. (As demanded)

AGR 554 Soil and Plant Analysis (3). A study of the chemical and analytical procedures used on soils and plants along with instruction and theory of the use of common analytical equipment. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Prerequisite:  AGR 250. (Fall)

AGR 555 Advanced Soil Fertility (3). The chemistry of the essential elements in soils and the use and the manufacturing processes of various fertilizer materials are considered. Prerequisite:  AGR 250. (Spring)

AGR 563 Arboriculture (3). Classification, identification and care of ornamental trees, shrubs and vines, including pruning, bracing, surgery, transplanting, insect and disease control, and fertilization, as related to large areas of organized plantings. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. (Spring, odd years)

AGR 566 Advanced Greenhouse Management and Production (3). A study of the principles and practices used in the production of specific important greenhouse crops. Considerable emphasis will be placed on the manipulation of environmental conditions during production. (Fall, even years)

AGR 569 Plants for Interior Design (2). A study of the basic plants used for interior design and decoration. This study includes identification, nomenclature, growing requirements, insect and disease problems and proper use of these plants in interiors.

AGR 571 Advanced Precision Agriculture (3). Designed for students who desire to apply and expand knowledge of the acquisition and analysis of geographically referenced data for the management of crop production systems, data formats, geographic information systems, grid sampling, soil fertility and physical properties, herbicide management, yield monitoring, variable-rate application, crop modeling and economics.

AGR 573 Agricultural Processing Systems (3). An analysis of systems and methods for harvesting, processing and storing agricultural products. Includes drying and curing principles, grinding, mixing, cleaning, sorting, material handling and structural environmental design. (Fall, even years)

AGR 574 Agricultural Irrigation and Water Systems (3). Includes determining water needs, water sources, pumps, fundamental pipeline hydraulics and designing a complete irrigation and/or water system for the farm.  (Spring, even years)

AGR 575 Combine and Grain Handling  Systems (3). Developing a complete grain harvesting, handling, drying and storage operation. A study of combine operation and the materials flow concept, closed loop handling, psychrometrics, grain drying, drying methods, facility layout and facility management. Combine comparison, selection and utilization.

AGR 576 Agricultural Electrification Systems (3). Study of the basic principles of electricity, the fundamentals of wiring and selection, the operation and economics of agricultural electricity equipment. (Spring)

AGR 577 Tractor Power Principles (3). Study of the principles governing the selection and application of tractors and power driven machines. Emphasis is placed on operating systems of engines, including compression, ignition and carburetion. Mechanical principles of tractors and preventive maintenance included. (Fall, odd years)

AGR 578 Research and Development of Agriculture Tractors and Equipment (3). Tours of the major agriculture tractor and equipment industries. The tours include:  research and development, engineering, foundries, and the assembly of engines, transmissions, final drives, combines, cotton pickers, and planting equipment. (Summer)

AGR 580 Veterinary Products (3). This course deals with old and new products currently available in the veterinary market. Market will include the ordering and purchasing of wholesale products, selling, inventory control, computer programming, marketing, and pricing of products utilized in a veterinary practice. (Fall)

AGR 582  Veterinary Practice and Operations (3). Course will deal with the day to day events centered around the operation of a veterinary practice. Supervisory skills, communication skills, inventory, bookkeeping, planning, and advertising are the main areas stressed in this course.
 
AGR 585 Specialized Journalism/RTV (1-3). Directed individual study. Can be a journalistic effort in areas such as science, sports, government, religion, graphics, etc., or a project in radio or television such as a major production or series, an extensive research project and paper, or other approved project. Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and written approved proposal required prior to registration.

AGR 590 Internship in Animal Technology (3-6). Practical full-time work experience to be arranged through an animal-related facility during the fall, spring or summer session. Site to be arranged by the student and approved by the course coordinator. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. Prerequisites:  AGR 100, 300, 331, 332, 340, 351 and 400. Enrollment only by consent of instructor. (Fall, Spring or Summer)


Anthropology
(ANT)
ANT 140 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3). A survey of the diverse ways human societies are organized with an analysis of how their cultures meet the common and distinctive needs of these societies, with emphasis placed upon non-literate peoples.

ANT 311 Anthropology of Complex Societies (3). An analysis of a range of societal types including small hunting bands, peasant societies and emerging urban societies. Primary emphasis will be placed on the processes that lead to the emergence of complex societies, rural to urban migration in non-western societies, and a cultural analysis of the southern United States. Prerequisite:  ANT 140 or consent of instructor.

ANT 315 Special Topics in Anthropology (3). This seminar will cover an important topic or related topics. Both student and faculty interest will determine the topic. Students will both contribute and lead discussions of the readings. Research paper is required. May be repeated.

ANT 325 Biological Anthropology (3). The biological nature of man. A survey of man’s physical origin, his primate background, and his evolution. Cultural association with fossil evidence and concepts of race.

ANT 329 The American Indians (3). A history of the Indians of North America from the earliest times until the late nineteenth century. This course focuses on the cultures, customs and traditions of the various Indian civilizations of the United States. (Same as HIS 329.)

ANT 330 Contemporary Latin American Cultures (3). A survey of present cultures in Latin America, emphasizing problems of acculturation, cultural conflict and change, and the mechanisms which maintain indigenous cultures. Prerequisite:  ANT 140 or consent of instructor.

ANT 343 Minorities in the United States (3). Identity, goals and organization of minority groups; dynamics of prejudice; processes of communication, conflict and accommodation. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or anthropology, or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 343.)

ANT 344 The Black Experience (3). An analysis of the African American way of life utilizing anthropological and historical approaches. Major themes in black culture will include religion, family relations and political empowerment. Biographical, autobiographical and ethnographic materials will be utilized. (Same as SOC 344.)

ANT 345 Cultural Ecology (3). An examination of how humankind has used the various aspects of the social structure to adapt to the physical environment. Current ecological theories will be utilized to examine social evolution from hunting and gathering to industrial societies. (Same as SOC 345.)

ANT 356 The Art of Non-Western Cultures (3). Study of the arts of Asia, Oceania, Africa and the Pre-Western Americas. (Same as ART, MCG, RGS 356.)

ANT 390 Applied Anthropology (3). A study of how anthropologists use their knowledge to solve special social and technical problems. Topics to be covered include the history of applied anthropology, the ethics of significantly altering the culture of the group, and the explanation of how and why behavioral systems change. Prerequisite:  six hours of anthropology or consent of instructor.

ANT 400 Medical Anthropology (3). This course examines cultural differences in health and health care practices, and western and non-western patterns of cultural responses to various diseases. The course concentrates on how societies explain and treat disease, and how they respond to modern and traditional medical institutional settings.

ANT 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

ANT 450 History of Anthropological Thought (3). An examination of the history and development of the field of anthropology with special emphasis on the theories and practitioners of the discipline.

ANT 470 Comparative Cultures (3). A study of cultural traits and social institutions of selected societies. Prerequisite:  nine hours of anthropology or consent of instructor.

ANT 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ANT 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ANT 500 Directed Studies (1-3). Selected topics in anthropology as arranged by the student and a professor. May be repeated up to nine hours credit. Prerequisites:  at least 12 hours of anthropology and permission of department chair.

ANT 596 The Minority Elderly (3). This course focuses on the minority elderly including racial, ethnic and lower income groups. Applicable concepts and theories in social gerontology will also be covered. Prerequisite:  nine hours of anthropology, gerontology or sociology or consent of instructor. (Same as GTY 596.)


ARCHAEOLOGY
(ARC)
ARC 150 Introduction to Archaeology (3). Survey of archaeology’s contribution to humankind’s knowledge of prehistoric and historic development on a worldwide basis with emphasis placed upon discoveries rather than methods of archaeology.

ARC 300 Archaeological Method and Theory (3). History theory, and methods of archaeology; introduction to problems and techniques of field and laboratory research (mapping, recording, artifact classification, reporting). Lectures and laboratory sessions. Prerequisite:  ARC 150 or consent of instructor.

ARC 302 Archaeological Field Work I (5). Field training in the strategy and tactics of archaeological survey and excavation; intensive instruction in the recovery and documentation of cultural remains and data from archaeological sites. Six weeks continuous field work. Usually offered only during summer session. Prerequisites:  ARC 150 and 300, or consent of instructor.

ARC 304 Archaeological Laboratory Methods (1). Practical training in the organization and methods of archaeological laboratory procedures. Instruction in processing, cataloguing, preliminary analysis, and preparation for curation/archival storage of cultural remains and records resulting from archaeological field work. Repeatable for a maximum of three credits. Prerequisite:  ARC 150 and 302 or permission of the instructor.

ARC 308 Documentary Archaeology (1). An examination of archaeological subjects as discussed in recent documentaries. Course includes video footage from archaeological sites in both the New and Old Worlds. Prerequisite: ARC 150 or permission of instructor.

ARC 310 Archaeological Laws and Ethics (1). Examines archaeological laws and archaeological ethics from Kentucky and the United States that directly affect the professional practice of archaeology. Prerequisite: ARC 150, or permission of instructor.

ARC 315 Special Topics in Archaeology (1-3). Seminar will cover an important topic or related topics. Both student and faculty interest will determine the topic. Students will contribute to class through discussions of assigned readings and research. The course has variable credit and may be repeated three times for a total of nine credit hours. Prerequisite: ANT 140 or ARC 150, or permission of instructor.

ARC 321 Ancient Civilizations (3). An in-depth anthropological, archeological and historical examination of the origins of seven of the world’s earliest civilizations (Southwest Asia, Egypt, India, China, Mesoamerica, Andean and North American).

ARC 330 North American Archaeology (3). A survey of prehistoric North American Indian cultures from 15,000 B.C. through historic contact. Emphasis placed on archaeological cultural histories of North America. Prerequisite:  ARC 150.

ARC 335 Forensic Archaeology (3). An examination of the methods used by forensic anthropologists to determine the identity, age, sex and race of an individual from skeletal remains using archaeological and anthropological field and laboratory methods. Prerequisites:  ARC 150 or permission of instructor.

ARC 340 Archaeology of Africa (3). A survey of the archaeology of Africa, from human origins to the historic period. Emphasis placed on the archaeological evidence of African culture history before the advent of European colonization.

ARC 350 Contract Archaeology (3). This course includes an examination of the federal and state laws that mandate contract archeology, how to prepare cost estimates for prospective clients, and how to conduct contract archeology projects.

ARC 360 Historical Archaeology (3). A methodological survey of the archaeology of historical societies, with geographic concentration on North America. Emphasis on research strategies and special problems in the archaeological study of literate societies. Prerequisite:  ARC 150 or consent of instructor.

ARC 362 Frontier Archaeology (4). This course examines the archaeology of the colonial and frontier eras (1650-1800) of the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys.  Special emphasis is placed on those sites within the river valleys that have been studied archaeologically.  Field  (day) trips as lab work to visit several of these sites are required on four weekends during the semester. Prerequisites: ARC 150 and 360; HIS 221 or consent of instructor.

ARC 370 Archaeology of the Eastern Woodlands (3). An intensive examination of eastern U.S. prehistory from 12,000 B.C. through A.D. 1700, covering major cultural traditions, e.g. Paleo, Archaic, Woodland (Adena and Hopewell), and post-Woodland Indian groups (Ft. Ancient and Mississippian). Course includes the study of general midwestern U.S. and southeastern prehistory. Prerequisite:  ARC 150.

ARC 375 Archaeology of the Western Great Lakes (3). The archaeology of the western Great Lakes from 10,000 B.C. until A.D. 1800 is discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on the archaeology of the Upper and Lower Peninsula’s of Michigan. Prerequisite:  ARC 150 or permission of instructor.

ARC 385 Archaeology of Eastern Asia (3). A survey of the archaeology of Eastern Asia, from human origins to the historic period. Emphasis is placed on the archaeological evidence from the emergence of East Asian complex societies and culture history before the advent of European contact. Prerequisites:  ARC 150 or permission of instructor.

ARC 390 Geoarchaeology  (3). Geoarchaeology is the field of study that applies the concepts and methods of the geosciences to archaeological research. Prerequisites:  ARC 150 and GSC 336. (Same as GSC 390)

ARC 395 Archaeology of Religion (3). A survey of the archaeological evidence for religions throughout the world, from the earliest expressions of spirituality to the modern world religions. Emphasis is placed on the archaeological evidence for recognizing religious expressions in general, and for the emergence of modern world religions. Archaeological interpretations of New World, African, and Australian religions will be considered in comparative perspective. Fieldwork to a house of worship or cemetery will be required. Prerequisite: ARC 150 or permission of instructor. (Same as RGS 395)

ARC 425 Advanced Archaeological Laboratory Methods (3). Advanced training in the analysis of archaeological materials and writing of an archaeological study for professional presentation and publication. Prerequisites:  ARC 150, 300 and 304.

ARC 500 Directed Studies (3). Selected topics in archaeology as arranged by the student and a professor. May be repeated for up to nine hours. Prerequisites:  At least 12 hours of archaeology and permission of department chair.

ARC 510 Advanced Archaeological Field Work (3-6). Advanced field training in the strategy and tactics of archaeological survey and excavation. Intensive instruction in recovery and documentation of cultural remains and data from archaeological sites, the organization and logistics of archaeological field projects, and supervision of field crews. Six weeks of continuous field work. Usually offered only during the summer session. May be repeated for up to six hours credit. Prerequisite:  ARC 302 or permission of instructor.

ARC 592 Historic Preservation (3). This course will provide a general overview of the different aspects of historic preservation, including downtown revitalization, neighborhood organization, historic house management, preservation legislation, preservation education and historic architecture. Much of the class is taught in a laboratory atmosphere, with students making on-site visits to a variety of historic preservation projects. Emphasis is given to the study of the development of American architectural styles, so that students can recognize historic houses and place them in a wider context.

ARC 598 Museum Studies (3). This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of museum work. Topics included will be the history and philosophy of museums; the social, economic and political trends that shape museums; the staffing, management and financing of museums; and the multiple functions of museums — collection and care of objects, exhibition design and interpretation, educational programs, research activities and public relations.  (Same as HIS 598.)


Art
(ART)
Note: All prerequisite courses apply to students in art programs. Students not majoring or minoring in art may take any of the art courses listed if approved by the instructor and the department of art.

ART 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Introductory seminar for all first-semester art majors, including transfer students. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail

ART 101 Drawing I: Introduction to Drawing (3). Drawing with an emphasis on the development of visual perception. Six hours per week.

ART 105 Studio Art for Non-Majors (3). A studio course designed to introduce non-art majors to the processes of visual language and basic studio techniques that are fundamental to creating images. Six hours per week.

ART 111 Two-dimensional Design (3). Fundamental elements and concepts of design. Six hours per week.

ART 112 Three-dimensional Design (3). Fundamental elements and concepts of three-dimensional design. Six hours per week.

ART 121 Art Appreciation (3). Surveys the various aspects of the visual and functional arts and their relationship to human life and society. A variety of art forms from different cultures and historical periods will be studied. Does not count toward art history minor. A student cannot have credit for both ART 121 and HON 161.

ART 201 Drawing II: Life Drawing (3). Figure drawing in varied media. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 101 or permission of instructor.

ART 211 Introduction to the History of Art I (3). A survey of the history of art from Prehistory through the Middle-Ages.

ART 212 Introduction to the History of Art II (3). A survey of the history of art from the Renaissance to the present.

ART 298 Mid-Degree Review (0). Critique of selected works by a jury of art department faculty. Undergraduate and transfer students pursuing a baccalaureate degree in art must register for ART 298 the semester immediately following the completion of 30 credit hours in art.

ART 300 Drawing III (3). A conceptual study of both figurative and abstract approaches to drawing. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 101 and 201 or permission of instructor.

ART 303 Drawing IV (3). Exploration of drawing ideas with emphasis on the development of personal expression. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 300 or permission of instructor.

ART 304 Drawing V (3). Continuation of ART 303.  Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 303 or permission of instructor.

ART 309 Introduction to Metalsmithing I (3). Metals in jewelry-making, holloware, small sculpture, and object-making with an emphasis on design and craftsmanship. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 101 and 112 or permission of instructor.

ART 310 Introduction to Wood I (3). Three-dimensional design as it relates to ideas, tools, materials and processes. The student designs projects which integrate aesthetics and function using a variety of materials and processes. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 112 or permission of instructor.

ART 311 Metalsmithing II (3). Introduction to several casting techniques as well as a continuation of skills learned in ART 309. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 309 or permission of instructor.

ART 312 Metalsmithing III (3). Advanced problems in metalsmithing with an emphasis in ideation and conceptualization of content. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 311 or permission of instructor.

ART 313 Wood II (3). Exploration of functional design with an emphasis on development of personal direction in design. Advanced methods of construction and techniques will be taught. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 310 or permission of instructor.

ART 314 Wood III (3). Advanced problems in functional design. Chair and table construction will be emphasized in this class. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 313 or permission of instructor.

ART 330 Introduction to Painting I (3). This course covers basics of color theory and materials and techniques of painting in oil. Problems stress the mastery of the medium first, and then using it to render from observation.  ART 101, 111, and 201 or permission of instructor. Six hours per week. Required course for teacher certification.

ART 333 Painting II (3). Continuation of ART 330. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 330 or permission of instructor.

ART 334 Painting III (3). Continuation of ART 333. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 333 or permission of instructor.

ART 341 Fundamentals of Elementary School Art (3). Survey of the profession of art education at the elementary school level. Provides students with a combination of clinical and field experiences. Includes laboratory and lecture experiences in elementary school art materials and teaching methods. This course is designed for the art major pursuing teacher certification in ART P-12. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  EDU 103 or permission of the instructor.

ART 342 Fundamentals of Secondary School Art (3). Survey of the profession of art education at the junior and senior high school levels. Provides students with a combination of clinical and field experiences. A course similar to ART 341 with emphasis upon teaching of art on the junior and senior high school levels. This course is designed for the art major pursuing teacher certification in ART P-12. Six hours per week. Field hours required. Prerequisite:  ART 341 and EDU 103 or permission of the instructor.

ART 343 Art Materials and Techniques for the Classroom Teacher (3). A studio art education course emphasizing visual learning in all curricular areas of the elementary classroom. This course provides prospective elementary classroom teachers, early childhood educators, and special education teachers with the necessary art making skills in a variety of media and techniques. Class sessions include demonstration, experimentation, and manipulation of materials and techniques leading to reflective decision-making as well as critical assessment of finished work. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  EDU 103 or permission of the instructor.

ART 346 Introduction to Fibers I (3). Introduction to fiber forms through the use of on-loom and off-loom weaving techniques, surface design processes and sculptural applications. ART 101, 111, 112 and 201 or permission of instructor.

ART 347 Fibers II (3). Introduction to techniques appropriate to costume, fashion design and double weave techniques; exploration of concept. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 346 or permission of instructor.  

ART 348 Fibers III (3). Exploration of concepts in fibers with emphasis on the development of a personal expression. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 346 and ART 347 or permission of instructor.  

ART 350 Introduction to Graphic Design I: Digital Art (3). Introduction to the computer as a tool for fine art and illustration. Students are taught computer techniques and approaches to creating art. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  ART 101 and 111.

ART 351 Graphic Design II: Type and Image (3). Introduction to type and image production for graphic design. Students learn traditional and computer based problem-solving techniques. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 350 or permission of instructor.

ART 352 Graphic Design III:  Layout and Introduction to Design Systems (3). Intermediate level study in graphic design focusing on layout for publication. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 350 (ART 351 is also recommended) or permission of instructor.

ART 356 The Art of Non-Western Cultures (3). Study of the arts of Asia, Oceania, Africa and the Pre-Western Americas. (Same as ANT, MCG, RGS 356.)

ART 360 Introduction to Sculpture I (3). A study of form, space and surface through the development of 3-D sculptural assignments. Basic sculpture techniques involving additive and subtractive methods. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  ART 111 and 112 or permission of instructor.

ART 361 Sculpture II (3). Further exploration of form, space, and surface and an introduction to more advanced techniques and permanent materials. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 360 or permission of instructor.

ART 362 Sculpture III (3). A continuation of ART 361. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 361 or permission of instructor.

ART 370 Introduction to Ceramics I (3). Beginning ceramics furnishes the student with basic approaches to clay working:  throwing, hand building, press molding, clay extrusion, plus glazing and firing ware. The class may be taken by non-majors as well as by students who are majoring in art. Six hours per week.

ART 371 Ceramics II (3). A further study of formation techniques and lecture materials covering clay bodies, slips, colored engobes, firing and glazing. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 370 or permission of instructor.

ART 372 Ceramics III (3). Continuation of ART 371. Students will study glaze calculation and testing as well as concentrating on their own goal-based creative work. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 371 or permission of instructor.

ART 379 Introduction to Printmaking I (3). Introduction to the techniques and materials of intaglio and relief printing, including collograph, drypoint, etching and linoleum cuts. Composition, craftsmanship, and technique are emphasized. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 101, 201, 111 and 112 or permission of instructor.  

ART 380 Printmaking II (3). Introduction to the techniques and materials of lithography including stone, plate and photo lithography. Composition, craftsmanship, technique and individual investigation are emphasized. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 379 or permission of instructor.

ART 381 Printmaking III (3). Introduction to the techniques and material of silkscreen, including photo silkscreen. Composition, craftsmanship, technique and individual investigation are emphasized. Criticism and discussion.  Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 380 or permission of instructor.

ART 382 Introduction to Photography I (3). Includes various photographic processes, cameras (structures, use, operation), films (types, use and development) and print development (darkroom techniques). Both technical and compositional aspects are stressed. Criticism and discussion. Cameras are not supplied. Six hours per week.

ART 383 Photography II (3). Continuation and refinement of technical aspects presented in ART 382 with expanded emphasis on individual investigation. Discussion and criticism. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 382 or permission of instructor.

ART 384 Photography III (3). Exploration of personal style and various photographic processes. Discussion and investigation of historical and current photographic concerns and trends. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 383 or permission of instructor.

ART 385 Introduction to Cinematography (3). Techniques and criticism of motion pictures. Basic format in Super-8 or videotape for both class and individual productions. Cameras are not supplied.

ART 390 Seminar (3). Special projects and activities course involving problems utilizing special talents of Department of Art faculty and guest artists. Six hours per week. May be repeated up to three times for credit.

ART 397 Introduction to Papermaking and Bookbinding (3). Papermaking and bookbinding processes, tools, equipment and materials. Individual investigation, technical proficiency and design are emphasized. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  ART 101, 201, 111, 112 and 379 or permission of instructor.

ART 399 Professional Practices (1). A survey of the resources, methods and skills employed by artists in a range of professions.

ART 403 Drawing VI (3). Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 303 or permission of instructor.

ART 404 Drawing VII (3). Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 403 or permission of instructor.

ART 411 Metalsmithing IV (3). Advanced problems in metalsmithing. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 312 or permission of instructor.

ART 412 Metalsmithing V (3). Use of metals in jewelry-making, holloware, small sculpture, and/or object-making. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 411 or permission of instructor.

ART 413 Wood IV (3). Advanced problems in functional design. Complex carcass and drawer construction will be emphasized. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 314 or permission of instructor.

ART 414 Wood V (3). Advanced problems in functional design. Students will design and build functional pieces of their choosing. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 413 or permission of instructor.

ART 415 Greek and Roman Art (3). Topics in the history of the art and architecture of ancient Greece and Rome through the late Antique. Prerequisite:  ART 211 or permission of instructor.

ART 416 Medieval Art (3). Topics in the history of art from the Early Christian through the Gothic period. Prerequisite:  ART 211 or permission of instructor. (Same as RGS 417.)

ART 418 Renaissance Art (3). Topics in the history of the Renaissance. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 419 Baroque Art (3). Topics in the history of the art of the Baroque period, mainly in Europe. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 425 Art of Asia (3). A history of the art of India, Central and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, and Japan. Prerequisites: Both ART 211 and 212, or ART 356, or permission of instructor. (Same as RGS 425.)

ART 426 Romanticism to Realism (3). History of Nineteenth-Century art from the Romantic period through Realism (c. 1800 to c. 1870). Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 427 Late-Nineteenth Century Art (3). The history of Western art from c. 1870 to c. 1900. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.
 
ART 428 Nineteenth-Century Art (3). History of 19th Century Western art. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 429 Art from 1900 to 1960 (3). History of Western art from 1900 to 1960. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 430 Contemporary Art, 1960 to the Present (3). History of contemporary art from 1960 to the present. Prerequisite:  ART 212.

ART 433 Painting IV (3). Advanced problems. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 334 or permission of instructor.

ART 434 Painting V (3). Exploration of painting and ideas with emphasis on personal expression. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 433 or permission of instructor.

ART 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

ART 447 Fibers IV (3). Students pursue in-depth investigations of advanced processes and concepts in fibers. They are expected to create a body of work to be exhibited in their senior exhibition. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 346, 347 and 348, or permission of instructor.

ART 448 Fibers V (3). A continuation of ART 447. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: ART 346, 347, 348 and 447, or permission of instructor.

ART 451 Graphic Design IV:  System Design (3). Advanced level design for multimedia and the Internet. Web page design and exploration of multi-media. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 351, 352, or permission of instructor.

ART 452 Graphic Design V:  Senior Portfolio (3). Terminal level study in graphic design involving directed research, portfolio preparation and group evaluation. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 351, 352, or permission of instructor.

ART 461 Sculpture IV (3). Selected problems involved in the sculpture process. Opportunity for directed study and studio work in a variety of three-dimensional media or processes. Emphasis on developing a creative body of work. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 362 or permission of instructor.

ART 462 Sculpture V (3). A continuation of ART 461. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 461 or permission of instructor. Studio and lecture.

ART 471 Ceramics IV (3). Students majoring in ceramics will study kiln construction and design. In addition to subject matter instruction, students will pursue the normal work load assignments and critique session plus glazing and firing. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 372 or permission of instructor.

ART 472 Ceramics V (3). Continuation of ART 471. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 471 or permission of instructor.

ART 480 Printmaking IV (3). Advanced problems and  further exploration of the techniques, processes, tool and equipment related to intaglio, lithography, relief and silkscreen. Individual direction, technical proficiency and personal expression are emphasized. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 381 or permission of instructor.

ART 481 Printmaking V (3). Continuation of ART 480. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 480 or permission of instructor.

ART 483 Photography IV (3). Investigation of nontraditional and/or new technology related to light-sensitive image-making. Refinement of personal visual direction. Research into new techniques and/or visual trends in society and industry. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 384 or permission of instructor.

ART 484 Photography V (3). Concentrated study of selected photographic processes as related to student’s professional goals. Individual explorations are to culminate in a unified body of work such as a book or portfolio, to help prepare the student for his/her senior show, and to facilitate entry into graduate school or the workplace. Prerequisite:  ART 483 or permission of instructor.

ART 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ART 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ART 490 Special Problems in Studio Art (3). An independent problems course in studio art for advanced undergraduates majoring in art under the direction of a faculty member. The student must submit and receive approval of a detailed study plan prior to registration. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prerequisites: consent of supervising faculty member and permission of department chair.

ART 491 Special Problems in Art History (3). An independent problems course in art history for advanced undergraduates majoring in art under the direction of the art history faculty. The student must submit and receive approval of a detailed study plan prior to registration. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites:  consent of supervising faculty member and permission of department chair.

ART 492 Special Problems in Art Education (3). An independent problems course in art education for advanced undergraduates majoring in art under the direction of the art education faculty member. The student must submit and receive approval of a detailed study plan prior to registration. Does not count as a studio elective. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of supervising faculty member and permission of department chair.

ART 497 B.F.A. Project (3). Investigation of individual concepts and techniques culminating in a professional B.F.A. exhibition. Prerequisite:  completion of six hours of 400-level studio courses in the emphasis.

ART 498 B.F.A. Practicum Exhibition (3). Final project for the B.F.A. candidate taking an area in art. Documentation (slides/video) and written statement (which includes a description of the direction and influences upon the student’s work) must accompany the practicum exhibition. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites:  ART 497 and 298, or permission of instructor.

ART 499 B.A./B.S. Practicum Group Exhibition (1). Final project for the B.A./B.S. candidate taking an area in art. Written statement, including description of the direction and influences upon the student’s work, must accompany the work exhibited in the practicum exhibition. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites:  ART 298 and senior year, the final semester of the student’s program of study, or permission of instructor.

Note:  In 500-level studio and art history courses, students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work.

ART 501 Seminar:  Special Topics in Art History (3). Changing seminar topics to be determined by the instructor and student interest. May be repeated up to nine credit hours. Prerequisite:  ART 211 and 212, or permission of instructor.

ART 502 Seminar:  Contemporary Issues in Art (3). A study of modern critical methodologies and their application in analysis of contemporary art. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. B.A./B.S. majors must have permission of instructor. Prerequisite:  ART 428 or 429 or ART 430. Required of all B.F.A. and M.A. studio degree candidates.

ART 503 Drawing VIII (3). Concentrated exploration of drawing with emphasis on personal expression. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  two drawing courses or permission of instructor.

ART 504 Drawing IX (3). Continuation of ART 503. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 503 or permission of instructor.

ART 505 Weaving (3). Pursuit of techniques and materials needed to develop a personal statement in fiber form. Multi-harness and construction weaving. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in weaving or permission of instructor.

ART 506 Weaving (3). Continuation of ART 505. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 505 or permission of instructor.

ART 507 Surface Design (3). Pursuit of techniques and materials needed to develop a personal statement in fabric forms. Emphasis on three-dimensional concepts in fabric construction. Six hours per week. Prerequisites: two courses in textile decoration or permission of instructor.

ART 508 Surface Design (3). Continuation of ART 507. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 507 or permission of instructor.

ART 511 Metalsmithing VI (3). A concentrated exploration of the use of metals in jewelry-making and holloware. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in metalsmithing or permission of instructor.

ART 512 Metalsmithing VII (3). Continuation of ART 511. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 511 or permission of instructor.

ART 513 Wood VI (3). Advanced problems in functional design. Students will design and build functional pieces of their choosing. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in functional design or permission of instructor.

ART 514 Wood VII (3). Advanced problems in functional design. Students will design and build functional pieces of their choosing. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 513 or permission of instructor.

ART 515 Greek and Roman Art (3). History of the art and architecture of ancient Greece and Rome through the late Empire. Prerequisite:  ART 215 or permission of instructor.

ART 516 Early Medieval Art (3). History of the art of the early Christian/late Imperial Roman era through the Ottonian period. Prerequisite:  ART 215 or permission of instructor.

ART 517 Late Medieval Art (3). History of medieval art from the Romanesque period through the late Gothic period. Prerequisite:  ART 215 or permission of instructor.

ART 518 Renaissance Art (3). History of the art of the Renaissance. Prerequisite:  ART 218 or permission of instructor.

ART 519 Baroque Art (3). History of the art of the Baroque period, mainly in Europe. Prerequisite:  ART 218 or permission of instructor.

ART 520 Eighteenth-Century Art (3). History of the art of the eighteenth century. Prerequisite:  ART 218 or permission of instructor.

ART 522 Sub-Saharan African Art (3). Historical survey of the art and architecture of various peoples of Africa. Prerequisite: ART 120 or permission of instructor.

ART 524 Italian Renaissance Art (3). History of the art and architecture of the Early and High Renaissance in Italy. ART 122, 124, and 125 are prerequisites for art majors only.

ART 527 Northern Baroque Art (3). History of the art and architecture in the Baroque Period in Northern Europe, 1600 to 1750. ART 122, 124, and 125 are prerequisites for art majors only.

ART 528 Nineteenth-Century Art (3). History of European art from Neoclassicism to French Impressionism, 1780-1880. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 228 or permission of instructor.

ART 529 Early Modern Art, 1880-1940 (3). History of European art from Post-Impressionism to 1940. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 228 or permission of instructor.

ART 530 Contemporary Art, 1940 to the Present (3). History of contemporary art from 1940 to the present. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 228 or permission of instructor.

ART 531 The Art and Architecture of the Far East (3). Historical survey of the art and architecture of China, Korea and Japan. Prerequisite: ART 120 or permission of instructor.

ART 532 The Art and Architecture of India and Southeast Asia (3). Historical survey of the art and architecture of India and Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: ART 120 or permission of instructor.

ART 533 Painting VI (3). Concentrated exploration of painting with emphasis on personal expression. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two painting courses or permission of instructor.

ART 534 Painting VII (3). Continuation of ART 533. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 533.

ART 540 Foundations of Art Education (3). Survey of the fields contributing to art education. Includes human development, art supervision, teacher preparation, studies in philosophies of the aesthetic, history and criticism of both art and education. Reference is made to research methodology and to its relevance in education. Course may be taken by art education majors as an elective.

ART 544 Art Experiences for Elementary Teachers (3). Course for the in-service teacher or for elementary majors who desire a further involvement with art beyond that offered in ART 343. Course may be taken by art education majors as an elective. Six hours per week.

ART 545 Art Experiences for Secondary Teachers (3). Course for in-service teachers or secondary majors who wish to pursue studio practice and theory as they apply to the special needs of secondary school children. Course may be taken by art education majors as an elective. Six hours per week.

ART 551 Graphic Design VI (3). Additional refinement of graphic techniques, discussion and criticism. An emphasis on individual investigation concentrating on producing a unified body of work suitable for a portfolio or professional show. The student and the instructor will design a program of study directed toward this goal. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 452.

ART 552 Graphic Design VII (3). Advanced specialization; continuation of ART 551.

ART 556 Pre-Columbian Art (3). Historical survey of Pre-Columbian art of the Western Hemisphere. Prerequisite: ART 120 for art majors only.

ART 557 Modern Architecture (3). History of European and American architecture from the late 18th century to the present. Prerequisite: ART 120 for art majors only.

ART 558 American Art I (3). History of the art and architecture of the United States from colonial beginnings to 1850. Prerequisite: ART 120 for art majors only.

ART 559 American Art II (3). History of the art of the United States from 1850 to 1950. Prerequisite: ART 120 for art majors only.

ART 561 Sculpture  VI (3). Selected problems involved in the sculpture process. Opportunity for directed individual study and studio work in a variety of three-dimensional media or processes. Emphasis on developing a cohesive, creative body of work. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 462 or permission of instructor.

ART 562 Sculpture VII (3). A continuation of ART 561. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 561 or permission of instructor.

ART 571 Ceramics VI (3). Concentrated exploration of selected ceramic processes with emphasis on personal expression. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in ceramics or permission of instructor.

ART 572 Ceramics VII (3). Continuation of ART 571. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 571 or permission of instructor.

ART 580 Printmaking VI (3). Advanced problems. Concentrated study of selected printmaking processes with emphasis on personal expression. Individual direction and technical proficiency are emphasized. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two advanced courses in printmaking or permission of instructor.

ART 581 Printmaking VII (3). Advanced problems. Continuation of ART 580. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 580 or permission of instructor.

ART 583 Photography VI (3). Concentrated exploration of individual problems, culminating in a unified body of work such as a book or portfolio. Individual expression, discussion and criticism. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in photography or permission of instructor.

ART 584 Photography VII (3). Continuation of ART 583. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 583 or permission of instructor.

ART 593 Workshop for Teachers of Art (1).


Astronomy
(AST)
AST 115 (199) Introductory Astronomy (3). Descriptive examination of the objects of the solar system and the stellar universe. A brief historical presentation of the fundamental astronomical theories provides a basis for the examination. Multimedia presentations are used. Co-requisite: AST 116.

AST 116 Introductory Astronomy Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany AST 199. Two hours laboratory per week. Corequisite: AST 115.

AST 215 General Astronomy (3). A mathematical study of the relative positions, motions, and physical characteristics of celestial objects. Lectures supplemented by occasional visits to the observatory. Not open to students with credit in AST 115. Prerequisite:  MAT 130 or approved equivalent.

AST 216 Stars and Galaxies (3). Brief survey of radiation and spectra, geometric and radioactive properties of stars, multiple stars, variables, star clusters and associations. Prerequisites:  AST 215, MAT 250.

AST 220 Astrophotography (2). Involves technique of photographing the lunar surface, the planets, interstellar media, and constellations as well as studies of photographic materials.

AST 306 Astrometry (3). Survey of the basic measurements related to astronomical observing. Plane and spherical coordinates celestial sphere, stellar positions, proper motion and time effects. Prerequisites:  AST 215, MAT 250.

AST 316 Introductory Astrophysics and Space Physics (3). Introduction to astrophysics and space physics. Space physics is concerned with understanding the environment between the sun and the earth’s upper atmosphere. Topics include coronal mass ejections, the solar wind, magnetospheric storms, and auroral precipitation. Astrophysics is the study of planetary system formation and evolution, stellar structure and evolution, galactic structure, and cosmology. Phenomena of interest include quasars, black holes, supernovas, and the cosmic microwave background radiation. Prerequisites:  PHY 140 and 255. Co-requisite: PHY 370 or PHY 580; or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY 316.)

AST 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

AST 515 Special Topics (1-3). This course is designed to fulfill special needs not met by other courses. It may be a lecture or seminar course. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


Business and Marketing Education
(BED)
BED 510 Methods and Materials-Teaching Business/Marketing Education Subjects (3). A required course for business/marketing students emphasizing the latest methods and materials for teaching business and marketing subjects. Must be completed before doing student teaching. Field experience required. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: CTE 503 or EDU 303.

BED 517 Coordinated Occupational Experience (3-6). This course provides an internship in modern business and office positions. Related class meetings deal with orientation to cooperative education, school and business relationships, office procedures, systems, records management and maintenance, business English, and career opportunities.

BED 595 Special Problems (3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


Biology
(BIO)
BIO 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Required of all entering freshmen. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Fall semester only)

BIO 100 Introductory Biology Laboratory (1). Laboratory work for a non-majors general biology course. Open only to transfer students with three hours of non-majors general biology without a laboratory. Consent of biology chairperson is required.

BIO 101 Biological Concepts (4). Biological principles are examined in an active learning mode. This course relates the significance of biology to individuals and society and establishes that this body of knowledge underpins agriculture, medicine, and environmental management. Laboratory required. (Each semester)

BIO 112 Field Biology (4). Consists of study and identification of plants and animals with emphasis on those common to this area. Ecological and environmental aspects of living organisms are stressed. Four hours laboratory per week plus required Saturday field trips. (Spring semester)

BIO 115 The Cellular Basis of Life (3). An introduction to the concepts and foundations of modern biology. Intended to familiarize students with the mechanisms and terminology of biology at the cellular level, the topics presented and discussed act as a framework for successful succession into higher level biology courses. Emphasis is placed on the investigative methods used by biologists leading to our current understanding of biological chemistry, cellular processes, cell interactions, genes and DNA technology.

BIO 116 Biological Inquiry and Analysis (4). An inquiry-based introduction to concepts in biology. Research-oriented activities will emphasize the skills and attitudes necessary for understanding and conducting scientific inquiry. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 120 Scientific Etymology (1). A systematic study of the Latin and Greek origins of selected words. One lecture per week. (Fall)

BIO 154 Dendrology (3). Principles and art of identification of trees and shrubs in both summer and winter conditions. (Fall)

BIO 201 Human Biology for Social Workers (3). An examination of the structure, function and ecology of humans. Emphasis will be placed on the anatomy and physiology of major organ systems. Human population growth and response to environmental factors will also be explored. Does NOT count for University Studies. (Spring)

BIO 220 Clinical Terminology (1). A study of the terms, symbols, and abbreviations common to the clinically-oriented health professions. Prerequisites:  BIO 120 and eight hours of biology. (Spring)

BIO 221 Zoology:  Animal Form and Function (4). A study of the animal kingdom with emphasis on evolutionary and ecological relationships of animal groups, vertebrate anatomy and physiology, and evolutionary concepts. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 222 Botany:  Plant Form and Function (4). A study of the evolution, anatomy, morphology, physiology, classification, and life cycles of major divisions of the plant kingdom. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 227 Human Anatomy Lecture (2). Basic morphology of the human body. Cannot be applied toward a biology major. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or BIO 115 and 116 (BIO 221 may be substituted). Corequisite: BIO 228.

BIO 228 Human Anatomy Laboratory (2). The basic morphology of the human body. Four hours laboratory per week. Cannot be applied toward a biology major. Prerequisite:  BIO 101 or BIO 115 and 116 or BIO 221. Corequisite: BIO 227.

BIO 229 Human Physiology (3). A study of mammalian physiology with emphasis on humans. Three hours lecture per week. Concurrent enrollment in BIO 230 is suggested but not required. Course may not be counted toward the biology major. Prerequisite:  BIO 227 and BIO 228.

BIO 230 Human Physiology Laboratory (1). Experimental approach to the study of human systems physiology. Course may not be counted toward the biology major. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment or previous completion of BIO 229 with a passing grade.

BIO 290 Biomedical Research I (2). The student will be involved in biomedical research with a faculty member who agrees to direct them. The student will support the research of advanced students and their mentor and assist with experiments. In the process the student will be introduced to research and learn basic techniques. A minimum of 4 hours per week of research is expected. Prerequisites: admission into the biomedical sciences program and permission from a research mentor.

BIO 300 Introductory Microbiology (4). An introductory survey in general microbiology. Special emphasis is given to the study of the prokaryote microorganisms both in laboratory and lecture. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Eight hours of chemistry and eight hours of biology.

BIO 305 Introduction to Evolutionary Principles (3). Study of the theory of organic evolution including history, evidence, patterns, mechanisms and implications for humans. Prerequisite:  Introductory course in biology. (Fall, even years)

BIO 308 Ethics in Biology (3). A comprehensive study of current ethical issues in biology, including topics in genetics and biotechnology, reproductive technology, species conservation, use of natural resources, and medicine and human/nonhuman interests. Understanding and application of value-choices and ethics is emphasized. One three-hour lecture per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 115 and 116. (Spring)

BIO 320 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (5). Dissection and study of representative chordate systems with emphasis on the anatomy and evolution of fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. May require additional laboratory supplies fee. Eight hours of class per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 115, 116, and 221 or permission of instructor. (Spring)

BIO 321 Cell Biology (3). A detailed consideration of biological systems, their properties and interrelationships. Cellular and molecular biology are emphasized. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 115, 116, 221, and 222 and two semesters of chemistry or permission of instructor. (Fall)

BIO 322 Animal Physiology (4). Introductory study of animal physiology. The organ and systems approach is used to compare animals. Emphasis on vertebrates and certain invertebrates. Three lectures and three hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  Two semesters biology and two semesters chemistry; BIO 321 recommended. (Fall)

BIO 325 Biological Anthropology (3). The biological nature of man. A survey of man’s physical origin, his primate background and his evolution. Cultural association with fossil evidence and concepts of race. (On demand)

BIO 330 Principles of Ecology (4). An introduction to the fundamental concepts of ecology as they pertain to plants and animals, including humans. Emphasis will be placed on the basic principles of evolutionary, population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Three lectures and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 115, 116, 221, and 222 or permission of instructor.

BIO 333 Genetics (4). An introduction to molecular and classical genetics with laboratory experiments involving various organisms used extensively in genetic studies. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 115, 116, and 221.

BIO 350 Systematic Botany (4). Discussion of the vascular plants with emphasis on classification and phylogeny. Laboratory and field studies of the vascular plants of West Kentucky focusing on their identification, habitats, distribution and ecological role in this region. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (Fall, odd years)

BIO 380 Wildlife Techniques (4). A survey and application of methods and techniques used in wildlife management; examples — biotelemetry, live trapping, etc. Three  hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 221, 222 and 330. (Fall, odd years)

BIO 388 Biomedical Research II (3). The student will be involved in biomedical research with faculty members who agree to direct them. The student will work on a project under the direction of the research mentor. The student will write a research proposal including background information, specific aims and methods to be turned in near the end of the semester. The project will be initiated and a progress report will be submitted at the conclusion of the semester. A minimum of 6 hours per week of research is expected. Prerequisites: admission into the biomedical sciences program, permission from a research mentor, and completion of BIO 290.

BIO 389 Biomedical Research III (3). The student will be involved in biomedical research with faculty members who agree to direct them. The student will work on a project under the direction of the research mentor. The student will continue the project initiated in Biomedical Research II. The student will submit a research paper with an introduction, results and discussion, and methods, and make an oral presentation to the biomedical research group. A minimum of 6 hours per week of research is expected. Prerequisites:  admission into the biomedical sciences program, permission from a research mentor, and completion of BIO 290 and BIO 388.

BIO 420 Vertebrate Embryology (4). Comparative, developmental anatomy of the vertebrates with emphasis on the embryological development of humans. Two lectures and four hours laboratory  per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 320. BIO 321 recommended. (On demand)

BIO 421 Vertebrate Histology (4). A course designed for the identification and comparative study of cells, tissues, and organs of representative mammals. Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 320. (Spring)

BIO 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

BIO 438 Biomedical Research IV (4). The student will be involved in biomedical research with faculty members who agree to direct them. The student will work on a project under the direction of the research mentor. The student will write a research proposal including background information, specific aims and methods to be turned in near the end of the semester. The project will be initiated and a progress report will be submitted at the conclusion of the semester.  A minimum of 8 hours per week of research is expected. Research with a mentor other than the mentor used in BIO 388 is encouraged. Credit for this course will be offered in the summer to biomedical science students who are conducting off-campus research at an affiliated research site. Prerequisites:  admission into the biomedical sciences program, permission from a research mentor, and completion of BIO 290 and BIO 388.

BIO 439 Biomedical Research V (4). The student will be involved in biomedical research with faculty members who agree to direct them. The student will work on a project under the direction of the research mentor. The student will continue the project initiated in BIO 438. The student will submit a research paper with an introduction, results and discussion, and methods, and make an oral presentation to the biomedical research group. A minimum of 8 hours per week of research is expected. Credit for this course will be offered in the summer to biomedical science students who are conducting off-campus research at an affiliated research site. Prerequisites:  admission into the biomedical sciences program, permission from a research mentor, and completion of BIO 290 and BIO 438.

BIO 467 General Parasitology (4). A study of the principles of parasitology, including the morphology, taxonomy, life history and ecology of parasites. Laboratory will involve identification of important parasite groups, methods for host examination, diagnosis, and microtechniques. Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 221. (Fall)

BIO 483 Undergraduate Teaching Methods I (3). Designed for students interested in teaching in the life sciences, especially students working towards teaching certification. The course provides students with the opportunity to learn and apply teaching techniques in the classroom under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Teaching experiences are arranged individually with a faculty member. (A maximum of 3 credit hours total from BIO 483, 484, 491, 492, 493 and 494 may be used toward the minimum requirements for the biology major or minor.) Prerequisite:  junior or senior standing as a major within the College of Science and permission of the instructor and academic advisor.

BIO 484 Undergraduate Teaching in Biology (4). Designed for students interested in teaching in the life sciences, especially students working towards teaching certification. The course provides students with the opportunity to learn and apply teaching techniques in the classroom under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Teaching experiences are arranged individually with a faculty member. (A maximum of 3 credit hours total from BIO 483, 484, 491, 492, 493 and 494 may be used toward the minimum requirements for the biology major or minor.) Prerequisite:  junior or senior standing as a major within the College of Science and permission of the instructor and academic advisor.

BIO 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

BIO 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

BIO 491 Undergraduate Research I (1). Research projects arranged individually with faculty members who agree to direct the research. A written plan of research must be filed with the chair within two weeks of the beginning of the semester. Normally restricted to juniors and seniors. (A maximum of three credit hours total from BIO 483, 484, and BIO 491, 492, 493 and 494 may be used toward the minimum requirements for the biology major or minor.) (Available year round)

BIO 492 Undergraduate Research II (2).

BIO 493 Undergraduate Research III (3).

BIO 494 Undergraduate Research IV (4).

BIO 495 Medical Technology Internship (14). Designed for the medical technology students interning at an accredited school of medical technology. Topics covered during this semester course include orientation, urinalysis, and clinical chemistry. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of three years of the curriculum for medical technology in the Department of Biological Sciences. (Fall)

BIO 496 Medical Technology Internship (14). Continuation of internship and study at an accredited school of medical technology. Topics include hematology and microbiology. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of BIO 495. (Spring)

BIO 497 Medical Technology Internship (8). Topics include immunohematology and serology. Special topics such as laboratory management, education, and pathology are also presented. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of BIO 496. (Summer)

BIO 499 Senior Biology Seminar (1). The course exposes biology students to various career options through participation in the departmental seminar series, provides a review of biological concepts through directed study, and provides an assessment of the department’s academic programs with a nationally standardized test. Weekly seminar and/or discussion. Prerequisite: biology major and senior standing.

BIO 500 Pathogenic Microbiology (4). Study of the organisms causing disease as well as the effect of these organisms on the host. The normal bacterial flora and its role in the infection process are discussed. Laboratory entails identification of the pathogenic organisms. Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 300. (On demand)

BIO 501 Immunology (4). A discussion of immune response, formation of antibodies, structure of antibodies, antigen-antibody reactions, hypersensitivity, and allergic response. Laboratory includes techniques and methods for production and detection of antigen-antibody reactions. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 300. BIO 321 recommended. (On demand)

BIO 503 Virology (3). Introduction to the principles of virology with emphasis on animal viruses. The nature and classification of viruses, techniques for analysis and the role of viruses in disease will be covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 300 and 321. (On demand)

BIO 504 Medical Cell Biology (3). A discussion of cell biology as related to the field of medicine and clinical knowledge. Emphasis is placed on the most recent applications of cellular and molecular techniques used in the research, diagnosis and treatment of clinical conditions. Considerations will be given to a wide range of topics, including cancer, neural regeneration, wound healing, aging, gene therapy, congenital deformation, AIDS and other prevalent disease states. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 321. (On demand)

BIO 506 Advanced Field Biology (4). For students who wish to learn the identification principles and actual identification of living organisms. Course work will include a study of the ecological aspects of the various organisms and their distribution. Techniques of teaching about nature will be emphasized. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing for science educations majors or graduate standing for science teachers. (Summer)

BIO 510 Cell Physiology (4). The study of the life processes of the individual cell as related to structure. Particular emphasis is placed on current molecular aspects of biological mechanisms, including growth, cell division and macromolecular synthesis. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 321, CHE 310, and four hours of physics. (On demand)

BIO 511 Cell Metabolism (4). Cellular metabolism including photosynthesis, respiration, and the synthesis of lipids and proteins. Emphasis is placed on enzymatic mechanisms and metabolic pathways. Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 321 and CHE 530. (On demand)

BIO 512 Microscopy and Microtechniques (4). Techniques in bright field, phase contrast, interference contrast, and photo microscopy are emphasized. Standard methods in fixation, embedding, microtomy, and staining of specimens are covered. Darkroom techniques for the biological sciences are also included. Prerequisites:  BIO 221 and 222. (On demand).

BIO 514 Scanning Electron Microscopy (4). This course is designed to teach students the theory, principles and applications of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After a predetermined number of instructional hours, the student is expected to successfully complete a test which measures the competency of the individual in SEM operation. Subsequently, the student is required to complete a short research project utilizing SEM. Prerequisites:  BIO 221 and 222. (Summer, on demand)

BIO 521 Cell Biology Laboratory (3). An experimental approach to modern laboratory techniques in Cell Biology. An emphasis will be placed on the mastery of common cellular and molecular techniques used in clinical, industrial and research settings. Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 321. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 522 Pathophysiology (3). Introduction to physiological abnormalities in disease. For advanced students in, or headed for, careers in health related fields. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 228 and 229, or BIO 322, or equivalent. (On demand)

BIO 528 Neurobiology (3). Examines vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems at the cellular and systems levels. Topics include: (1) cellular processes of neurons and glial cells, (2) synapses and synapse formation, (3) sensory systems, (4) motor systems, and (5) learning and memory. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 321 or 322 recommended. (On demand)

BIO 530 Systematics and Bioinformatics (4).  This course will focus particularly on systematics and phylogenetic analyses, although other bioinformatics-related topics such as genomics and geographic information systems will be included. Students will search bioinformatic data sources, retrieve and edit data, and perform computer analysis on protein, DNA, and morphological data. Underlying biological processes will also be discussed.  Three hours lecture and two hours computer lab per week.  Prerequisite: BIO 333 (Genetics).

BIO 533 Molecular Genetics (3). A lecture course which involves discussions of general concepts of DNA structure, replication and translation. Current concepts in bacterial and bacteriophage genetics, such as gene transfer, recombination, gene regulation, and recombinant DNA technology will be examined. Prerequisites:  BIO 300 and 333, or consent of instructor. (Spring)

BIO 534 Molecular Genetics Laboratory (3). The laboratory covers classical bacterial and viral genetics such as transduction, conjugation, mutagenesis and mutant analysis by complementation, as well as recently developed recombinant DNA techniques. The student will get hands-on experience in DNA and RNA purification, restriction, endonuclease mapping, cloning and expression of foreign DNA in E. coli and DNA sequencing. These techniques and a clear understanding of the processes involved in gene expression will equip the student well for either a position in industry or graduate study. Prerequisite:  Previous or concurrent BIO 533. (Same as CHE 534.) (Fall)

BIO 535 Watershed Ecology (3). The study of the movement of water through the environment and its relationship to biotic systems. Areas emphasized include the hydrologic cycle and its influence on groundwater, lotic, and lentic systems; the effect of water on plant and animal communities; and the influence of human activity on watershed structure and function. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Same as GSC 535.)  (Spring, even years)

BIO 536 Evolution (3). A study of evolutionary concepts. Prerequisite:  BIO 333. (On demand)

BIO 537 Experimental Biochemistry (3). This course will emphasize a mastery of modern biochemical laboratory techniques and the analysis of experimental data. One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 530 or consent of instructor. (Same as CHE 537.)

BIO 538 Animal Behavior (4). An introduction to the principles of animal behavior. Ecological and evolutionary implications of animal behavior are emphasized. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 541 Phycology (4). A detailed study of the taxonomy and ecology of freshwater algae. Topics include the influence of physicochemical and biological factors on growth, productivity, succession and periodicity. Laboratories will stress not only taxonomy but also quantitative measurements of populations and productivity. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 543 Algal Ecology (4). A detailed study of the influence of physicochemical and biological factors on growth, succession, periodicity and productivity of phytoplanktonic populations. Laboratories stress methods for quantitative measurements of changes in these populations. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 546 Stream Ecology (4). The interactions of stream organisms with each other and their abiotic environments will be examined. An area stream will be used as an example for physical and chemical characteristics of a stream and adaptations of organisms to their environments. One weekend field trip required. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Summer)

BIO 547 Aquatic Vascular Plants (4). A general survey of local aquatic flora, including freshwater algae, aquatic mosses, ferns and angiosperms. Particular emphasis is placed on the morphology, taxonomy, ecology and economic importance of organisms. Field work comprises an integral part of the course. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 548 Wetland Ecology (4). An introduction to the hydrology, geomorphology, biogeochemical cycling and biology of wetlands. Emphasis is placed on understanding the physical, chemical and biological processes responsible for wetland functions. Procedures for identification of wetlands and assessment of wetland functions will be taught. Each student selects either a management or research class project. Several field trips (some overnight) are required. Students should expect to get wet and muddy. Prerequisites:  Two semesters of undergraduate laboratory science or permission of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 550 Morphology of Vascular Plants (4). A study of the seed plants and ferns with reference to life histories, distinguishing characteristics, relations to environment and economic importance. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 553 Field Botany (4). A survey of the flora of West Kentucky and surrounding states. This course should be of interest to anyone interested in the plants of the region. Emphasis will be placed on field identification of common species, identification using keys, collection, and preparation of herbarium specimens, and general plant ecology of the region. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (Summer)

BIO 555 Plant Physiology (4). Study of the growth, development, water, mineral, environmental and regulatory processes of the plant. Intermediary plant metabolism. Characterization of the photosynthesis and metabolic pathways of biosynthesis. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 558 Field Parasitology (4). An ecological approach to the study of parasites in the wildlife of West Kentucky. Will be oriented to appeal to those interested in wildlife management, public health and veterinary medicine. Prerequisite:  BIO 221. (On demand)

BIO 561 Freshwater Invertebrates (4). Functional anatomy, ecology and taxonomy of the freshwater invertebrates. Emphasis will be placed on collection, preserving and identifying invertebrates of this region. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 221. (On demand)

BIO 562 Field Entomology (4). The study of insect diversity in the field. Students become acquainted with about 200 Families of insects living in the terrestrial and aquatic habitats of the Midwest along with biotic and abiotic factors underlying their distribution, abundance, and dynamics. Each student conducts a small field project on some aspect of insect ecology, behavior, or natural history. Prerequisite: BIO 330.

BIO 563 Aquatic Entomology (4). The study of the ecology, natural history, life cycles, taxonomy and systematics of lotic and lentic insects. The class will include several field trips to aquatic habitats and the preparation of a working collection. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 565 Biogeochemistry (3). Survey and discussion of the scientific literature on global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and man-made chemicals with special emphasis on the biogeochemical and ecological processes that affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course will focus on interdisciplinary themes that incorporate new research results form the fields of biology, chemistry, and geosciences. Prerequisite: junior or higher standing in biology, chemistry or geosciences. (Same as CHE/GSC 565.)

BIO 570 Ichthyology (4). Natural history of fishes, their systematics and some anatomical and physiological relationships with the environment. One weekend fieldtrip required. Three lectures and one afternoon of lab per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 221. (Spring, even years)

BIO 572 Herpetology (4). A study of the taxonomy, morphology and natural history of reptiles and amphibians. Emphasis is placed on those species occurring in the central United States. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 573 Ornithology (4). Study of avian biology with emphasis on anatomy, physiology and classification of birds. Three lectures and two laboratory hours per week. Requires weekend field trip. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Spring, even years)

BIO 574 Mammalogy (4). A study of the classification and biology of mammals. Identification and collection of mammals, particularly those of the central United States, will be emphasized in laboratory. Two lectures and  four hours of laboratory per week. Some weekend and Saturday field trips required. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Fall, odd years)

BIO 575 Field Vertebrate Paleontology (4). The study of vertebrate fossils in both field and lab, including collection, processing and identification. Field work may include trips throughout the continental United States and occasionally overseas. (Usually taught during summer.) Prerequisites:  completion of two semesters of undergraduate laboratory science and upper-class or graduate standing. (Same as GSC 575.) (On demand)

BIO 577 Population and Conservation Genetics (3). An advanced study of the theories of genetic change in populations. Emphasis will be placed on theoretical aspects of change in gene frequencies as well as practical applications in the field of conservation biology. Prerequisites:  BIO 330 and 333. (Spring, even years)

BIO 578 Conservation Biology (4). An advanced study of the conservation of life at numerous levels of organization. Emphasis will be placed on modern empirical and theoretical studies of the maintenance, loss, and restoration of biological diversity, endangered species, and habitats. Three one-hour lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 330. Fall, even years)

BIO 580 Principles of Wildlife Management (4). Application of ecological principles of management of wild animals, wildlife agencies and their function in wildlife management; economic, social, biological and other values of wildlife. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Requires Saturday field trips. Prerequisite:  BIO 380. (Fall, even years)

BIO 582 Fisheries Management (4). Ecology and management of freshwater fishes. Methods of fishery investigation will be emphasized. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 330. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 584 Wildlife Policy and Administration (4). Emphasis is placed on the management of natural resources with particular focus on fish and wildlife. Topics will include an overview of natural resources agency structures and functions, the planning and management cycles, and ethical public relations techniques for multiple-use management in the public domain. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 586 Limnology (4). A study of the interrelationships of the physical, chemical and biological features of lakes and streams. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Summer)

BIO 587 Freshwater Biology (4). Study of the aquatic organisms, their biology, distributions, and ecology in natural aquatic communities and habitats in Kentucky Lake, streams, springs, and wetlands near the Hancock Biological Station. Aquatic organisms to be surveyed include bacteria, algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate animals. Includes two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 330. (On demand)

BIO 588 Groundwater Ecosystems (3). Course is a survey of the dynamics and functioning of groundwater ecosystems at various scales from organisms and their habitats to more complex interactions occurring within large aquifers and subsurface drainage basins. Course content is aimed at juniors, seniors and graduate students interested in groundwater quality and habitats. Students must be admitted to graduate status for graduate credit to be earned. A previous course from the following list is highly recommended: BIO 535, 546, 586, 589, 669, 670, GSC 515, 560, or 665. (On demand)
 
BIO 589 Reservoir Ecology (4). An examination of the variation in chemical and biological phenomena that characterize river impoundments. Literature reading and discussion is followed by 1) learning techniques of observation to identify pattern and process in nature, and 2) designing and conducting field experiments to assess cause and effect relationships. (On demand)

BIO 595 Wildlife/Fisheries Internship (1-4). A practical experience/study situation where the student works a 40-hour week in the field under the supervision of a wildlife biologist. Bimonthly progress reports are required to be submitted to both the university staff and the wildlife biologist. Students must have junior standing to be considered. (Summer)

BIO 596 Field Studies in Ecology (4). Two weeks or more will be spent living at a field site(s) studying the ecology of a selected ecosystem(s) (e.g., tropical rainforest, coral reef, mangrove swamp, pine forest). Students will gain an understanding of the selected ecosystem’s structure and function, including the roles of human cultural and economic influences. Studies are expected to occur in geographic areas other than western Kentucky. (On demand)

BIO 597 Topics in Advanced Molecular Biology (3). Taught from the current literature, this course focuses on new topics in cell and molecular biology. A combination of lecture and student seminars. Students taking the course for graduate credit will be required to complete a library research paper. Prerequisites:  BIO 533 and CHE 310, or consent of instructor. (On demand)  (Same as CHE 597.)


Bachelor of Independent Studies
(BIS)
Note:  Credit with a BIS prefix counts only toward the Bachelor of Independent Studies (B.I.S.) degree.

BIS 301 Portfolio Development (3). A study of the process of portfolio development for securing academic credit for college-level prior learning. The process includes examining, identifying, describing and evaluating prior learning for college-level competencies and skills. Also included is a study of the research techniques and skills necessary to develop an acceptable proposal for the field of study project.

BIS 302 Proposal Writing (3). The course guides the student through the steps leading to a formal proposal for the B.I.S. field of study project, including annotated bibliography, research techniques, review of literature, and the formal written project proposal. Prerequisites:  admission to B.I.S. program, senior standing, and permission of B.I.S. director.

BIS 399 Seminar in Bachelor of Independent Studies (3). Seminar for students in the  Bachelor of Independent Studies (BIS) program. Investigation and discussion of current issues in adult and distance learning. Topics include curriculum information in BIS program, job search process, problems experienced by and subjects of interest to adult students. Prerequisites: junior standing, acceptance into BIS program, and consent of BIS advisor or instructor.
 
BIS 437 Senior Project (3-6). The course, usually taken along with a departmental directed independent studies course, guides the student to completion of the field of study project, which is a baccalaureate senior thesis required for completion of the Bachelor of Independent Studies degree. Prerequisites:  admission to B.I.S. program, senior standing, completion of two courses (six semester hours) in research methodology or creative arts appropriate to the project undertaken.


Business and Public Affairs
(BPA)
BPA 099 (FOR) Freshman Orientation (1). A student (transfer or regular) who has not enrolled in and earned a total of 12 hours prior to his/her first semester at Murray State University must take freshman orientation. (College of Business and Public Affairs students only.) Graded pass/fail. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation.

BPA 140 Foundations of Business (3). An introduction to the various functions of business such as finance, management, marketing, personnel, etc. Open only to students who have not completed a business course above the 200 level.

BPA 200 Collegiate Leadership and Service (1-2). Course introduces students to basic leadership concepts and practices in business and public affairs. Student skills in the area of leadership will be enhanced through the use of class presentations, discussion, freshman orientation responsibilities, and participation in Collegiate and University activities. This course may be repeated for a total of three hours. A maximum of six hours credit may be earned or scheduled from any combination of GUI 251, 252, and 450 and BPA 200. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

BPA 215 Business Communication (3). This course is designed to acquaint the student with the principles of business communication and give him/her practice in solving business problems through the use of written communications, research and report writing, and oral communications. Prerequisite:  ENG 102 or the equivalent.

BPA 235 Records Management (3). A study of the principles and concepts of records management including creation, use, maintenance, and destruction. The course includes consideration of storage facilities, records classification, forms and report control, protection of vital records, and micro-graphic and optical disk systems. Prerequisite: CSC 199 or working knowledge of database applications software.

BPA 355 Information Systems and Decision Making (3). This course is a brief overview of information systems and the roles they play in support of decision making. Specific topics include information technology hardware and software, business intelligence, database management and data warehouses, e-commerce, decision support systems, IT infrastructures and controls, and computer crime and forensics.  Prerequisites:  ACC 200 and 201; CSC 199 or equivalent.

BPA 360 Principles of Office Administration (3). A basic introduction to the field of administrative management — the management of organizational information. The principles of general management as applied to this field, basic concepts, and terminology are major considerations. Prerequisite: junior standing.

BPA 396 International Business Seminar (3). Designed to give participants firsthand exposure to cultures and business practices outside the United States. The seminar includes travel, study, visits to corporate and governmental offices, and other experiential assignments in various countries. At the instructor’s discretion, the seminar may focus on a specific topic or theme. May be repeated once with advisor’s approval. Prerequisite: junior standing.

BPA 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

BPA 442 Business Ethics and Environments (3). This course involves a study of modern and classical approaches to both business and personal ethics as well as the other major components of the business environment: the political, international, ecological, social and cultural environments. Prerequisites:  LST 240, MGT 350, FIN 330, MKT 360, and senior standing. (Same as PHI 442.)

BPA 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

BPA 499 Senior Seminar in Business (1). Seminar for students of business administration programs with a primary focus on preparation of seniors for a variety of employment environments and professional development. Recommended for students enrolled in their next to last undergraduate semester, but with approval could be taken in last undergraduate semester. Prerequisite:  Senior standing.

BPA 515 Communicating in International Business Environment (3). This course is designed to acquaint students with the challenges of international business communication, provide guidelines for successful cross-cultural business communication, and give practice in solving international business problems through the use of the guidelines.

BPA 521 CPS Review I (3). This course, which is team-taught, is designed to aid the professional secretary in a comprehensive review. This review should be valuable to any professional secretary and especially helpful to those secretaries preparing for the Certified Professional Secretaries Examination. Specifically covered in this section is a review of business and public policy, economics of management, and office procedures. Graded pass/fail.

BPA 522 CPS Review II (3). This course, which is team-taught, is designed to aid the professional secretary in a comprehensive review. This review should be valuable to any professional secretary and especially helpful to those secretaries preparing for the Certified Professional Secretaries Examination. Specifically covered in this section is a review of environmental relations in business, financial analysis in mathematics of business, and communication and decision-making. Graded pass/fail.

BPA 595 Special Problems (3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

BPA 596 International Business Seminar (3). Designed to give participants firsthand exposure to cultures and business practices outside the United States. The seminar includes travel, study, visits to corporate and governmental offices, and other experiential assignments in various countries. At the instructor’s discretion, the seminar may focus on a specific topic or theme. This course includes an individual research project approved by the instructor.

BPA 597 Commonwealth Business Seminar (3). A travel-study program that will allow university students enrolled in Kentucky universities to be exposed firsthand to the business environment and practices in Kentucky.


Communication Disorders
(CDI)
CDI 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Same as EXS/HEA/NTN/REC 099.)

CDI 205 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3). An introduction to the areas of speech-language pathology and audiology. An integral part of the course is observation of therapy with speech, language, and hearing disorders.

CDI 215 Clinical Phonetics (2). Application of the informational and perceptual domains of phonetics in the clinical setting. Includes transcription using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

CDI 292 Communication Disorders for Special Educators (4). A survey course of speech and language acquisition, disorders and remediation. The course is specifically designed for the special educator and classroom teacher and will center on information and remedial procedures particularly applicable to a classroom situation.

CDI 310 Anatomy and Physiology (3). Lecture course dealing with the structure and functions involved in speech and the peripheral hearing mechanism. Prerequisite:  CDI 205 (may be taken concurrently).

CDI 315 Speech Science (3). Study of speech sound production and perception. Prerequisite:  CDI 310

CDI 325 Communication Disorders I (3). A survey of the symptomatology and etiology of disorders of articulation, voice, cleft palate, and stuttering. Prerequisites:  CDI 205, and 340.

CDI 340 Speech and Language Development (3). A survey of speech and language acquisition in children. Primarily a lecture course with required clinical observation.

CDI 345 Communication Disorders II (3). A survey of the symptomatology and etiology of disorders of language in children and adults. Prerequisites:  CDI 205, and 340.

CDI 405 Audiology (3). An introduction to the field of audiology. Specific emphasis on basic testing procedures and causes and types of hearing loss. Clinical observation and practice are required. Prerequisite:  CDI 310 or consent of instructor.

CDI 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

CDI 451 Aural Rehabilitation (3). Study of psycho-social, educational, vocational and communication implications of hearing impairment with emphasis upon intervention strategies. Includes clinical observation and/or practice. Prerequisites:  CDI 325 or 345 and CDI 405.

CDI 452 Signing Exact English I (3). This course serves as an introduction to Signing Exact English, a form of manual communication used primarily by children. The course includes study of manual communication and development of basic skills in finger spelling and signing.

CDI 465 Neuroanatomy and Physiology for the Speech-Language Pathologist (3). A study of the organization of tissues and gross structural elements of the human nervous system and current knowledge of the physiology of neural transmission. The course emphasizes the significance of neural imaging technology for understanding the normal structure and function of the neural substrates for speech  and language. Prerequisites: senior status in communication disorders or permission of the instructor.

CDI 470 Clinical Methods I (3). A course dealing with assessment and treatment techniques appropriate to speech sound disorders. This is an applied course and consists of reading, discussion, and guided practice as well as limited lecture. Some activities will take place in the clinic. Prerequisite: CDI 325.

CDI 472 Clinical Methods II (3). A course dealing with assessment and treatment techniques appropriate to child language disorders. This is an applied course and consists of reading, discussion, and guided practice as well as limited lecture. Some activities will take place in the clinic. Prerequisite: CDI 345.

CDI 474 Practicum (1-3). May be repeated up to nine hours. Supervised clinical practice in communication disorders. Graded according to departmental grading scale. Prerequisite:  CDI 345.

CDI 480 School Services for Communication Disorders (3). This course is an in-depth study of roles and responsibilities of the speech-language pathologist and speech-language pathology assistant practicing in the schools. Prerequisites: CDI 325, EDU 103, SED 300.

CDI 482 Augmentative-Alternative Communication (3). Introduction to assessment and intervention across the lifespan with person with severe communication disorders. The course will also focus on augmentative and alternative communication techniques, including verbal and non-verbal communication modalities.

CDI 548 Linguistics (3). Study of normal linguistic development and linguistic development of children with language disorders. Prerequisites:  CDI 205, 340, 345, and 472.

CDI 550 Neuromuscular Disorders (3). The study of pathology, etiology, diagnosis and speech rehabilitation of cerebral palsy and other neuromuscular disorders.

CDI 555 Audiometry (3). A lecture and laboratory course designed to develop skill in administering audiometric tests. Prerequisite:  CDI 310 or consent of instructor.

CDI 572 Diagnostic Methods (3). In-depth study and practical use of contemporary tests used by the speech-language pathologist. Includes formal and informal evaluation procedures. Prerequisites:  CDI 325, 345, and 470.

CDI 582 Communication Programming for Individuals with Severe Disabilities (3). This course will include diagnostic and therapeutic implications for communication characteristics of individuals with severe disabilities. Emphasis will be on communication development and disorders of this population; vocal, unaided, and aided communication systems; assistive technology; various service delivery models; integrating communication skills into functional activities; and feeding implications. Prerequisite:  CDI 205 or 292, and CDI 550.

CDI 584 Communication Disorders of Aging (3). Course will include information relative to the effect of communication disorders on the aging population and to acquaint the student with intervention techniques appropriate for the communicatively handicapped older person.

CDI 598 Directed Study:  Communication Disorders (3). Available for students who want to investigate special problems. Can be repeated up to six credit hours. Prerequisites:  senior standing and consent of instructor directing the study.


Civil/Construction Engineering Technology
(CET)
CET 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Meetings with advisors, department personnel, service areas, and campus field trips comprise the main involvement. Availability of university resources is stressed with emphasis on personal needs. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Fall)

CET 199 Environment Science and Technology Concepts (4). Pollution assessment and control introduction intended for general public awareness. Topics include basic environmental science and ecological principles; population dynamics and resource management; sampling and analytical techniques; regulatory considerations; and water treatment, air pollution control, solid waste handling, and hazardous waste management systems. Laboratory required.

CET 280 Plane Surveying (3). Field and office procedures necessary for measuring distances, elevations, horizontal and vertical angles. Boundary and area calculations and basic construction applications of survey procedures. Care and use of survey instruments. Two hours lecture and three hours lab. Prerequisite:  MAT 130 and ITD 107. (Fall and Spring)

CET 282 Construction Methods and Equipment (3). A study of the production rates and owning and operating costs of construction equipment along with methods used in heavy and building construction. Prerequisite:  MAT 130. (Fall)

CET 298 Strength of Materials (4). A study of internal stresses and physical deformations caused by externally applied loads to structural members. Topics include normal and shearing stresses, stress and strain relationships, simple tension and compression of axial members, composition beams, inelastic bending, transverse shear stresses in beams, deflections, and elementary design of beams and shafts. Includes a laboratory investigation of mechanical properties of materials and structural elements.  Prerequisites:  ENT 287 and MAT 230.

CET 302 Structural Drawing (3). A study of methods and procedures used in architectural drawing and in graphical presentations of steel and concrete structures. Emphasis is placed on structural drawing and detailing with special emphasis on detailing of structural steel and reinforced concrete members of buildings. Six contact hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 107 or equivalent. (Spring)

CET 310 Anatomy of Buildings (3). Study of the function, physical makeup, and working principles of various building systems, components and materials. Emphasis on the basic design principles and interdependence of the structural, utility and climate control systems. This course is designed to enhance the student’s knowledge of the total building process. Prerequisites:  consent of advisor. (Spring)

CET 341 Water Quality Technology (3). The course of study includes fundamental design and operation of municipal and industrial water and wastewater treatment systems. Topics include analyses of water and wastewater characteristics, system design conforming to regulatory requirements, and understanding related chemical, biological and hydraulics concepts. Prerequisite:  ENT 286.

CET 342 Air Quality Technology (3). Ecosystem air chemistry and dynamics are stressed. The impacts of natural and human-derived pollution, both indoor and outdoor, are studied. The impact of regulations upon industrial production is also addressed. Prerequisite:  ENT 286.

CET 353 Solid and Hazardous Waste Management (3). Generation and remediation of solid and hazardous wastes are examined. Transportation and recycling within legislative guidelines are studied. Waste management planning, recycling technologies and risk assessment are also included. The course scope includes municipal, industrial and forest/agricultural solid waste generation. Prerequisite:  CET 341 or junior standing.

CET 370 Intermediate Surveying (3). Field and office practice in surveys needed for road construction and improvement. Computer mapping, preparation of digital terrain models, earth volume and mass diagram computation. Radial staking using electronic distance measurement and total station surveying instruments. Methods of free positioning on the construction site. Prerequisites:  CET 280, MAT 230.

CET 380 Photogrammetry (3). A study of the fundamental methods of photogrammetry including geometry of single photographs and terrestrial photographs, planning the photographic mission, ground control for mapping, an introduction to analytic photogrammetry, stereo-photogrammetric plotting instruments and photo interpretation. Prerequisites:  CET 280, MAT 230. (Same as GSC 380.) (Every other Spring)

CET 381 Boundary Surveying I (3). Field surveys and computational procedures necessary for boundary retracement and land subdivision in both metes and bounds and public lands states. Boundary law, subdivision ordinances, statutory requirement for boundary surveys. Two hours lecture and three hours lab. Prerequisite:  CET 280 and MAT 230 or 250. (On demand)

CET 385 Heavy Construction Cost Estimating (3). Basic estimating procedures relating to quantity surveying, earthwork computations, and cost of labor and materials. CPM determinations of project durations and resources required for construction. Prerequisite:  CET 310. (Fall)

CET 386 Building Construction Cost Estimating (3). Estimating and bidding large construction projects with an emphasis on reinforced concrete and structural steel work. Prerequisite:  CET 310. (Spring)

CET 387 Water Quality Engineering Technology (3). A study of engineering methods of design and operation of groundwater and surface water treatment systems including iron removal, corrosion control, disinfection, chemical coagulation, filtration, and carbon absorption. Prerequisite:  ENT 286 or consent of instructor.

CET 460 Geodesy (3). Basic elements of geometric and physical geodesy. Geodetic direct and inverse. Data adjustment. Observations using the global positioning system. Two hours lecture plus three hours lab. Prerequisites:  CET 381 and MAT 308 or 330.

CET 480 Construction Planning and Management (3). Project management including planning, scheduling, supervision and emphasis on contracts and specifications. Prerequisite:  CET 385. (Fall)

CET 481 Structural Steel Design (3). Elementary structural analysis and design of tension members, beams, columns and connections. Emphasis is placed on the AISC specifications. Prerequisites:  CET 298. (Fall)

CET 482 Reinforced Concrete Design (3). Analysis and design of reinforced concrete beams, columns, footings and one-way slabs using the strength design method. Emphasis is placed on the ACI Building Code. Prerequisites:  CET 298. (Spring)

CET 483 Construction Materials (4). Basic properties of materials used in construction concrete, asphalt, aggregates and timber. Design procedures, field control and adjustments. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Prerequisites:  ENT 287. (Fall)

CET 484 Soil Mechanics and Foundations (4). Mechanical and physical properties of soils and their relations to engineering considerations, such as soil classification, permeability, shearing strength, consolidation, stress distribution, and bearing capacity of soils. Introduction to the analysis and design of shallow footings. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites:  ENT 287. (Spring)

CET 485 Land Use and Watershed Protection (3). Focuses on impacts of land use on receiving waters, storm water management, erosion control, stream bank restoration, and reclamation of disturbed lands. Two hours lecture and three hours lab. Some weekend field trips required. Prerequisites: CET 280, ENT 286, and 382.

CET 486 Boundary Surveying II (3). Addresses field surveys and computational procedures necessary for land subdivision. Boundary retracement of state and municipal boundaries along with the colonial land system and Virginia/Kentucky land grant systems will also be components of the course. Two hours lecture and three hours lab. Additional field exercises are required. Prerequisite: CET 381.

CET 527 Air Contaminants and Industrial Ventilation (3). A course examining the chemical and particulate air contaminants occurring in the industrial working environment and their potential health hazards. Emphasis is given to industrial ventilation techniques, inhalation control measures and air contaminant treatment methods. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (Same as OSH 527.)

CET 555 Environmental Regulatory Affairs (3). Laws and regulations pertinent to the management of water and wastewater, hazardous and toxic wastes, air contaminants, underground storage tanks and other timely environmental issues are studied. General legal concepts, the relationships among industries and local, state, and federal agencies, environmental audits and community right-to-know requirements are among the topics included. Prerequisite:  CET 341, 342 and 353 or consent of instructor.

CET 585 Remediation Technology (3). Study includes process design and operations for biological and physical/chemical systems used to remove organic and inorganic contaminants from soil and groundwater. Prerequisite:  CET 341 or consent of instructor.

CET 586 Unit Treatment Process Laboratory (3). A laboratory course with emphasis on designing, setting up and performing treatability studies for engineering treatment evaluations and water quality research. Actual treatment projects will be selected for purposes of treatment design, performance, optimization and troubleshooting. Prerequisite:  CET 387.

CET 587 Bioresiduals Management and Natural Wastewater Treatment Systems  (3). Course focuses on regulatory requirements, design, and operations of bioresiduals handling and disposal systems. The course includes design and operations of bioresiduals land application systems and natural wastewater treatment systems. Prerequisite:  CET 341 or consent of instructor.

CET 589 Environmental Modeling (3). Computer modeling of environmental/ecosystem phenomena including predictive impact of pollution discharges and engineering hydrology will be stressed. Prerequisite:  ENT 382.


Chemistry
(CHE)
CHE 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

CHE 101 Consumer Chemistry (4). A brief course in chemistry for those who plan to take no more chemistry. Designed specifically to satisfy the University Studies physical science requirement. Explores social and cultural issues associated with science and technology to provide knowledge of resource conversion in a world dominated by an information explosion. Considers the impact of chemistry and technology on history, art, and business. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 105 Introductory Chemistry I (4). A beginning course in general chemistry designed for students who plan to take additional chemistry courses. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Not applicable to major or minor. Math ACT score of at least 20 or MAT 105 (or the equivalent) strongly advised.

CHE 106 Introductory Chemistry II (4). A continuation of CHE 105 emphasizing elementary organic chemistry and biochemistry. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Not applicable to major or minor. Prerequisite:  CHE 105. Credit for either CHE 106 or CHE 210, not both, can count toward graduation.

CHE 120 Chemical Laboratory Safety (1). A general course in laboratory safety. It is recommended for all students seeking chemistry degrees and students in other fields involving extensive laboratory work. Two hours of lecture per week for half a semester. Corequisite:  CHE 201 or consent of instructor. This course does not count for university studies credit.

CHE 201 General College Chemistry (5). A thorough course in inorganic chemistry emphasizing atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the gaseous state of matter, periodic classification, nuclear chemistry, and chemical bonding. Three lectures, two hours of laboratory, and two hours of recitation per week. Prerequisites:  High school chemistry or CHE 105 and a math ACT score of greater than or equal to 23 or MAT 140 and MAT 145 or the equivalent.

CHE 202 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis (5). A continuation of CHE 201 emphasizing thermochemistry, solution chemistry, oxidation-reduction reactions, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and other selected topics. Three lectures, two hours of laboratory, and two hours of recitation per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 201.

CHE 210 Brief Organic Chemistry (3). An elementary course in organic chemistry for non-majors emphasizing the nomenclature, properties and reactions of important classes of organic compounds. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 105 or 202. Credit for either CHE 106 or CHE 210, not both, can count toward graduation.

CHE 215 Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1). Two hours of laboratory per week to accompany CHE 210 which is a co-requisite.

CHE 303 Strategies of Teaching Chemistry (3). An investigation of the skills of teaching which are applicable at any grade level. Emphasis is placed on the application of teaching strategies in classroom and laboratory settings. The course will also include coverage of classroom management strategies, discipline techniques, and curriculum development as a function of instruction. Laboratory experiences required. Prerequisite: successful completion of EDU 103, chemistry major, and admission to Teacher Education.

CHE 305 Analytical Chemistry (5). Fundamental principles and techniques of volumetric and gravimetric analysis. Two lectures and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 202.

CHE 310 Organic Chemistry I (3). Introduction to organic chemistry including structure, properties, methods of preparation, and selected reactions of aliphatic hydrocarbons and halides. Stereochemistry and basic reaction mechanisms are also included. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 202.

CHE 315 Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (3). An introduction to the theory and practice of organic chemical laboratory procedures and manipulations which include the preparation, separation, purification and identification of typical compounds and provides hands-on experience with, and an introduction to the theory of, modern instrumental techniques (GC, IR, NMR, GC/MS) used in the identification of organic species. One hour of lecture and four and one-half hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 310.

CHE 320 Organic Chemistry II (3). A continuation of CHE 310 including similar studies of aromatic hydrocarbons and other fundamental classes of organic compounds. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 310.

CHE 325 Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (3). A continuation of CHE 315 involving more complicated syntheses and the identification of unknown compounds of a variety of classes. Four and one-half hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 315. Corequisite:  CHE 320.

CHE 329 Molecular Visualization in Chemistry (1). Survey of the techniques and methods used to visualize biological and organic molecules. One hour of lecture per week. Corequisite:  CHE 330, 530 or 540 or consent of instructor.

CHE 330 Basic Biochemistry (3). A basic course surveying the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids, and the action of vitamins, hormones and enzymes. Three lectures per week. Credit for either CHE 330 or CHE 530, but not both, can count toward a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisite:  CHE 210 or equivalent.

CHE 352 Basic Chemical Instrumentation (3). An introduction to basic chemical instrumentation and instrumental methods of analysis, with emphasis on applications, including chromatographic, optical and electrometric techniques. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 202 and consent of instructor; CHE 305 is strongly recommended.

CHE 400 Chemical Literature (1). An introduction to methods of locating and accessing chemical information, both in the library and through on-line searching of computerized chemical databases; instruction in the writing of technical papers and reports. One lecture per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 320.

CHE 403 Basic Physical Chemistry (5). Broad coverage of physical chemistry with inclusion of biological applications. Topics included are gas laws, kinetic theory, states of matter, laws of thermodynamics, solutions and chemical kinetics. Designed for students in biological, medical, veterinary and allied health fields, and those who require one semester of basic physical chemistry. Four lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  CHE 305, MAT 250, PHY 132 and 133 or 255 and 256.

CHE 410 Physical Chemistry I (4). Theoretical chemistry with mathematical involvement. Topics included are gas laws, kinetic theory, laws of thermodynamics, and states of matter. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Should be taken in junior year. Prerequisites:   CHE 305, PHY 255 and 256, or PHY 132 and 133 with consent of instructor, and MAT 250.

CHE 420 Physical Chemistry II (4). A continuation of CHE 410 including solution chemistry, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, basic quantum chemistry, and basic statistical thermodynamics. Three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 410.

CHE 435 Undergraduate Seminar (1). An undergraduate seminar program in which the student must attend 15 departmental (or other approved) chemistry seminars. Attendance may be during two consecutive semesters, but must be completed during the semester of enrollment. In addition, the student will present two short seminars in the departmental seminar program or at an approved professional meeting. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  CHE 305 or 310 or permission of chair.

CHE 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

CHE 446 Physical Chemistry for the Technical and Engineering Sciences (5). A course in physical chemistry for students in technical and engineering fields. Topics include kinetic theory, thermodynamics, phase diagrams, solution chemistry, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum theory, and spectroscopy. Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  CHE 305, MAT 309, PHY 255.

CHE 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CHE 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CHE 495 Senior Research (3). Problems and hours arranged individually with staff members directing the research; minimum of nine hours per week. A valuable course for students entering the chemistry profession at the bachelor’s degree level and for those who plan graduate study. A written report is required. Prerequisites: Approval of research director and department chair.

CHE 498 Biological Chemistry Seminar (1). Weekly seminar involving reports of the current biological chemistry literature, including student-faculty discussions. (Same as BIO 498.)

CHE 502 Fundamentals of Toxicology (3). This course surveys the scope and fields of toxicology, including the methods and design of toxicity studies with attention to toxic chemicals, their effects and regulatory considerations. Prerequisite:  CHE 320 or consent of instructor.

CHE 503 Industrial Chemistry (3). Discussion of the application of chemistry principles to industrial processes. Three lectures per week.

CHE 511 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3). Practical aspects of wave mechanics and bonding theories for covalent and ionic compounds; considerations of symmetry; properties and theories associated with the solid state, acids, bases, and coordination compounds. Limited descriptive chemistry; the course focuses on organo-metallic, multi-metal, and icosahedral borane and carbaborane derivatives. PES, NMR, IR, and UV/VIS spectroscopy applications in modern inorganic chemistry. Two 75-minute lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 420 or its equivalent at another four-year institution with a grade of C or better.

CHE 512 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (2). Syntheses, characterization and introduction of techniques of inorganic chemistry. Four hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite:  CHE 511.

CHE 513 Environmental Chemistry (3). Studies related to chemicals in the environment as to origin, identification, distribution, modification and effect on biological systems. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 320 or consent of the instructor.

CHE 518 Instrumental Analysis (Non-Thesis Only) (3). Discussion of instrumental concepts of spectroscopy, chromatography and electrometric methods used in analytical chemistry. Theory and calculations and techniques stressed. Three lectures per week. This course will substitute for CHE 519 upon approval for graduate students with extensive instrumental laboratory experience only.

CHE 519 Instrumental Analysis (5). Theory, calculations, and use of modern analytical techniques, such as visible, ultraviolet, infrared and Raman spectrometry, flame methods, gas chromatography, electrometric methods of analysis and magnetic resonance. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 523 Radiochemistry (3). Theory of nuclear radiations, their interactions, detection and chemical applications. Laboratory experiments utilizing ionization chambers, Geiger counters, proportional gas-flow counters, solid crystal and liquid scintillation detectors, gamma ray spectrometers and experimental simulations. Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week. Corequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 525 Biochemical Toxicology (3). A study of the basic biochemical aspects of toxicology including adverse chemico-biological interactions and chemical and biologic factors modulating these interactions, descriptions of effects of specific chemical classes, and biochemical mechanisms of toxic effects. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  CHE 502 and 330, 530, or consent of instructor.

CHE 527 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3). An intensive survey of modern organic chemistry with emphasis on theoretical concepts, reaction mechanisms and syntheses. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  CHE 320 and 420.

CHE 530 Fundamentals of Biochemistry I (3). Survey of the chemical properties and biological functions of proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Topics include: protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, and elements of organismal metabolism, including a description of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. Three lectures per week. Credit for either CHE 530 or 330, but not both, can count toward a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisite:  CHE 320.

CHE 534 Molecular Genetics Laboratory (3). The laboratory covers classical bacterial and viral genetics such as transduction, conjugation, mutagenesis and mutant analysis by complementation, as well as recently developed recombinant DNA techniques. The student will get hands-on experience in DNA and RNA purification, restriction endonuclease mapping, cloning and expression of foreign DNA in E. coli and DNA sequencing. These techniques and a clear understanding of the processes involved in gene expression will equip the student well for either a position in industry or graduate study. Prerequisite:  Previous or concurrent BIO 533. (Same as BIO 534.)

CHE 537 Experimental Biochemistry (3). This course will emphasize a mastery of modern biochemical laboratory techniques and the analysis of experimental data. One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 530 or consent of instructor. (Same as BIO 537.)

CHE 540 Fundamentals of Biochemistry II (3). Continued study of the elements of metabolism, including their chemical reactions, energetics and regulation. Additional topics include hormones, biochemical function of various organs and replication, transcription and translation of genetic information. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 530.

CHE 545 Glassblowing (1). Laboratory demonstrations and exercises. Mastery of the different types of seals used in construction of scientific glass apparatus. Three hours of laboratory per week. Course restricted to chemistry majors. Prerequisite:  Senior standing. Cannot be used as an elective for ACS-accredited area.

CHE 560 Modern Chemistry for Middle School Science Teachers (1-3). For middle school science teachers with limited preparation in chemistry-basic organic and inorganic chemistry, emphasizing atomic structure, chemical bonding and solution chemistry. Although content-oriented, special effort is made to enable the participants to immediately implement relevant applications into their respective science programs.

CHE 561 Modern Chemistry for High School Science Teachers (1-3). For high school science teachers with limited preparation in chemistry. Basic organic and inorganic chemistry, emphasizing atomic structure, chemical bonding and solution chemistry. Although content-oriented, special effort is made to enable the participants to immediately implement relevant applications into their respective science programs. One to three lectures per week.

CHE 565 Biogeochemistry (3). Survey and discussion of the scientific literature on global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and man-made chemicals with special emphasis on the biogeochemical and ecological processes that affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course will focus on interdisciplinary themes that incorporate new research results form the fields of biology, chemistry, and geosciences. Prerequisite: junior or higher standing in biology, chemistry or geosciences. (Same as BIO/GSC 565.)

CHE 569     Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds (2). A problems course dealing with he theory and applications of the following methods to the structural analysis of organic compounds:  infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, ultraviolet and mass spectrometry. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHE 320 and 519.

CHE 581 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3). Continuation of some topics included in the one-year physical chemistry course and inclusion of new topics. Among these topics are quantum chemistry, bonding, statistical thermodynamics, spectroscopy, macromolecules and the solid state. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 591 Special Problems in Chemistry (1). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics. Minimum of three hours per week. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites:  Senior standing and consent of instructor.  

CHE 592 Special Problems in Chemistry (2). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics. Minimum of six hours per week. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites:  Senior standing and consent of instructor.

CHE 593 Special Problems in Chemistry (3). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics. Minimum of nine hours per week. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites:  Senior standing and consent of instructor.

CHE 597 Topics in Advanced Molecular Biology (3). Taught from the current literature, this course focuses on new topics in cell and molecular biology. A combination of lecture and student seminars. Students taking the course for graduate credit will be required to complete a library research paper. Prerequisites:  BIO 533 and CHE 310, or consent of instructor. (Same as BIO 597.)


Computer Information Systems
(CIS)
CIS 200 Business Application Modeling Using Spreadsheet & Database Software (3). An in-depth study of the use of spreadsheets and databases to solve business application problems. The course will include both the techniques of modeling applied to solving business related problems and the tools in the spreadsheet and database software to implement the model. This course will not satisfy requirements for the computer information systems area. Prerequisite:  CSC 199 or equivalent spreadsheet and database skills or course.

CIS 201 Report Program Generator (3). Topics include elements of RPG II programming and program execution, calculations, files, file organization and file processing, programming disk file applications, tables, arrays and subroutines, and communication skills. Prerequisite:  CSC 145 or consent of instructor.

CIS 243 Business Statistics I (2). Statistical techniques used in analyzing and solving problems encountered in a business environment. Techniques include organizing and presenting statistical data, descriptive statistical analysis, probability distributions for discrete and binomial random variables, normal probability distribution, and simple random sampling. Techniques are applied to practical business problems using appropriate computer resources.  Prerequisites:  CSC 199 and MAT 140 or equivalent. Corequisite: MAT 220.

CIS 260 Application Program Development in COBOL I (3). Introduction to algorithms and programs, variable assignment, and input, decision, looping, tables, subroutines, algorithm design and testing, records, file organization, and processing. The focus of this course is on control structures and their syntax, elementary data structures, and sequential files.  Two hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:  high-level programming language or consent of instructor.

CIS 290 Internship (3-6). Open to sophomore associate degree candidates in computer data processing. These students, upon approval of the computer data processing faculty, are placed with cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training or advanced design and programming training of equivalent value. Work experience is supervised by faculty. Written progress reports are required.

CIS 299 Special Topics in Computer Applications (1-3). A special topics course designed to permit the teaching of appropriate topics as needed in a changing high-tech discipline. The course will include those topics which are relevant but not necessarily appropriate for permanent, specific course status. Topics will be selected and offered on university/community need and/or interest. Does not apply to the CSC or CIS majors. May not be substituted for any course in the business core. Prerequisites vary with topics covered. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. (Same as CSC 299.)

CIS 304 Principles of Information Systems Analysis and Design (3). Topics to be covered are systems development processes, structured analysis design methods, prototyping, systems development life cycle, and communication skills. A systems design model will be developed during the course. Prerequisites: junior standing; high level programming language or consent of instructor.

CIS 307 Decision Support Technologies (3). An in-depth study of techniques and tools used in business modeling and decision-making to solve managerial problems. Students will use contemporary spreadsheet, database, and Web application software packages (and their integration) to implement a variety of business modeling and decision-making scenarios. Prerequisite:  CSC 199 or equivalent.

CIS 309 Data Warehousing and Business Intelligence (3). An overview of the concepts behind data warehousing and business intelligence. Emphasis will be on techniques for gathering and cleaning data, designing and using data warehouses for business intelligence purposes. Data mining tools currently in use will be reviewed. Prerequisites:  junior standing; CIS 307 or equivalent.

CIS 325 E-Business Programming (3). An introduction to programming languages and Web server technologies used in E-business applications. This course focuses more on client-side E-business development issues such as good web page design techniques, prevalent technologies, interactive and dynamic Web applications, and programming using common scripting languages. Some server-side issues are also covered. Prerequisite: a high-level programming class or permission of instructor.

CIS 343 Business Statistics II (2). Statistical techniques used in analyzing and solving problems encountered in a business environment. Techniques include point estimates, confidence intervals for a population mean, hypothesis testing for mean of one and two populations, statistical inference of proportions and simple linear regression. Techniques are applied to practical business problems using appropriate computer resources. Prerequisites:  CIS 243 with a minimum grade of C and MAT 220.

CIS 360 Advanced Application Program Development for Business (3). Topics include structured program design and development techniques, logical and physical file structures and corresponding processing techniques, table and array manipulation, string manipulation, internet interface for legacy systems and Job Control Language concepts. Prerequisites: junior standing; CIS 260.

CIS 361 On-Line Applications (3). Study of development of on-line computer usage with specific applications in the functional areas of business. Topical coverage includes the design and development of a complete application, use of utilities to create and support user libraries, and the implementation of the system through the use of commercial on-line software and the COBOL programming language. Prerequisites:  junior standing; CIS 260 or consent of instructor.

CIS 407 Advanced Database Management Systems (3). This course is designed to cover both the theoretical and practical aspects of database design and implementation. The theory and practice of design approaches and languages for the relational model are stressed. Specific topics will include data modeling: database design using normalization theory and relational query languages; issues of concurrency control, recovery, optimization, database security, privacy and integrity; new database technology, developments, and trends. Students in the course will be expected to design and implement a practical database application using a contemporary database management software package. Prerequisite: A high level programming language and either CIS 307 or ACC 308; or consent of instructor.

CIS 420 Application Software Design and Implementation (3). The capstone course for students graduating with an Area in Computer Information Systems (CIS). Students will work in teams to design and implement a complete information system using contemporary software development tools. The workplace will be simulated to the extent possible by stressing in-depth analysis of the client’s requirements, formal modes of communication and established project management techniques. Evaluation is based on the completed project using feedback from clients. Prerequisite:  CIS 304 and CIS 307 or consent of instructor.

CIS 425 Building E-Business with Web Database (3). Course covers how to build the front-end, middleware, and backend components that drive E-business. Emphasis is on building a functional E-business site that is capable of processing transactions and interacting with a database. Topics include common E-business technologies, Web database technology, content management, on-line payments, Web usability, client-side and server-side programming using common scripting languages and middleware technologies, and website registration, promotion, and maintenance. Prerequisite: CIS 325 or permission of instructor.

CIS 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

CIS 440 End User Technology Support and Management (3). This course presents the student with software, hardware and administrative issues commonly encountered in supporting end users. Topics covered:  installation, configuration, upgrading, security, training, evaluation/acquisition/maintenance of software and hardware. Prerequisites:  senior standing with at least 9 hours of CIS/CSC courses (excluding CIS 243, 343, 443 or CSC 199).

CIS 443 Business Statistics III (3). Statistical techniques used in analyzing and solving problems encountered in business organizations. Techniques include multiple regression analysis, time series analysis and forecasting, analysis of variance and nonparametric statistics. Additional topics will include conditional probability, the Poisson, exponential and uniform probability distributions, and the chi-square goodness-of-fit test. Techniques are applied to practical business problems using computer statistical software. This course provides preparation for those students considering graduate school and for those students pursuing programs requiring statistical preparation beyond CIS 343. Prerequisite:  CIS 343 with a minimum grade of C.

CIS 445 Information Systems and Technology for Managers (3). This is an overview of information systems (IS) and information technology concepts with applications in business. Topics covered include the relevance of information from the perspective of individuals, managers, organizations and the global environment; the value of information and its use as a strategic resource; usage of IS and related systems in the functional units of an organization. Emphasis is placed on using current and relevant software to address typical business needs. Prerequisites:  CSC 199 and FIN 330.

CIS 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CIS 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CIS 490 Quantitative Methods and Information Systems (3). Designed for juniors, seniors and graduate students who have an inadequate background in mathematics and computer systems. Covers material of MAT 220 and CSC 199. Not open to students who have credit for MAT 220 and CSC 199 or equivalent. Prerequisite:  none.

CIS 499 Senior Seminar (1). Seminar for students of Computer Science and Information Systems programs with primary focus on the preparation of seniors for a variety of employment environments and professional development. Recommended for students enrolled in their next-to-last undergraduate semester. Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisite: Senior standing

CIS 500 Internship (3). Graded pass/fail.

CIS 507 Fundamentals of Distributed Database Applications (3). This course covers the fundamental concepts of distributed database management systems. The emphasis is on the concepts, algorithms and the protocols. It includes an overview of the architecture, database design, query processing algorithms, concurrency control, recovery and replication strategies. Prerequisite: CIS 307 or equivalent.

CIS 508 Computer Simulation (3). A study of computer simulation models of systems and processes. Simulation methodology, simulation model development, simulation computer languages, and the analysis of simulation results are considered. The course makes use of simulation computer software. Prerequisites:  CIS 343 and CSC 199 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

CIS 525 Overview of E-Business Technologies (3). This course provides an overview of important technologies that underlie and enable E-Business. A solid understanding of the common E-Business models and their underlying enabling technologies will be examined using a practical case-based approach. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CIS 530 (430) Systems Planning (3). The primary focus of the course is to understand the development of a systematic planning cycle for implementing and maintaining an organization’s Information Technology (IT)/Information Systems (IS). Specifically to understand the complex but direct relationship between “business planning” commonly called the “Corporate Strategic Plan (CSP)” and “systems planning” also call “Information System Plan (ISP)”. Students will explore the theory and practice of IS planning through case study analysis. Students will understand how IT/IS projects and the planning involved in the projects implement the ISP. Prerequisite:  CIS 304 or permission of instructor.

CIS 545 Enterprise Resource Planning (3). This course provides the knowledge required to appreciate the functions and benefits of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. Students will learn the impact of an ERP system, how ERP software integrates business functions, and how to make current business functions compatible with and ERP system. The students will also develop an appreciation of live, interactive information form an ERP system. The students will also develop an appreciation of live, interactive information form an ERP system and the value of its availability throughout the organization. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CIS 553 Quantitative Business Analysis (3). A study of quantitative methods used in business and industrial organizations. Topics covered include linear programming, inventory models, PERT and CPM, simulation and waiting-line models. Prerequisite:  MGT 443.

CIS 595 Special Problems (3). This course consists of independent in-depth study of some problem in computer methods and/or quantitative methods. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


Civilizations
(CIV)
CIV 101 World Civilizations and Cultures I (3). An interdisciplinary survey of the origins of man, the emergence of civilized life, the evolution of and interaction among the environmental, social, economic and political influences in the major civilizations of the world prior to 1500 A.D. A student cannot have credit for both CIV 101 and HON 151.

CIV 102 World Civilizations and Cultures II (3). An interdisciplinary survey of the evolution of and interaction among the environmental, social, economic and political influences in the major civilizations of the world since 1500, and a consideration of the causes and consequences of the emergence of a global civilization in the modern world. A student cannot have credit for both CIV 102 and HON 152.


Organizational Communication
(COM)
COM 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

COM 161 Introduction to Public Speaking (3). Organization and presentation of ideas through participation in frequent speech activities. Students present speeches to inform, solve problems and persuade. Communication needs of the individual students are considered and guidance is given by the instructor.

COM 181 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3). Communication in an interpersonal environment. Topics studied include interpersonal perception, verbal and nonverbal communication, conflict reduction, and language and its use. Will not satisfy requirements for organizational communication major or minor.

COM 201 Communication Foundations and Theory (3). Theoretical constructs of the speech communication discipline. A survey from classical through contemporary perspectives of human discourse. Focus is on the development of the major content areas of the field. Corequisite: COM 161.

COM 251 Debate and Advocacy (3). Review and application of debate and advocacy skills including the ability to develop, organize, present, refute, and analyze well-reasoned arguments. Appropriate for individuals seeking preparation for those professions (e.g., law, business, teaching, ministry) where advocacy of ideas is essential.

COM 353 Team Communication and Leadership (3). Study of small groups, including investigation of the types, purposes, problems and communication processes of each. Focus is on the methods used by groups to accomplish tasks and resolve problems. Consideration is given to the theory and practice of group discussion.

COM 357 Communication and Critical Thought (3). The course explores the relationship between communication and critical thought. Based on the rhetorical traditions of oral discourse, students will explore argumentation, negotiation, reason, fallacy, language, and evaluation of information as each relates to critical thinking.

COM 361 Career Presentations (3). Speech composition and presentation with an examination of the principles of rhetoric, criticism, ethics, and persuasion as they apply to public speaking. Students present speeches of various types. Prerequisite:  COM 161.

COM 372 Communication in Educational Environments (3). Special communication needs of teachers of any discipline. Students develop an understanding of communication concepts applicable to the classroom as well as communication skills useful in other aspects of educational environments. Course content is developed through readings, lectures, discussions, structured activities, and classroom visitations; provides the teacher an experiential and a cognitive understanding of the role of communication in the educational environment.

COM 381 Interpersonal Communication (3). In-depth study of communication and interpersonal relations. Prerequisite:  COM 181 or COM major or minor.

COM 384 Communication Skills for Professionals (3). This course will focus on written and oral communication skills development. Practical experience may be gained in conducting interviews (e.g., performance appraisals, exit, disciplinary, orientation); managing conflict; managing meetings; managing change; preparing and delivering oral reports, proposals and sales presentations; and exploring leadership communication styles.

COM 385 Organizational Communication (3). Examination and exploration of applications of communication theories within the framework of an organization. Attention will be given to strategies for diagnosing communication problems and effecting change in communication behaviors.

COM 387 Intercultural Communication (3). Designed to explore communication principles from the viewpoint of different western and non-western cultures.

COM 390 (382) Communication Research (3). A course introducing students to the academic field of communication and to a variety of related career options. Students examine the process of conducting academic research and become familiar with many professional communication associations and their publications. Students explore a variety of library resources and undertake career research applicable to their own professional goals and career development.

COM 399 Co-Curricular Activities (1-3). Participation in departmental co-curricular activities as required. A journal of the activity is maintained and the student must devote a specified number of clock hours to the chosen activity. May be repeated for credit. Graded pass/fail.

COM 409 Seminar in Communication (3). The capstone course for majors and minors in speech communication and organizational communication which surveys theoretical and applied content areas within the discipline. Requirements include a major paper and a one-hour oral exam. Open only to graduating seniors with consent of instructor. Graded pass/fail.

COM 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required. Graded pass/fail.

COM 461 Persuasive Communication (3). Approaches used in changing the attitudes and actions of others. Persuasive speeches in class are given, as well as one public performance.

COM 481 Conflict and Communication (3). Examines conflict processes as communication phenomena. Explores theories of conflict communication and develops competencies for a range of professional and interpersonal contexts by applying theory to practice.

COM 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

COM 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

COM 499 Contemporary Issues in Communication  (1-3). Studies of interest to faculty and students (e.g., effective mentoring skills, communication and the family, health communication, gender issues). A different subject is examined each time the course is offered, with the topic being announced one semester in advance. Variable credit is assigned on the basis of instruction hours (15-20 hours per unit of credit). Enrollment is open to juniors and seniors and may be repeated once for a total of six hours.

COM 551 Supervision of Forensic Activities (3). A survey of current problems in administering a speech and theatre activity program. Includes tournament management and judging. Practicum in supervision of festival and tournament activities facing the instructor, such as preparing the contestant for duet acting, the contest play, interpretive and forensic events.

COM 553 Advanced Small Group Processes (3). An examination of the communication processes in various types of small groups. The course will consider the ways in which leadership, norms and conflict relate to the social and decision-making processes in groups.

COM 581 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3). A study of the contemporary approaches to interpersonal communication with opportunities for practical application of those approaches in diverse interpersonal situations.

COM 585 Advanced Organizational Communication (3). Survey of theory and research relevant to the study of organizational communication. Students will examine how communication processes shape and reshape the activities of organizing within and between organizations. Prerequisites:  senior standing and COM 385 or graduate status.

COM 589 Directed Individual Study in Communication Theory (3). A course designed to meet the needs of individuals and groups who wish to explore topics not covered in other speech and theatre courses or to do in-depth study of an issue introduced in another course. A proposal for study must be approved by the instructor during the first week of classes. General areas of study from which specific topics can be drawn include interpersonal communication, small group communication, and communication within organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. Graded pass/fail.

COM 599 Internship (3-6). A course designed for students to get experience in the application of theory to practical situations. Businesses and organizations selected to participate draw from qualified students with skills in organizational communication, forensics, technical theatre or acting. May be repeated for a total of six hours. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of instructor.


Criminal Justice
(CRJ)
CRJ 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Introductory seminar for all first semester criminal justice majors. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

CRJ 140 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3). An overview and integration of major concepts, assumptions, developments and approaches of criminal justice as a system, including police, courts, corrections and legislative control at adult and juvenile levels.

CRJ 220 Law Enforcement (3). Philosophy, theory, and processes of policing at the federal, state and local levels. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 240 Corrections (3). Philosophy, theory and processes of adult and juvenile corrections at the federal, state and local levels. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 300 Crime and Criminals (3). Examines various forms of juvenile and adult criminal behavior with particular attention to the psychological, social and educational needs and characteristics of offenders and the role of law enforcement and correctional officers in dealing with offenders. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 303 (360) Principles and Methods of Research (3). An introduction to quantitative and qualitative methods of research designed to enable students to understand the critical and scientific methodologies their discipline uses to discover knowledge and ascertain its validity. Ethical issues and program evaluation will also be discussed. Enrollment will be limited to criminal justice and social work majors and minors or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better. (Same as SWK 303.)

CRJ 305 Internship (3). Supervised internship placement in a criminal justice agency. For juniors and seniors majoring or minoring in criminal justice. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites:  CRJ 140, six hours of additional CRJ coursework, and permission of instructor.

CRJ 315 Addiction: Treatment and Society (3). An overview of current theories, models and definitions of addictive disorders, with focus on both the addictive and recovery processes. The role of the social worker/helping professional in identification, intervention and treatment will be stressed. The needs of special populations, diverse populations and family and adolescent issues will be addressed. Prerequisite: junior standing. (Same as SOC 315 and SWK 315.)

CRJ 320 Juvenile Justice (3). An overview of juvenile justice systems and juvenile delinquency in the United States. This course traces the evolution of a separate justice system for children and considers the causes, prevention and treatment of delinquency, with particular attention devoted to sources of juvenile crime and to characteristics of juvenile offenders. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 or consent of instructor.

CRJ 325 Criminal Justice Ethics (3). An examination of the application of ethical decision-making within the field of criminal justice with special attention to police deviance, judicial misconduct, control of inmates in correctional facilities, and other ethical dilemmas within the field. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 333 Criminalistics (3). A study of the application of scientific knowledge, instruments and techniques to the investigation of crime. Includes discussion of the recognition, identification, examination and evaluation of physical evidence through scientific means. Prerequisites:  CRJ 140 and 220.

CRJ 336 Family Violence (3). A comprehensive examination of the effects of violence on the American family, and the ways in which social service agencies and practitioners respond to the unique needs created by this social problem. Prerequisite:  junior standing. (Same as SWK 336.)

CRJ 346 Criminal Investigation (3). Techniques of evidence collection and preservation, modus operandi, interviews and interrogations, report writing, and preliminary and follow-up investigations. Prerequisites: CRJ 140 and 220 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 355 Security in Business and Industry (3). A study of planning, development, organization and management of modern security systems. Discusses the processes of personnel, property and information security. Includes major concepts, legal aspects, principles and practices of risk assessment, loss control, prevention and related functions of protective services. An approved business and occupational safety and health elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor.

CRJ 365 Interviewing and Interrogation (3). An examination of the theory, nature, methods, and principles of interviewing and interrogation in criminal justice with discussion and practical exercises focusing on eliciting information from witnesses and criminal suspects and case documentation. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 385 Violent Crime (3). A comprehensive examination of the nature and extent of violent crime in society, with specific consideration given to the workplace, family and other intimate relationships, and schools. Particular attention is given to the criminal justice system’s response to the offender and victim in these situations. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 425 Terrorism (3). The history, philosophy, various forms and definitions of terrorism are examined. The nature and causes of domestic and international terrorism, the possible means for prevention, and criminal justice system of governmental response to terrorist acts, and current issues in terrorism are explored. Prerequisites: CRJ 140 and 220 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 440 Criminal Justice Administration (3). Principles of administration, organization, leadership and management are examined as they apply to the various components of criminal justice. Prerequisites:  CRJ 140, 220, and 240 or permission of instructor.

CRJ 442 Probation and Parole: Community Corrections (3). Study of community alternatives to prison confinement. Examination of halfway houses, work release and other community-based approaches to corrections. Prerequisite: CRJ 240 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 444 (345) Topical Seminar (3). Inquiry into selected topics and problems in the field of criminal justice. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours provided topics vary. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 445 Race, Ethnicity and Gender in Criminal Justice (3). Examines the nature and causes of injustice in the criminal justice system. Key policy issues are explored. Particular attention is given to race, ethnicity and gender as they apply to crime incidents, victims, offenders, and criminal justice professionals. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 447 Business and Political Crime (3). Concepts, policies and issues relating to crimes in business, industry and government. Includes discussions of the impact of white-collar and organized crime, terrorism, fraud, corruption, and other forms of official and unofficial deviance. An approved business elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better or consent of instructor.

CRJ 455 Police and Community Relations (3). Individual and collective study of relationships between police officers, agencies and the public. Exploration of areas of conflict and cooperation. Prerequisites: CRJ 140 and 220 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 475 (375) Organized Crime (3). Historical dimensions of organized crime and its control. Examination of emerging groups of ethnic and international organized crime and the statutes and techniques used to combat criminal organizations. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 480 Senior Seminar in Criminal Justice (3). Designed as a capstone course in which criminal justice majors are assessed on their mastery of the core curriculum. Students develop a job search strategy, which includes the exploration of on-line employment resources as well as resume building and writing, professional interviewing, and related documentation. Students are required to critically assess current literature, including, but not limited to, issues of race, gender, and class in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite:  senior standing and completion of all other CRJ core courses.

CRJ 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CRJ 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CRJ 495 Special Problems (3). Individual study and projects designed to meet the needs of each student. Restricted to seniors majoring or minoring in criminal justice. Must have a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.0 in CRJ  courses taken for the major or minor. Prerequisite:  Completion of all CRJ core courses for the major except 480 or 15 hours of CRJ courses in the minor.

CRJ 522 Issues in Policing (3). Examines police function, history, operational strategies, ethics, deviance, use of force, policy, accreditation, accountability, and other contemporary issues. Prerequisites: CRJ 140 and 220 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 533 Juvenile Delinquency (3). Nature and extent of delinquency; competing explanatory theories; evaluation of programs for prevention and control; role of police, detention, juvenile courts and corrections. Prerequisite:  CRJ 320 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 533.)

CRJ 537 Juvenile Justice Procedures (3). The organization, function and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies; police referrals, preventive techniques and youth divisions; juvenile court procedures and juvenile statutes. Prerequisites:  CRJ 140 and 320 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

CRJ 544 Constitutional and Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3). A comprehensive examination of the constitutional law that affects criminal justice professionals, citizens, suspects, and incarcerated individuals, with considerable attention given to both civil and criminal legal issues surfacing in the criminal justice field. Topics will include due process, search and seizure, self-incrimination, bail, and right to counsel and a fair trial. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 573 Victimology (3). Analysis of major perspectives on victimization. Emphasis on patterns of victimization, the role of victims in the generation of crime, and the experience of the victim in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 575 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3). An examination of non-American criminal justice systems. Specific areas of comparison will include but not be limited to, the police, judiciary, and criminal corrections of selected foreign systems. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.


Computer Science
(CSC)
CSC 125 Internet and Web Page Design (3). Introductory course covering the Internet and web page design. The student will be introduced to Internet tools including mailers, browsers, search engines, metasearch engines, FTP clients, and the physical components of computer networks. The major part of this course will cover the fundamentals of web page design using HTML. Web page development will include the use of lists, client-side image maps, tables, frames, forms, cascading style sheets, and a web editor. An introduction to XHTML, JavaScript, and freely available HTML editors will also be included. Prerequisite: basic computer literacy.

CSC 136 FORTRAN Programming (3). Basic course in computing and FORTRAN programming. Credit not given for both CSC 136 and CSC 214.

CSC 145 Introduction to Programming I (4). An introduction to problem-solving methods and algorithm development using a higher level programming language. The course will include methods of program design, coding techniques, debugging and internal documentation. The course emphasizes structured programming and top-down design. Topics include variable I/O, repetition, selection, subprograms and file handling. Course includes three hours lecture per week and a two-hour laboratory experience. This is the recommended first course for majors in the discipline. Credit not given for both CSC 210 and CSC 145. Corequisites:  MAT 250 or equivalent or math ACT of 21 or above.

CSC 199 Introduction to Information Technology (3). This introductory computing course is designed for students pursuing any program of study. It is intended to provide the student with knowledge about computing in general and personal computing in particular. In addition to general concepts about computing in our technological society, the student will acquire competency with Windows and its file management system, word processing, spread sheet, data base management, and presentation graphics software. Corequisites:  MAT 117, 140, or appropriate math ACT score.

CSC 204 Assembly Language Programming I (3). An introduction to System 370 assembly language. Topics studied:  OS system macros; basic input and output operations; binary and packed decimal instruction set along with necessary instructions from the standard instruction set; internal and external subroutine linkage; program debugging; formatting and page control operations. Prerequisite:  knowledge of high-level programming language.

CSC 210 Directed Study of Ada I (1). An independent, self-paced study course of the Ada programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in Ada. Topics include variables, expressions, input/output control structures, arrays, functions, procedures, access variables (pointers), and records. Emphasis is on procedural programming, problem decomposition and block-structured software development. Credit not given for both CSC 210 and CSC 145. Prerequisite:  knowledge of a high-level programming language.

CSC 211 Directed Study of Ada II (1). The second of two independent, self-paced study courses of the Ada programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in Ada. Topics include linked-lists; variant and hierarchical records; exception handling; object-oriented programming; packages and generics; child library and private child units; limited and derived types; objects and inheritance; classes and polymorphism; and tasking and concurrency. Credit not given for both CSC 211 and CSC 245. Prerequisite:  CSC 210 or equivalent.

CSC 212 Directed Study of C++ I (1). An independent, self-paced study course of the C++ programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in C++. Topics include variables, expressions, input/output control structures, arrays, functions, pointers, records, and an introduction to object-oriented features of C++. Credit not given for both CSC 212 and CSC 235. Prerequisite:  knowledge of a high-level programming language.

CSC 213 Directed Study of C++ II (1). The second of two independent, self-paced study courses of the C++ programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in C++. Topics include object-oriented programming; classes; single and multiple inheritance; virtual functions and polymorphism; templates; exception handling. Credit not given for both CSC 213 and CSC 235. Prerequisite:  CSC 212 or equivalent.

CSC 214 Directed Study of FORTRAN (1). An independent, self-paced study course of the FORTRAN programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in FORTRAN. Topics include variables, expressions, input/output, control structures, arrays, functions, subroutines, sequential file I/O, FORTRAN 90 extensions to FORTRAN 77. Credit not given for both CSC 136 and CSC 214. Prerequisite:  knowledge of a high-level programming language.

CSC 215 Directed Study of Visual Basic (1). This is a self-paced independent study course of the Visual Basic programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in Visual Basic. Topics include the fundamentals of Visual Basic programming. Prerequisite:  knowledge of a high-level programming language.

CSC 216 Directed Study of Java I (1). A self-paced independent study of the Java programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in Java. Topics include applications, applets, control structures, methods, arrays, object-based programming and an introduction to the object-oriented features of Java.  Prerequisites:  Knowledge of a high-level language. Credit not given for both CSC 216 and CSC 240.

CSC 217 Directed Study of Java II (1). The second of two self-paced courses in the Java programming language. Students will be given suggested exercises to complete and a faculty contact to provide assistance as they study and learn programming in Java. Topics include:  strings, graphics, graphical user interface components, exception handling, multithreading and multimedia. Prerequisite: CSC 216 or equivalent. Credit not allowed for both CSC 217 and CSC 240.

CSC 218 Introduction to Web Programming I (1). An introduction to Web authoring using HTML programming with tags, links, embedded images, tables, frames and forms. A number of high-level and low-level web programming environments and support tools are used. This course includes an introduction to client-side programming using scripting languages. Issues of commercialization of the Web are addressed including:  Web page publication, registration, and maintenance.

CSC 232 (135) Visual Basic Programming I (4). Introductory programming course for students with little or no programming experience who want a course that covers basic algorithm development, structured programming, and event-driven programming. Visual Basic Language will be used. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Corequisite:  MAT 140 or equivalent with grade of C or better.

CSC 235 Programming in C++ (3). A course in programming in C++ using both procedural and object-oriented methods. Topics include variables; expressions; stream and file input/output; control structures; arrays; functions; pointers; records; dynamic memory management; object-oriented programming with classes; single and multiple inheritance; virtual functions and polymorphism; templates; and exception handling. Credit not given for both CSC 212 or 213 and CSC 235. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  knowledge of a high-level programming language.

CSC 240 Programming in Java (3). A first course in programming in Java with emphasis on object oriented programming techniques. Topics include applications, applets, control structures, methods, arrays, object-based and object-oriented programming, strings, graphical user interfaces, exception handling, multithreading, and multimedia. Credit not allowed for CSC 240 and either of CSC 216 or CSC 217. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  Knowledge of a high-level programming language.

CSC 245 Introduction to Programming II (4). A course to continue the development of discipline in program design, in style and expression. Includes methods of dynamic memory management and recursion. Introduces data structures, and abstract data types (ADT) for arrays, strings, lists, stacks, queues, trees and graphs. Covers algorithms for tree balancing, hashing, creating priority queues and heaps, sorting and searching and graph and tree traversals. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Credit not given for both CSC 211 and CSC 245. Prerequisite:  CSC 145 or consent of instructor.

CSC 275 Graphical Rendering (3). Introduction to three-dimensional computer graphics and design for photo-realistic rendering. Techniques for the description of scenes and objects for computer-based raytracing are covered. Course emphasizes still images and non real-time animation. This is a hands-on laboratory course. Prerequisite: ART 101 or ART 111 or approval of instructor.

CSC 299 Special Topics in Computer Applications (1-3). A special topics course designed to permit the teaching of appropriate topics as needed in a changing high-tech discipline. The course will include those topics which are relevant but not necessarily appropriate for permanent, specific course status. Topics will be selected and offered on university/community need and/or interest. Does not apply to the CSC or CIS majors. May not be substituted for any course in the business core. Prerequisites vary with topics covered. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. (Same as CIS 299.)

CSC 301 Foundations of Computer Science I (3). Course introduces the discrete mathematical foundations of computer science, providing the appropriate theoretical background for advanced courses. Topics include:  functions, relations, sets, logic, proof techniques, combinatorics, digital logic, elementary number theory. Prerequisites: CSC 145 and mathematical preparation sufficient to take calculus.

CSC 302 Foundations of Computer Science II (3). A continuation of CSC 301. Topics include:  graph theory, finite state machines, queueing theory, sequences, series, recurrence relations, context free grammars. Prerequisites: CSC 301 or permission of instructor.

CSC 310 Database Administration (3). A course in administering database management systems. Topics include data definition language, data control language, backup and recovery, security, performance tuning, network administration. Prerequisites:  CIS 307 and TSM 132.

CSC 330  Introduction to Discrete Structures (3). Review of set algebra including functions and relations; mathematical induction, Boolean algebra, propositional logic and proof techniques; elements of graph theory; introduction to finite state automata and complexity of algorithms. Prerequisites:  CSC 145 and MAT 250.

CSC 332 (336) Visual Basic Programming II (3). An in-depth study of the latest version of the Visual Basic programming language for the Internet and the World Wide Web. The course will consider both the event driven programming and object oriented programming paradigms. Additional topics include structured programming, ActiveX technologies, browser programming and multimedia programming. Prerequisite:  CSC 232 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor.

CSC 335 Microcomputer Architecture and Assembly Language (3). An introduction to microcomputer architecture and microcomputer assembly language. Topics covered will include CPU and memory organization, hardware/software interaction, memory resident software, and application software used to control hardware functions. Prerequisite:  knowledge of a high-level language.

CSC 345 Data Structures (3). Data structures and abstract data types including arrays, strings, lists, stacks, queues, trees and tree balancing algorithms; hashing techniques with applications to file processing; priority queues and heaps; sorting algorithms; graph algorithms; generalized algorithm design techniques. Emphasis will be placed upon object-oriented software design techniques to facilitate software reuse. Prerequisite:  CSC 245.

CSC 360 Scripting Languages (3). Course is a survey of several popular scripting languages. Operating system shell languages and Perl will be discussed. The emphasis will be on applications of scripting languages to network and server administration tasks. Prerequisites: Knowledge of at least one high-level programming language and at least one server operating systems. Prerequisites: Knowledge of at least one high-level programming language and at least one server operating system.

CSC 405 Computer Architecture (4). Application of digital circuits and assembly language to the design and operation of the functional components of the modern general-purpose computer. Course includes a study of parallel and distributed architectures, alternative processor architectures and microcontrollers. Three hours lecture, two hours lab per week. Prerequisite:  CSC 301 or permission of instructor.

CSC 410 Operating Systems (3). An overview of principles of computer operating systems. This course covers the concepts process and thread execution, mutual exclusion, deadlock, storage management, processor scheduling, parallel and distributed computing, and system and network security. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.  This course must be taken with one of the following: CSC 411, 412, 413, or 414. Prerequisite:  CSC 301 or permission of instructor.

CSC 411 Operating Systems Project in Graphics and Visual Computing (0). Project course to accompany CSC 410. The chosen project will be related to operating systems and graphics and visual computing. This course must be taken with CSC 410. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 412 Operating Systems Project in Net-Centric Computing (0). A project course to accompany CSC 410. The chosen project will be related to operating systems and net-centric computing. This course must be taken with CSC 410. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 413 Operating Systems Project in Embedded Systems Programming (0). Project course to accompany CSC 410. The chosen project will be related to operating systems and embedded systems programming. This course must be taken with CSC 410. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 414 Operating Systems Project in Applications Programming (0). Project course to accompany CSC 410. The chosen project will be related to operating systems and applications programming. This course must be taken with CSC 410. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 415 Programming Languages (3). Formal definition of programming language syntax and semantics. Global properties of imperative languages including scope of declarations, binding times, simple data types, data structures and abstract data types, control structures, subprograms, concurrency, and exception handling. Introduction to functional, logic and object-oriented programming paradigms. Prerequisites:  CSC 235 or 240 and CSC 245 and CSC 301.

CSC 420 Numerical Analysis I (3). An introduction to the numerical algorithms fundamental to scientific computer work. Includes elementary discussion of error, polynomial interpolation, quadrature, linear systems of equations, solution of non-linear equations, and numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. The algorithmic approach and the efficient use of the computer are emphasized. Prerequisites:  MAT 250, knowledge of high-level programming language and CSC 302 or permission of instructor.

CSC 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

CSC 445 Computer Algorithms (3). Study of the design and analysis of algorithms. This course covers methods of tree and graph traversal for optimal and approximate solutions to semi-numerical problems. It includes a study of the basic problem-solving techniques of greedy method, divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, backtracking and branch-and-bound. Introduction to complexity and the NP hierarchy. Corequisite: CSC 446, 447, 448 or 449. Prerequisites:  CSC 245 and 302 or permission of instructor.

CSC 446 Algorithms Project in Graphics and Visual Computing (0). A project course to accompany CSC 445. The chosen project will be related to algorithms and graphics and visual computing. This course must be taken with CSC 445. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 447 Algorithms Project in Net-Centric Computing (0). A project course to accompany CSC 445. The chosen project will be related to algorithms and net-centric computing. This course must be taken with CSC 445. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 448 Algorithms Project in Embedded Systems Programming (0). A project course to accompany CSC 445. The chosen project will be related to algorithms and embedded systems programming. This course must be taken with CSC 445. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 449 Algorithms Project in Applications Programming (0). A project course to accompany CSC 445. The chosen project will be related to algorithms and applications programming. This course must be taken with CSC 445. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CSC 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CSC 500 Compiler Construction (3). Review of program language structures, translation, loading, execution and storage allocation. Compilation of simple expressions and statements. Organization of a compiler including compile-time and run-time symbol tables, lexical scan, syntax scan, object code generation, error diagnostics, object code optimization techniques and overall design. Use of writing languages and bootstrapping. Prerequisites:  CSC 415.

CSC 503 Automata and Formal Languages (3). Alphabets, languages and grammars:  finite automata, regular expressions and type E grammars, context-free languages and push down automata, Turing machines and unsolvability. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of instructor.

CSC 510 Data Communications and Networking (3). An introduction to data communications and computer networking including transmission media, protocols, standards, and the OSI model, multiplexing, data compression, error detection and correction; encryption and decryption; local and wide area networks; distributed computing and client-server systems; network planning, installation, management, and inter-networking. Students will install, configure and test networks of personal computers using several popular network operating systems. Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.

CSC 515 Computer Graphics Programming (3). Techniques in two-dimensional and three-dimensional computer graphics image generation and animation.  Course includes a study of image rendering with both radiosity and raytracing techniques using high-level graphics tools.  Covers the mathematical foundations for computer graphics including vector and matrix theory for affine and projective transformations.  Prerequisites:  knowledge of a high-level language or permission of instructor.

CSC 520 Numerical Analysis II (3). A thorough treatment of solutions of equations, interpolation and approximations, numerical solution of initial value problems in ordinary differential equations. Selected algorithms will be programmed for solution on computers. Prerequisites:  CSC 420 and MAT 411 or consent of instructor.

CSC 525 Special Topics I (3). This course is designed to fulfill special needs not met by other courses. It can be a lecture or seminar course. May be repeated one time. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

CSC 526 Special Topics II (3). Special topics in computer science. May be repeated one time.

CSC 530 Graphical User Interface Development (3). Presents an introduction to human-computer interaction, graphical user interface design and implementation. The course requires the development of significant software application using a selected user interface development tool. Corequisite: CSC 531, 532, 533 or 534. Prerequisites:  knowledge of a high-level language and consent of instructor.

CSC 531 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Graphics and Visual Computing (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and graphics and visual computing. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 532 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Net-Centric Computing (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and net-centric computing. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 533 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Embedded Systems Programming (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and embedded systems programming. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 534 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Applications Programming (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and applications programming. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 540 Social, Ethical and Professional Issues in the Information Age (3). This course emphasizes social, ethical, legal, technical and professional issues encountered in the information age including the historical and social context, professional responsibilities, risks and liabilities, and intellectual property. Prerequisite:  senior standing.

CSC 545 Advanced Computer Architecture (3). In-depth discussion of some topics from CSC 405, high-speed functional units, distributed architecture, multiprocessors, pipelining, parallel computers and other topics. Prerequisite:  CSC 405.

CSC 551 Microprogrammed Logic Design (4). Combinational and segmented logic implementation using selectors, multiplexers, PLA, ROM and RAM. Architecture of logic emulation. Virtual machines. Vertical and horizontal microprogramming. Simulation studies of microprogrammed systems. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratories per week. Prerequisite:  CSC 405.

CSC 575 Computer Animation and Game Development (3). This course builds on the computer animation techniques of CSC 515. Topics covered include lighting techniques, texture mapping, atmospheric effects, collision detection, joystick and game pad inputs, and sound effects. Physics modeling, real-time animation, AI behavior modeling and other fundamentals of fame design are introduced. Prerequisites: CSC 515 or permission of instructor.

CSC 560 UNIX System Administration (3). This course covers the fundamental principles of administering the family of UNIX operating systems. Topics that will be covered include installation, configuration, administration and management of one flavor of this operating system.

CSC 565 Embedded Systems Design (3). Architecture of various microcontrollers and their uses in embedded systems applications are studied. One or more of the popular microcontrollers will be selected for practice in hardware design and programming, including methods for interfacing with computers, sensors and control systems.  Prerequisite:  CSC 405 or consent of instructor.

CSC 580 Introduction to Computer Programming Education (3). The first in a sequence of courses for education majors. General introduction to the computer, particularly as it relates to education. Students will be introduced to the BASIC language to solve programming problems. Not open to students who have credit for CSC 135.

CSC 581 Educational Programming Languages (3). Designed to introduce students to programming languages currently being used in the educational environment. Having been introduced to BASIC in the prerequisite course, students will also cover that language in greater detail. Prerequisite:  CSC 580.

CSC 595 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised independent study of specialized topics in computer science. May be repeated one time. Prerequisite:  senior standing and/or consent of instructor.


Career and Technical Education 
(CTE)
CTE 170 Professional and Technical Occupations (2). Professional and technical occupations related to industrial and technical education; characteristics of the occupations, aptitudes and training needed.

CTE 182 Basic Concepts Concerning Education (3). The main thrust of this course is to survey the basic concepts of education, including a study of educational theories, the development of technology and the elements of technological systems. Emphasis is placed on the impacts and interrelationships among technological subsystems and the student’s involvement in the actual technology education classroom/laboratory setting. (Same as TTE 182.)

CTE 200 Introduction to Career and Technical Education (3). This course is designed to provide new and pre-service teachers with an introduction to the field of career and technical education. Included are topics related to motivation, and learning theory, curriculum, school organization, funding, laboratory management and historical, socio-cultural, psychological and philosophical foundations of career and technical education.

CTE 265 Conference Leadership (3). A study of techniques and procedures in conference leadership. Class activities will provide experiences in planning conferences and practice sessions in leading conferences to develop skill. Members of the class will make a critical analysis of the practice conference.

CTE 270 Basic Foundations of Career and Technical Education (3). Foundations of contemporary curricular developments, selection and organization of course content and introduction of teaching techniques. Credit may only count once from CTE 270, 570 or TTE 470.

CTE 272 Organizing and Managing School Learning Facilities (3). Principles and practices related to equipping and maintaining shop, laboratory and classroom. Emphasis is given to safety and current technology.

CTE 274 Basic Instructional Media and Curriculum Development for Career and Technical Education (3). Curriculum construction and selecting and arranging teaching content; preparation of instructional materials; utilization of media.

CTE 360 Principles of Vocational Guidance (3). A course designed to provide instruction in selecting activities related to guiding students in matters of making career choices.

CTE 363 Evaluation of Instruction in Career and  Technical Education (3). A course designed to provide instruction in the process of instructional evaluation. Emphasis is given to the establishment of student performance criteria, the assessment of student performance in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, and the assigning of grades.

CTE 367 Supervised Work Experience in Industry (2-9). Supervised employment in industry. Assignments individually arranged by the university coordinator and the cooperating industry. Written reports required. Graded pass/fail.

CTE 368 Workshop in Career and Technical Education (3-9). Laboratory approach which provides opportunities for experienced educational personnel to concentrate their study on practical problems in vocational-industrial and technical education. Graded pass/fail.

CTE 371 Methods of Instruction in Career and Technical Education (3). The presentation and application of instructional materials, methods, techniques and devices relevant to teaching vocational-industrial and technical education; their relationships and technical subjects.

CTE 380 Career and Technical Subjects (3-24). An assessment will be made of previous educational experiences from universities, community colleges, private and public schools, and all institutions recognized by the National Commission on Accrediting. Graded pass/fail.

CTE 381 Career and Technical Experiences (3-24). Credit may be earned by thoroughly documented experiences in an occupation where the individual meets the standards for the entry level of teaching as defined by the Kentucky Department of Education, and where one would be eligible for the one-year vocational teaching certificate. On the basis of this review by the department chair, a specific amount of credit will be determined and given. Graded pass/fail.

CTE 421 Student Teaching in Career and Technical Education (8). Observation, participation and supervised teaching in vocational-industrial and technical education. Includes experiences in lesson planning, classroom management, record keeping, development and use of instructional materials and directed teaching in approved centers. Graded pass/fail.

CTE 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

CTE 463 Seminar in Student Teaching, Career and Technical Subjects (4). The identification of selected teaching concepts and a study of their use as a foundation for instructional methods, student activities, and evaluation of student learning. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  four years teaching industrial or health program.

CTE 480 Industrial Work Experience (1-4). Industrial experience related to the student’s goals and needs. Generally completed prior to entry into teacher preparation, with amount of credit and suitability of industrial experience to be evaluated on the basis of established criteria.

CTE 500 Analysis of Global Influences on the Workplace. (3) Course focuses on the global influences that are changing the workplace for teachers and trainers of today. The primary emphasis is on the scope, origins, and current trends that influence the classroom and other learning contexts, including business and government. Students are asked to research and explore global effects on their own current or prospective work environments.

CTE 501 Teaching through Application (3). This course is designed to provide new and pre-service teachers with an introduction to the field of career and technical education. Included are topics related to motivation, and learning theory, curriculum, school organization, funding, laboratory management and historical, socio-cultural, psychological and philosophical foundations of career and technical education. Field experience required.

CTE 502 Instructional Media, Curricula and Assessment in CTE (3). This course will provide an overview of current trends and issues in instructional technology and curricula in the technology rich instructional environment. The focus is on instructional approaches unique to and appropriate for the career and technical education classroom and laboratory. Field experience required.

CTE 503 Planning and Implementing Instruction in CTE (3). This course will provide an overview of current trends and issues in planning and implementing instruction in the media rich career and technical education classroom and laboratory. Includes exploration of such varied methods as lecture, discussion, group instruction, projects and instructional modules.

CTE 510 Introduction to Technical Training Programs for Industry (3). A study of the organization, planning, delivery and evaluation of adult education, development and training as conducted within business and industry.

CTE 540 School and Occupational Relations (3). A course designed to provide instruction in establishing a working relationship between vocational schools and industry. Attention is given to organizing and maintaining an occupational advisory committee, occupational surveys, field based instruction and student follow-up.

CTE 560 Seminar in Career and Technical Education (3). Individual and group investigations of current problems and issues in the field of vocational-industrial and technical education. Each student will be expected to plan and complete a minor research project and present his findings to the seminar.

CTE 561 Planning Technical Education Facilities (3). Principles and practices underlying the planning and designing of shops and laboratories for vocational, industrial and technical education, and implementation of legislation such as OSHA.

CTE 562 School and Community Relations for the Technical Instructor (3). A systematic approach to school-community relations that treats the community as an active participant with the vocational staff in the development and operation of an effective occupational-oriented educational program.

CTE 563 Evaluation of Instruction in Industrial Technical Education (3). A course designed to provide instruction in the process of instructional evaluation. Emphasis is given to the establishment of student performance criteria, the assessment of student performance in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, and the assigning of grades. An independent study project or research report is required.

CTE 565 Program Planning and Evaluation (3). Procedures and techniques in planning and evaluating programs in career and technical education.

CTE 566 Special Problems in Career and Technical Education (1-6). Provides an opportunity for individual study, laboratory practice and research in vocational education. The student must show a real need for such study and have the proposed problem approved before registering for the course. May be repeated for up to six hours of credit.

CTE 567 Managing and Organizing Student Organizations (3). A study of procedures for organizing clubs, suggestions to club sponsors, employer-employee banquets, publications, open-house, field trips, etc.

CTE 568 Independent Study in Career and Technical Education (3-6). Supervised readings or independent investigative projects in the various aspects of administration, supervision and coordination of vocational programs. May be repeated for up to six hours of credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

CTE 569 Practicum in Career and Technical Education (3). This course is designed for vocational education personnel who are interested in working within special areas in vocational education such as administration, coordination and implementation of legislation such as metrics, OSHA, etc.

CTE 570 Foundations of Career and Technical Education (3). A study of the social, historical and philosophical foundations of technology education and vocational education. Includes critical examination of the influences of the foundations of technology and vocational education on contemporary curricular developments, selection and organization of course content and teaching techniques. An independent study project or research report is required. Credit may not be received for both 270 and 570. (Same as TTE 470.)

CTE 571 Instructional Methods in Career and Technical Education (3). The presentation and application of instructional materials, methods, techniques and devices relevant to teaching technology and vocational education at the orientation, exploration and preparation levels. Students will explore current research on methods of instruction, then plan and execute teaching units for both individual and group instruction, selecting content and instructional strategies based on the goals and objectives appropriate to the content organizers of technology. Activities will include development of lesson plans, organization of materials, and presentation of psychomotor, affective and cognitive instruction as well as establishment of student expectations and a student behavior policy. An independent study project or research report is required. (Same as TTE 471.)

CTE 572 Managing Career Trade and Technical Learning Facilities (3). Principles and practices for planning, organizing, and maintaining school shop, laboratory and classroom facilities used in teaching vocational subjects. Emphasis is given to classroom management and control, supply inventory, equipment maintenance and safety. An independent study project or research report is required.

CTE 573 Occupational Field Experience (3). Directed work experience in various vocational settings for the purpose of giving the student practical experiences in the field. Supervision is provided by both the instructional staff of the college and the cooperating agency. Students are expected to maintain a full record of activities and assignments and to prepare periodic progress reports.

CTE 574 Instructional Media and Curriculum Development (3). A study of current trends and issues in curriculum development and instructional media for technology and vocational education. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the curricular considerations unique to the application of other areas of knowledge to technological problem-solving. Research and problem-solving skills will be utilized to adapt instructional media and existing teaching units to both individual and group instruction. Students will link content and instructional strategies based on goals and objectives appropriate to the content organizers of technology. An independent study project or research report is required. (Same as TTE 474.)

CTE 575 Managing Instruction for Learners with Special Needs (3). A study of the basic ideas, perspectives and techniques critical to the planning, management and evaluation of instruction for special needs learners. Classroom situations involving diverse populations and handicaps will be examined. A student-generated field experience is required. (Same as TTE 575.)

CTE 576 Emerging Trends in Instructional Technology (3). A study will be made of trends in industrial technology affecting career and technical education, including competency-based education, management by objectives, objectives exchange systems, information storage and retrieval, instructional models, etc.

CTE 577 Educator Externship, Field Experience in the Workplace (3). Emphasis on behavior patterns and changes in adults. Theories of occupational development, levels of occupational maturity, effects of personality traits, and socio-psychological environmental influences. Projects and field studies will be utilized.

CTE 578 Vocational Guidance (3). Problems and procedures involved in assisting individuals to choose, prepare for, enter upon and become adjusted in their vocations. Students will develop skills which enhance their ability to teach identification and clarification of values, as well as enhancement of decision-making, career planning and job acquisition skills. Technology education teachers, vocational education teachers and counselors will develop insight into the principles involved in evaluating occupational outlooks and the skills and traits required for success in selected careers.


Economics
(ECO)
ECO 140 Contemporary Economics (3). Fundamental economic principles applied to a wide range of real world problems, with the objective of developing an understanding of the market form of economic organization. Designed specifically for two purposes:  (1) to meet the needs of the students who are able to take only one economics course in their curriculum, and (2) to satisfy the University Studies social science requirement. Does not apply toward business or economics major, minor, or area requirement.

ECO 190 Consumer Economics (3). A study of consumer buying practices, family finances, protection of the consumer, and other problems of the household. Does not apply toward business or economics major, minor, or area requirements.

ECO 200 Economics and Politics (3). This course provides an introduction to the economic analysis of governments and politics. Topics covered include the role of special interest groups in American government, the growth of the government sector in the American economy, and the fundamental differences between private and public sector decision-making. The course is designed to introduce students to the role that incentives play in understanding government decision-making. Does not apply toward business or economics major, minor, or area requirement, but may be used as an elective.

ECO 230 Principles of Macroeconomics (3). An introduction to the application of the basic principles of supply and demand to issues in aggregate economics such as national income accounting, unemployment, growth, inflation, business cycles, and the role played by government through its fiscal and monetary policies. Prerequisites:  MAT 117, 120, 140 or 150; or an ACT math standard score of at least 23; or consent of instructor.

ECO 231 Principles of Microeconomics (3). An introduction to the application of the basic principles of supply and demand to the behavior of individual economic agents such as consumers, households, business and nonprofit firms, industries, and resource owners. Real world examples are used to demonstrate the application of microeconomics to everyday situations, including an analysis of the effects of government policies on individual markets and income distribution. Prerequisites:  MAT 117, 120, 140 or 150; or an ACT math standard score of at least 23; or consent of instructor.

ECO 305 Money and Banking (3). A survey of money and its role in the operation of the economy and the banking system. Prerequisites:  junior standing; ECO 230 and 231.

ECO 310 Issues in the Global Economy (3). A review of fundamental issues in international trade, payments, investment, and economic and social systems relevant for informed international business and public policy decision making. This class may not be taken for credit in the economics major. Prerequisites:  junior standing, ECO 230 and ECO 231, or consent of instructor.

ECO 311 European Economic History (3). A descriptive study of the economic development of Europe. This course focuses on historical economic thought that developed in Europe and provides a perspective of how Europe is structured today. Prerequisite:  ECO 230 or 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 312 American Economic History (3). A descriptive study of the historical development of major economic institutions in the United States. Prerequisite:  ECO 231.

ECO 315 Comparative Economic Systems (3). An analysis and appraisal of the various economic structures utilized by societies to solve the economic problem of how to allocate scarce resources among unlimited wants. Prerequisites:  junior standing; ECO 230 or consent of instructor.

ECO 330 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3). An analysis of the application of the principles of supply and demand to the macroeconomic problems that face society, such as inflation, unemployment, growth, deficits and recessions. This course is a continuation of ECO 230 with a greater emphasis on the development of formal models of macroeconomic activity. Prerequisites:  ECO 230 and MAT 220.

ECO 331 Intermediate Microeconomics (3). An analysis of the application of the principles of supply and demand to the resource allocation decisions faced by consumers, firms and resource owners. This course is a continuation of ECO 231 with a greater emphasis on the development of formal models of individual product and resource markets. Prerequisites:  ECO 231 and MAT 220.

ECO 335 Economics and Public Policy of Telecommunications Industry (3). The study of market performance and business practices of the telecommunications industry. Includes topics such as market power, merger analysis, vertical relationships, entry and regulation of price and lines of business. Prerequisites:  ECO 231.

ECO 345 Environmental Economics (3). Development of a framework for investigating the meaning and causes of environmental deterioration. Special emphasis on developing and using economic analysis to evaluate the appropriateness of proposed solutions. Prerequisite:  ECO 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 410 Economic Development (3). An introduction to the economic characteristics and problems of the less developed countries and to theories and policies applicable to the developing economy.

ECO 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

ECO 440 Urban Economics (3). A study of the economic theory relevant to the urban environment with applications of this theory to current urban problems. Prerequisite:  ECO 231.

ECO 441 Regional Economics (3). An analysis of factors contributing to the economic development of geographical regions of the American economy. Prerequisite:  ECO 231.

ECO 450 Economic Applications to Law (3). An introduction to the analysis of legal issues and legal reasoning. Case studies include property, contracts, torts, product liability, criminal behavior and the value of life. Prerequisites:  ECO 230, and 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 460 International Trade and Finance (3). A study of the principles, practices, and institutions of international trade and finance. Prerequisite:  ECO 231.

ECO 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ECO 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ECO 498 Research Methods in Economics (2). Course is the first of a two course sequence (with ECO 499) which together make up the senior seminar portion of the economics major. This course will cover research methods including: project design, research methods, writing skills and presentation skills.  The student must have completed or be enrolled in CIS 443. Those not meeting these requirements must seek the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: senior standing.

ECO 499 Senior Seminar in Economics (1). This is a capstone course in economics and is required of all economics majors. This class will serve to draw together the knowledge and analytical tools developed during the economics major course of study by requiring the development and completion of an independent research project. Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor.

ECO 500 Foundations of Economic Analysis (3). A rigorous introduction to economics including the application of the basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course is designed for nontraditional students who would like to refresh their understanding of economics and for graduate students and advanced undergraduates who lack prior proper training in economics. Students cannot receive undergraduate credit for this class and ECO 230 and/or ECO 231. In addition, this class cannot be used to fulfill graduate requirements in the M.B.A. or M.S. in economics program. Prerequisites:  MAT 117, 120, 140 or 150; or an ACT math standard score of at least 23; or consent of instructor.

ECO 505 Internship in Economics (1-3). Open to junior and senior economics majors. Students are placed with cooperating firms or government agencies to receive on-the-job training in economic analysis. Work experience is supervised by faculty and written reports are required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of departmental chair.

ECO 530 Intermediate Macro Theory (3). A review of the macroeconomic problems that face society, the theories that have arisen to describe the economy, and policy implications of possible solutions. Outside research as specified by the instructor will be required. Credit cannot be given for both ECO 330 and ECO 530. Prerequisites:  ECO 230 and MAT 220 or consent of instructor.

ECO 531 Intermediate Micro Theory (3). An analysis of price and distribution theory. Outside research as specified by the instructor will be required. Credit cannot be given for both ECO 331 and ECO 531. Prerequisites:  ECO 231 and MAT 220 or consent of instructor.

ECO 538 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3). An appraisal of the federal government’s efforts to promote full employment and price stability. Prerequisite:  ECO 330 or consent of instructor.

ECO 539 Microeconomic Policy (3). An analysis of government policy affecting business firms and consumer choice. Prerequisite:  ECO 331 or consent of instructor.

ECO 540 Market Structure and Firm Behavior (3). This course examines non-competitive market structures such as monopoly, oligopoly and monopolistic competition. The course will focus on output and pricing decisions of such firms, the economic impact of these market structures, and the regulation of non-competitive markets. Prerequisite:  ECO 230 and 231.

ECO 550 Public Finance (3). A survey of the principles and practices of raising and spending public revenues. Prerequisite:  ECO 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 555 National Income Accounting (3). The application of social accounting to the analysis of aggregate economic activity. Prerequisites:  ACC 201 and ECO 330 or consent of instructor.

ECO 570 Labor Economics (3). A survey of the economics of labor, the conditions of employment, wages and the development of labor organizations in the United States. Prerequisite:  ECO 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 595 Special Problems (1-3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

ECO 597 Teaching and Application of Economic Principles:  K-12 (3). A survey of content, materials, teaching methodology and practicum in program design for incorporating economic principles into grades K-12. The course is designed for those with little or no formal economic background. (Same as EDU 597.)


Educational Psychology
(EDP)
EDP 260 Psychology of Human Development (3). A study of the systematic changes in the cognitive, behavioral, social, and biological functioning of the individual across the developmental stages of life. Note: Cannot be counted toward both teacher certification and the psychology major or minor.

EDP 380 Educational Psychology (3). Psychological theories, concepts, data, and methods pertaining to the teaching-learning context and to the general educational setting are presented. Prerequisite: PSY 180.


Education
(EDU)
EDU 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

EDU 103 Issues and Practices of American Education (3). Course designed to provide all students with an overview of the field of education. Included are topics related to motivation and learning theory, curriculum, school organization, and historical, socio-cultural, psychological and philosophical foundations of education. Although this is also an initial education course for students seeking teacher certification, all students will be able to apply what they have learned as parents and concerned citizens in their adult lives. Field observations required.

EDU 104 Exploration of Teaching (3). An elective course for high school students interested in pursuing a career in teacher education which will serve as a bridge class between EDU 103 and collegiate level teacher education courses. The course will include an exploration of the professional qualities and expectations of the teacher/educator. Roles, responsibilities, and challenges in the field of education will be examined. The course will include a minimum of 22 hours of field experiences. Prerequisites: successful completion of EDU 103 and recommendation of EDU 103 instructor.

EDU 300 Fundamentals of Secondary Education (3). This is the initial course in education for students who are considering an alternate route to certification in secondary education. It is designed to provide students with an introduction to the field of education with special attention to secondary education. Included are topics related to motivation and learning theory, curriculum, school organization, as well as historical, sociocultural, psychological and philosophical foundations of education. Graded pass/fail.

EDU 303 Strategies of Teaching (3). This course is an investigation of the skills of teaching which are applicable at any grade level. Emphasis placed on the application of teaching strategies in microteaching and classroom settings. The course will also include coverage of classroom management strategies, discipline techniques, and curriculum development as a function of instruction. Laboratory experiences required. Prerequisite:  Students must have earned a C or better in EDU 103 or permission of chair.

EDU 403 Structures and Foundations of Education (2). A course designed to provide the undergraduate teacher education student with an in-depth study of the foundations of education. The course includes a major emphasis in the social, historical, legal, and philosophical foundations of education. Prerequisite:  admission to Teacher Education.

EDU 404 Teaching Environmental Education (K-12) (1). A residential experience at Land Between the Lakes that entails the study of environmental education and its interdisciplinary nature including the materials and methods. Field experiences required including participation in a 24-hour Friday overnight environmental education retreat at LBL. Prerequisites: ELE 401, 402 or COM 372; MID 370, 372, 373 or 374; admission to Teacher Education or permission of instructor. Graded pass/fail.

EDU 405 (383) Evaluation and Measurement in Education (2). The selection, administration, and uses of educational evaluation and measurement approaches with emphasis on application in school classrooms. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education.

EDU 422 Student Teaching Seminar (3). A professional experience to be provided concurrently with student teaching to provide theory, research base and a forum to support the performance in the school assignment. Topics arising from problems encountered in the classroom as well as other current topics will be studied. Graded pass/fail.

EDU 450 Special Problems (1-12). Individual study and projects in education. Repeatable for up to 12 hours of credit. Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

EDU 515 Introduction to Environmental Education (3). An introduction to environmental education which will include philosophy, historical development, resource identification, curriculum development, field trip and other activities designed to use the various subject areas in all grade levels as a vehicle to create an environmental ethic.

EDU 520 NASA Aerospace Science Workshop (3). A course designed for teachers at all levels and subject disciplines. The intent of this course is to introduce teachers to the history, present status and future of the space movement through the efforts of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration agency. Instruction will be provided by Aerospace Education Specialists and College of Education faculty.

EDU 585 Environmental Interpretation (3). A course designed for persons in the fields of natural and cultural history, recreation, education, and media. A focus will be placed upon the philosophy, process and values of environmental interpretation while looking closely into the methods and techniques of interpreting programming. Successful completion of the course will lead to a national certification through the National Association for Interpretation.

EDU 597 Teaching and Application of Economic Principles:  K-12 (3). A survey of content, materials, teaching methodology and practicum in program design for incorporating economic principles into grades K-12. The course is designed for those with little or no formal economic background. (Same as ECO 597.)


Elementary Education
(ELE)
ELE 302 Music and Movement for Young Children (3). An in-depth exploration of developmentally appropriate music and movement experiences for young children infancy through five years of age. Students will develop skills to assist young children with and without disabilities in producing, recognizing and creating simple songs, playing with melody, and expressing feelings through music and movement. Prerequisites: MUS 200 or permission of instructor.

ELE 304 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary P-5 (3). A study of the structure of mathematics, materials, and methods which build insight and skill in the curriculum area. Field experiences required. Prerequisite:  EDU 303.

ELE 305 Children’s Literature (3). A critical study of the literature for children in grades P-5. Field experiences required. Prerequisite:  EDU 303.

ELE 306 Language and Early Literacy for Early Childhood (3). This course focuses on the child’s emerging literacy and exposure to language stimulation. Combining research, reflection and early childhood practices, the course fosters an understanding of how techniques and activities affect language and early literacy skills development in young children infancy through five years of age with and without disabilities. Prerequisites: EDU 103 or permission of instructor.

ELE 307 Teaching Language Arts in Elementary P-5 (3). A course designed to introduce students to content and teaching methodology in the language arts. Emphasis is on the language arts in the total elementary school program. Laboratory experiences required. Prerequisite:  EDU 303.

ELE 390 (404) Introduction to Kindergarten and the Primary School (3). A study of the historical background, organization of physical facilities for kindergarten, developmental tasks of the young child and his relationship to learning, and parent-teacher relationships.

ELE 401 Teaching Social Studies in Elementary P-5 (3). An exploration of the content, methods, and materials for the teaching of social studies at the elementary level. Topics include the integration of subject areas, technology, thinking skills, and citizenship education. Field experiences required including participation in a 24-hour Friday overnight environmental education retreat at LBL. Prerequisite:  ELE 307 and admission to Teacher Education.

ELE 402 Teaching Science in Elementary P-5 (3). An exploration of content, materials, and methods of teaching science at the elementary level. Activities include discussions, experiments, field trips, and observation of children. Field experiences required including participation in a 24-hour Friday overnight environmental education retreat at LBL. Prerequisite:  ELE 307 and admission to Teacher Education.

ELE 410 Collaboration and Communication in IECE Environments (3). Examines collaboration processes involving early childhood professionals, families of children with and without disabilities, and other community resource personnel. Communication skills needed to function effectively in interdisciplinary early childhood education environments are a primary focus. The course also addresses topics that are critical to the practitioner’s professional development including reflective thinking, ethics, and advocacy. Prerequisites: EDU 103, FCS 210, and 211 or permission of instructor.

ELE 421 Student Teaching in Elementary P-5 (7-14). Student teaching in the elementary school should allow the individual to participate in the work and duties of the school that are generally expected of the classroom teacher. This will be a 14-week assignment. Student teachers will be supervised by a public school teacher as well as a university coordinator. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: admission to Teacher Education and Student Teaching.

ELE 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

ELE 439 Early Childhood Assessment and Program Development (3). Students will develop skills in observing children birth through five years of age and in conducting developmental screenings, evaluations and assessment. Student will develop skills in creating and implementing individual education programs and individualized family service plans and in monitoring child progress. Student will be introduced to the concepts of home-based and center-based instruction. Prerequisites: EDP 260, EDU 103,  and SED 300 or instructor permission.

ELE 455 Curriculum and Methods for Infants and Toddlers (3). An in-depth look at care and education for infants and toddlers including children with disabilities and children from diverse backgrounds. Major emphasis is placed on methods to provide quality care to meet physical, emotional, cognitive and social needs of infants and toddlers while working collaboratively with families and other community agencies and service providers. Current best practices in education of infants and toddlers will be reviewed. Clinical field experiences will be required. Prerequisite: EDP 260 and EDU 103 or instructor permission.

ELE 474 IECE Practicum (3). This course makes provisions for students to participate in all activities generally expected of an interdisciplinary early childhood education professional. Supervision by the faculty member teaching course will be provided. Regularly scheduled seminars to promote reflective decision-making, discuss student progress and provide additional training in methods, procedures, and evaluation will coincide with the practicum experience. Prerequisites: EDP 260, EDU 103, ELE 439, FCS 310, 311 or permission of instructor.

ELE 505 Educational Program for Kindergarten Children (3). A study of recent developments in the education of young children, selection in the use of appropriate activities, methods and materials for kindergarten. Prerequisite: ELE 404.


Electromechanical Engineering Technology
(EMT)        
EMT 212 Industrial Electronics (4). A study of semiconductor diodes, transistors, FETs, four-layer devices, operational amplifiers, power devices, and digital devices as they are used in industrial control and signal amplification and processing. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Corequisite:  ENT 111.

EMT 261 Introduction to Fluid Power Systems (3). The study of the basic physical concepts behind fluid power generation, transmission and conversion. Common industrial hydraulic and pneumatic circuits are designed and analyzed using computer programming. Programmable logic controllers are introduced as a means of system control. Three hours lecture per week. Must be taken concurrently with EMT 262. Prerequisites:  MAT 130. (Fall)

EMT 262 Introduction to Fluid Power Systems Laboratory (1). Laboratory course must be taken concurrently with EMT 261. Two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  MAT 130. (Fall)

EMT 310 Programmable Logic Controllers (4). This course will cover the techniques of utilizing the programmable logic controllers (PLCs) in the industrial environment. Hardware aspects, programming techniques, and interfacing situations will be covered. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:  CSC 232. (Spring)

EMT 312 Industrial Instrumentation (4). A study of electrical measurement and electromechanical control and includes signal conditioning, sensors, interfacing to final outputs, controller principles and control loop characteristics. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisites:  TSM 210 and MAT 230 or equivalent. (Fall)

EMT 355 Electric Machinery and Controls (4). A study of electric motors and their controls including the operating characteristics and applications of various dc and ac motors, electromechanical controls and electronic drives. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:  TSM 110. (Spring)

EMT 361 Introduction to Industrial Motion Controls (4). A study of motion control as applied to current production manufacturing and process systems. This course includes an introduction to the mathematics, electronics, and control theory required to understand these system. Non-servo hydraulic and pneumatic systems will be presented; however, the emphasis of the course is on closed-loop servo-mechanisms. The course is laboratory oriented with theoretical and design content presented at the appropriate time. Prerequisites:  EMT  261, 262, 310, 312, ENT 365, MAT 230. (Spring)

EMT 420 Senior Project (3). A project-oriented study of actual manufacturing problems. The student will be given valuable industrial experience before leaving school. This course requires that students be able to apply previously acquired knowledge in obtaining a viable solution to their projects. Prerequisite:  EMT 419 and senior standing.

EMT 455 Manufacturing Control Systems (4). This course is a capstone integration course design to apply manufacturing planning systems and manufacturing equipment control systems. This course will focus on the development and integration of local area networks and industrial control processes. The topics included in this course are: local area networks, industrial networks, programmable logic controllers, man machine interfaces, motor control device networks and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisites:  EMT 310 and 312. (Fall)

EMT 462 Machine Design (3). Design of machines using bearings, belts, clutches, gears, springs and screws. Develops the application of the theory of working stresses, power transmission and lubrication to the analysis and design of machine elements. Prerequisites:  CET 298, ENT 365, and ITD 102. (Spring)


English
(ENG)
ENG 095 Writing Workshop (3). A basic writing skills course which emphasizes clear sentence structure and development of ideas in paragraphs and essays. This course is required for entering Community College freshmen. It must be completed before enrollment in English 100 or 101. The instructor will recommend which English course must be taken upon completion of English 095. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements.

ENG 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

ENG 100 Basic Writing (3). A writing skills course which emphasizes paragraph and essay development. The course is required for entering freshmen with ACT English scores below 18 and must be completed before enrollment in ENG 101. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements.

ENG 101 Composition (3). Instruction and practice in writing expository prose. Students use word processors to write and revise essays. All students who do not have credit for ENG 101 or the equivalent must enroll in this course upon entering Murray State University, or upon completing ENG 100, unless they qualify for ENG 104.

ENG 102 Composition and Research (3). A study of advanced composition skills, with emphasis on techniques of research. Unless eligible for ENG 104, all students who do not have credit for ENG 102 or the equivalent must enroll in this course at the first available opportunity after earning credit in ENG 101 or the equivalent. Prerequisite: ENG 101.

ENG 103 Business English (3). This course introduces the language of business and gives a comprehensive review of the basic elements of grammar. The student is led to make practical application in both speaking and writing. The course will not substitute for any English requirements. May  count as a business elective. Prerequisite:  ENG 101 or consent of instructor.

ENG 104 Honors Composition and Research (3). Intensive study and practice of advanced composition and research skills. Open to students enrolled in the Honors Program, or to those with an English Advanced Placement score of 4 or an enhanced ACT English standard score of 30 or above. For all degrees, this course may be used in lieu of  ENG 101 and 102, or ENG 102 only.  Two of these three courses may count toward graduation credit.

ENG 107 Teacher Bridge Writing Project (3). For Teacher Bridge Program participants only, this course helps prepare them to make the transition to a four-year university setting. Students improve their writing skills while exploring teacher education. May not be used for credit for ENG 101 or 102 but may count as an elective toward graduation.

ENG 109 Oral Skills Workshop for International Students (3). Course for international students entering MSU or enrolled at MSU based on required TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores who are weak in listening and particularly in speaking skills in English. It is also open to any other MSU student who may feel the need to improve English speaking skills.

ENG 110 ESL Skills Laboratory (3). The enhancement of English language skills in academic settings for nonnative speakers of English. This support course, intended primarily for upper division undergraduate and newly enrolled graduate students, provides classroom and individual instruction and practice in written and oral academic presentations. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements. Course my be repeated up to three times as needed.

ENG 111 Fundamental Writing Skills I (1). This course is designed for individualized instruction in basics of grammar, punctuation, and composition. Does not count toward an English major, minor, or University Studies requirements. Should be taken concurrently with 101.

ENG 112 Fundamental Writing Skills II (1). This course is a continuation of ENG 111. Does not count toward an English major, minor, or University Studies requirements. Should be taken concurrently with ENG 102. This is a letter-graded class.

ENG 201 Appreciation of Literature (3). A course designed to develop a broad literary appreciation and understanding. This course provides for the study of various genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama. ENG 201 is a University Studies humanities elective. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 or 104.

ENG 204 Advanced Expository Writing (3). A course designed to develop and enhance writing skills in expository prose, both in the personal essay and in writing from text-based sources. Students will concentrate on improving style, clarity, and organization while developing presentations related to various disciplines, particularly those in the humanities and social sciences. Prerequisites:  completion of ENG 101 and 102 or 104 with at least a C average, or credit for freshman composition via CLEP or ACT challenge examination.

ENG 213 The Film and Literature (3). A study of the correlations between the film form and traditional literary forms. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102.

ENG 214 Introduction to Creative Writing (3). An introduction to the forms of poetry and fiction, combining the careful reading of the works of established writers and original student writing. Designed for majors and non-majors. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 221 Introduction to English Studies (3). An introductory course for English majors and minors designed to familiarize students with a range of literary and writing genres, as well as the discourses, practices, and major theories of English studies. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 224 Writing in the Professions (3). This course prepares students to write documents such as proposals, reports, memos, letters, and e-mail in professional scenarios. Students will learn to assess practical writing situations and to write successful documents for specific purposes and audiences. The course will emphasize computer skills. Course activities may include peer review, collaborative writing, and intensive planning and revision workshops. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 or 104 (or the equivalent).

ENG 243 Literary Masterpieces: Fantasy, Myth and Legend (3). A study of the literary manifestations of fantasy, myth, and legend as they appear in the works of such writers as Homer, Shakespeare, Milton, Coleridge, Yeats, and Tolkien.

ENG 245 African-American Literature (3). Beginning with a consideration of the African American experience during slavery, students enrolled in this survey course will examine the fiction and nonfiction written by African Americans. Thematic emphasis will be given to historical, cultural, and contemporary issues as viewed in seminal African American works written by such authors as Frederick Douglass, Linda Brent, W.E.B. DuBois, Toni Morrison, Zora Neale Hurston, Booker T. Washington, Langston Hughes, and Harriet Wilson. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 or ENG 104 (or the equivalent).

ENG 250 Contemporary World Literature (3). A study of selected novels, short stories, plays, and poetry from world literature of the last thirty years. Works studied will be by important new authors not native to the United States and will illustrate contemporary literary trends. Works will include representative texts from North America, South America, Asia, Europe, and Africa. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 or ENG 104 (or the equivalent).

ENG 302 Major American Authors (3). A survey of the fiction, poetry, drama and essays written by America’s most important writers from the nation’s beginnings to the mid-twentieth century. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 303 British Literature to 1760 (3). A study of the development of British literature from the Old English through the Early Modern English periods, with emphasis on key texts, figures, genres, and trends, including critical approaches. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 304 British Literature, 1760 to the Present (3). A study of British literature form the late 18th century to the present, with emphasis on key texts, figures, genres, and trends, including critical approaches. ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 305 Survey of World Literature, 1700-1945 (3). A survey of world literature in English or English translation from 1700 to 1945. Works studied will include novels, short stories, plays, and poems by authors from Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia, and the Americas. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 306 Contemporary Literature (3). A survey of literature written in English from 1945 to the present. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 307 World Literature to 1830 (3). A survey of world literature in English or English translation, from the ancient world to 1830, including critical approaches. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104)

ENG 308 World Literature, 1830 to the Present (3). Survey of world literature In English or English translation from 1830 to the present, including critical approaches. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102. (or 104)

ENG 309 History of the English Language (3). A survey of the English language from Old to Middle to Modern English.

ENG 310 Linguistics and English Grammars (3). A survey of modern studies in the English language, with emphasis placed upon its impact on the theory and practice of several grammatical systems.

ENG 311 American Literature to 1890 (3). A study of the development of U.S. literature from the nation’s beginnings to 1890, with emphasis on major works and writers, including critical approaches. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 312 American Literature 1890 to the Present (3). A study of U.S. literature and its developing ethnic and cultural traditions from 1890 to the present, including critical approaches. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 313 History of the Cinema (3). This course will cover the international, historical, cultural, artistic, and technical development of the cinema from the beginnings to the present, with some emphasis on American contributions.

ENG 314 Film Theory and Criticism (3). Study of major aesthetic and critical theories about film and of the theory and practice of film criticism, with focus on American cinema. This class meets for two hours for lecture and discussion and two hours for film viewing. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 315 Global Cinema (3). A study of national cinemas and industries outside the United States, examining significant directors and film movements. This class meets for two hours for lecture and discussion and two hours for film viewing. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).


ENG 316 The Bible as Literature (3). A study of the Bible as a literary source. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102. (Same as RGS 316.)

ENG 317 Literature and Religion (3). Course that explores the intersections between literature and religion within larger cultural contexts. Depending on individual research needs and the interest of the group, mandatory field experiences may be scheduled. Prerequisites: CIV 101, 102; HUM 211, 212 or equivalent. (Same as RGS 317.)

ENG 318 Women’s Literature (3). A study of literature written by women. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 319 Gay and Lesbian Literature (3). Literary works by gay and lesbian authors as well as works about the gay and lesbian experience will be read, spanning the long and varied history of this genre. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 or ENG 104, and either ENG 201 or 221.

ENG 320 Survey in African-American Literature (3). A thematic survey and analysis of African-American literature and appropriate theoretical concepts.

ENG 324 Technical Writing  (3). Theory of and practice in the writing of technical letters and reports for industry and technology. Will not count toward University Studies requirements. Prerequisite:  ENG 101.

ENG 325 Professional Technical Writing (3). This course is designed for students who want to become professional technical writers. Students will develop skills in writing reports, proposals, manuals and other documents for paper and electronic media. Students will also learn the basic patterns of professional discourse and activity in the field of technical writing.  Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102.

ENG 328 Standard English Usage (3). The traditional or prescriptive approach to a comprehensive study of standard English grammar and the conventions of punctuation and capitalization.

ENG 329 Teaching English in Middle/Secondary Schools (3). A practical course in the materials and methods used in teaching English in middle and secondary schools.

ENG 330 Special Topics (3). A study of literary genres or sub-genres, or of other special topics. Content will vary from semester to semester according to student and faculty interests. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 334 Shakespeare (3). A study of selected Shakespearean histories, comedies, and tragedies.

ENG 341 Introduction to Fiction (3). An introduction to fiction writing, combining the careful reading of works by established writers with analysis of original student stories.

ENG 342 Introduction to Poetry (3). An introduction to poetry writing, combining the careful reading of poems by established writers with analysis of original student poems.

ENG 343 Special Topics in Creative Writing (3). The study of a special area of creative writing. Content will vary from semester to semester according to student and faculty interest. The course will combine the careful reading of works by established writers with analysis of original student work. Students will be required to attend readings sponsored by the Creative Writing Program and encouraged to attend other readings on campus and in the area. Course may be repeated for credit three times with the consent of the instructor and student’s advisor. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 344 Introduction to Creative Non-Fiction (3). Study and practice in the literary art of creative non-fiction with particular emphasis on the personal essay. Course requirements will include attendance at readings sponsored by the Creative Writing Program. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102. (or ENG 104).

ENG 351 Special Topics in Film Studies (3). The study of an advanced area in film studies, including, but not limited to studies in major filmmakers, national traditions, genres, schools of theory, or influential actors. The course may be repeated twice for credit with consent from the Chair. Prerequisite: ENG 313.

ENG 360 Literature and Philosophy (3). Interdisciplinary look at ways in which literature raises philosophical questions and also how philosophical writings articulate a relationship between philosophy and literature. Topics may include the role of imagination and emotion in reasoning, interpretation, rhetoric, and the role of literature in moral reasoning. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 or 102, ENG 104. (Same as PHI 360)

ENG 370 Law and Literature (3). A course that explores the intersections between law and literature within larger cultural contexts. Prerequisites: CIV 101 and 102; HUM 211 and 212, or equivalent. (Same as LST 370.)

ENG 371 Literature and the Environment (3). A study of literary and other works from a variety of cultures and periods with a focus on the environment, its inhabitants, and their survival. Depending on individual research needs and the interest of the group, field experiences may be scheduled, some of which might include excursions into developed, threatened, and wilderness areas and visits to other relevant sites. Prerequisites: English 101 and 102, or 104.

ENG 380 Introduction to Poetry and Poetics (3). An introduction to the traditions and techniques of poetry, including the study of meter, literary devices, and form. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102, or 104.

ENG 404 Advanced Composition (3). Intensive workshop in writing for the English major. Topics include expository writing, rhetorical and literary analysis, and research writing. Required of all English majors. Prerequisite: ENG 221.

ENG 405 British Novel to 1830 (3). A study of the background and development of the British novel to 1830.

ENG 406 British Novel Since 1830 (3). A study of the background and development of the British novel after 1830.

ENG 407 Short Fiction (3). A study of the origin and development of the short story, the short-short story, and/or the novella as unique literary genres. Special emphasis will be on the analysis of the form.

ENG 409 The American Novel (3). A study of the American novel from James Fenimore Cooper to William Faulkner.

ENG 410 Contemporary American Literature (3). An in-depth study of some of the Americas’ influential contemporary literature. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 412 Directed Studies in Film Studies (3). Supervised independent work in film studies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 413 American Poetry (3). A study of the development of American poetic traditions and achievement from 1620 to the present.

ENG 415 Writer’s Workshop: Short Story (3). An intensive study of the techniques of writing the short story, with special concentration on the student’s own work. Prerequisites:  ENG 214 or 341 or consent of the instructor.

ENG 416 Writer’s Workshop: Poetry (3). An intensive study of the techniques of writing poetry, with special concentration on the student’s own work. Prerequisites:  ENG 214 or 342 or consent of the instructor.

ENG 417 Film in the Classroom (3). Film studies course introducing educators and future educators to methods of effectively incorporating film into classroom curricula. This class meets for two hours for lecture and discussion and two hours for film viewing. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 104).

ENG 421 Technical Document Design (3). This course teaches students how to create elements of successful technical documents and manage systems of technical documentation. Students will explore practical and theoretical issues in user-centered technical document creation. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor, ENG 324 or 325.

ENG 422 Writing for the Web and Electronic Media (3). Students in this course examine the effect of discourse conventions in electronic documents on the distribution and consumption of technical information. Students will practice writing electronic technical documents such as web sites, e-mail, portable documents, and help files, as well as electronic document management techniques such as single-sourcing. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor, ENG 324 or 325.

ENG 423 Writing for Desktop Publishing (3). Students in this course will learn the skills to write and create a variety of traditional paper technical documents, such as technical manuals. The course will teach students the desktop publishing skills technical writing requires. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 or permission of the instructor, ENG 324 or 325.

ENG 425 Teaching Literature, Writing and Grammar in Middle Schools (3). A practical course in the materials and methods used in teaching English/language arts in middle schools. Prerequisite: ENG 329 or EDU 303.

ENG 426 Classical Literature (3). The literature of Greece and Rome, read in translation.

ENG 427 Medieval Literature (3). European literature from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance, read in translation.

ENG 428 Renaissance Literature (3). European literature of the Renaissance, read in translation, with emphasis placed upon its impact on English thought and literature.

ENG 435 Teaching Literature in Secondary Schools (3). Background and readings in literature commonly taught in secondary schools; emphasis on contemporary young adult literature. May include study of the novel, short story, poetry, drama and nonfiction. Prerequisites:  ENG 329 and senior status or permission.

ENG 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis or project which allows Honors Program students with senior standing to undertake advanced research. (A thesis paper, written review of an art exhibit or a performance is required.

ENG 440 Traditional Rhetoric and the Written Argument (3). A study of rhetoric from ancient Greece to the 19th century. Emphasizes the application of traditional rhetoric to written argument while giving students an opportunity to analyze and create persuasive messages pertaining to politics and the law, business, science, and the arts.

ENG 441 Contemporary Rhetoric and the Written Argument (3). A study of rhetoric from the 19th century to the  present. Emphasizes the application of contemporary rhetoric to written argument while giving students an opportunity to analyze and create persuasive messages pertaining to politics and the law, business, science, and the arts.

ENG 445 Teaching Writing in Secondary Schools (3). A consideration of process writing and its implications for teaching writing to secondary school students. Prerequisites:  ENG 329 and senior status.

ENG 460 Comedy and Satire (3). This course will examine the historical development of comedy and/or satire as a literary genre and as a cultural manifestation (e.g., plays, novels, essays, movies, comedians, etc.). It may also focus on theories of comedy and satire. Prerequisites:  ENG 101, 102, and at least one upper-level literature course.

ENG 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ENG 500 Chaucer (3). A study of Chaucer’s works and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 501 Milton (3). A study of Milton’s works and their historical and critical contexts. (Same as RGS 511.)

ENG 502 Early English Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of English literature before 1500, studied partly in translation.

ENG 503 Medieval Drama (3). European secular and religious drama in the Middle Ages, studied partly in translation. Prerequisite: ENG 303 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 504 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of British literature from 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century.

ENG 505 British Romantic Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of British literature of the Romantic Age.

ENG 508 Modern Fiction (3). A critical and historical study of selected European and American prose fiction from 1900 to the present.

ENG 509 Literary Criticism (3). An historical survey of literary criticism, together with some collateral reading of literature.

ENG 510 Applied Linguistics for Second Language Teaching (3). An overview of the basic concepts, scope, and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects, including topics and issues in current linguistic studies.  Prerequisite: ENG 310. (Same as MLA/TSL 510.)

ENG 511 Non-Shakespearean Elizabethan-Jacobean Drama (3). A study of selected plays of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 512 Directed Study (1-4). Directed independent study program, mutually developed by student and instructor, leading to one or more papers or projects. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 513 Major Authors (3). A major literary figure (or two related figures) will be studied in depth. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: ENG 101, 102 and at least one survey of literature course.

ENG 520 Forms of Poetry (3). Explores the question of poetic form from the point of view of practitioners. A course in prosody and the historical development of forms in English and American poetry, including rhymed verse forms, the meters, syllabics, free verse, and prose poetry. Material for discussion will include student poetry and outside texts. This is a capstone course for English majors with an option in creative writing. Prerequisite:  ENG 416 or consent of instructor.

ENG 521 Forms of Fiction (3). A study of literary fiction from the writer’s point of view. Prerequisite:  ENG 415 or consent of instructor.

ENG 524 Historical Principles in Composition Theory (3). An historical survey of rhetorical theories as they originate in the classical era, are reinterpreted by composition theory and pedagogy, and are applied to contemporary writing and writing instruction.

ENG 531 Introduction to Linguistic Science (3). A study of the basic concepts, scope and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects. Not open to the student who has credit for ENG 310.

ENG 532 Approaches to Modern English Grammar (3). A systematic study of the structure of modern English with attention to recent descriptions of its phonemic, morphemic, and syntactical features. Prerequisite:  ENG 310 or 531.

ENG 533 Language and Culture (3). A study of the relationship among language, society, and the individual’s conception of reality. Prerequisite:  three hours of linguistics.

ENG 535 Sixteenth-Century British Literature (3). A survey of non-dramatic British literature from 1500 to 1600, attention to historical and critical contexts.

ENG 536 Seventeenth-Century British Literature (3). A survey of non-dramatic British literature from 1600-1667, with attention to historical and critical contexts.

ENG 537 British Poetry and Non-Fictional Prose, 1832 to 1900 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 538 British Fiction, 1832 to 1900 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 539 Modern British Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of selected works from 1900 to the present.

ENG 541 American Literature, 1607 to 1820 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 542  American Literature, 1820 to 1870 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 543 American Literature, 1870 to 1920 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 544 American Literature, 1920 to the Present (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 545 Studies in Southern Literature (3). A survey of southern literature and its historical and critical contexts.

ENG 546 Survey of the American Novel to 1900 (3). A study of the American novel from its beginnings to 1900, with attention to historical and critical contexts.

ENG 547 Topics in African-American Literature (3). A study of selected works of African-American literature and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 548 Proseminar in Literature (3). A study of selected topics in literature in English; may be repeated for credit.

ENG 550 Modern Drama (3). A study of selected European and American plays, with attention to literary backgrounds and technical experimentation.

ENG 560 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction (3). Critical discussion of original student writing. Individual conferences and reading assignments in contemporary literature are included. Prerequisite:  ENG 415 or consent of instructor. May be re-taken for credit.

ENG 561 Advanced Creative Writing:  Poetry (3). Critical discussion of student work, from impulse to final draft. Other topics include the relationships between vision and craft; language and experience; image and idea. Reading assignments in contemporary poetry will help to establish criteria for good work. Prerequisites:  ENG 416 or consent of instructor. May be re-taken for credit.

ENG 571 Documentation Project Management and Standards (3). Techniques and practices for handling documentation projects. Students will learn to manage the work of multiple authors and reviewers, implement successful consulting practices, plan and schedule projects, design style sheets, and create version control systems. The course also covers the dynamics of managing documentation for the implementation of international standards such as ISO 9001. Prerequisites:  ENG 324 or 325 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 572 Writing Training Materials (3). An overview of the pedagogy and procedures used to create training materials for business, industry, and government. Prerequisites:  ENG 324 or 325, or permission of instructor.

ENG 573 Writing Proposals and Grants (3). Techniques and practices for writing proposals and grant proposals. The course will help students learn and practice the rhetorical and persuasive skills necessary to plan and create successful proposals. Prerequisites:  ENG 324 or 325, or permission of instructor.

ENG 574 Writing Manuals, Instructions, and Procedures (3). An overview of the principles, conventions, and technologies used to write instructions, manuals, and procedures for business, industry, and government. The course will examine and practice methods for creating instructions and procedures (geared toward processes) and manuals (geared toward products). Prerequisites: ENG 324 or 325, or permission of the instructor.

ENG 575 Advanced Technical Writing (3). Advanced topics and projects in technical writing, focusing on direct application to business and industry. This course serves as the capstone for the Professional Writing major, Technical Writing minor, and Technical Writing Certificate programs. Prerequisites: at least two 500-level courses from the following: ENG 571, 572, 573, 574).

ENG 580 Approaches to the Writing Process (3). A consideration of the writing process and its implications for teaching writing to students at all levels.

ENG 581 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (3). An examination of contemporary and traditional issues and concerns in the study of rhetoric and composition. The course usually will focus upon an announced topic but will allow students to explore matters of individual concern. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 590 Practicum in Instructional Techniques for Developmental English (3). Practical experience in tutoring individuals and small groups in a writing laboratory. Prerequisites:  senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor.


Engineering Technology
(ENT)
ENT 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Meetings with advisors, department personnel, service areas, and campus field trips comprise the main involvement. Availability of university resources is stressed with emphasis on personal needs. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Fall)

ENT 111 Electric Systems (4). A study of dc and ac circuits including an introduction to three-phase systems and electric power. Lecture and laboratory provide learning experiences with basic test instruments, circuits, components and computer analysis. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:  MAT 130 or 150.

ENT 286 Introduction to Environmental Engineering Technology (3). An introduction to air and water pollution control, water and wastewater treatment, steam and groundwater hydrology, energy and resource demands. Included are discussion of ecological bases of water and air treatment systems, data and analyses, and statistical and computational techniques.

ENT 287 Statics for Technology (3). A course covering the branch of mechanics which deals with the effects of forces acting on a body at rest. The course deals with the graphical and analytical study of force systems in equilibrium. This entails an understanding of applied and frictional forces, centers of gravity, and vectors. Prerequisite:  MAT 130, PHY 120. (Fall and Spring)

ENT 293  Manufacturing Processes and Materials (3). A technical and economic analysis of the various methods of fabrication, processes utilized and materials used in today’s manufacturing industry. (Fall)

ENT 351 Industrial and Commercial Power Distribution (3). A in-depth study of industrial and commercial power distribution including three-phase systems, transformers, cable and conduit, grounding, system protection and safety. Prerequisite:  TSM 110.

ENT 364 Introduction to Thermodynamics (3). Basic concepts of thermodynamics with an emphasis on the methods of solving a wide range of technical problems. Topics included are the first and second law, entropy, reversible and irreversible processes and ideal gases. Corequisite: MAT 308 or 330. (Spring)

ENT 365 Dynamics for Technology (3). A study of motion of particles and rigid bodies and the effects of forces on bodies with acceleration. Topics included are kinematics of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, impulse and momentum. Prerequisites:  MET 287 Corequisite:  MAT 308 or 330. (Fall)

ENT 382 Hydraulics (4). The principles of fluid statics, dynamics and kinematics are addressed. Included are studies relating to fundamental laws for fluid motion in the form of Euler’s Bernoulli’s, impulse-momentum, and work-energy relationships. Also studied are resistance to flow, flow measurement, pumping equipment, and an introduction to compressible flow. Prerequisite:  ENT 287. (Spring)

ENT 393 Engineering Economy (3). Economic evaluation and financial analysis of engineering systems alternatives to optimize the engineering decision process. Prerequisites:  IET 125, MAT 230 and CSC 135. (Fall and Spring)

ENT 400 Thermodynamics and Energy Development (3). Thermodynamic relationships are applied to ideal and industrial systems. Energy transference between materials and through heat exchanger design is a primary focus. Development, application and conservation of energy resources are considered. Prerequisite:  MAT 230 or 250.

ENT 419 Senior Project I (3). A project-oriented study of actual manufacturing problems from area industry. The student will be given valuable industrial experience before leaving school. This course requires that students be able to apply all previously acquired knowledge in obtaining a viable solution to their projects.

ENT 420 Senior Project II (3). A project-oriented study of actual manufacturing problems from area industry. The student will be given valuable industrial experience before leaving school. This course requires the students be able to apply all previously acquired knowledge in obtaining a viable solution to their projects. This is the capstone course for the Electromechanical program and is the second part of the ENT 419 and ENT 420 series. Prerequisite:  ENT 419 and senior standing.

ENT 458 Applying the National Electric Code (3). A study and application of major parts of the National Electric Code including overcurrent protection, branch and feeder circuit calculations, grounding, motor control circuits, transformers and services. Studies will focus on applications to individual and multifamily dwelling units as well as industrial and commercial buildings. Prerequisite:  TSM 110. (Spring)

ENT 491 Industrial Operations (3). Quantitative analysis for planning, organizing and controlling a production/operations system. Prerequisite:  CSC 135, ENT 393 and CIS 243. (Fall)

ENT 499 FE Exam Review (1). A review course for the Fundamentals of Engineering registration examination. The course is intended for seniors majoring in engineering technology.


Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering 
(ETE)
ETE 099 Freshman Orientation (1).  Introduction to the ETE major, the engineering profession, the department, and the university.  Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation.  Graded pass/fail.  (Same as PHY 099)

ETE 264 Linear Circuits I (4).   Resistive circuits, nodal analysis, loop analysis, Thevenin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem, PSPICE  analysis, capacitors and inductors, AC steady state analysis, polyphase circuits.  Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.  Prerequisite:  PHY 255. (Same as PHY 264)

ETE 365 Linear Circuits II (3). First and second order transient circuits, magnetically coupled circuits, variable frequency circuits, Bode plots, Laplace Transforms, Fourier Analysis.  Prerequisite: ETE 264 (Same as PHY 365)

ETE 366 Analog Electronics I (3). Transistor amplifiers, feedback circuits, filters, frequency response of circuits, power supplies and switching circuits.  Computer simulation of circuits will be emphasized.  Prerequisite:  ETE 365 and MAT 309. (Same as PHY 366)

ETE 378 Logic Design I (4). Binary logic and hardware logic minimization.  Study of SSI and MSI digital circuits design.  Performance trade-offs.  Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.  Prerequisites:  PHY 140 or knowledge of a high-level computing language and PHY 255. (Same as PHY 378)

ETE 398 Principles of Design (3). The task of engineering design, which includes the formulation of the problem, creative approaches to design problem solution, analysis, material selection and economics, is considered in design decisions from conception to final product. Prerequisites:  working knowledge of a high-level computer language  and junior standing, or consent of the instructor. (Same as PHY 398)  

ETE 420 Signals and Linear Systems (3). Analysis of continuous-time and discrete-time, discrete-parameter, time-invariant, linear systems based upon the convolution integral, Fourier series and transform, Laplace transform, Z-transform, and state-space methods.  Topics include impulse response, transfer function, energy spectra, filtering, sampling, and applications to networks, communications, and controls.  Prerequisite:  ETE 365 or equivalent.

ETE 421 Active Network Design I (3). Design principles of active signal processing networks are developed.  Topics include modeling the non-ideal operational amplifier, sensitivity functions, feedback and feedforward, switched capacitor filters, and approximation theory.  Comparisons of realization techniques are discussed. Prerequisite:  ETE 365, ETE 366.  Corequisite:  ETE 422.

ETE 422 Active Network Design I Laboratory (1).  Laboratory to accompany ETE 421.  Prerequisite:  ETE 365, ETE 366.  Corequisite:  ETE 421.

ETE 460 Electricity and Magnetism I (3). Electric fields, potential, dielectrics, steady currents, magnetic fields and electromagnetic induction.  Prerequisites:  PHY 255, MAT 411. (Same as PHY 460)  

ETE 461 Electricity and Magnetism II (3). Magnetic materials, alternating currents, transient phenomena, electromagnetic radiation.  Prerequisite:  ETE 460. (Same as PHY 461)

ETE 498 Senior Engineering Design I (3). Through discussions with the faculty advisor and other members of the faculty, students will determine the design-related engineering problem that they wish to study.  A detailed written project proposal will be submitted to and approved by the student’s faculty project director prior to midterm.  Working as individuals or in teams, the student will apply the design process by developing a project from the proposal state to the test, evaluation, and implementation stages.  Field trips may be required. Prerequisites:  senior standing in the program or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY 498)

ETE 499 Senior Engineering Design II (3). A continuation of ETE 498.  Field trips may be required.  Prerequisite:  ETE 498. (Same as PHY 499)

ETE 510 Computer Design (3). Review of logic design and elementary computer organization.  Asynchronous and synchronous logic design using VHDL and programmable logic.  Design of the central processing unit, memory, control, and input-output portions of a computer.  The VHDL hardware design language will be used.  Three hours lecture per week.  Cannot be taken for graduate credit. Prerequisite:  ETE 366, ETE 378.  Corequisite:  ETE 511.

ETE 511 Computer Design Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany ETE 510  Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Prerequisite:  ETE 366, ETE 378.  Corequisite:  ETE 510.

ETE 520 Digital Signal Processing (3). Discrete-time signals and systems; Sampling and aliasing; Discrete Fourier Transform; Z-Transforms; FIR and IIR filter design techniques; Current applications of digital signal processing. Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Three hours lecture per week.  Prerequisite:  PHY 264 or equivalent.

ETE 521 Digital Signal Processing Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany ETE 520. Cannot be taken for graduate credit. Prerequisite: ETE 264 (PHY 264). Corequisite: ETE 520.

ETE 542 Physical Electronics (3). Semiconductor fundamentals, energy bands, carrier transport theory, continuity equations, PN junction diodes, Zener diodes, Schottky Barrier diodes, metal-semiconductor contacts, bipolar junction transistors, MOS capacitors, field effect transistors, and microelectronic fabrication.  Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 370.

ETE 550 Communications and Modulation (3). Modulations such as AM, FM, PAM, PPM, PDM, single sideband, vestigial sideband.  Coherent and non-coherent detection, heterodyne action, performance and distortion, circuits for modulating and demodulating.  Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite:  ETE 420.  Corequisite:  ETE 551.

ETE 551 Communications and Modulation Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany ETE 550.  Prerequisite:  ETE 420.  Corequisite:  ETE 550.


Exercise Science
(EXS)
EXS 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Same as CDI/HEA/NTN/REC 099.)

EXS 250 Anatomical Concepts in Wellness (3). A course designed to familiarize the student with basic anatomical and physiological principles of the human body. This course serves as a foundation for additional exercise science courses. Prerequisite: University Studies biological science.

EXS 270 Clinical Experience I (1). A course
designed to complement the material presented in EXS 301 and allow time for practicing the clinical competencies required for athletic training certification. The student will be required to attend clinical experience in the MSU athletic training rooms or other locations as assigned by the instructor. This course is a prerequisite to further courses within the curriculum and required for those pursuing certification in athletic training. Prerequisite:  BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250 and admittance to the Athletic Training Program. Co-requisite:  EXS 301.

EXS 271 Clinical Experience II (1). A course designed to complement the material presented in EXS 390 and allow time for practicing the clinical competencies required for athletic training certification. The student will be required to attend clinical experience in the MSU athletic training rooms or other location as assigned by the instructor. This course is a prerequisite to further courses within the curriculum and required for those pursuing certification in athletic training. Prerequisite: EXS 270 and admittance to the Athletic Training Program. Co-requisite: EXS 390.

EXS 301 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (3). The most recent information on the prevention and treatment of athletic injuries will be discussed. Prerequisites:  BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250. Co-requisite: EXS 270 (for those admitted to the Athletic Trainer Program).

EXS 310 (410) Exercise Concepts in Special Populations (3). Course designed to provide students with information relevant to the needs of special populations in the field of exercise science. Topics of discovery will include exercise and cancer recovery, health and exercise for at-risk populations, and modifying exercise programs for individuals with special needs. Prerequisites: BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250.

EXS 320 Evaluation of Non-Orthopedic Conditions (3). Course designed to prepare the student to use the proper terminology when communicating to other healthcare professionals, locate anatomical landmarks, and perform general evaluation techniques employed by athletic trainers and other allied health care workers. This course specifically covers evaluation and proper management of non-orthopedic conditions, including: thoracic and abdominal injuries, general medical conditions, psychosocial conditions, and dermatological conditions. This course is required for those pursuing certification in athletic training. Prerequisites: EXS 301 and admittance to the Athletic Training Program or permission from the instructor.

EXS 333 Theories and Techniques in Strength and Conditioning (3). Designed to acquaint the exercise science major with comprehensive information on scientific principles, concepts, and theories of strength training and conditioning as well as the practical applications to sports medicine, health promotion, and wellness. The course also prepares the student for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist examination. Prerequisite:  BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250.

EXS 371 Clinical Experience III (2). A course designed to complement the material presented in EXS 402 and allow time for practicing the clinical competencies required for athletic training certification. The student will be required to attend clinical experience in the MSU athletic training rooms or other locations as assigned by the instructor. This course is a prerequisite to further courses within the curriculum and required for those pursuing athletic training certification. Prerequisite:  Admittance to the Athletic Training Program and EXS 271. Co-requisite: EXS 402.

EXS 372 Clinical Experience IV (2). A course designed to complement the material presented in EXS 403 and allow time for practicing the clinical competencies required by the for athletic training certification. The student will be required to attend clinical experience in the MSU athletic training rooms or other locations as assigned by the instructor. This course is a prerequisite to further courses within the curriculum and required for those pursuing athletic training certification. Prerequisite:  EXS 371 and admittance to the Athletic Training Program. Co-requisite:  EXS 403.

EXS 375 Biomechanics in Sport and Exercise (3). A study of basic biomechanics with respect to human performance in physical activities. Prerequisite:  BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250.

EXS 380 Sport Medicine Pharmacology (3). A course designed to familiarize students in exercise and health science with  major pharmacological substances and their effects on physically active individuals. This course will assist students who are preparing for the certification exam in athletic training as well as those preparing for certification through the American College of Sport Medicine. Prerequisites: CHE 105; BIO 227, 228 and 229, 230; or EXS 250.

EXS 390 Therapeutic Modalities (3). Course designed to study therapeutic modalities:  the techniques utilized during treatment protocols and the body’s physiological responses to modalities. Indications and uses are discussed to further the student athletic trainer’s  ability to decide what modalities should be utilized in the treatment process. This course is a prerequisite to further courses within the curriculum and required for those pursuing certification in athletic training. Prerequisites:  CHE 105 and EXS 301. Co-requisite: EXS 271 (for those admitted to the Athletic Training Program).

EXS 400 Measurement and Evaluation in Human Performance (3). This course is designed to integrate and utilize measurement and evaluation procedures, along with statistical analysis techniques, applicable to the field of Exercise Science.

EXS 402 Evaluation of the Lower Extremity (3). Course designed to prepare the student to perform general evaluation techniques employed by athletic trainers and other allied health care workers. The course specifically covers evaluation techniques on the foot, ankle, lower leg, knee, upper leg, hip, pelvic girdle, low back and  gait and posture assessment. This course is a prerequisite to further courses within the curriculum and required for those pursuing certification in athletic training. Prerequisites: EXS 301 and admittance to the Athletic Training Program or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: EXS 371.

EXS 403 Evaluation of the Upper Extremity (3). Course designed to prepare the student to perform general evaluation techniques employed by athletic trainers and other allied health care workers. The course specifically covers evaluation techniques on the head, neck, shoulder girdle, upper arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, hand, and thorax. Sports emergency assessment will also be discussed. This course is required for those pursuing certification in athletic training. Prerequisite:  EXS 402 and admittance to the Athletic Training Program or permission of instructor. Co-requisite:  EXS 372.

EXS 420 Rehabilitation Techniques (3). Course designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of rehabilitation techniques employed during the treatment of injuries occurred by physically active people. General rehabilitation techniques will be presented along with specific rehabilitation techniques and injury protocols. This course is required for those pursuing certification in athletic training.. Prerequisite:  CHE 105 and EXS 390. Co-requisite:  EXS 472 (for those admitted to the Athletic Training Program).

EXS 450 Exercise Physiology (3). Students will become acquainted with general concepts in exercise physiology. Some topics to be included are cardiovascular function, neural control, musculo-skeletal responses and respiratory function. Laboratory activities will be integrated with each unit. Students will collect data, compile results and complete laboratory reports. Each student will review and summarize at least one research article from approved refereed journals in the field. Prerequisites:  BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250. Completion of BIO 229, 230, and EXS 475 preferred.

EXS 455 Exercise Prescription (3). Designed for senior students majoring in exercise science. This course will present methods for graded exercise testing, basic EKG recognition, flexibility and strength assessment, body composition, fitness evaluation, exercise prescription and the development of competencies needed to certify in the American College of Sport Medicine Health/Fitness Instructor or Exercise Specialist. Prerequisites:  BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250; EXS 450, 475 and a cumulative GPA of 2.5.

EXS 460 Practicum (3). Individual and small group practical experience in testing and prescription, health screenings, health promotion activities and service learning. The majority of work is to be completed on campus with faculty supervision. Students contract for a grade with required and optional activities. This course is designed for senior exercise science majors to acquire hands-on experience prior to graduation. Prerequisites:  Senior status, EXS 455, a cumulative GPA of 2.5 and consent of instructor.

EXS 465 Advanced Exercise Physiology (3). A continuation of advanced concepts presented in EXS 450. Some exercise physiology topics to be included are metabolic demands, nutritional needs, performance enhancement issues, gender differences, endocrine, aging, and immune system changes. Laboratory activities will be integrated where appropriate. Outside activities related to specific topics will be included. A research paper will be required. Prerequisites: BIO 229, BIO 230, EXS 450 and a cumulative GPA of 2.5.

EXS 470 Professional Experience (6). Placement in fitness centers, industry, and hospitals and rehabilitation clinics for practical experience prior to graduation. This course is to be taken the last semester prior to graduation. Prerequisites:  2.5 GPA, CPR certification and consent of instructor. Graded pass/fail.

EXS 471 Administration in Exercise Science (3). Course designed to familiarize the exercise science student with administrative goals and skills associated with the daily operation of various employment settings. This course discusses the legal issues, information technology, record keeping, programming, and personnel management. This course is required for those pursuing certification in athletic training or certifications through the American College of Sports Medicine. Prerequisite:  A cumulative 2.5 GPA is required prior to enrollment in this course and advisor approval.

EXS 472 Clinical Experience V (2). Course designed to complement the material presented in EXS 420 and allow time for practicing the clinical competencies required for athletic training certification. The student will be required to attend clinical experience in the MSU athletic training rooms or other locations as assigned by the instructor. This course is required for those pursuing certification in athletic training. Prerequisite:  EXS 372 and admittance to the Athletic Training Program. Co-requisite:  EXS 420.

EXS 473 Clinical Experience VI (2). A course designed to give autonomy to a senior student athletic trainer. This course allows time for practicing the clinical competencies required for athletic training certification. The skills performed prepare the student as an entry-level certified athletic trainer. The student will be required to attend clinical experience in the MSU athletic training rooms or other locations as assigned by the instructor. Graded:  pass/fail. Prerequisites:  EXS 472, OSH 101 admittance to the Athletic Training Program, and consent of both the instructor and the head athletic trainer.

EXS 475 Kinesiology  (3). A study of basic kinesiology with respect to human performance in physical activity and rehabilitation. Prerequisite:  BIO 227 and 228 or EXS 250. University studies biological science, mathematics and EXS 375 preferred.

EXS 480 Special Problems in Exercise Science (1-3). Prerequisite:  prior consent of instructor.

EXS 485 Sport and Exercise Psychology (3). This course is an introduction to the fields of sport and exercise psychology and sport sociology. The students will learn correct principles and applications of sport and exercise psychology, as well as the influential social-psychological factors of sport and their impact on performance.

EXS 520 Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as GTY/HEA/REC 520.)

EXS 540 Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology (3). This course is designed to introduce the student to applied principles of sport  and exercise psychology. The class consists of approximately half the semester hours spent in a supervised sport/exercise camp or wellness/rehabilitation setting. Prerequisites: EXS 485 or 660, or have the permission of the instructor.


Family and Consumer Studies
(FCS)
FCS 110 Introduction to Early Childhood Education (3). Course will serve as a practical and basic introduction to the early childhood profession. It satisfies the requirements for the Kentucky Commonwealth Child Care Credential and serves as a foundation for initial skills and knowledge for early childhood professionals. Field experiences are required.

FCS 111 The Family and Its Environment (3). An introduction to the changing structure and dynamics of families in our diverse society. Identification of changes and choices available to family members and critical issues facing families. Some topics that may be included are: changing gender role expectations, family policy, communication in families, family violence, divorce and effects on family, aging families, parent-child relationships, cultural and racial diversity, remarriage and blended families, and myths and facts about families.

FCS 121 Basic Clothing Construction (3). Principles of design applied to selection of clothing; fundamentals of clothing construction and fitting; pressing techniques; use and care of the sewing machine and equipment. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours.

FCS 125 Apparel Quality Analysis (3). An analysis of apparel components as they relate to quality. A comparative analysis of low-, moderate-, and high-priced apparel.

FCS 210 Child Development I (3). In-depth study of infancy to include concepts, principles and development theories. Students will observe, record and analyze the social, emotional, physical and cognitive development of the typical and atypical infant and toddler in the social and cultural context. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours.

FCS 211 Child Development II (3). Study of the characteristics of growth and development of young children ages three to eight. Guided observation in the child development center as a basis for understanding children and oneself. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite:  FCS 210.

FCS 234 Practicum (3). Supervised work experience, dependent on program requirement, by which students expand their career opportunities and enhance their employment potential. Food service administration students may repeat for six credit hours.

FCS 238 Practicum/CDA (3). Supervised work experience in child care facilities, child development centers, head start programs, site-based or home-based experiences. For students enrolled in the Child Development Associate (C.D.A.) program. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

FCS 241 Family Economics (3). The class is designed to introduce the student to the principles of money management. Class members will learn the basic buying skills needed when shopping for transportation, clothing, food, housing, recreation and insurance. In addition, the fundamental concepts of credit, borrowing, taxes, investments and estate planning will be studied. Lecture, three hours.

FCS 310 Program Planning for Preschool Children (3). Study of programs for preschool children with a practicum in the laboratory. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite:  FCS 210 and 211.

FCS 311 Child Guidance (3). A study of guidance techniques applicable to young children, with practicum for operation group experiences for preschool children. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisite:  FCS 210 and 211.

FCS 342 Consumer Decision Making (3). A decision making model is used to study consumer decision making throughout the life cycle. Goal setting, consumer redress, money management, financial planning and buymanship are explored. Emphasis is placed on consumer responsibility in relation to environmental and energy concerns. Global interdependence issues are also included. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite:  sophomore standing.

FCS 361 Programs in Vocational Family and Consumer Sciences (3). Study of scope of vocational home economics education including philosophy, legislation, occupational and consumer competency-based programs, adult programs and youth organizations. Survey of existing area and state home economics programs. Lecture, three hours.

FCS 413 Marriage and Family Relationships (3). Exploration of personal values and personal development as they relate to traditional and nontraditional marriage, and a study of family life styles in contemporary society. Lecture, three hours.

FCS 441 Family Resource Management (3). A study of the theory underlying family resource management practices. Provides an opportunity for students to apply their skills in managing time, energy, money and human capital in individual and family settings. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

FCS 462 Methods of Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences (3). Development of planning and organizational teaching skills, use of resource materials and simulated teaching experiences. Principles of learning, curriculum planning, styles of management. Field experiences required. A student may not receive credit for FCS 462 and FCS 461 or 561. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

FCS 499 Professional Development Seminar (1).

FCS 501 Problems in Family and Consumer Studies (1-3). This course is designed to permit special study in selected areas of family and consumer studies. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

FCS 507 Internship in Early Childhood Programs (3). Demonstration by students in assuming different professional roles in a nursery school, day care center, or Head Start Program, or other early childhood programs. Practicum supervision in an early childhood program.

FCS 511 Readings in Family and Consumer Studies Topics (1-3). Directed readings of individualized professional family and consumer studies topics. Critique of readings and oral presentation.

FCS 520 Human Relations in Child Studies Programs (3). Study of ways to improve human relationships in early childhood programs. Appraising materials and procedures for promoting better home-school relations. Three lecture hours per week.

FCS 522 Workshop in Child Studies (2-3). Study of topical content in a workshop setting.

FCS 525 Advanced Child Development Programs (3). In-depth study of theories of child development and an examination of current problems and critical issues. Lecture, three hours.

FCS 527 Parenting (3). Principles and theoretical perspectives on the act of parenting. Emphasis on parent-child relationships, establishing and maintaining a nurturing relationship between parents and children, and parent-child communication. Current issues affecting parenting are also studied. Lecture, three hours.

FCS 536 Research Procedures for Family and Consumer Studies (3). A study of quantitative and qualitative research procedures and techniques utilized in family and consumer science professional practice. Reviewing literature, selecting and formulating a research problem, planning methodology, interpreting data, and making conclusions concerning research are studied.


Finance
(FIN)
FIN 230 Personal Financial Planning (3). The course prepares the student to manage his or her own personal financial affairs in a competent manner as well as providing a foundation for later study and work in the financial planning field. Designed to meet the needs of both business and non-business majors. This course does not count toward a finance major or area but can be counted as a business elective with the approval of the advisor. Prerequisites:  none.

FIN 330 Principles of Finance (3). A comprehensive study of the field of finance, covering institutions, financial markets, investments, financial theory and techniques relating to financial decisions in business. Prerequisites:  ACC 201 and junior standing.

FIN 331 Principles of Insurance (3). Designed to give the student a basic understanding of the principles and practices of insurance. Topics included are insurance in general, life insurance, disability insurance, fire insurance, transportation insurance, legal liability and property damage insurance, insurance against dishonesty and failure of others. Prerequisite: junior standing.

FIN 332 Financial Management (3). A study of the financial management of business firms, with emphasis on the development of analytical and decision-making techniques. Major subject areas include financial planning; capital budgeting; evaluation of alternative sources of short-term, intermediate and long-term funds; and acquisitions. Prerequisites:  junior standing; FIN 330.

FIN 333 Principles of Investment (3). A study of marketable securities that can be purchased and sold by investors on a daily basis. Such investments as bonds, common stocks, options and futures are included. Prerequisites:  junior standing; FIN 330.

FIN 334 Financial Institutions (3). The operation of financial institutions and an analysis of their role in the economy. Various financial institutions are studied from the point of view of changes in asset composition, liabilities, forms of organizations, laws and deregulations in response to new economic developments. Prerequisites:  junior standing; FIN 330.

FIN 336 Employee Benefits and Retirement (3). Course introduces and explores the concepts involved in developing retirement and employee benefit plans from both the employer and employee perspectives. The legislation that impacts plan design and the tax advantages and disadvantages of various qualified and non-qualified plans including IRAs and pension and profit sharing plans will be discussed. Also addressed are federal Social Security, Medicare, and business applications. Prerequisites: FIN 330 and junior standing.

FIN 338 Estate Planning (3). This course introduces and explores the concepts involved in estate planning. It examines estate planning from a professional financial planning viewpoint. The legislation that impacts plan design and the tax advantages and disadvantages of various estate planning options will be discussed. Prerequisite: FIN 330 and junior standing.

FIN 421 Financial Models (3). Applications of financial models on the microcomputer, leading to the solution of financial problems. Emphasis is placed on building and using models developed (1) in electronic worksheets, and (2) with database software. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

FIN 461 International Financial Management (3). A study of the contemporary corporation in a multinational setting. An in-depth analysis of risks and opportunities available for the global corporation. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 480 Senior Seminar in Finance (3). This is the finance capstone course that also serves as a designated communications course. Finance 480 uses case studies to give students an opportunity to incorporate various financial concepts and techniques in financial decision making. Students are required to work in teams to prepare and present case reports to the class. Prerequisites:  FIN 332 and senior standing.

FIN 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

FIN 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

FIN 505 Internship in Finance (1-3). Open to junior and senior finance majors. These students, upon approval of the finance faculty, are placed with cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training in finance. Work experience supervised by faculty; written reports are required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of department chair.

FIN 520 Risk Management (3). A communications course for the finance discipline. It is a study of appropriate risk management techniques for the contemporary non-financial corporation. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 522 Portfolio Management and Theory (3). An introduction to portfolio management. Emphasis on modern techniques of security selection which are directed toward risk diversification and portfolio balance. Students manage simulated portfolio by basing buy/sell decisions on current market data. Computer programs are used in the portfolio selection and evaluation process. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 533 Security Analysis (3). A study of the stock and bond markets using a pragmatic approach. Evaluation methods, economic relationships and market strategies are emphasized. A “hands-on” type of class. Prerequisite:  FIN 333 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 534 Life Insurance (3). A study of the nature and functions of life insurance, with particular attention to policy forms and provisions, reserve and investment problems, company organization, legal aspects, taxation and the application of life insurance to personal and business needs. Prerequisite:  FIN 331 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 535 Property and Casualty Insurance (3). A study of the nature and functions of property and casualty insurance. Special attention is given to the services performed, contracts and benefits of fire and automobile insurance. Prerequisite:  FIN 331 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 537 Commercial Banking (3). Problems of commercial banking from the point of view of bank management are studied. Topics covered are asset reserves, credit analysis, investment policies, equity reserves and capital account. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 595 Special Problems (1-3). Research by students in fields of special interest. Includes project research studies and intensive reading programs, accompanied by conferences with professors in fields involved. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


French
(FRE)
FRE 101 Fundamental Communication in French (3). Basic French in which students learn to describe themselves to someone from another culture; to express preferences, abilities, needs, and obligations; to ask for information; to describe people, places, and things in their world; and to report their typical activities to a French speaker.

FRE 102 Social Interactions in French (3). Expanding upon skills built in FRE 101, students move toward increasing linguistic and social awareness of French-speaking cultures. Students learn to use past tenses to talk about typical activities or to tell a story; to expand their basic vocabulary and ability to communicate in simple French; and to demonstrate basic understanding of aspects of French or Francophone culture that may differ from their own. Prerequisite:  FRE 101 or equivalent.

FRE 105 Introduction to French Culture (3). A survey of contemporary French character and society. Using a historical perspective, attitudes, achievements, institutions and life styles of the French people are explored. Conducted in English. Designed to satisfy the university studies humanities requirement. Taught in English. No prerequisite.

FRE 110 Basic Conversational French (3). A conversation-oriented introduction to pronunciation, essential structures, and vocabulary. Designed to enable students to communicate in simple French in everyday situations in French-speaking countries. Pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking and simple reading and writing of material related to conversational situations are included. No continuation offered. Not applicable toward French major or minor. Only taught abroad. No prerequisite.

FRE 201 Intercultural Communications in French (3). Students strengthen their basic language skills while continuing to broaden cultural awareness of French-speaking societies. Students relate experiences, produce brief reports on course topics, and express opinions concerning a variety of themes. Students learn to communicate on a more complex level in French. Taught in French. Prerequisite:  FRE 102 or equivalent.

FRE 202 Practical Applications in French (3). Students advance their speaking, writing, reading, and listening language skills in this interactive course focused on the practical application of the language in contemporary French-speaking countries. Activities include role-play, projects, reports, and discussions of texts. Taught in French. Prerequisite:  FRE 201 or equivalent.

FRE 203 French for the Working World (3). A continuation from French 201, this course is a practical application of French for the working world together with grammar review and with emphasis on communication skills on the formal level. Includes further practice in listening, conversation, reading and writing. Students may be required to attend and write a report on two approved cultural events or complete alternative cultural assignments. Taught in French. Students may receive credit for French 202 or 203, but not both. French 203 counts toward the minor and the major. Prerequisite: French 201 or equivalent.

FRE 210 Intermediate French Conversation (3). A course designed to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college French or equivalent. Emphasis will be placed on bringing the student into contact with French native speakers and various aspects of their culture. May count as an elective for French major or minor. Only taught abroad. Prerequisites:  FRE 102 or equivalent.

FRE 301 Social Issues in French Texts (3). An exploration of social issues through the reading, discussion, and written analysis of authentic texts in French-speaking cultures in Europe, Canada, Africa, and the Caribbean. While examining these issues, the student will also learn and practice the rudiments of literary interpretation. Prerequisite:  FRE 202 or consent of instructor.

FRE 302 Conversation and Composition (3). Additional practice in speaking and writing based on a variety of topics and materials. Prerequisite:  FRE 301 or consent of the instructor.

FRE 306 Introduction to French Literature (3). An introduction to literary analysis, designed to develop skills in reading, oral expression and expository writing. A variety of genres will be presented:  short story, poetry, the novel, and theater. Prerequisite:  FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 310 Conversation and Composition Abroad (3). Intensive practice in speaking and writing based on the student’s interaction with native speakers and the international setting. Only taught abroad. Counts toward the major and minor approved electives. Prerequisite:  Two years of college French or equivalent.

FRE 323 French Culture and Civilization (3). A survey of the contributions of France to world culture including the historical development of France from pre-historic times through the French Revolution. Classes conducted in French with extensive use of visual aids. Prerequisite:  FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 324 Contemporary French Culture and Civilization (3). A survey of attitudes, achievements, and behavioral characteristics of the French people from 1800 to the present. Classes conducted in French with extensive use of audio and visual aids. Prerequisite:  FRE 301 or consent of the instructor.

FRE 331 Advanced Language Practice (3). Course will offer students the opportunity to expand their cultural and linguistic knowledge of French-speaking cultures through a central conceptual framework, such as an international conference, an apartment building, a hotel, or a business. Students will engage in extensive role-play and creative exercises to establish contexts, choose fictive identities, and improvise a series of encounters. Prerequisite: FRE 202 or consent of instructor.

FRE 332 Phonetics (3). Introduction to linguistic terminology and principles of phonology with intensive individual diagnosis and practice of the French phonological system. Includes study and practice of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisite:  FRE 202 consent of the instructor.

FRE 401 Survey of French Literature I (3). Representative masterpieces of the novel, poetry and theatre from the Middle Ages to the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or consent of instructor.

FRE 402 Survey of French Literature II (3). Representative masterpieces of the novel, poetry, and theatre for the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 421 Topics in French Literature (3). Course content will vary according to the needs of the French program. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credit hours. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 430 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3). For the advanced student who has completed a 300-level conversation and composition course or who has had extensive experience with French language. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

FRE 441 Topics in French Cultural Studies (3). Course content will include a variety of factors that contribute to and reflect the cultural life, social themes, and national perspectives of French society. The course content will vary  according to the needs of the students in the French program. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite:  FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 450 Literary Masterpieces in French (3). A general survey of the literary periods, major authors, and initial acquaintance with their work. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite:  FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 451 Directed Study (1-3). Independent work in the area of language, culture or literature, designed to meet the needs and interests of individual students. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 460 Studies in a Genre (3). The course will explore a particular genre, e.g., the novel, novella, drama, poetry, short story, and the theory behind the respective genre and an examination of a variety of works within that genre. May be repeated as a second course for up to six credit hours provided that the second course covers a different genre. Prerequisite: FRE 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

FRE 501 Middle Ages Literature (3). A study of representative works of French literature dating from 1095 to 1600. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3). A study of representative literary works from the period 1600 to 1795. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 505 Nineteenth-Century Literature (3). A study of representative literary works published between 1800 and 1899. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 507 Twentieth-Century Literature (3). A study of representative literary works published since 1900. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 521 Topics in French Literature (3). Course content at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 531 Advanced Grammar (3). A comparative study of the grammatical structures of French and English. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 532 Phonetics (3). Introduction to linguistic terminology and principles of phonology with intensive individual diagnosis and practice of the French phonological system. Includes study and practice of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 551 Directed Study I (1-3). Independent work in areas of language, culture or literature, designed to meet needs and interests of individual students.

FRE 552 Directed Study II (1-3).

FRE 555 Study Abroad (3-9). Approved programs of travel and study in French-speaking countries. Repeatable up to nine hours.


Freshman Year Experience
(FYE)
FYE 098 New Student Orientation (1). Course designed to assist students admitted with conditions in the academic and social transitions associated with college life. The development of specific success skills such as time management, note-taking, study strategies,  and academic and career guidance activities will be included in the class.

FYE 100 Freshman Orientation II (1). Course designed to assist students in the academic and social transitions associated with college life. The development of specific success skills such as time management, note-taking and study strategies, and career and academic guidance activities will be included in this class. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements. Prerequisite: freshmen students on probation or by approval of instructor.


Graphic Communications Management
(GCM)
GCM 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Meetings with advisors, department personnel, service areas, and campus field trips comprise the main involvement. Availability of the university resources is stressed with emphasis on personal needs such as time management. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

GCM 150 Graphic Communications (3). Surveys the development of graphic communications technology and management, past and present. Includes a study of history, design, processes, terminology, materials and the importance of graphic communications in contemporary society. Structured to deal with the digital and traditional technologies of printing reproduction.

GCM 151 Introduction to Print Media Management (3). Reviews the graphic reproduction systems of mass-communication including print manufacturing, digital imaging, computer animation, video capturing, customer service, business operations, and global media marketing.  Lecture and laboratory.

GCM 152 Introduction to Digital Imaging (3). An introduction to production skills and critical awareness of digital media practices which include Internet production, video, gaming, still imaging, and 3D modeling. There is a strong emphasis on cross platform, digital communication, teamwork, and leadership skills. The course is designed to give direction to students who are computer literate, abut need information on the various opportunities available in the imaging world. Current computer programs are utilized.  Lecture and laboratory.

GCM 153 (253) Electronic Imaging (3). This course deals with the technology of electronic imaging relating to the field of graphic communications.  The course covers image generation and electronic printing and publishing.  Lecture and Laboratory.

GCM 250 Fundamentals of Photography (3). Camera techniques and film selection. Experience with various cameras, photographic techniques, developing and printing procedures. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (Same as JMC 283.)

GCM 252 Digital Image Conversion (3). Introduction to converting continuous tone and line illustration to digital and film formats. Covers materials, equipment, camera/scanner operation, problem-solving, pre-flighting and imposition techniques.  Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 or consent of instructor.

GCM 340 Introduction to Gravure (3). This course covers the magazine and packaging industry as they relate to high volume printing. Included in the course are:  pre-flighting, customer service, press production, problem-solving techniques, and distribution systems. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 or consent of instructor.

GCM 341 Screen Process Printing (3). This course addresses the problems of commercial screen printing on various substrates. Covers:  inks, environment, State and Federal regulations, safety, and training practices used in the industry. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 or consent of instructor.

GCM 342 Finishing and Distribution (3). Introduction to post-press and finishing operations and distribution practices common to the packaging and printing industries. Course covers historical as well as modern aspects of finishing, embossing, foil stamping, die-cutting, and material fulfillment. Prerequisite: GCM 151 or consent of instructor.

GCM 350 Basic Color Photography (3). A study of color photographic materials and processes including color transparencies, negative analysis, internegatives, transparency duplicates, and color prints. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 250 or consent of the instructor.

GCM 351 Graphic Communication Processes (3). This course is designed for non-majors who wish to understand the printing and manufacturing reproduction processes at a higher level. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 or consent of instructor. (Same as ART 351)

GCM 352 Press Image Transfer I (3). A study of image transfer processes including flexography, letterpress and pressure related printing operations, e.g. die stamping, gold leaf and embossing, etc. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 or consent of instructor.

GCM 353 Press Image Transfer II (3). A study of image transfer processes including lithography, silk screen and nontraditional methods of image transfer. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 and 352 or consent of instructor.

GCM 354 Principles of Estimating (3). Analysis of printing cost procedures using regional costing data and norms. Also, determining cost of materials, equipment and human activity will be determined. Prerequisite:  nine hours in graphic communications, including GCM 253.

GCM 355 Estimating II (3). Further study in estimating printing costs emphasizing standard materials available to assist the estimator. Lecture. Prerequisite:  GCM 354 or consent of instructor.

GCM 356 Printing Plates, Substrates, Inks and Toners (3). A study of current plate and CTP technology, paper, fabric, plastic, and ink technologies will be discussed in relation to the standard printing systems. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 or consent of instructor.

GCM 357 Industrial Photography (3). A study of photography as it is utilized by industry in problem-solving, security, and scientific and technical applications. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 250.

GCM 358 Commercial Photography (3). A study of the making of photographs in the studio and on location; investigation of the photographic medium as a means of communicating ideas. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 250.

GCM 359 Publication Photography (3). A study of the make-up of yearbooks and various other publications requiring photography, and the problems of the photographer in preparing materials for printing. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 250.

GCM 360 Portraiture Photography (3). Formal and contemporary portraiture. Includes studio and informal techniques, printing and finishing instruction. Prerequisite:  GCM 250.

GCM 365 Customer Service in Print Media (3). This course explores all aspects of customer service including, scheduling, human resources, manufacturing, finance, computer systems, and quality control. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 or consent of instructor.

GCM 371 Workshop in Graphic Communications Sales and Marketing (3). Methods and techniques essential to sales and marketing. Includes sales and marketing processes, qualities of sales personnel, submitting proposals, assessing the competition, customer relations, developing new clients, and servicing accounts. Credit is given for professional sales seminars. Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM or consent of program coordinator.

GCM 399 Professional Development Seminar I (1). Seminar for students of industry and technology programs, focusing on the job search process, employment opportunities, and related problems. Recommended for students in the sophomore or junior year. Graded pass/fail.

GCM 427 Professional Photographic Practices (3). The course introduces students to the business and marketing practices common to photography. Emphasis is placed on developing professional objectives based upon careful consideration of the financial, legal, organizational, promotional, interpersonal and ethical practices particular to photography. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

GCM 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 and 253.

GCM 440 Electronic Digital Photography (3). This course deals with desktop electronic imaging and digital photography. Explored is the use of photography and production photographs with a variety of computer hardware and software programs. Graduate students will be required to research a problem in addition to photography assignments. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites:  GCM 253 or consent of instructor.

GCM 441 Desktop Multimedia (3). Desktop digital imaging and multimedia presentations are developed with a variety of hard and software. The course is designed to allow the student to cross-platform images from diverse electronic technologies. Graduate students will be required to research a problem in addition to photography assignments. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 253 or consent of instructor.

GCM 442 Digital Interactive Technology (3). This course introduces and explores digital interactive technology as an aspect of electronic imaging. It examines the use of digital technology in the production of interactive presentations;  it includes a variety of currently used computer hardware and software. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 253 or permission of instructor.

GCM 452 Production Printing (3). This course includes experiences from planning to final reproduction of a printed work. All the printing processes are utilized including sheet and web fed printing equipment. Use of field trips and cooperation with the industrial sector are required. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 and 253 or junior standing.

GCM 453 In-Plant and Small Printing Facility Management (3). This course explores the impact of the family owned printing facility and how they are:  managed, purchased, sales and human resources. Regulations of federal and state taxes are explored. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 and GCM 253.

GCM 454 Color Management and Quality Control (3). Materials and procedures of color management and quality control procedures. Included are ICC profiles, spectrophotometry, densitometry, masking, color proofing, quality control devices, and color scanning. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151 and 253, or consent of instructor.

GCM 455 Newspaper Production Management (3). A study of special needs of newspapers from the standpoint of management and production. Lecture. Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM or consent of instructor.

GCM 456 Packaging Production Management (3). This course is concerned with the specific problems relating to the packaging industry. This course reviews the concerns of managing a packaging facility by reviewing the management, human development, environmental issues, material handling, finance, and quality control concerns. Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM or consent of instructor.

GCM 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GCM 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GCM 499 Professional Development Seminar II (1). Seminar for students of industry and technology programs, focusing on the transition to the world of work and related problems. Recommended for students in the senior year. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  GCM 399.

GCM 552 Survey of Graphic Communication Management (3). Exploratory experiences in graphic communications management for those with no prior experience in the field. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of chair.

GCM 554 Printing Production and Manufacturing Management (3). Reviews the current practice and theoretical approaches of printing manufacturing; forecasting, quality control, purchasing and finance, equipment selection, plant layout, environmental, and human relations considerations.  Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM.

GCM 556 Communications Sales Management (3).  Methods and techniques essential to sales and marketing. Includes sales and marketing processes, qualities of sales personnel, submitting proposals, assessing the competition, customer relations, developing new clients, and servicing accounts. Prerequisite:  Nine hours of GCM or consent of instructor.

GCM 558 Trends in Graphic Communications (3). A study of management trends, technical advances, and problems as they pertain to the future of the communications industry.  The course will include report writing, verbal presentations and a field experience. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of instructor.

GCM 560 Plant Equipment Layout and Purchasing (3).  Procedures for planning, equipment and printing plant operation are studied, as well as purchasing supplies, understanding local, state and federal codes, and environmental regulations. Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM.

GCM 570 Practicum I (4). Cooperative work experience in the printing industry. Recommended for summer between sophomore and junior years. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

GCM 571 Problems in Technology (3). Individual study and research pertaining to special problems in graphic arts technology. Prerequisite:  approval of problem before registering for the course.

GCM 572 Practicum II (4). Cooperative work experience in the printing industry. Recommended for summer between junior and senior years. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

GCM 578 Workshop in Technology (3). Workshops on topics pertinent to graphic arts or printing management. May be repeated for additional credit.

GCM 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GCM 651 Advanced Printing Press Operation (3). Includes all aspects of printing production using any of the conventional press systems. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151.

GCM 697 Research in Technology (3). Independent study under the guidance of a supervising faculty member in a problem related to industry and technology as selected by the student.

GCM 698 Thesis (3).

GCM 699 Thesis (3).


German
(GER)
GER 101 Fundamental Communication in German (3). Basic German in which students learn to describe themselves to someone from another culture; to express preferences, abilities, needs, and obligations; to ask for information; to describe people, places, and things in their world; and to report their typical activities to a German speaker.

GER 102 Social Interactions in German (3). Expanding upon skills built in GER 101, students move toward increasing linguistic and social awareness of German-speaking cultures. Students learn to use past tenses to talk about typical activities or to tell a story; to expand their basic vocabulary and ability to communicate in simple German; and to demonstrate basic understanding of aspects of German culture that may differ from their own. Prerequisite:  GER 101 or equivalent.

GER 105 Introduction to German Culture (3). A survey of the contemporary culture of Germany, Austria and Switzerland with emphasis on the values, behavioral characteristics, social and political systems and achievements of the German-speaking people. Conducted in English. No prerequisite.

GER 110 Basic Conversational German (3). A conversation-oriented introduction to pronunciation, essential structures, and vocabulary. Designed to enable students to communicate in simple German in everyday situations in German-speaking countries. Pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking and simple reading and writing of material related to conversational situations are included. No continuation offered. Not applicable toward German major or minor. Only taught abroad. No prerequisite.

GER 201 Intercultural Communications in German (3). Students strengthen their basic language skills while continuing to broaden cultural awareness of German-speaking societies. Students relate experiences, produce brief reports on course topics, and express opinions concerning a variety of themes. Students learn to communicate on a more complex level in German. Taught in German. Prerequisite:  GER 102 or equivalent.

GER 202 Practical Applications in German (3). Students advance their speaking, writing, reading, and listening language skills in this interactive course focused on the practical application of the language in contemporary German-speaking countries. Activities include role-play, projects, reports, and discussions of texts. Taught in German. Prerequisite:  GER 201 or equivalent.

GER 203 German for the Working World (3). A continuation from German 201, this course is a practical application of German for the working world together with grammar review and with emphasis on communication skills on the formal level. Includes further practice in listening, conversation, reading and writing. Students may be required to attend and write a report on two approved cultural events or complete alternative cultural assignments. Taught in German. Students may receive credit for German 202 or 203, but not both. German 203 counts toward the minor and the major. Prerequisite: German 201 or equivalent.

GER 210 Intermediate Conversational German (3). A course designed to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college German or equivalent. Emphasis will be placed on bringing the student into contact with German native speakers and various aspects of their culture. May count as an elective for the major or minor. Only taught abroad. Prerequisites:  GER 102 or equivalent.

GER 301 Social Issues in German Texts (3). Intensive practice in speaking and writing based on a variety of topics and materials. Prerequisite:  GER 202 or equivalent.

GER 302 Conversation and Composition (3). An exploration of social issues through the reading, discussion, and written analysis of authentic texts in German-speaking cultures. While examining these issues, the student will also learn and practice the rudiments of literary interpretation. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or consent of instructor.

GER 306 Introduction to German Literature (3). An introduction to literary analysis, designed to develop skills in reading, oral expression and expository writing. A variety of genres will be presented. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 310 Conversation and Composition Abroad (3). Intensive practice in speaking and writing based on the student’s interaction with native speakers and the international setting. Only taught abroad. Counts toward the major and minor approved electives. Prerequisite:  Two years of college German or equivalent.

GER 323 German Culture and Civilization (3). A survey of the contribution of German-speaking people to world culture in art, music, science, education, philosophy and religion. Classes conducted in German. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 324 Contemporary German Culture and Civilization (3). A survey of the present-day culture of the German-speaking countries, including Austria, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. Course includes the study of German dialects, geography, social and political systems and religious orientation. Classes conducted in German. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 331 Advanced Language Practice (3). Course will offer students the opportunity to expand their cultural and linguistic knowledge of German-speaking cultures through a central conceptual framework, such as an international conference, an apartment building, a hotel, or a business. Students will engage in extensive role-play and creative exercises to establish contexts, choose fictive identities, and improvise a series of encounters. Prerequisite:  GER 202 or consent of instructor.

GER 332 Phonetics (3). Contrastive study of German and English phonology with individual practice designed to improve pronunciation. Prerequisite:  GER 202 or consent of instructor.

GER 401 Survey of German Literature I (3). Historical interpretation of representative literary works from the Medieval periods to the Enlightenment. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 402 Survey of German Literature II (3). Historical interpretation of representative literary works from Classicism to the present. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 421 Topics in German Literature (3). Course content will vary according to the needs of the German program. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credit hours. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

GER 441 Topics in German Cultural Studies (3). Course content will include a variety of factors that contribute to and reflect the cultural life, social themes, and national perspectives of German society. The course content will vary  according to the needs of the students in the German program. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 450 Literary Masterpieces in German (3). A general survey of the literary periods, major authors, and initial acquaintance with their work. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite:  GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 451 Directed Study (1-3). Independent work in the area of language, culture or literature, designed to meet the needs and interests of individual students. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

GER 460 Studies in a Genre (3). The course will explore a particular genre, e.g., the novel, novella, drama, poetry, short story, and the theory behind the respective genre and an examination of a variety of works within that genre. May be repeated as a second course for up to six credit hours provided that the second course covers a different genre. Prerequisite: GER 301 or 331 or consent of instructor.

GER 501 Literature Before 1600 (3). A study of major works chosen to present prominent themes and important literary developments within the period. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3). A study of major works chosen to present prominent themes and important literary developments within the period. Representative authors such as Goethe, Schiller, Novalis and Kleist will be treated. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 505 Nineteenth-Century German Literature (3). A study of literary developments during the era of the industrial revolution and political reform in Germany. Works by Buchner, Heine and representative authors of Poetic Realism and Naturalism will be treated with secondary emphasis placed on the emergence of the Biedermeier tradition. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 507 Twentieth-Century Literature (3). A study of the literature and the policies affecting literature during the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, Post-War Literature and the Gruppe 47, and contemporary developments. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 521 Topics in German Literature (3). An in-depth course treating a topic in German literature. Selected according to the needs and interests of the students. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 531 Advanced Grammar (3). A specialized study contrasting German and English grammatical structures and usage. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 532 Phonetics (3). Contrastive study of German and English phonology with individual practice designed to improve pronunciation. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 551 Directed Study I (1-3). Independent work in areas of language, culture or literature, designed to meet needs and interests of individual students. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 552 Directed Study II (1-3). Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 555 Study Abroad (3-9). Credit given for approved projects of study in a German-speaking country. Prerequisite: junior standing or above. Repeatable up to nine hours.


Geosciences
(GSC)
GSC 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

GSC 101 The Earth and the Environment (4). An introduction to the materials of the earth and the processes that modify them to form our landscapes and create our physical environment. Includes an introduction to aerial photo and topographic map interpretation. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

GSC 102 Earth Through Time (4). An introduction to the study of how the earth’s environment has changed through time and the geological processes that are causing the changes. Topics include hypotheses regarding the earth’s origin, the evolution of the earth’s oceans and atmosphere, and the interaction between environmental factors and appearance of life on the earth. The methods that geologists use to measure time will be identified and described. Particular emphasis will be given to the North American continent. The laboratory will focus on interpretation of earth history through the study of minerals, rocks, and fossils. Prerequisite:  GSC 101.

GSC 110 World Geography (3). A course designed to introduce students to the geographic distribution of major regions of the world. Attention will be focused on the delicate interrelationships between the natural landscapes of the earth and corresponding major cultural activities.

GSC 125 Weather and Climate (4). Introduction to the dynamics of the atmosphere and how humans interact with and are influenced by atmospheric processes and climatic variations.

GSC 199 Earth Science (4). This course introduces basic earth science concepts with elaboration on the origin, structure, and the complex interactions between the major earth components of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and lithosphere. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.

GSC 200 Introduction to Oceanography (3). An introduction to the study of oceans and marine processes, with emphasis on the morphology of the ocean floor, life in the ocean, oceanic circulation, seafloor spreading and shoreline management. Prerequisite:  One college-level physical or biological science course or consent of the instructor.

GSC 202 Introduction to Geographic Information Science (4). This course is designed to provide an introduction to the fundamental principles and concepts of the mapping sciences. The course will focus on digital image processing and geographic information systems as techniques utilized in such areas as land cover and land capability mapping. The introduction of global positioning systems (GPS) as an auxiliary mapping tool is also included in the course. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.

GSC 205 Image Analysis (4). The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and techniques in the processing, interpretation and utilization of remotely sensed imagery. The focus of the course is on applications in such fields as agriculture, environmental studies, minerals exploration and resources management/planning. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.

GSC 210 Hydrology (3). Occurrence, movement, quality and behavior of water in hydrologic cycle with reference to recovery of underground water in areas of detrital and carbonate rocks. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  GSC 101 or consent of instructor.

GSC 220 Economic Geography (3). The course will consist of an analysis of cultural and physical variables which lead to an understanding of the worldwide distribution of primary, secondary and tertiary economic activities.

GSC 250 Geography of the Developing World (3). A survey, by climatic regions, of the cultural, economic and natural setting of the developing world, including the transitional nature of the subtropics.

GSC 251 Geography of the Industrialized World (3). A survey, by climatic regions, of the cultural, economic and natural setting of the industrial world.

GSC 300 Economic Geology (3). Distribution, mode of occurrence, origin and uses of mineral deposits. Environmental problems associated with extraction and utilization of mineral resources. Prerequisite:  GSC 102 or consent of instructor.

GSC 303 Introduction to Water Science (3). An introduction to the study of the marine and freshwater environments of the earth. Study of the oceans as the largest component of the earth’s hydrosphere will emphasize geological forces which are shaping the ocean floor, ocean currents and tides, the origin of ocean salt, and life in the ocean. Study of freshwater components of the earth’s hydrosphere will emphasize connections with the ocean and the special role of each component in the earth’s hydrologic cycle. Prerequisite:  one college-level physical or biological science course, or consent of instructor.

GSC 305 Map Analysis (3). An introduction to the analysis of a variety of maps including topographic, geologic, hydrologic and thematic maps. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding, analysis and the application of information presented in map form.

GSC 320 Geography of North America (3). Regional approach to studying the dynamic interaction between the physical and cultural aspects of North America.

GSC 325 Geography of the Russia and Central Asia (3). Regional approach to studying the dynamic interaction between the physical and cultural aspects of the Russia and the republics of Central Asia.

GSC 327 Geography of the Middle East and North Africa (3). Regional approach to studying the dynamic interaction between the physical and cultural aspects of the Middle East and North Africa.

GSC 335 Landscapes of the National Parks (3). A study of the genesis and evolution of the North American landscape with special emphasis on the national parks. Three lectures per week.

GSC 336 Principles of Geomorphology (4). The origin, characteristics and development of landforms and the processes which determine their formation. Three hours lecture and two hours lab per week.

GSC 339 Field Geology (3). A course designed to acquaint the student with field and laboratory techniques used by the geologist and to familiarize the student with the geology of Kentucky and adjacent areas. Lectures, laboratory and field study. Prerequisites:  GSC 102 and consent of instructor.

GSC 380 Photogrammetry (3). A study of the fundamental methods of photogrammetry including geometry of single photographs and terrestrial photographs, planning the photographic mission and ground control for mapping, an introduction to analytic photogrammetry, stereo-photogrammetric plotting instruments and photo interpretation. (Same as CET 380.)

GSC 390 Geoarchaeology (3). Geoarchaeology is the field of study that applies the concepts and methods of the geosciences to archaeological research. Prerequisites:  ARC 150 and GSC 336. (Same as ARC 390)

GSC 420 Geography of Agriculture (3). A real approach to the study and analysis of the regional, national and international aspects of agriculture as they relate to the production, distribution and consumption of agricultural products.

GSC 426 Applied Meteorology (4). A detailed study of synoptic meteorology and weather forecasting. Emphasis placed upon weather maps, their construction and interpretation. Attention given to the micro and meso aspects of meteorology/climatology. Prerequisite:  GSC 125.

GSC 427 Population Geography (3). An in-depth look at world population distributions and dynamics including past, present, and future trends and the influence of population growth on world economic activity.

GSC 428 Landform Analysis (3). The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the various landform assemblages and their distribution. Emphasis on the processes involved in landscape evolution and the influence of man upon this portion of his environment.

GSC 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GSC 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GSC 500 Recreation Geography and Planning (3). Practical application of problem-solving techniques and processes to recreational management and planning. Focus placed on site planning and development. (Same as PLN 500.)

GSC 507 Land Use Planning (3). Analyze the principles and techniques utilized in the planning process. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of planning:  needs, problems and proposed solutions. (Same as PLN 507.)

GSC 510 Geophysics (3). Practical aspects of applied and environmental geophysics including gravity, magnetics, electricity, electromagnetic theory and practice. Prerequisite:  MAT 150 or equivalent.

GSC 512 Introduction to Remote Sensing (4). Emphasis will be placed upon the fundamentals of image interpretation using a wide variety of image types both airborne and spaceborne. The application of remotely sensed data and techniques in many areas such as geoscience, agriculture, forestry and planning will be emphasized. Three hours lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

GSC 513 Photogeology (3). The application of remote sensing technology in the field of geology. Major area of concentration will be the manual interpretation of black and white imagery. Also included will be other imagery types, sensors and digital image processing. Prerequisite:  GSC 336 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

GSC 515 Geochemistry (3). The chemistry of the geologic environment including the distribution of chemical elements in the earth and natural waters, the nature and causes of chemical processes, and the application of chemical laws, methods and data to the solution of geologic problems. Emphasis is on the low-temperature geochemistry as it pertains to sedimentation, weathering and groundwater quality.

GSC 520 Geography of Kentucky (3). A survey of the topography, soils, climate, industries, commerce and population in Kentucky with emphasis upon the interrelationships between these various phenomena.

GSC 521 Geographic Information Systems (3). Techniques course that introduces digital georeferenced information systems, including data capture, editing and encoding techniques, data storage structures, database  management systems, data analysis and model development, and information display methods. (Same as PLN 521.)

GSC 522 Digital Cartography (3). The map as a communication system. Special individual projects dealing with cartographic design and the preparation of maps for publications. Practical experience with computer mapping of spatial data.

GSC 523 Problems in Urban Geography and Urban Planning (3). Theories, techniques and research in urban geography and planning. Focus placed on the designs and strategies addressing present-day urban problems. (Same as PLN 523.)

GSC 524 Conservation and Environmental Geosciences (3). Course will study human population growth and associated resource requirements considering the physical makeup and history of the earth. Natural resource inventory, protection of the environment, geologic hazards and other conservation related topics will be discussed. Use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be emphasized.

GSC 528 History and Philosophy of Geosciences (3). The development of knowledge in the geosciences and the status of the profession as expressed in the writings of the past and present by geoscientists and other individuals in related fields. Emphasis will be placed upon current trends in the geosciences.

GSC 530 Crystallography and Optical Mineralogy (4). Crystallography, crystal chemistry, optical theory and technique. Identification of the common rock-forming minerals by indices of refraction and other optical properties. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 531 Geology for Teachers (3). An introduction of the materials of the earth and the processes that modify them to form our landscapes and create our physical environment. Laboratory is integrated into the classroom lectures and will include study and identification of rocks and minerals and the interpretation of geological maps and photos. The literature of geology teaching will be reviewed with an emphasis on exercises that can be used in the teacher’s classroom or laboratory.

GSC 532 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4). Detailed study of igneous and metamorphic rocks and the processes by which they form. Prerequisites:  GSC 530, CHE 105 or CHE 121.

GSC 533 Paleoecology (3). The study of the formation of the first ecologies with the origin of life on earth, and the continuing changes in the earth’s ecologies through time. Classic paleoecological communities are examined, including Precambrian, Ordovician, Cretaceous and Pleistocene ecosystems. Specific attention paid to the interaction and co-evolution of the organic and inorganic environments. Prerequisites:  GSC 101, BIO 101, or equivalent.

GSC 534 Invertebrate Paleontology (4). The classification, morphology and paleontological significance of fossil invertebrates. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 535 Watershed Ecology (3). The study of the movement of water through the environment and its relationship to biotic systems. Areas emphasized include the hydrologic cycle and its influence on groundwater, lotic and lentic systems; the effect of water on plant and animal communities; and the influence of human activity on watershed structure and function. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Same as BIO 535.)  

GSC 537 Stratigraphy and Sedimentary Petrology (4). A course to focus on sedimentary petrology and stratigraphy pertaining to environmental modeling, an essential component in the field of petroleum geology. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 538 Structural Geology (3). An introductory course in genetic and descriptive aspects of the deformational features of the earth. Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 550 Well-Log Analysis (3). Open hole well-logging theory and techniques as applied to quantitative analysis of lithology, porosity, permeability and fluid content of subsurface formations. Prerequisite:  GSC 102 or consent of instructor.

GSC 560 Hydrogeology (3). Knowledge and experience in the use of hydrologic and erosion models. State-of-the-art surface water, ground water and erosion models will be studied, along with hands-on training in the use of digital computers for applying these models to real-world geological situations. Prerequisite:  MAT 150 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

GSC 561 Precision GIS/GPS Applications (1-3). An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) applications in natural resources, business and land management. The course is divided into three distinct parts: 1) Introduction to GIS/GPS applications, 2) Business applications, and 3) Precision land management applications. Students must take the introduction phase before continuing with the other two parts. Variable credit hours: 1 credit for Part 1, 2 credits for Part 1 and 2 or 1 and 3, or 3 credits for Parts 1, 2, and 3. Course may be repeated for a maximum of three credit hours.

GSC 565 Biogeochemistry (3). Survey and discussion of the scientific literature on global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and man-made chemicals with special emphasis on the biogeochemical and ecological processes that affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course will focus on interdisciplinary themes that incorporate new research results form the fields of biology, chemistry, and geosciences. Prerequisite: junior or higher standing in biology, chemistry or geosciences. (Same as BIO/CHE 565.)

GSC 570 Computer Applications in Geosciences (3). Introduction to the use of computers in geoscientific problem-solving and data processing. Students will utilize existing programs and will develop original routines. Prerequisites:  GSC 532 and 538 or GSC 521 or GSC 522, and one of the following:  CSC 136, 145 or 235.

GSC 575 Field Vertebrate Paleontology (4). The study of vertebrate fossils in both field and lab, including collection, processing and identification. Field work may include trips throughout the continental United States and occasionally overseas. (Usually taught during summer.)  Prerequisites:  completion of two semesters of undergraduate laboratory science and upper-class or graduate standing. (Same as BIO 575.)

GSC 580 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3). A project-based course for students seeking greater understanding of GIS theory, technology, and applications. Students will apply GIS to their research interests and gain hands-on experience through using ArcGIS software package. By the end of the class, students will be able to identify the appropriate methods for solving particular research problems, be familiar with current research directions in spatial analysis, and demonstrate their ability to complete a research project. Students seeking graduate credit must be admitted to graduate status prior to enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: GSC 521 or consent of instructor.

GSC 591 Special Problems (1). This course is designed for students who have an aptitude for research in the area of geosciences. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 592 Special Problems (2). This course is designed for students who have an aptitude for research in the area of geosciences. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 593 Special Problems (3). This course is designed for students who have an aptitude for research in the area of geosciences. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (May be repeated one time.)


Gerontology
(GTY)
GTY 207 Inclusive Recreation (3). A survey of the characteristics and recreational needs of the various types of exceptional children and adults. (Same as REC 207.)

GTY 264 Psychology of Aging (3). The study of the biological, cognitive, affective and social aspects of the aging process. The normal and pathological conditions of aging are emphasized. The interaction of the aged and society is also considered. Prerequisite:  PSY 180. (Same as PSY 264.)

GTY 265 Psychology of Death (3). A study of the place of death in the process of human development. Two viewpoints will be stressed:  death of self and death of others. Emphasis will be given to the cultural, social, biological and affective aspects related to the final stage of life. Customs, medical practices, financial concerns, legal matters and scientific issues will be considered. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180. (Same as PSY 265.)

GTY 303 Community Leisure Organizations (3). Study of administrative and leadership procedures related to leisure organizations in the community. (Same as REC 303.)

GTY 305 Services to Older Americans (3). An examination and study of the social problems experienced by older Americans and the modes of social intervention employed by society through the aging network to assist the aging and aged. Prerequisite:  junior standing. (Same as SWK 305.)

GTY 340 Sociology of Medicine (3). An examination of sociological perspectives on systems of medical care. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the structure and organization of health care institutions and societal responses to problems of illness and disease. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC/NUR 340.)

GTY 341 Social Gerontology (3). An introduction to the sociocultural dimensions of the problems of the process of aging and its impact on individuals and society. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 341.)

GTY 342 Sociology of Retirement (3). Examination of retirement as a process, an event, and a role. Aspects of retirement as a social institution are reviewed with emphasis upon the implications for the social system. Prerequisite:  GTY/SOC 341 or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 342.)

GTY 400 Independent Studies (3). This course will allow different instructors in the gerontology minor to teach special topics not covered by classes regularly offered. Independent projects will cover a variety of issues, topics and class assignments.

GTY 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GTY 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GTY 520 Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as REC/HEA/PHE 520.)

GTY 521 Issues in Social Gerontology (3). A study of theory and research on aging, policies and programs related to nutrition, retirement, health and housing of elderly. Prerequisite:  SOC/GTY 341 or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 521.)

GTY 596 The Minority Elderly (3). This course focuses on the minority elderly including racial, ethnic and lower income groups. Applicable concepts and theories in social gerontology will also be covered. Prerequisite:  nine hours of anthropology, gerontology or sociology, or consent of instructor. (Same as ANT 596.)


Guidance
(GUI)
GUI 097 Self-Realization and Career Investigation (3). A course developed especially for Student Support Services students as a prerequisite to GUI 100. The course is designed to enhance students’ abilities to examine and identify their values. Decision-making skills which are essential to value clarification, occupation, and course work choices are confirmed through role playing and class discussion. Computer software will be used for the purpose of career investigation. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements.

GUI 100 Self-Development and Career Exploration (3). A study of decision-making as it relates to the student’s life experiences. In-class activities teach the concepts of decision-making, time management, career planning, assertiveness and communication skills. Credit for general elective.

GUI 188 Cooperative Education (2). A meaningful, planned and evaluated work experience related to career exploration and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive both academic credit and financial remuneration. GUI co-op courses may be repeated to a maximum of four credits and cannot count as an elective toward a major, minor or area. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: freshman/sophomore status with permission of instructor and approval of co-op coordinator.

GUI 251 Seminar in Leadership Development and Experiential Activities I (2). This course is designed to introduce the dynamics and concepts of leadership and its application. The concepts to be applied will be taught in the class and followed through in university activities. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated once for credit. Note: A maximum of six hours of credit may be earned or scheduled from any combination of GUI 251, 252, and 450.

GUI 252 Seminar in Leadership Development and Experiential Activities II (2). Continuation of GUI 251. May be repeated once for credit. Note: A maximum of six hours of credit may be earned or scheduled from any combination of GUI 251, 252, and 450.

GUI 288 Cooperative Education (2). A meaningful, planned and evaluated work experience related to career exploration and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive both academic credit and financial remuneration. GUI co-op courses may be repeated to a maximum of four credits and cannot count as an elective toward a major, minor or area. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: junior/senior status with permission of instructor and approval of co-op coordinator.

GUI 450 Seminar in Personnel Services (3). This seminar will serve as an observation, discussion, participation and evaluation laboratory for individuals who are working in the areas of personnel services. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. A maximum of six hours of credit may be earned or scheduled from any combination of GUI 251, 252, and 450.

GUI 500 Interpersonal Relations in the Classroom (3). A course designed to assist the pre-service individual in developing interpersonal communication skills appropriate to the teaching/learning process. The course will provide a series of training experiences, through interactions, designed to develop skills in the following areas:  (1) attending and responding behaviors (verbal and non-verbal), (2) communication of empathic understanding, respect and warmth, (3) the effect of communication on understanding self and others, (4) effective communications in discipline, (5) establishing comfortable classroom climates for instruction.

GUI 584 Problems/Industrial World of Work (3). This course is designed to familiarize counselors, educators, administrators, and other advanced students (undergraduate and graduate) with working conditions, personnel practices, career fields and opportunities in business and industry. Emphasis is on real work setting. Travel to and from field observations and discussions at local and regional industrial sites required. Prerequisite:  consent of advisor and instructor.

GUI 592 Group Processes (3). A study of the history and characteristics of group processes and structure as well as issues in leadership style and development of a model in small group interaction. May not be used toward school counseling certification.


Health Care Administration
(HCA)
HCA 401 (601) Overview of the Health Care Delivery System (3). This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the American health care system by focusing on the people, places and processes of health care delivery. The course surveys important trends in health care delivery and utilization and develops a model of the care seeking process. The major health care resources (personnel, facilities and programs, and the government) and processes (financing, planning and quality assurance) are discussed in detail.

HCA 405 (605) Hospital and Health Services Administration (3). Prepares administrators and practitioners to manage health care organizations by introducing concepts and skills essential to effective health care administration.

HCA 410 (610) Health Care Planning (3). A course designed to provide health care administrators and practitioners an understanding of the critical issues and techniques used in successful planning efforts, including a comparison of public sector program planning and private sector strategic planning.

HCA 415 (615) Financial Aspects of Health Service Organizations (3). A course designed to provide health care administrators and practitioners a basic understanding of health care financial management principles and their application to the practical aspects of managerial decision-making in health care facilities.

HCA 525 Case Management: Theory and Practice (3). This course will address the theory and practice of effective case management and the skills necessary to assess the client situation and to optimize client functioning. This course will focus on a diverse population of vulnerable clients across various practice settings. The settings emphasized include medical/health, educational, psychiatric and services to the elderly. Policy issues will be addressed, as they relate to advocacy, service planning, and program design. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Same as SWK  525)


Health
(HEA)
HEA 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Same as CDI/EXS/NTN/REC 099.)

HEA 190 Personal Health Issues (2). Course designed to educate students about wellness through the acquisition of knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. The major health-related problems in society are addressed, as well as an understanding of individual developmental patterns and health needs. Broad ranges of factors affecting wellness, including identification of risks and health promotion behaviors, are covered. Topics include, but are not limited to, substance use and abuse, nutrition, sexually transmitted diseases, health risk factors, mental and emotional health, and exercise.

HEA 191 Personal Health (3). This course is designed to educate students about wellness through the acquisition of knowledge, attitudes and behaviors. The major health-related problems in society are addressed, as well as an understanding of individual developmental patterns and health needs. Personal fitness is assessed and activities that promote lifelong fitness are practiced. A broad range of factors affecting wellness, including identification of risk and health promotion behaviors, are covered. Topics include, but are not limited to, substance use and abuse, nutrition, sexually transmitted diseases, health risk factors, mental and emotional health, exercise.

HEA 195 First Aid and Safety (2). The purpose of this course is to give the student knowledge of the practice of first aid including the performance of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. American Red Cross CPR and First Aid certifications may be earned.

HEA 200 Community and Consumer Health (3). This course is designed to address the foundations of community health. Topics include health through the life span, promoting community health, environmental health protection and health resources and services.

HEA 320 Planning Effective Health Education Programs (3). This course is designed to address planning for health education and health promotion programs. Topics include theoretical foundations of health, community analysis, establishing priorities, developing goals and objectives, locating resources and services, methodologies to meet identified objectives, program implementation and program evaluation. Prerequisite: permission of chair.

HEA 360 Health Education Services (3). This course is designed to prepare the health education student with the skills necessary to coordinate and provide resources for health education programming and presentation. The purpose is to assist the student in assessing the available health-related services at the local, state and national levels, determining the resources and materials available for use in health education programs, and enhancing coordination and collaboration among personnel in health services and health education programs. Prerequisite: HEA 150 or permission of chair.

HEA 460 (500) Human Sexuality (3). This course is designed to acquaint students with issues of human sexuality. Topics include gender, sexual anatomy and physiology, love, sexual arousal and response, sexual behaviors and relationships, conception, pregnancy, contraception, sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, and sexual victimization. The purpose is to examine human sexuality from biological, psychological, behavioral, clinical and cultural perspectives. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work.

HEA 470 (570) Education for Drug Abuse Prevention (3). This course seeks to develop the student’s concept of drug education through in-depth exploration, research and discussion of problems related to alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Special emphasis on the effects of abuse for the individual and on the effects of abuse for the individual and society. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work.

HEA 499 Practicum in Health Education (3). A course designed for the student to serve with a community health organization or agency under the direction of faculty and field supervisors. A minimum of 90 service hours are required. Prerequisite: HEA 150 or permission of chair.

HEA 511 Epidemiology (3). This course is designed to examine the principles and practices in the cause, prevention and control of diseases in various community settings. Topics covered include an introduction to epidemiological terminology; the measurement of morbidity, mortality and fertility; descriptive and analytic epidemiology; screening; infectious disease; and occupational epidemiology.

HEA 520 Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as GTY/PHE/REC 520.)

HEA 575 Human Sexuality II (3). This course is an advanced study of issues of sexuality including sexual exploitation, sexual victimization, sexual abuse, sexual harassment, altered body image and sexual function, family structures, the law and sexuality issues, and new research in sexual health. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisites:  HEA 500 or equivalent.

HEA 605 Curriculum in Health and Physical Education (3). A course designed to acquaint the student with the aims and objectives of curriculum design; to alert the student to innovations, new techniques and research in this area; and to equip the student with guidelines for good curriculum construction. (Same as PHE 605.)

HEA 610 Sociology of Sport and Exercise (3). A critical study of the sociological factors affecting sport, performance, and exercise. Students will learn about the social, cultural, environmental and racial dynamics involved in sport and exercise. This course will also study the effects sport and exercise have on the social structure of society. (Same as EXS/REC 610.)

HEA 620 Current Trends and Issues in Health, Physical Education and Recreation (3). A review of the current research in the fields of health, physical education and recreation.


History
(HIS)
HIS 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Introductory seminar for all first semester history majors. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

HIS 110 Special Topics in History for Study Abroad (3). Designed for students enrolled in a study abroad program, History 110 is an academic course involving both traditional classroom learning and experiential learning opportunities in an international setting. This course will cover a particular historical topic, period, personality or problem. Specific subject matter will vary according to student and faculty interest and in relation to study abroad locations and opportunities. Does not count toward History major or minor.

HIS 201 Modern Europe (3). A study of major political, economic, social and intellectual forces in European history, tracing their development through the past five centuries. This course is designed both to provide history majors and minors with background for work in upper-level courses and to acquaint students in other fields of study with the persons, forces and values that have created modern Western civilization.

HIS 221 American Experience to 1865 (3). A thematic approach to the history of the U.S. to 1865, designed as a University Studies social science elective. Three basic themes will be included:  the transplantation of European and African cultures to America and their interaction with the cultures of native American Indians; the emergence of distinctive American values and institutions and the establishment of the American nation; and the stresses that culminated in the Civil War.

HIS 222 American Experience Since 1865 (3). A thematic approach to the history of the U.S. since 1865, designed as a University Studies social science elective. Students will examine three themes:  the forces that transformed America from a predominantly rural, agricultural society to a predominantly urban, industrial one; the rising political consciousness of various American groups and the expanding regulatory role of the federal government; and the emergence of America as a world power.

HIS 300 Introduction to Historical Studies (3). Introduction to the methods by which historians study the past and present their conclusions to the public. Students will be expected to write a research paper in which the emphasis will be placed on developing research skills, organizing the results in a coherent form, and developing an effective writing style. Required for history majors as a prerequisite for 400-level courses and recommended for anyone interested in developing research and writing skills. Prerequisites: Two of the following or transfer equivalents: HIS 201, 221, or 222.

HIS 301 Ancient History to the Fall of Rome (3). A study of the Near East, Greece and Rome with particular emphasis on the influences of these civilizations on modern Western civilization. Particular attention will be paid to the development of democratic and republican forms of government.

HIS 302 Medieval Europe (3). A survey of the major events in Western history from the Fall of Rome to the Renaissance, with special emphasis on those political, economic, social and cultural-intellectual forces and institutions that helped form the modern world outlook. (Same as RGS 302.)

HIS 303 The Making of Britain (3). This course surveys primarily the political and constitutional history of England from the period of Roman Conquest to the victory of Henry VII in the War of the Roses. The development of the theme of united government will be its main emphasis.

HIS 304 The History of Ireland (3). A systematic investigation of the history of Ireland from first human habitation, with an emphasis on the period since 1500. The course will look at the development of, and interactions among, the various cultural/religious traditions of Ireland and the long struggle of the Irish people to attain self-government.

HIS 305 The Irish Diaspora (3). A systematic study of the dispersal of Irish people around the world, focusing on their interaction with the various host cultures they have encountered both as settlers and in other roles. Particular attention will be given to the Irish on the European continent and in Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, South Africa, and South America, especially Argentina.

HIS 306 Europe in Renaissance and Reformation (3). A survey of the development of Western Europe, emphasizing the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Crisis of the seventeenth century, the Scientific Revolution, the English Revolutions of the seventeenth century, and France under Louis XIII and XIV.

HIS 307 The Foundation of Russian Power (3). A study of Kiev Rus, the Mongol invasion of the thirteenth century and its impact on later Russian development, the Rise of Moscow, Westernization currents of the seventeenth century, Russia under Peter the Great and Catherine the Great. Emphasis will be placed upon social-intellectual developments and the problem of serfdom.

HIS 309 Survey of World Religions (3). A study of the historical development of Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and other world religions, with special attention to their similarities and differences. (Same as RGS 309.)

HIS 315 Women in American History (3). This course will examine the position and contributions of women in American society from the colonial period to the present from the perspective of the major trends in American history. It will focus on significant women in each period, while emphasizing several particular themes.

HIS 320 African-American History (3). A survey of the history of black Americans from their African heritage to the present. Special attention will be devoted to the African background, the experiences of slavery, and the various forms of black resistance to discrimination.

HIS 322 History of Religion in the United States (3). The historical development of organized religion in America, with special attention to the relationships between religion and other features of American society. (Same as RGS 322.)

HIS 323 The Great American West (3). A survey of the westward movement from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, beginning with the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804 and ending with the closing of the frontier in 1890. Emphasis is placed on the political and economic development of the Trans-Mississippi region; attention will also be devoted to biography, social, institutions, and folkways.

HIS 329 The American Indians (3). A history of the Indians of North America from the earliest times until the late nineteenth century. This course focuses on the cultures, customs and traditions of the various Indian civilizations of the United States. (Same as ANT 329.)

HIS 330 Sports in America (3). This course will offer a survey of the institutional development of American sports from the colonial period to the present. It will focus on the major spectator sports and emphasize the role of professional sports as an institution of social mobility, the development of race relations, the bureaucratization and professionalization of sports as an entertainment industry, and the struggle of athletes for collective bargaining rights.

HIS 333 Military History of the United States (3). A consideration of American military history from colonial militias through the role of the military in Vietnam. Topics covered include the causes of war, methods of recruitment, military policies, and the effect of the industrial revolution and technology on war. (Same as MIL 333.)

HIS 334 History of American Agriculture and Rural Life (3). An exploration of the historical development of rural America from colonial times to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of different crops on regional economic growth, organizational and technological changes in farming, urban-rural relationships, the role of government in agriculture, and the rural community in modern America.

HIS 340 The Far East in Modern Times (3). This course is designed to provide undergraduates with an introduction to the history of the major countries of the Far East. The development of modern China and Japan will be examined, with special attention given to their varying responses to both western intrusion and internal social problems, from the seventeenth century to the present.

HIS 350 History of Latin America (3). A survey of Latin American history from pre-colonial times to the present. Special attention will be given to the early Indian Civilizations, Spanish colonization, the struggles for independence and the problems of Latin American nations in the modern world.

HIS 355 Islamic Middle East (3). History of the Middle East from the 7th century to the 19th century. The course will examine the apostleship of Muhammad, the question of succession and the Sunni-Shi’ah schism, the government, society, and culture of the High Caliphate, the decline of Arab power and the rise of the Turks, the Islamic perspective of the Crusades, the revival of Islamic power under the Gunpowder Empires, and the decline of Islamic civilization in the face of Western expansion. (Same as RGS 355.)

HIS 361 Teaching History (3). A course offering practical approaches for teaching history in the public schools using a concepts-and-problems approach. The course will focus on either the history of the United States or world history, and therefore could be taken twice for credit if the focus is different the second time. Does not count toward the major in history. Consult the department chair.

HIS 370 History of Africa (3). A survey of the main trends in African history from the origins of man through the successes of African nationalism in the mid-twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on the development of African civilizations, their interaction with Islamic and European civilizations, and the adaptations resulting from those contacts.

HIS 380 Introduction to Public History (3). An introduction to the various areas in which historians work outside academe, including museums, historic preservation programs, archives and special collections libraries, and oral history programs, among others.

HIS 390 Special Topics (3). A course designed as an elective for the general student; it will cover a particular topic, period, personality or problem of the past. Specific subject matter varies from semester to semester, according to student and faculty interest. Open to history majors and minors with approval of the instructor. Repeatable with permission.

HIS 400 Senior Seminar (3). This course is designed to accomplish three objectives:  (1) presentation and evaluation of senior research projects; (2) examination of career opportunities for history majors and use of the University Placement Office; and (3) assessment of the history major through a comprehensive departmental examination. Required for all majors. Prerequisite: HIS 300.

HIS 401 The French Revolution (3). This course has three main areas of emphasis:  eighteenth-century French society and culture, the causes of the French Revolution, and the career of Napoleon Bonaparte. The course’s main theme is that the Revolution was a watershed in history.

HIS 402 Nineteenth-Century Europe (3). A social, political and cultural history of Europe’s great age, the period from the French Revolution and Napoleon to the outbreak of the First World War.

HIS 403 Europe Since 1914 (3). A study of consequences of World War I, the emergence of bolshevism and fascism, the impact of the depression and World War II, and the transformation of Europe since 1945, together with some consideration of European thought in the twentieth century.

HIS 408 The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union (3). This course begins with the aftermath of the Revolution of 1905. World War I and the abdication of Nicholas II receive close attention, as do the Bolshevik Revolution, the Civil War, the New Economic Policy, and the Stalin Revolution of the 1930s. We study World War II and its impact on the USSR, as well as Stalin’s last years and the unsuccessful attempts to reform his system. The course ends with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and Russia’s struggle to adapt democracy and capitalism to her needs.

HIS 409 Tudor and Stuart England (3). A study of the molding of the English monarchy and of the eclipse of its authority by the social and political groups which came to dominate Parliament by the seventeenth century.

HIS 410 Modern Britain (3). A study of Britain since the Stuarts, including its age of greatness in the nineteenth century and its decline in the twentieth century. Political and cultural history are emphasized.

HIS 411 Modern France (3). A study of political traditions which have divided French people, challenges posed to the Third Republic, and the transformation of French society since World War II.

HIS 412 Modern Germany (3). A study of the political, social and intellectual causes and consequences of German unification that attempts to answer the question, Why Hitler?  Includes discussion of Germany since 1945.

HIS 414 Europe During World War I and World War II (3). An introductory survey of European history from 1914 to about 1945. It will describe and analyze the events leading to both World Wars as well as some of the consequences of those wars, delineating the major military figures and the military history of the World Wars.

HIS 415 Women in History (3). An examination of the position and contributions of women in history. Topics will vary.

HIS 421 United States Social and Cultural History to 1865 (3). The development of American society and thought from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War. Special emphasis is placed upon the forces that have shaped the daily lives of the American people:  immigration, religious traditions, the frontier, economic change, ethnic diversity, slavery and war.

HIS 422 United States Social and Cultural History Since 1865 (3). The development of American society and thought since the end of the Civil War. Emphasis is placed upon the forces that have shaped the daily lives of the American people:  racial and ethnic diversity, industrialization and urbanization, immigration, mass media, religious traditions and modern transportation.

HIS 424 United States Foreign Relations Since 1898 (3). An analysis of the United States’ relations with other nations since 1898. Special emphasis is placed on the role of “ideals and self-interest” in foreign relations.

HIS 430 Colonial America to 1763 (3). An explanation of the transplantation of European and African culture to the United States, the adaptation of these cultures to the New World environment, their impact upon eastern Indian cultures and the rise of distinctly American institutions and ideas. The course will emphasize the evolution of English colonial policies and the comparison of New England, Middle Atlantic and Southern colonial experiences.

HIS 431 America in Revolution (3). Spanning the revolutionary and early national periods of American history, this course focuses upon the United States’ transformation from colonies to a nation. It emphasizes the American struggle for independence, economic as well as political, and the clash of values, interests and ambitions that produced the American system of government.

HIS 433 Jacksonian America and Sectional Conflict (3). Covers the period from 1815 to the presidential election of 1860 and the break-up of the union. Emphasis is on the political, social and economic conditions as they related to the sectional controversy that raged during this part of the nineteenth century. Some specific topics include the rise of the common man, the Jacksonian era, slavery and the abolitionist movement.

HIS 434 Civil War and Reconstruction (3). Covers the period from the beginning of the Civil War to the presidential election of 1877. If the course has a distinguishing emphasis, it is on political history, but the course gives due attention to military, economic and social history.

HIS 435 Transformation of America 1877-1929 (3). A study of the transformation of the United States from an agricultural to a modern industrial nation. Topics included within this broad theme are the rise of big business and labor unions, urbanization, immigration, the closing of the frontier, reform movements, the struggles of blacks and women for equal rights, national politics and cultural changes.

HIS 436 Recent America (3). A study of the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and the subsequent forces that have shaped contemporary American life. Emphasis is placed on the role of the United States in international relations, the civil rights movement, and domestic economic developments.

HIS 441 History of the Old South (3). A survey of southern history from colonial times through the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on examining slavery, social life, the emergence of southern nationalism, and the South during the Civil War.

HIS 442 History of the New South (3). A survey of southern history from the end of the Civil War to the present. Emphasis is placed on the enduring characteristics of the South as well as the process of change since World War II.

HIS 445 History of Race Relations in the United States (3). An examination of the social, political and economic influences upon race relations in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the sources of change in race relations, the various forms of racial discrimination, and the responses to discrimination in American history.

HIS 446 (546) History of Kentucky (3). The process of political, economic and social evolution in Kentucky is traced from early settlement to the modern era. Geographical influences upon the patterns of Kentucky development, Kentucky’s changing role within an expanding union, and the Commonwealth’s participation in national movements and events are stressed.

HIS 450 Modern Africa (3). A study of Africa since about 1880, including the transformation of African societies in contact with other cultures, the growth of nationalism and nationalist movements, and the questions of African unity and neocolonialism. (Same as POL 450.)

HIS 451 Slavery in Africa (3). An examination of the historical development of traditional African society in the pre-colonial and post-colonial periods. Particular emphasis will be given to the effects of slavery on the social and political fabric of Africa.

HIS 455 Middle East since 1800 (3). A study of the Middle East from 1800 to the present, with emphasis on the historical and political forces that have affected and still influence the region. (Same as POL 455.)

HIS 456 The Arab-Israeli Conflict (3). Study of the historical background to the conflict between the state of Israel and the Arab states. Examines the origins of Zionism and of Arab nationalism in the 19th century, the phases of Jewish settlement in Palestine, the consequences of the First World War for Zionist and Arab nationalist movements, the British Mandate in Palestine, the Israeli war for independence in 1948, Nasserism, the Suez War, the Six-Day War, the invasion of Lebanon, the Intifada, and the possibilities for peace.

HIS 472 Modern China (3). A study of the political, economic, social and intellectual forces in modern China from 1850 to the present. This course is designed to provide the student with an in-depth knowledge of the major civilization of East Asia.

HIS 474 China in Revolution (3). A study of the last decade and collapse of the Qing dynasty and China’s subsequent search for unity and political form, beginning with the Republic, proclaimed in 1912, and ending with the Tiananmen massacre of 1989.

HIS 475 Modern Japan (3). The cultural and political history of Japan from its unification under the Tokugawa Shogunate to the present. Major topics examined include the Japanese success in meeting the challenge of Western imperialism in the nineteenth century, Japan’s own venture into imperialism on the Asian mainland in the twentieth century, and the Japanese economic phoenix in the postwar era.

HIS 476 The World Since 1945 (3). A survey of new directions in modern history, particularly the rise of the USA and the USSR as world powers and the end of the colonial empires of Asia and Africa. This course will discuss the Cold War through international relations, the escalation of wars in Southeast Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as rival strategies for economic and cultural development in the post-war world.

HIS 477 Hollywood History (3). A critical, analytical examination of the portrayal of the past in films and how movies shape popular perceptions of history.

HIS 478 Comparative Civilizations after 1500 (3). Comparative analysis of civilizations after 1500. The course will introduce comparative methodology and analyze values and institutions across cultural boundaries. Particular attention will be given to comparative change within Asian, African, and Western civilizations during the era of Western expansion. Prerequisites: CIV 101 and 102 or equivalent world history survey.

HIS 481 Revolutionary Mexico 1810 to the Present (3). An in-depth examination of Mexico’s history since 1810. Emphasis will be given to economic development and diplomacy during the Diaz regime, the role of culture and North American influence in Mexico’s development, and the coming of the 1910 revolution and the one-party state.

HIS 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

HIS 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

HIS 492 (592) Historic Preservation (3). This course will provide a general overview of the different aspects of historic preservation, including downtown revitalization, neighborhood organization, historic house management, preservation legislation, preservation education and historic architecture. Much of the class is taught in a laboratory atmosphere, with students making on-site visits to a variety of historic preservation projects. Emphasis is given to the study of the development of American architectural styles, so that students can recognize historic houses and place them in a wider context.

HIS 493 Archival Principles and Practices (3). An in-depth introduction to the care of historical materials, including archives, manuscripts, photographs and ephemeral items.

HIS 498 (598) Museum Studies (3). This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of museum work. Topics included will be the history and philosophy of museums; the social, economic and political trends that shape museums; the staffing, management and financing of museums; and the multiple functions of museums—collection and care of objects, exhibition design and interpretation, educational programs, research activities and public relations. (Same as ARC 598.)

HIS 500 Comparative History Topics (3).
This course is designed to provide upper-class and graduate students with specialized studies of topics (such as racism, industrialism, nationalism and revolution) that cross national, class and chronological boundaries. Topics offered will vary with interests of students and instructors. May be repeated for credit with permission of chair and instructor.

HIS 590 Directed Studies (3). Individualized instruction for the exceptional student. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  permission of department chair.

HIS 599 Historic Interpretation Internship (3). This course will provide on-the-job training in historical interpretation for museums, public or private agencies and historic sites. Each student will be placed in an internship (generally for 12 weeks in the summer) in which he or she will work in an interpretative capacity and conduct a major research project related to the historic interpretation programs of the agency. The student will present the results of this research in a formal paper to a designated advisor in the Department of History. This course will count as a part of the major, but no student will be permitted to repeat the course for credit.


Honors Courses
(HON)
Note:  Courses with an HON prefix are open only to Honors Program students.

HON 099 Freshman Orientation for Undeclared Incoming Honors Students (1). A one-hour semester course designed for incoming Honors Program students with an undeclared major. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  Must be admitted to the Honors Program.

HON 100 Interdisciplinary Humanities and Fine Arts (3). Introduction to ways of knowing, issues, and practices in selected humanities and fine arts disciplines, including philosophy, literature, history, art, music, and theater. The course is open only to students in the Commonwealth Honors Academy. The work of the various disciplines (and different sections) will be rotated and organized around a general theme each time the course is offered. Prerequisite: acceptance into the Commonwealth Honors Academy.

HON 151 Honors Seminar in Social Science I (3). An interdisciplinary course involving readings and discussion of environmental, social, economic, and political influences and developments in the major civilizations of the world prior to 1500 A.D. Open only to students in the Honors Program. Fulfills three hours of the world civilizations University Studies requirement in place of CIV 101. A student cannot have credit for both this course and CIV 101.

HON 152 Honors Seminar in Social Science II (3). An interdisciplinary course involving readings and discussion of environmental, social, economic and political influences and developments in the major civilizations of the world since 1500 A.D. Open only to students in the Honors Program. Fulfills three hours of the world civilizations University Studies requirement in place of CIV 102. A student cannot have credit for both this course and CIV 102.

HON 161 Honors Seminar in Visual Arts (3). An exploration of the importance of the visual arts in human culture through visual presentations, readings, discussion and participation. Open only to students in the Honors Program. A University Studies fine arts elective. A student cannot have credit for both this course and ART 121.

HON 162 Honors Seminar in Music (3). An exploration of the importance of music in human culture through aural presentation, reading, discussion, and participation. Open only to students in the Honors Program. A University Studies fine arts elective. A student cannot have credit for both this course and MUS 105.

HON 163 Honors Seminar in Theatre (3). An exploration of the importance of theatre in human culture through reading, attendances at dramatic interpretations, discussion, and participation. Open only to students in the Honors Program. A University Studies fine arts elective. A student cannot have credit for both this course and THD 104.

HON 164 Honors Seminar in Arts and Culture Abroad (3). An interdisciplinary exploration, in study-abroad settings, of the visual arts, architecture, music, theatre, and cinema. Classes will consist of lectures, discussions, and presentations based on cultural experiences of the fine arts abroad, with related readings. Research and critical writing will be emphasized. Assignments will include class excursions, museum visits, and attendance at concerts, plays, and films. Prerequisite:  Open only to students in the Honors Program as a fine arts elective.

HON 165 Honors Seminar in Communications (3). An exploration of interpersonal communication and public address skills necessary for personal and professional success. A university studies communication and basic skills elective. A student cannot have credit for this course and COM 161 or COM 181. Prerequisite: must be enrolled in the Honors Program.

HON 251 Honors Seminar in Literature and Philosophy I (3). An exploration of the roots of modern ethics and values through intensive study, in a lecture/precept setting, of the world’s literary and philosophical works from the ancient to the modern eras. Open only to students in the Honors Program. Fulfills three hours of the humanities University Studies requirement in place of HUM 211. A student cannot have credit for both this course and HUM 211.

HON 252 Honors Seminar in Literature and Philosophy II (3). An exploration of modern ethics and values through intensive study, in a lecture/precept setting, of the world’s literary and philosophical works in the modern to post-modern eras. Open only to students in the Honors Program. Fulfills three hours of the humanities University Studies requirement in place of HUM 212. A student cannot have credit for both this course and HUM 212.

HON 261 Honors Seminar in Science I (3). An exploration through readings and discussion of various topics in the history and philosophy of science. Open only to students in the Honors Program. Prerequisite: four hours of lab sciences to be approved by the Honors Program Director.

HON 351 Honors Seminar in International Affairs (2). An examination of selected international issues and problems with particular reference to students’ international study experiences. Open only to students in the Honors Program.

HON 355 Honors, Independent Study Abroad (3). This course is designed for those students who elect to engage in an individualized study or project which will provide an international experience. It may take the form of an exchange, internship, and/or extended research study. Permission for enrollment and course requirements must be secured from the academic department sponsoring the study and approved by the Honors Program.

HON 364 Advanced Honors Seminar in Arts and Culture Abroad (3). An advanced interdisciplinary exploration of the visual arts, architecture, music, theatre, cinema, and folk and popular culture. Offered only in study-abroad programs sponsored by Murray State University. There will be at least 37 contact hours in a formal classroom setting, and additional “lab” requirements that will depend upon cultural offerings in the program locale and in excursion destinations. This course will be cross-listed with HON 164, but substantial additional independent research and critical writing will be required. Open only to students with junior-level standing, with at least 3 hours previous credit in the fine arts, and with at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA at the time of application to study-abroad program.

HON 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.


Health and Physical Education
(HPE)
HPE 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

HPE 175 Foundations of Health and Physical Education (3). Designed to provide an overview of health and physical education. This will examine the scope, history, philosophy, aims and objectives of health and physical education programs as well as career opportunities in the field.

HPE 409 Evaluation and Assessment in Health and Physical Education (3). Basic statistical techniques and paper/pencil testing methodologies applicable to health and physical education plus other physical and mental testing techniques commonly employed in these fields. Various physical and skill tests will be covered. Prerequisite: HPE 175, junior or senior standing,  or permission of program coordinator.

HPE 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required. Prerequisite: HPE 175 or permission of program coordinator.

HPE 450 Effective Teaching Strategies in Health Education (3). This course is designed to address comprehensive school health education. Topics covered include the health status of children, adolescents and young adults; Healthy People 2000; school health services; school health education; program goals and objectives; and instructional strategies. Content covered in the school health education program:  mental/emotional health; life skills; family and relationship skills; human sexuality; growth and development; nutrition; personal fitness; substance use and abuse; diseases and disorders; consumer health; safety and injury prevention; and community and environmental health. Prerequisite: HPE 175 or permission of program coordinator.

HPE 459 Teaching Health and Physical Education (3). Introduces a number of teaching methods and techniques appropriate to middle and secondary physical education. Includes 12 field hours. Prerequisite: HPE 175, junior or senior standing,  or permission of program coordinator.

HPE 480 Special Problems in Health and Physical Education (1-3). Repeatable with permission of advisor and chair. Prerequisite:  HPE 175, junior or senior standing,  or permission of program coordinator.


Humanities
(HUM)
HUM 205 The Humanistic Tradition Abroad (3). Study of traditional ideas and values as reflected in various international cultures; specific content will vary. Satisfies  University Studies humanities elective requirement. Prerequisite:  concurrent enrollment in study abroad program approved by Murray State University.

HUM 211 The Western Humanities Tradition:  Continuity (3). An exploration of humanistic themes as reflected in literary and philosophical works prior to the twentieth century. Replaces HUM 202, found in previous bulletins. A student cannot have credit for both this course and HON 251. Prerequisites:  ENG 101, 102; CIV 101, 102.

HUM 212 The Humanities in the Modern World:  Diversity (3). An exploration of humanistic themes as reflected in literary and philosophical works of the modern period. Replaces HUM 201, found in previous bulletins. A student cannot have credit for both this course and HON 252. Prerequisites:  ENG 101, 102; CIV 101, 102.


Interdisciplinary Courses
(IDC)
IDC 099 Freshman Orientation—Undeclared Majors (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.


Industrial and Engineering Technology
(IET)
IET 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Meetings with advisors, departmental personnel, service areas, and campus field trips comprise the main involvement. Availability of the University resources is stressed with emphasis on personal needs. Graded pass/fail.

IET 125 Analytic Methods in Engineering Technology (3). Introduction to problem-solving methods used in engineering technology. Graphing, mathematical modeling and presentation of analysis results. Includes use of spreadsheet, equation solver, and analysis software. Prerequisite:  MAT 130 or MAT 150.

IET 370 Practicum in Technology I (2). Work experience in industry. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  approval of work experience before enrolling in class.

IET 371 Practicum in Technology II (2). A continuation of IET 370. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites:  IET 370 and approval of work experience before enrolling in class.

IET 380 Professional Internship I (1,3). Work experience or training in industry. Evaluation of experience made by department. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  junior standing or consent of instructor.

IET 381 Professional Internship II (3). Work experience or training in industry. Evaluation of experience made by department. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  junior standing or consent of instructor.

IET 397 Undergraduate Research (3). Research projects arranged individually with faculty members who agree to direct the research. A written plan of research must be filed with the instructor within two weeks of the beginning of the semester. A written summary of the research performed, data obtained, and conclusions following from the work must be submitted not later than the final week of classes. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the instructor.

IET 399 Professional Development Seminar I (1). Seminar for students of industry and technology programs, focusing on the job search process, employment opportunities, and related problems. Recommended for students in the sophomore or junior year. Graded pass/fail.

IET 419 Senior Project (3). A course in which the student assumes the responsibility of design of a technology project utilizing the knowledge gained from previous coursework. Complete documentation of the project is required. Prerequisites:  senior standing and an approved project. (Fall and Spring)

IET 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

IET 481 Supervised Work/Observation (1-4). Assignments individually made, with university approval, to afford opportunities for supervised employment in industry. Agreement by both the university and participating employer as to extent and nature of the experience prerequisite to actual assignment, with credit to be determined accordingly.

IET 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

IET 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

IET 491 Technology Management and Design (3). The capstone course requires analyses and design of manufacturing, civil, environmental, electrical and computer systems. It requires analyses of management philosophies from conceptualization to implementation of engineering projects. Students are teamed based upon academic concentration and teams are coupled with industrial representatives. Each team produces a viable industrial design. Prerequisite:  senior standing.

IET 499 Professional Development Seminar II (1). Seminar for students of industry and technology programs, focusing on the transition to the world of work and related problems. Recommended for students in the senior year. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  IET 399.

IET 550 Robotic Systems (4). A quantitative analysis of robotic systems that includes kinematics, actuators, drives, adaptive control, off line programming and computer simulation. Emphasizes applications in manufacturing processes. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: EMT 261, 361, ENT 111, 365.

IET 551 Introduction to Electrohydraulic Motion Control (3). An introduction to the integration of the basic principles of hydraulics, electronics, controls and system dynamics as they pertain to electrohydraulic motion control.

IET 571 Problems in Industrial and Engineering Technology (3). Individual study and research pertaining to special problems in industrial and engineering technology. Prerequisite:  approval of problem before registering for course.

IET 578 Workshop in Industrial and Engineering Technology (1-4). Workshops on topics pertinent to industrial and engineering technology. May be repeated for additional credit.

IET 584 Engineering Economic Analysis (3). Economic evaluation and financial analysis of engineering alternatives to optimize the engineering decision process. Prerequisite:  ENT 393 or consent of  instructor.

IET 591 Materials Management (3). The design of an organizational and managerial system to balance the conflicting interests in the company in the considerations of quality, quantity, delivery and cost of materials with the aim of optimizing the return of the materials investment.

IET 592 Production Systems and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (4). Includes a survey of various topics in production, automation and related systems such as flow-line production, numerical control, industrial robots, computer-aided manufacturing, process monitoring, flexible manufacturing systems and computer-integrated manufacturing. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisites:  ENT 111, EMT 261, 361.

IET 596 Industrial Relations (3). Industrial relations responsibilities, procedures, and applications in job evaluation, wage surveys, union negotiations, hiring employee counseling, and affirmative action awareness. Prerequisite:  junior standing.

IET 597 Quality Control (3). Examines the various aspects of quality control from the viewpoint that product and service quality requires managerial, technological and statistical concepts throughout all the major functions in an organization. Prerequisites:  CIS 243 or consent of instructor.


International Studies
(INT)
INT 099 International Orientation (1). Course to provide international students with information and experiences necessary for successful adjustment to life in the U.S. and at Murray State University. The course will include MSU facilities, American culture and educational systems, health care, culture shock, government regulations, international student organizations, and the Murray community. Similar to freshman orientation required of all American students. Required of all matriculating international students. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

INT 310 International Student Exchange (3-15). Individual study abroad through a Murray State sponsored program as administered by the Institute for International Studies; pre-approval within specific disciplines required; pass/fail. Prerequisite:  consent of academic advisor and pre-approval by instructors prior to registration; undergraduate level.

INT 400  Seminar in Global Studies (3). Advanced examination of selected international issues and problems designed to develop an awareness of the inter-relatedness of world societies and problems. Prerequisite: students minoring in international affairs/global studies or consent of instructor.

INT 510 International Student Exchange (3-15). Individual study abroad through a Murray State sponsored program as administered by the Institute for International Studies; pre-approval within specific disciplines required; pass/fail. Prerequisite:  consent of academic advisor and pre-approval by instructors prior to registration; senior and graduate level.


Industrial Technology and Design 
(ITD)
ITD 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Meetings with advisors, department personnel, service areas, and campus field trips comprise the main involvement. Availability of university resources is stressed with emphasis on personal basis. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

ITD 101 Introduction to Design and Graphic Communications (4). An introduction to the fundamental theory and practice of technical design communication, engineering sketching and CAD drafting conventions. Techniques are presented with emphasis on both theory and practical applications. The course includes an introduction to product design, the engineering design process, orthographic projection of product geometry and dimensioning/specifications. Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours.

ITD 102 CAD Applications (3). An introductory course with emphasis in multiview projection for mechanical components and the design file creation using 3D parametric modeling. Cannot be taken for credit by ITD/Engineering Graphics and Design majors/minors.

ITD 103  Technical Sketching (2). Techniques of freehand and sketching. Delineation and rendering in two and three dimensional drawings. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 104 Computer Aided Design (4). An intermediate course in the theory and practical applications of computer aided systems for drafting/design fields. A review of two-dimensional drawing techniques is presented followed by three-dimensional drawing techniques with emphasis on wireframe, surface and solid modeling. An introduction to parametric design is included. This course includes hands-on experience on interactive graphics equipment. Lecture two hours; laboratory four hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 101. (For ITD students only.)

ITD 107 Introduction to Technical Drawing and Computer Aided Drafting (4). A survey course in conventional and computer aided drafting theory and practice. The application of design principles, multi-view drawing techniques and precision use of conventional drafting equipment will be complemented by an introduction to computer aided drawing software, including setting up, drawing, editing, saving and plotting drawings. Does not apply towards a major in drafting and design. Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours.

ITD 120 Processes and Materials (3). Study of manufacturing processes and materials as they apply to contemporary industrial products. May not be taken for credit by ITD majors.

ITD 130 Manufacturing Processes and Materials (3). Study of manufacturing processes and materials as they apply to contemporary industrial and consumer products. For ITD majors only or permission of chair. Lecture and laboratory-five contact hours.

ITD 202 Applied Technical Drawing (4). Drawing and problem-solving techniques, principles and conventional practices as applied to selected industrial fields:  mechanical engineering product design, topographical, piping, weldment and sheet metal. This course emphasizes technical/engineering sketching and CAD.  Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 101 and 104.

ITD 204 Parametric Modeling and Rendering (3). An intermediate course in the theory and practical application of computer aided design. Emphasis will be on the planning and operational techniques required producing parametric models with corresponding photo-realistic renderings. This course includes hands-on experience on interactive graphics equipment. Two hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: ITD 104.

ITD 205 Computer Graphics Application (3). A survey course in the current theory and practice of computer-generated graphics. The application of micro and mainframe computers as a tool for figurative and abstract drawing, graphics, graphing and technical drafting.

ITD 221 Design in the Near Environment (3). Application of art elements and principles of design to everyday living. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours.

ITD 240 Woodworking Design and Practices (3). Fundamental instruction in woodworking materials, design, planning procedures, hand tool use, machine tool operations, construction techniques and safety principles and practices. This is a practical course for the beginner and woodworker with intermediate knowledge and skill. Lecture and laboratory. No prerequisite.

ITD 241 Woodturning (2). Spindle, face plate, chucking operations and procedures involved in woodturning. Experiences in designing, turning and finishing. For beginning woodturners and those who want to improve their skill. No prerequisite. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 251 Equipment (3). Selection, use, and care of materials and equipment used in the home, principles of kitchen and laundry planning. Lecture, two hours; laboratory two hours.

ITD 252 Housing and The Family (3). Housing alternatives, constraints, norms, needs, and selection; comparison of economic factors of various types of shelter; procedure for purchasing shelter. Lecture, three hours.

ITD 253 Interior Design Studio I (3). Studio problems in interior design. Programming, basic drawing skills and application of art elements and principles of design in solving interior design problems. Emphasis is on developing basic drawing skills for presenting design solutions. Laboratory, four hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 221; co-requisite:  ITD 252.

ITD 254 Furniture Construction and Finishes (2). A study of construction and finishing techniques used in the furniture industry. Lecture 2 hours.

ITD 300 Industrial Product Design (2). Design principles relative to industrial products. Principles of functional, structural and visual design. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 301 Architectural Drawing and Residential Planning (4). Functional planning, designing and construction detailing of residences and allied structures; drawing techniques and conventions; client-related, financial and legal aspects of building. Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours. Prerequisites:  ITD 101 and 104 or equivalent.

ITD 304 Advanced Parametric Modeling (4). An advanced course in the theory and application of computer aided system for parametric drafting and design manufacturing. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITD 204. ((Spring)

ITD 305 Sketching and Industrial Blueprint Reading (3). Technical sketching fundamentals as applied to the needs of industrial shop personnel and field technicians. Emphasis is placed on the readings and interpreting of selected types of industrial drawings.

ITD 306 Engineering Graphics (4). Orthographic projection with an emphasis on auxiliary projection and descriptive geometry. Descriptive geometry theory and techniques are used to solve applied engineering problems. Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 101 and 104. (Spring)

ITD 309 Engineering Models Design and Construction (2). A course in the principles of design and construction of scale model representation of engineering, architectural, and related structures, including materials and processes.

ITD 322 Introduction to Plastics (4). Industrial plastics and polymer sciences. Experience with plastic materials and manufacturing methods. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 230 (330) Machine Tool Processes (4). A study in the shaping of metallic products using traditional and nontraditional machine tools. Includes examination of precision measuring methods, cutting tools properties and methods required in achieving an efficient, economical, and safe material removal process.  Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 120.

ITD 333 ANSI Fundamentals for Mechanical Product Design (4). Focuses on the intermediate technical fundamentals of ANSI standards applicable to mechanical product design and engineering graphics. Engineering sketching and 3D parametric modeling will be emphasized. Two hours lecture and four hour laboratory. Prerequisites: ITD 202,  204, and 330. (Spring)

ITD 341 Machine Processing of Wood Products (4). Fundamental machine processes of the wood industry. The safe operation and care of industrial type equipment; design, planning, construction and finishing of wood furniture; jigs, fixtures and mass production techniques; study and completion of basic experimental research in woodworking. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITD 120.

ITD 350 Construction Systems (4). A study of the construction industry theory and practice. Emphasis is placed on the structural and mechanical systems in single-family detached dwellings and non-residential light commercial civil construction projects. Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 101 and 120, junior standing or instructor approval.

ITD 351 Textiles for Interior Design (3). Consumer-oriented study of textiles emphasizing fibers, yarns, fabric construction and finishes in relation to use, serviceability and care of apparel and household fabrics. Lecture, three hours.

ITD 352 History of Interiors I (2). A survey of architecture and interiors from ancient times to 1800. Emphasis is on furnishings, interior architectural details, accessories, materials, significant designers and architects of the periods, and current sources of reproductions of furniture and accessories. Lecture, two hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 221.

ITD 353 Interior Design Studio II (3). Study of and practical experience in space planning of residential interiors. Emphasis is on functional, aesthetic and economic considerations, materials and codes; perspectives and color board preparation techniques. Graphic and oral presentations of interior design projects. Laboratory, four hours. Prerequisites:  ITD 221, 251, 252, 253 and ITD 104.

ITD 356 Practical Problems in Interior Design (3). Hands-on experience in implementing plans for diverse background treatments for residential and commercial interiors using a variety of materials in a laboratory setting. Design and produce accessory and display items; develop estimates; practice installation techniques. Prerequisites:  ITD 221, 251, 253 and 352, or consent of instructor.

ITD 368 Computer-Aided Manufacturing and Robotics (4). A study of basics of computer-aided manufacturing; computer numerical control (CNC), computer aided design and machining (CAD/CAM) and robotics applications in manufacturing. Laboratory work in manual and automatic programming and set-up of CNC machines and robots.

ITD 401 Architectural Drafting and Design- Multi-Family Light Commercial (4). Fundamental principles of designing and drawing construction documents for multi-family residential and other light commercial construction. Architectural programming,  building code analysis, site analysis, budgetary considerations, design principles, building methods, materials selection, and drawing resulting in a package of contract documents for construction. Two hours     lecture and four hours laboratory. Prerequisites:  ITD 101, 104, 301 and 350. (Fall)

ITD 403 Product and Tooling Design (4). This course utilizes parametric, feature-based, solid modeling software and techniques applied to problem solving and representation of product and tooling components and assemblies. Emphasis is placed on dimensioning, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, 3-D modeling and design of mechanical devices, and principles of tooling design. Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 330 and 333. (Spring)

ITD 409 Technical Illustration (4). Illustration drawing and rendering techniques. Two- and three-dimensional methods of preparing precision pictorial drawings and renderings for presentations and publications. Prerequisite:  ITD 101, 104 and 304 or equivalent.

ITD 420 Equipment Maintenance and Materials Processing (4). Maintenance and adjustment of industrial machinery and equipment such as (but not limited to) metalworking, woodworking and drafting equipment. Theory and activities in the design, materials, and equipment of durable goods manufacturing industries. Emphasis on modern production materials, robotics, CNC, and production design systems. Prerequisites:  ITD 120 and 330.

ITD 431 Advanced Numerical Control and CAD/CAM (4). A study of programming machine tools through the application of computer aided manufacturing (CAM) software. Course will include experiences in 2D and 3D programming systems — drilling, milling and turning operations. Economic analysis of computer aided manufacturing will be reviewed. Six contact hours. Prerequisites:  ITD 368 and a CAD class.

ITD 450 Problems in Housing (3). Analysis of family housing needs for contemporary living. Selected topics will be chosen from these major areas:  home energy needs and energy conservation, housing and interiors for special needs groups, housing for low-income families, and practical problems in interior design. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

ITD 452 History of Interiors II (2). A study of architecture and interiors from 1800 through the present time. Emphasis is on French, English and American styles, significant designers and architects, international movements influencing designs, product quality and furnishing resources. Laboratory, four hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 352.

ITD 453 Contract Interiors (3). Application of elements and principles of design in planning public interiors. Business practices and professional ethics included. Prerequisite:  ITD 452 or consent of instructor.

ITD 454  Studio Problems in Interior Design (3). Studio problems in interior design. Practical problems with historical and contemporary interiors. Issues include environmental concerns, economics, special needs, quality and sources of materials. Experience with renderings, cost estimates and specifications. Graphic and oral presentation of designs. Laboratory, four hours. Prerequisite:  ITD 221, 251, 253, 353 and ITD 104.

ITD 455 Housing for the Handicapped and Elderly (3). Analysis of shelter needs for handicapped and elderly persons. Synthesis of needs into design of facilities, both residential and commercial, to meet these needs emphasis on universal design. Specifications for and cost estimates of design features. Prerequisite:  ITD 353 or consent of instructor.

ITD 456 Internship (3). Placement in an appropriate position in an approved firm to provide professional development through observation and supervised performance of assigned tasks. Intention to participate must be made a semester in advance. Placement is based on selection of study by business via resume and interviews and is not guaranteed. Required for certification by the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA). Repeatable for six credit hours. Minimum 300 clock hours of field experience. Prerequisites:  GPA 2.5 and approval of faculty advisor.

ITD 457 Interior Design Studio III (3). Preparation of portfolio plus self-initiated, large-scale, complex interior design project. Emphasis is on synthesizing all learning to date and critiquing work. Presentation of complete project and portfolio. Must be senior housing and interior design student and have approval of instructor. Lecture and tutorial.

ITD 458 Interior Design Market Experience (1). Field experience at interior design market during market time. Attendance at market seminars. Visiting showrooms and participating in dialogue with showroom representatives. Interacting with interior design professionals.

ITD 459 NCIDQ and NKBA Exam Review (1). A review course for the National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ) exam to become a professional member of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) and the National Kitchen and Bath (NKBA) exams and for becoming a certified kitchen and/or bath designer. Timed problem solving drawing exams and objectives exams over specific sections of knowledge will be administered. This course is intended for seniors in the interior design option.

ITD 490 Computer Aided Engineering Design Graphics (4). The utilization of state-of-the-art computer applications focusing on industrial product and tooling design. Design modeling techniques will be addressed that reduce product cost by taking into account quantified design parameters defined as a result of manufacturing processes and geometric tolerancing. Theory and applications of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing for industrial product and tooling design will be applied. Discussions of design criteria and print/design file interpretation. A review of product design communications as applied by product designers, tooling designers, setup and production personnel and quality assurance/verification specialists. Prerequisites:  ITD 120, ITD 303, senior standing or instructors approval.

ITD 492 Plant Layout and Material Handling (3). A study of the arrangement of physical facilities and materials handling to optimize the interrelationships among operating personnel, material flow, information flow, and the methods required in achieving enterprise objectives efficiently, economically, and safely. Prerequisite:  junior standing (Fall)

ITD 495  Industrial Supervision (3) An in-depth study of the qualities necessary in order for a frontline supervisor to be a vigorous leader, an effective leader, a source of technical know-how and deft mediator between policy-setting management and the rank-and-file worker. Prerequisite:  junior standing. (Fall)

ITD 498 (500) Industrial Design Processes and Prototypes (4). Study of product design principles, production methods and simultaneous manufacturing techniques. Laboratory activities are centered around the design and prototyping a product. Lecture and laboratory-six contact hours. Prerequisites: ITD 130 and 304.

ITD 501 Architectural Drafting and Design-Light Commercial (4). Theory and practice in instrument and computer aided drafting and design for architectural structures. Topics will include the review and evaluation of existing designs, plans and specifications for nonresidential light commercial structures. Structures in the building code classifications of: assembly, business, and mercantile will be included. Program and design architecture will be included. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: ITD 301, ITD 104 AND ITD 401.

ITD 504 Advanced Study in Computer Aided Drafting/Design (4). An advanced course in the theory and application of computer aided systems for the drafting and design field. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites:  ITD 304 or consent of instructor.

ITD 522 Industrial Plastics (4). Materials and processes used in plastics manufacturing industries; includes mold design and construction. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITD 322 or consent of instructor.

ITD 531 Numerical Control/Computer NC Machining Systems (4). A study of automatic manufacturing by NC/CNC. Technical, social and economic aspects of NC/CNC machining systems. Laboratory work in manual and computer-assisted numerical control programming. Setup and operation of machines. Six contact hours.

ITD 532 Metallurgy (2). Structure, properties, behavior and use of metals. Laboratory analysis and research. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 533 Technology and Production Tooling (2). Machine setups, tooling and inspection procedures. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites:  ITD 531 or 532.

ITD 541  Industrial Wood Fabrication (4). Material, equipment, processes and nomenclature of the woods manufacturing industry; emphasis on design and planning for production. A study of both traditional and innovative wood processing techniques. Prerequisite:  ITD 341.


Journalism and Mass Communications
(JMC)
JMC 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

JMC 168 Contemporary Mass Media (3). The mass media, stressing development, nature, controls under which they operate, economic and political foundations, social implications and future roles. Open to non-majors as an elective.

JMC 194 Newswriting (3). Principles of newswriting for print and electronic media. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 with a grade of B or better, keyboarding proficiency, JMC 168 with a grade of C or better.

JMC 213 Computer Techniques for Print Media (3). Introduction to Macintosh-based techniques used by professionals in the print media. Prerequisites: JMC 168 with a grade of C or better.

JMC 270 Basic Audio/Video Production  (3). Introduction to production technology including audio control room operations, audio and video recording, camera operations and editing. Prerequisites:  JMC 168 and ENG 101 with a grade of C or better.

JMC 283 Principles of Photojournalism (3). An introduction to basic principles of news and magazine photography. Laboratory work in taking, developing, and printing news and feature photographs. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (Same as GCM 250.)

JMC 294 Advanced Newswriting (3). Advanced news story construction for print and electronic media as well as basics of copy preparation for the World Wide Web. Emphasized new style, language usage, and news story construction. Prerequisite: JMC 194.

JMC 295 Copyediting (3). Basics of handling newspaper copy, including headline writing, copy editing and proofreading. Prerequisite:  JMC 194.

JMC 300 Digital Media Production (3). Introduction to digital production technology and methodology emphasizing the application to the mass media. Topics to include design, graphics, audio video, and writing for the Internet and interactive CD-ROM disks. Prerequisites: JMC 168 and basic knowledge of how to operate a computer.

JMC 322 Mass Media Study Abroad (3). Study of current trends and practices in mass media in foreign nations; specific content will vary. Credit may not be earned for both JMC 322 and JMC 522. Prerequisites:  consent of supervising instructor and department chair; acceptance in a study abroad program approved by Murray State University.

JMC 330 Mass Media Effects (3). A systematic approach to mass media in terms of structure, functions and effects; includes such topics as meaning, perception, selectivity, ethics persuasion, subliminal seduction, violence and erotica, political socialization, learning, agenda-setting, and uses and gratifications. Prerequisite:  JMC 168.

JMC 336 Script Writing (3). Theory and practice of writing for radio and television. Includes dramatic scripts; radio and TV copy conventions; script outlines and documentaries. Prerequisite:  JMC 168.

JMC 344 Press and Politics (3). The role of newspapers, television, and radio in the American national political process. (Same as POL 344.)

JMC 358 Television Studio Production (3). Television studio production technology including camera operation, recording, audio and video control, video switching, electronic graphics, lighting, staging, and production organization, with an emphasis on broadcast-quality results. Prerequisites:  ENG 101, JMC 168, 270, 336; or permission of instructor.

JMC 369 Audio Studio and Field Production (3). Digital audio control and operations, including radio broadcasting, mixing and editing, multi-track recording, and sound reinforcement. Prerequisite: JMC 270.

JMC 383 Advanced Photojournalism (3). Continuation of JMC 283 with emphasis on problem-solving and developing an aesthetic visual image for today’s publication. Prerequisite:  JMC 283.

JMC 385 Directed Individual Study (1-3). Repeatable up to three hours.

JMC 390 World Wide Web as Mass Medium (3). This course is designed 1) to enhance the student’s effectiveness as a user of Internet technologies; 2) to build understanding of the social implications of, and the major issues surrounding, the popularization of the World Wide Web; and 3) to focus on the Web’s functions as a mass medium. Also considered are key technical concepts integral to Web operations that apply to the fields of journalism. Prerequisites: MC 168 and 300, or consent of instructor; knowledge of browser software, and access to the Internet.

JMC 391 Public Relations Principles (3). A study of the profession of public relations, skills, jobs, case studies, media relations, and writing. Students may not be enrolled in JMC 391 and JMC 412 simultaneously. Prerequisite: JMC 168 or consent of instructor. Business program students: MKT 360.

JMC 394 Introduction to Advertising (3). A survey course on the role and function of advertising in society; emphasis on the basic structure and techniques of advertising, marketing, media roles, creative strategies and the agency system. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 with a grade of C or better, typing proficiency, JMC 168 or consent of instructor. Business program students: MKT 360.

JMC 396 Publication  Design (3). Advanced editing class emphasizing newspaper design, layout and graphics. Prerequisite:  JMC 295.

JMC 397 Reporting for Print Media (3). Techniques of news gathering and reporting for the print media. Provides general assignment, specialized and beat reporting experiences by emphasizing the acquisition of information through interviews, direct observation and journalistic research.  Prerequisite:  JMC 194, 295.

JMC 398 Electronic News Reporting (3). News gathering and reporting for television and radio. Surveys electronic newsroom operations and emphasizes construction of news copy, elementary news packaging techniques, and journalistic ethics. Includes 30 hours arrangeable lab work. Prerequisites:  JMC 194; JMC 270 or consent of instructor.

JMC 400 International Mass Communications (3). Study of world’s communications systems and the roles they play. Analysis of international news flow. The effect of the basic philosophical differences among the media in the developed and developing worlds and the changing communication technologies will be examined. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor.

JMC 412 Writing for Public Relations (3). Emphasis placed on writing across the media, for diverse publics, to achieve organizational objectives. Basic formats include, but are not limited to,  news releases, feature articles, fact sheets, newsletters, brochures, and business correspondence. Basic copy editing and design concepts will be covered. Analysis of publicity methods used in professional campaigns will also be included. Prerequisites:  JMC 194 and 391.

JMC 417 Advertising, Copywriting and Layout (3). A study of the theory, techniques and practical skills needed for both writing advertising copy and doing basic advertising layout. Prerequisite:  JMC 394.

JMC 426 Advertising Media Sales (3). Theory and practical application of media advertising sales. Advertising strategy, policy formulation and implementation. Creative and media decision-making structure and procedure. Management of media sales personnel. Students prepare and present advertising sales plan. Prerequisite:  JMC 394.

JMC 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

JMC 439 Advertising Media Planning (3). The study and application of media analysis, planning, and buying. Students prepare and present an advertising media campaign. Prerequisite:  JMC 394.

JMC 440 Research Methods for Public Relations (3). Use of social science research methods in public relations. Emphasis will be on survey techniques and focus groups, interpretation, application, and communication of research findings to the public. Prerequisites:  JMC 168 and 330.

JMC 445 Newspaper Management (3). Problems of organization, production and distribution of the community newspaper. Prerequisites: JMC 394 or permission of instructor. Students are encouraged to take ACC 200 or MGT 350 before enrolling in this course.

JMC 448 RTV Operations (3). Day-to-day operations of radio and television stations with emphasis on strategic planning,  fiscal responsibilities, programming, promotion, sales, personnel, regulation, technology, and ethics. Prerequisites: JMC 168 and junior standing with preference to electronic media majors.

JMC 451 Television Field  Production  (3). Single camera and multi-camera electronic field production, non-linear editing and postproduction to create a variety of television productions from spots to full-length programs, with an emphasis on broadcast-quality results. Prerequisites: ENG 101, JMC 168, 270, and 336; junior standing or permission of instructor.

JMC 466 Advanced Electronic News Reporting and Production (3). Advanced electronic journalism, including emphasis on compiling, writing, videotaping, editing and producing news for television. Students serve as reporters, photographers and producers and gain practical work experience at MSU-TV. Includes 30 hours arrangeable lab work. Prerequisite:  JMC 398.

JMC 486 Media Production Technique (1-3). Advanced and specialized media production techniques in electronic, print, and related mass media technology and practical experience in production and distribution of media content. Two (2) contact hours per week are required for each hour of credit. Prerequisites:  JMC 168, junior or senior standing. Individual instructors may require basic competency in certain media production technologies and/or other prerequisite courses.

JMC 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

JMC 492 Feature Writing (3). Techniques of researching, writing, editing and marketing feature articles. Prerequisites:  JMC 194, 295, or consent of instructor.

JMC 499 Senior Seminar (1). A required course for all graduating seniors in advertising, public relations, journalism, and radio-TV. A forum for career preparation on such topics as resume and portfolio preparation, job searches, interviews and graduation requirements. Graded pass/fail.

JMC 501 School Publications (3). Journalistic problems on the high school and college levels; methods of teaching and advising of school and college publications. Required for teacher certification.

JMC 502 Writing for the Mass Media (3). An intensive writing course covering news-gathering and reporting for print and broadcast, basic editing, advertising copy, news releases, features, columns, reviews and editorials. Open to those students who are not pursuing a major in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications; required for any JMC graduate student who does not have an undergraduate major or minor in the mass communications field. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 or JMC grammar test.

JMC 504 Writing the Nonfiction Article (3). A Jesse Stuart workshop writing course, taught only in the summer. Preparation, writing, editing and marketing the nonfiction article. Individual critique sessions conducted by a highly published journalist. For graduate and undergraduate students. Prerequisite:  permission.

JMC 505 Writing for Children (3). A Jesse Stuart workshop writing course, taught only in the summer. Analysis of the children’s literature market and preparation of fictional and nonfictional works designed for the young reader. Individual critiques by a noted editor and writer of children’s literature. For graduate and undergraduate students. Prerequisite:  permission.

JMC 515 History of U.S. Journalism and Broadcasting (3). History of journalism and broadcasting with emphasis on the role of newspaper, radio, television and other communications media in the United States.

JMC 525 Television Program Development (3). Capstone seminar in creating television programs. Topics include program concepts, target audiences, scripting, budgeting, pre-production planning, producing and marketing pilots. It is anticipated that for a successful outcome, students will commit a minimum of nine hours per week to this course plus an additional 30 hours during the semester working on special projects and productions. Work outside the studios may be required for some productions. Prerequisites: JMC 270, 336, 358, 451; senior or graduate standing with preference given to electronic media majors.

JMC 556 Advertising Campaigns (3). A seminar course designed to bring together the knowledge acquired in advertising, marketing and communications courses and apply them to a realistic problem. Students develop management ability in analysis and preparation of complete advertising campaign. Students are required to work in teams to prepare plans books and give formal ad agency presentations. Prerequisites:  JMC 394, 417, 426, and 439; MKT 360 or consent of instructor.

JMC 558 New Technologies (3). The development of technology in media industries and related businesses, such as consumer electronics and office systems. Topics include the nature of technical innovation, economic feasibility, public policy, social impact, and diffusion models.

JMC 560 Alternative Media Criticism (3). An examination of the cultural and social functions of non-mainstream on-line media, such as “e-zines”, independent film, informational websites targeting women and minorities, alternative press reviews, and “fringe” artistic mass media. While most media studies concern the product of major media conglomerates, this course encourages independent and critical thought about the paradigm of nontraditional media content, which leans toward subjectivity and counter-cultural influence. Prerequisites: senior or graduate level in JMC. The ability to write at the college level, as well as proficiency in the English language. Graduate students should have the ability to create Web material.

JMC 585 Specialized Journalism/Radio-Television I (1-3). Directed individual study. Can be a journalistic effort in areas such as science, sports, government, religion, graphics, etc., or a project in radio or television such as a major production or series, an extensive research project on paper or other approved project. Repeatable up to three hours. Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and written approved proposal required prior to registration.

JMC 586 Special Topics (3). Seminar for seniors, graduate students concerning a current topic affecting the mass media. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor, senior or graduate level standing.

JMC 590 Mass Communication Law (3). The law as it affects journalism and broadcasting. History and background of the freedom of the press and broadcast industries with emphasis on First Amendment and FCC regulations, including such areas as seditious libel, libel, obscenity, privacy, copyright, advertising and the Fairness Doctrine. Primarily a lecture and reading course. Prerequisite:  JMC 330.

JMC 591 Advanced Public Relations (3). A capstone seminar course designed to provide students an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the skills, techniques, and knowledge acquired in previous major and minor courses. Working in teams, students will research, develop, and create a public relations campaign, as well as give formal presentation of their work that includes production of all materials supporting the campaign. This semester-long project should further enhance the students public relations skills and knowledge, as well as develop their management and analytical skills. Prerequisite:  ENG 101, JMC 194, 300, 330, 391, 412, and 440.

JMC 593 Editorial and Critical Writing (3). A writing course in editorials and the editorial page; personal columns; and critical reviews of plays, TV shows, books and movies. Prerequisites:  JMC 194 and 330 or consent of instructor.

JMC 596 Internship in Advertising, Journalism, Public Relations and Radio-TV (3). Course for advanced students in journalism and radio-TV who have completed a minimum of eight weeks as an intern with the media or a public relations or advertising agency. Case studies are prepared by the students on their work experience. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

JMC 597 Public Affairs Reporting (3). Project-based advanced techniques of specialized reporting, emphasizing community-based journalism and civic journalism. Includes overview of issues concerning multiculturalism, journalistic ethics and legal concerns. Prerequisites:  JMC 397 or 466.

JMC 599 American Mass Media (3). Guided independent study in the structure of the mass media in the United States and the impact of American media content on audiences. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: consent of graduate coordinator.


Japanese
(JPN)
JPN 101 Elementary Japanese I (3). An introduction to the basic skills of speaking, understanding, reading and writing Japanese.

JPN 102 Elementary Japanese II (3). A continuation of JPN 101. Prerequisite:  JPN 101.

JPN 105 Introduction to Japanese Culture (3). A survey of contemporary Japanese characters and society. A historical perspective. Attitudes, achievements, institutions and life styles of the Japanese people are explored. Conducted in English.

JPN 110 Basic Conversational Japanese (3). A conversation-oriented introduction to pronunciation and essential structures and vocabulary. Pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking and simple reading and writing of material related to conversational situations are included. No continuation offered. Only taught abroad. No prerequisite.

JPN 201 Intermediate Japanese I (3). An intensive grammar review with emphasis on communication skills. Includes further practice in speaking. Prerequisite:  JPN 102 or consent of instructor.

JPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II (3). A continuation of JPN 201. Prerequisite:  JPN 201 or consent of instructor.

JPN 210 Intermediate Conversational Japanese (3). To develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college Japanese or equivalent. Emphasis will be placed on bringing the student into contact with the Japanese people and various aspects of their culture. No continuation offered. Only taught abroad. Prerequisite:  JPN 102 or equivalent.

JPN 310 Conversation and Composition Abroad (3). Intensive practice in speaking and writing based on the student’s interaction with native speakers and the international setting. Only taught abroad. No continuation offered. Prerequisite:  Two years of college Japanese or equivalent.

JPN 551 Directed Studies (1-3). Course work designed to meet specific needs and interests on an individual basis. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.


Liberal Arts
(LBA)
LBA 099 Freshman Orientation (1). An introduction to university life in general and the liberal arts major in particular. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

LBA 438 Seminar in Liberal Arts (3). Capstone course limited to students who are taking a major in Liberal Arts. It is designed to help students who are completing their coursework refine writing and thinking skills and to give them an opportunity to think in an interdisciplinary and career-oriented way about the courses they have taken. Prerequisite:  permission of program director.

LBA 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of program director.

LBA 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of program director.

LBA 499 Internship (3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational goals of each student. Graded pass/fail. Repeatable for a maximum of six hours total. Prerequisite: permission of the program coordinator.


Library Science
(LIB)
LIB 542 Reference Sources in Subject Fields (3). A study of special reference sources for students who desire to obtain a basic background in library materials in their specific subject field. Emphasis is based on the resources useful for individual research.


Library Orientation
(LOR)
LOR 101 Library Research for Information Literacy (2). A course designed to aid the student in locating, evaluating, and using information and information resources effectively. Includes an introduction to on-line access to information, familiarization with general reference sources and other information materials, and development of research skills for effective use of information resources.


Legal Studies
(LST)
LST 240 The Legal Environment of Business (3). This course involves a presentation of the basic principles of law as they apply to business.

LST 242 Real Estate Law (3). Comprehensive survey of the law of realty as it affects the real estate professional. A study which involves historical and recent developments in legislation and court precedent affecting real estate, with emphasis in license law, real estate commission rules and regulations and professional ethics. Prerequisite:  RES 132 or consent of instructor. (Same as RES 242.)

LST 300 Introduction to Legal Research (3). An introduction to primary and secondary sources of law including finding tools; federal and state court reports and citation forms; legal digests and encyclopedias; annotated law reports; legal periodicals, including periodical indexes; treatises and restatements; federal and state administrative law; federal, state, and local court rules; research aids.

LST 310 Legal Analysis and Writing (3). A course intended to teach students to think, analyze, research, and write like law-trained professionals. Since legal research is involved in solving some homework problems, LST 300 provides helpful preparation for this course.

LST 350 Legal Services for the Elderly (3). An in-depth survey of the major public benefit programs affecting the elderly including Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Medicare and Medicaid. The course also studies the law relating to pensions, wills, protective arrangements and nursing homes and is intended to prepare paralegal students to assist the elderly having legal problems in these areas.

LST 370 Law and Literature (3). A course that explores the intersections between law and literature within larger cultural contexts. Prerequisites: CIV 101 and 102, HUM 211 and 212, or equivalent. (Same as ENG 370).

LST 400 Litigation and Trial Practice (3). Preparation of case profiles; familiarization with attorney briefs; organizing and indexing of documents related to discovery; interviewing witnesses; tracing physical evidence; examination of public records; preparation of deposition questions; arrangements for client interviews and witness appearances in court; digesting transcripts; indexing documents; preparation of exhibits for trial.

LST 430 Trusts and Estates (3). Preparation of documents relating to administration of estates; the collection of assets, maintenance of records and notification of beneficiaries; preparation of wills and trusts for review; completing federal and state tax returns; applying income principal rules to estates; drafting court forms from account records; preparing periodic statements for estates, trusts and individuals; transferring securities into names of people entitled to them; drawing checks for signature of executors, and follow-through on collection and delivery.

LST 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

LST 444 Judicial Process (3).  A political science course that surveys the nature, functions and sources of law and the role of politics and the courts in the administration of justice.  (Same as POL 444.)

LST 446 Criminal Law (3). Sources of criminal law. The Model Penal Code, Rules of Criminal Procedure. Constitutional mandates relevant to law enforcement investigative procedures. Prerequisites:  senior standing or consent of instructor.

LST 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

LST 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

LST 505 Internship (3). Independently sponsored programs to which qualified students may elect to pursue for practical experience in legal activity. For juniors and seniors minoring in legal studies. Must have a 2.5 overall GPA and a 2.8 in LST courses taken for the minor. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  LST 240, 242, and 300.

LST 534 Court Management (3). Administrative procedures and management techniques of a unified court system. Prerequisite:  Senior standing or consent of instructor.

LST 540 Commercial Transactions (3). A study of business organizations and their commercial transactions. Topics include business organizations and relationships, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, sales, credit, agency, and property. Prerequisite:  LST 240.

LST 545 Constitutional Law I: Developments & Trends (3).  A political science course that surveys the development of and historic trends in selected subjects of constitutional law. (Same as POL 545.)

LST 546 Constitutional Law II: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3).  A political science course that studies the leading court decisions and their impact on the development of American Constitutional Law in the subject areas of civil liberties (Amendment I), civil rights (Amendments IV, V, VI, VIII, and IX) and the equal protection and due process clauses of the Amendment XIV.  Prerequisites: none.  (Same as POL 546.)

LST 595 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised readings or research in selected subjects designed to supplement regular course offerings. For seniors minoring in legal studies. Must have a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.0 in LST courses taken for the minor. Prerequisites:  LST 240, 242, 300 and 310.


Mathematics
(MAT)
MAT 095 Fundamental Mathematics Skills (1). Course designed to supplement MAT 100 lecture classes with one contact hour per week. May NOT be repeated for credit. Credit earned in this course cannot be counted toward graduation requirements and cannot be used to fulfill general education requirements. Graded pass/fail. Corequisite: MAT 100.

MAT 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Required for all entering freshmen. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Fall)

MAT 100 Developmental Mathematics (3). The basic operations as they pertain to fractions, decimals, percentages and pre-algebra including signed numbers and operations performed on polynomials. A developmental and refresher course. Credit earned in this course cannot be counted toward graduation requirements and cannot be used to fulfill university studies requirements. Letter-graded course.

MAT 105 Introductory Algebra (4). Algebraic expressions, exponents, linear and quadratic equations, graphing, systems of equations, inequalities, and mathematical modeling. Prerequisite:  ACT math standard score of at least 18 or MAT 100. Credit earned in this course cannot be counted toward graduation requirements and cannot be used to fulfill university studies requirements.

MAT 115 Mathematics for Middle and Elementary Teachers I (3). Development of the real number system with arithmetic and basic ideas of algebra. A course specifically designed for the needs of future elementary and middle school teachers. Cannot be used for university studies requirements. Prerequisite:  Math ACT score of at least 18 or one course from University Studies mathematics electives.

MAT 117 Mathematical Concepts (3). Provides students with problem-solving skills and literacy related to the mathematics which is commonly encountered in our society. Topics can include descriptive statistics, personal finance, voting methods, elementary probability, and graph theory. This course is especially appropriate for students whose degree programs do not otherwise require a course in mathematics. It is not an adequate preparation for any other mathematics course except MAT 115 and 215. Prerequisite:  ACT math standard score of at least 18 or MAT 100.

MAT 130 Technical Math I (5). Topics from algebra and trigonometry for the technology student. Restriction:  A student may not receive credit for MAT 130 and 140 or 145 or 150. Prerequisite:  ACT math standard score of at least 20 or MAT 105.

MAT 135 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (4). Elementary probability, the binomial, normal, student’s and chi-square distributions, random sampling, regression and correlation. Prerequisite:  ACT math standard score of at least 20 or MAT 105.

MAT 140 College Algebra (4). Course develops and extends the student’s basic algebra concepts and problem-solving skills in the context of functions, models, and applications. Topics include exponents and radicals, graphing, setting up and solving equations in linear, quadratic, and other forms, systems of equations, and operations on functions. Properties and applications of linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions are studied. Prerequisite:  ACT math standard score of at least 20 or MAT 105. A student may not receive credit for MAT 140 and 130 or 150. (MAT 140 in combination with MAT 145 will substitute for MAT 150.)

MAT 145 Trigonometry (3). Course is a study of plane trigonometry. Topics include angles, right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric functions and their graphs, identities, solving trigonometric equations, and applications of trigonometry. Prerequisite:  ACT math standard score of at least 20 or MAT 105. A student may not receive credit for MAT 145 and MAT 130 or 150. (MAT 145 in combination with MAT 140 will substitute for MAT 150.)

MAT 150 Algebra and Trigonometry (5). Course is an intensive study of college algebra and trigonometry. A combination of MAT 140 and MAT 145, it is a faster-paced course for students with some familiarity with the subjects. MAT 150 may be used as a “refresher” course to help prepare students for MAT 250. Prerequisite:  ACT math standard score of at least 22. Restriction:  A student who receives credit for MAT 150 may not receive credit for MAT 130, 140 or 145. (Credit or the combination of MAT 140 and MAT 145 will substitute for MAT 150.)

MAT 215 Mathematics for Middle and Elementary Teachers II (3). Geometry, measurements, probability and statistics for elementary and middle school teachers. Cannot be used for university studies requirements. Prerequisite:  Math ACT score of at least 18 or one course from University Studies mathematics electives.

MAT 220 Business Calculus (3). An introduction to calculus and its applications for students in various fields of business. Primary emphasis is on differential calculus. Prerequisite:  MAT 140 or math ACT score of at least 23.

MAT 230 Technical Math II (5). Analytic geometry, differential and integral calculus with applications from technical fields. Prerequisite:  MAT 130.

MAT 250 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (5). First course in calculus develops main ideas of differentiation and integration of single-variable functions. Topics include limits, continuity, techniques of differentiation, graphing techniques, definite and indefinite integral, basic integration methods, and applications of the derivative and integral to natural and social sciences. Prerequisites:  ACT math standard score of at least 26 or MAT 150 or MAT 140/145.

MAT 305 Intermediate Geometry (3). Selected elementary topics in Euclidean geometry. Includes studies in parallelism, similarity, congruence, areas, volumes, elementary transformation, and coordinate geometry. Intended for students seeking middle school certification. Prerequisite:  MAT 115 or 215.

MAT 308 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II (5). A continuation of MAT 250, this course further develops techniques and applications of integration and is an introduction to sequences and series. Topics include integration strategies, computing areas and volumes, arc length, parametric curves, polar coordinates, sequences and series, tests for convergence of series, power series, and Taylor series. Prerequisite:  MAT 250.

MAT 309 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (4). Course develops main ideas of differentiation and integration of functions of several variables and introduces vector calculus. Topics include vectors, analytic geometry of 3-dimensional space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, integrals of functions of two and three variables, vector fields, line integrals, Green’s theorem, and the divergence theorem. Prerequisite:  MAT 308.

MAT 312 (299) Mathematical Reasoning (3). Course designed to improve the students understanding of the nature and methods of mathematical proof by means of practice and participation. The content will include mathematical logic, set theory, relations and functions, cardinality, axiomatic structures, techniques of proof, and extensive practice in proof and problem solving. Credit cannot be received for both MAT 312 and 399. The department recommends a student take this course in his/her sophomore year in the program. Prerequisite:  MAT 308 or consent of instructor.

MAT 330 Technical Math III (3). Continuation of MAT 230. Includes differentiation and integration of transcendental functions, series expansions of functions, and differential equations. Prerequisite:  MAT 230.

MAT 335 Matrix Theory and Linear Algebra (3). The algebra of matrices and its application to problems in Euclidean spaces and elementary linear transformations. Prerequisite:  MAT 308.

MAT 399 Sets, Logic and Functions (3). An investigation of mathematical reasoning including techniques of mathematical exploration, problem-solving and proof. Intended for students seeking Middle School Certification. Does not count toward a major or minor in mathematics and credit cannot be received for both MAT 299 and MAT 399. Prerequisite:  MAT 250 or consent of instructor.

MAT 411 Ordinary Differential Equations (3). First-order differential equations, linear equations with constant coefficients, linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Prerequisite:  MAT 308.

MAT 421 Introductions to Algebraic Structures (3). An elementary study of the major structures in modern algebra including groups, rings, fields and integral domains. Prerequisite:  MAT 299 and 308.

MAT 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

MAT 440 Mathematics Transforms with Applications (3). Integral and discrete transforms, such as Laplace and Fourier transforms, and the z-transform. Power series solutions and special functions. Prerequisite:  MAT 411 or consent of instructor.

MAT 442 Introduction to Numerical Analysis (3). Taylor polynomial approximation, numerical root finding methods and fixed-point iteration, polynomial and spline interpolation, numerical differentiation and integration, and direct methods for the solutions of linear systems. Prerequisite:  MAT 308 or consent of instructor.

MAT 450 Introduction to Engineering Statistics (3). Probability, population and sample distribution, sampling, hypothesis testing, regression on one variable, and quality control. Prerequisite: MAT 309.

MAT 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MAT 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MAT 500 Internship (1). Graded pass/fail.

MAT 501 Mathematical Modeling I (3). A study of mathematical models used in the social, life and management sciences and their role in explaining and predicting real world phenomena. The emphasis is on developing skills of model building. Topics include difference equations, perturbation theory and non-dimensional analysis. Prerequisite:  MAT 411.

MAT 502 Mathematical Modeling II (3). A continuation of topics discussed in MAT 501. A term project consisting of a model of a non-mathematical problem is required. Prerequisite:  MAT 501.

MAT 505 Abstract Algebra I (3). An in-depth study of rings and fields. Topics will include the Isomorphism Theorems, ideals, polynomial rings, integral domains, fields, field extensions. Prerequisite:  MAT 421 or consent of instructor.

MAT 508 Introduction to Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3). Selected topics and applications from combinatorics and discrete mathematics, which can include:  enumeration, generating functions, recurrence relations, partially ordered sets, Boolean algebras, block designs, coding theory, and topics in graph theory, including trees, networks, optimization, and scheduling.  Prerequisites:  MAT 308 and either MAT 299 or MAT 335.

MAT 510 Foundations of Geometry (3). Study of postulate systems for geometry, critical examination of Euclid’s Elements, introduction to non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 or consent of instructor.

MAT 512 Partial Differential Equations (3). Partial differential equations of first and second order and applications. Prerequisites:  MAT 309 and 411.

MAT 515 Theory of Numbers (3). Divisibility, the Euclidean algorithm, mathematical induction, prime and composite numbers, Diophantine equation, Pythagorean triplets, Fermat’s Theorem, congruences, quadratic residues, continued fractions. Prerequisite:  MAT 308 or consent of instructor.

MAT 516 Introduction to Topology (3). Set theory, topology of the real line, topological spaces, metric spaces. Prerequisite:  MAT 299 and 309.

MAT 520 Introduction to Complex Variables (3). Complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions, integration, Cauchy theorem, Taylor and Laurent expansions, and applications. Prerequisite:  MAT 309.

MAT 522 Vector Calculus (3). Operations with vectors; differentiation and integration of functions of several variables; transformation of coordinates; line and surface integrals; Green’s, Stokes’s, and the divergence theorems. Prerequisite:  MAT 309.

MAT 524 Boundary Value Problems (3). Analytic and computational techniques for linear first and second order partial differential equations, initial, and boundary value problems. Classification, Fourier series, separation of variables, finite difference and/or finite element methods. Prerequisites:  MAT 309, 335 or consent of instructor, and 411.

MAT 525 Advanced Calculus I (3). A rigorous development of one variable calculus including limits, continuity, differentiation, integration and sequences of functions. Prerequisite:  MAT 299 and 309.

MAT 526 Advanced Calculus II (3). A continuation of MAT 525 and functions of several variables. Prerequisite:  MAT 525.

MAT 530 Special Topics in Mathematics I (1-3). Library investigations of various lengths concerning special topics in mathematics. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites:  Six hours of mathematics courses numbered 400 and above with a mathematics GPA of at least 3.0; consent of instructor.

MAT 531 Special Topics in Mathematics II (1-3). Library investigations of various lengths concerning special topics in mathematics. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites:  Six hours of mathematics courses numbered 400 and above with a mathematics GPA of at least a 3.0; consent of instructor.

MAT 535 Linear Algebra (3). Linear transformations, matrices, quadratic and hermitian forms, eigenvalues and elementary spectral theory. Prerequisite:  MAT 335.

MAT 540 Mathematical Statistics I (4). Introduction to probability theory and statistical inference. Combinatorics, conditional probability independence. Discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions. Expected value and moments of distributions. Estimation theory and properties point estimators. Confidence intervals. Basic theory of hypothesis testing. Testing means and proportion. T-tests. Descriptive statistics. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 or consent of instructor.

MAT 541 Mathematical Statistics II  (3). Additional topics in probability theory and statistical inference. Bayes’ Theorem, functions of random variables, order statistics. Bayesian inference, F-tests, chi-square tests, contingency tables, regression and correlation. Prerequisites:  MAT 540.

MAT 542 Numerical Analysis (3). Numerical solutions of differential equations, iterative techniques for solving linear systems, discrete least-squares methods, orthogonal polynomials, and approximating eigenvalues. Prerequisites:  MAT 411 and either MAT 442 or consent of instructor. Requires knowledge of a scientific programming language.

MAT 545 Boolean Algebra with Applications to Digital Computer Design (3). Boolean algebra is developed as a model to study various physical systems, including the algebra of subsets of a set, propositional logic, and switching circuits. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 550 Teaching Mathematics I (3). Programs in secondary mathematics, theory of mathematical learning, classroom management, evaluation, remedial and enrichment programs, use of teaching aids with special application to the teaching of mathematics. Gives credit only toward the M.A.T. or M.A.Ed. degrees or toward an undergraduate major or minor in mathematics for those students following a teacher certification program. If  MAT 550 or 551 is counted for the math major or minor, MAT 421 or 510 must also be taken. If MAT 550 and 551 are counted for a math major or minor, the student must also take MAT 421 and 510. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 or consent of instructor.

MAT 551 Teaching Mathematics II (3). Topics in mathematics of special interest to secondary teachers of mathematics taught with emphasis on presenting them to high school students. Gives credit only toward the M.A.T. or M.A.Ed. degrees or toward an undergraduate major or minor in mathematics for those students following a teacher certification program. If MAT 550 or 551 is counted for the math major or minor, MAT 421 or 510 must also be taken. If MAT 550 and 551 are counted for a math major or minor the student must also take MAT 421 and 510. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 or consent of instructor.

MAT 560 Statistical Methods (3). A survey course in statistical methods for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students with no prior training in statistics. The course covers techniques commonly used for data analysis in many scientific fields. Topics included are probability distributions, sampling, variance, estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency table, regression and analysis of variance. (Does not apply toward any degree in mathematics or a minor in mathematics.)

MAT 565 Applied Statistics I (4). A study of applied statistical techniques including correlation, regression, analysis of variance and non-parametric methods with a view toward applications. A statistical computer package will be used when appropriate, but no computer background is required. Prerequisite:  MAT 560 or consent of instructor.

MAT 566 Applied Statistics II (3). A continuation of MAT 565. Includes further topics in analysis and variance, non-parametrics and multivariate analysis. Prerequisite:  MAT 565.

MAT 569 Topics in Statistics (3). Selected topics in probability and statistics. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 570 Linear Programming (3). Theory and application of linear programming and the role it plays in operations research. Prerequisite:  MAT 335.


Multicultural, Class and Gender Studies
(MCG)
MCG 201 Introduction to Multicultural, Class, and Gender Studies (3). This course will provide students with an interdisciplinary examination of the issues concerned with multiculturalism, economic and social class, and gender. Students will gain a broad historical perspective of how these factors have had an impact on the formation of America as a country and as a nation in the international context.

MCG 351 Open Topics in Multicultural, Class, and Gender Studies (3). Changing topics in the study of multicultural, class and gender issues, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the MCG committee. Can be repeated twice. Prerequisite:  MCG 201.

MCG 356 The Art of Non-Western Cultures (3). Study of the arts of Asia, Oceania, Africa and the Pre-Western Americas. (Same as ART, RGS 356.)

MCG 412 Directed Study in Multicultural, Class and Gender Studies (3). An independent study course in an area of multicultural, class and/or gender studies. Students must submit a study plan, along with the name of the faculty member with whom they have arranged to work, to the MCG committee for approval prior to registration. Can be repeated twice. Prerequisite:  MCG 201

MCG 499 Senior Project (3). This project may take the form of a guided independent study, a practicum/internship or a study abroad. The student will put together a three-person committee consisting of at least two faculty members, one of whom will act as a chair. A project proposal must be submitted for pre-approval to the MCG committee. Prerequisite:  MCG 201 and 12 additional hours in the MCG minor.


Management
(MGT)
MGT 250 Introduction to Management:  Taking the Lead (3). An introductory KET course that covers planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling, decision-making, motivating, communicating, and leadership. Helpful for the managerial candidate who has not had any formal training in business management. Credit is not allowed for both MGT 250 and 350. Students who declare a business major or area should consult their advisor on receiving credit for MGT 350.

MGT 350 Fundamentals of Management (3). The fundamental concepts, relationships and principles of managing organized activities are studied. Special emphasis is given to human behavior in organized systems, with attention to the diverse workforce, interpersonal relations, group processes, and the philosophy for managing human resources effectively. Prerequisite:  junior standing.

MGT 354 Techniques of Oral Reporting and Management Briefings (3). Stresses basic principles of oral reporting with emphasis upon informational speeches and special techniques of management briefings. Provides practice in preparation and use of visual aids and the conduct of briefings. Prerequisites:  junior standing; MGT 350.

MGT 358 Entrepreneurial Business Plan Development (3). This course is devoted to the study of the entrepreneurial process including identifying opportunities, creating value, developing concepts and plans, attracting resources, building an organization, and managing growth. Prerequisites:  junior standing; ACC 200 and MGT 350.

MGT 420 Entrepreneurial Strategic Growth (3). An in-depth study of the managing a growing business in a professional manner, while maintaining the entrepreneurial spirit. Subject matter includes measuring economic performance, obtaining management information for decision making, management control systems, short and long-term planning, capital funding, and condition that prevail in similar business environments. Prerequisites:  MGT 350 and MKT 360.

MGT 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

MGT 443 Management of Operations and Technology (3). A study of the concepts and processes of the operations function with emphasis on the application of these to the management of various types of systems. Special attention is given to the management of technology, quality and globalization. The student is introduced to models commonly used in decision-making. Prerequisites:  MGT 350 and CIS 343.

MGT 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MGT 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MGT 490 Entrepreneurial Consulting (3). Students will develop the tools necessary to provide a meaningful consulting experience to an entrepreneurial business. Students in teams of three or four individuals will work with an assigned consulting client and provide value by creating a deliverable for the client. Prerequisites: MGT 350, MKT 360 and senior standing.

MGT 499 Senior Seminar (1). Seminar for students of the Management and Marketing Department’s programs with a primary focus on employment preparation and professional development. Recommended for students enrolled in their next-to-last undergraduate semester.

MGT 550 Human Resource Management (3). Familiarizes the student with fundamental tools to effectively manage and motivate a diversified workforce. Included in this course is a study and analysis of the programs in human resource management including job analysis, job evaluation, selection and placement, testing and training, personnel services, and labor relations, as well as the current issues of globalization and the changing composition of the workforce. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 551 Organizational Behavior (3). Study of human behavior in organizations with attention to individual, small group and organization-wide issues. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the organization’s environment, managing in international settings, and the importance of ethics in management. May not be taken by M.B.A. students. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 552 Management of Operations and Technology II (3). A continued study of the operations function of organizations. Topics covered include technology management, achieving zero defects, continuous improvement, total productive maintenance and world class competition. Prerequisite:  MGT 443.

MGT 553 Human Resource Selection (3). A concentrated investigation of the methods appropriate to the development, implementation and administration of the staffing process (attracting,  selecting and placing candidates in positions) in contemporary organizations will be conducted. This will involve analyzing organizational environments and identifying the appropriate staffing strategies and policies, including an examination of the regulatory environment, cost analysis of human resources, and the statistics of personnel validation of screening devices, i.e. personnel testing, interviewing and biographical information. Prerequisite: MGT 350.

MGT 554 Managing a Diverse Workforce (3). This course involves a study of the cultural perspective and processes reflecting individual, work group, and organizational diversity in the work place. Specific issues this course will include are:  prejudice and stereotypes; group and organizational factors affecting diversity; legal issues related to diversity; and global, cross-cultural and gender issues. Prerequisite: MGT 350.

MGT 555 Training and Development (3). This course examines the needs and characteristics of adult learners and the role of training and development as part of human resources in the business setting. The role of the trainer, the learner, needs assessment, methodologies, learning objectives, and measurement and evaluation techniques will be explored and practiced. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.

MGT 557 International Management (3). Course covers two principal areas: (1) the evolution of the multinational corporation, and (2) a comparative cross-cultural study of management philosophy and practice. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 559 Compensation Management (3). A study of basic considerations for successful wage and salary administration. Areas studied include job evaluation, employee evaluation and systems and plans of compensating employees. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 570 Organization Theories (3). A study of the major contemporary theories of organization with emphasis on such modern concepts as Management by Objectives and organization design. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 572 Organizational Development (3). Studies approaches to organizational development, growth and renewal, with special emphasis on the organization’s ability to adapt to its environment. Particular attention is paid to the process of planned change, the techniques used in organizational development, and the role of ethics in organizational change. May not be taken by M.B.A. students. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 575 Labor-Management Relations (3). A study of labor-management relations in the United States with emphasis on the structure and role of labor organizations, the collective bargaining functions and processes, and the philosophy and approaches essential to a successful relationship between labor and management institutions. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 577 Labor Law and Public Policy (3). Traces the development of the principles of labor law and labor legislation as well as their administration at the national, state and local levels in the United States. Uses administrative and court decisions and policy analysis to examine issues of current significance concerning labor relations. Prerequisite:  MGT 350 or consent of instructor. (Same as POL 577.)

MGT 580 Seminar in Leadership (3). Describes the nature and meaning of leadership in organizations, including the importance of effective leadership, knowledge of various leadership theories, and personal attributes associated with effective leaders. The course integrates leadership research findings with leadership application and skill development. Prerequisite: MGT 350.

MGT 590 Strategic Management (3). Course involves a study of the process of strategy formulation and implementation and the integration of the functional areas of the business into a concerted organizational effort. Case problems are used. Should be taken in the student’s last semester. May not be taken by M.B.A. students. Prerequisites:  FIN 330, MGT 350, MKT 360, and senior standing.

MGT 595 Special Problems (3). This course consists of independent study of some managerial problem area. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisite:  consent of  instructor.


Middle School Education
(MID)
MID 270 Teaching and Learning in the Middle Grades (3). A course designed to provide students in the middle school education with knowledge and experience critical for instruction of middle school students and management of middle school classrooms. Laboratory experiences required. Prerequisites: EDP 260 and EDU 103.

MID 307 Middle School Language Arts (3). This course focuses on teaching communication skills — listening, speaking, reading and writing within the subject matter fields — to middle school children. Laboratory experiences required. Prerequisites:  EDU 103, EDU 303, MID 270.
 
MID 370 Laboratory in Teaching English Communications:  Middle School (2). A concentrated laboratory experience for upper division students seeking middle school certification with a teaching field in English and communication. Includes directed and supervised teaching experience with middle school students in area schools. Prerequisites: EDU 303 and MID 270, 307.

MID 371 Laboratory in Teaching Mathematics:  Middle School (2). A concentrated laboratory experience for upper division students seeking middle school certification with a teaching field in mathematics. Includes directed and supervised teaching experience with middle school students in area schools. Prerequisites: EDU 303 and MID 270.

MID 372 Laboratory in Teaching Science:  Middle School (2). A concentrated laboratory experience for upper division students seeking middle school certification with a teaching field in science. Includes directed and supervised teaching experiences with middle school students in area schools. Prerequisites:  EDU 303 and MID 270.

MID 373 Laboratory in Teaching Social Studies:  Middle School (2). A concentrated laboratory experience for upper division students seeking middle school certification with a teaching field in social studies. Includes directed and supervised teaching experiences with middle school students in area schools. Prerequisites:  EDU 303 and MID 270.

MID 374 Laboratory in Library Science:  Middle School (2). A concentrated laboratory experience for upper division students seeking middle school certification with a school media librarian teaching field. Includes directed and supervised library experience with middle school students in area schools. Prerequisites:  EDU 303 and MID 270.

MID 375 Laboratory in Teaching Foreign Language:  Middle School (2). A concentrated laboratory experience for upper division students seeking middle school certification with a teaching field in a foreign language (French, Spanish, German). Includes directed and supervised teaching experience with middle school students in area schools. Prerequisites:  EDU 303 and MID 270.

MID 421 Middle School Student Teaching (7-14). Student teaching in the middle school should allow the individual to participate in the work and duties of the school that are generally expected of the classroom teacher. Student teachers will be supervised by a public school teacher as well as a university coordinator. This will be a 7-14 week assignment with students having experiences in both teaching specialization fields. Graded pass/fail. (Professional Semester)


Military Science
(MIL)
MIL 100 Physical Conditioning Lab (1). This course provides the student an opportunity to participate and lead a military style physical fitness program. Training is based on the Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) and assists the student in developing a fit lifestyle. May be repeated for a maximum of eight credit hours. Graded pass/fail.

MIL 101 Land Navigation and Army Orientation (2). This course is designed in two parts to give the student an introduction to land navigation and an orientation on the United State Army and the army officer. In the land navigation phase, special emphasis is placed on the ability to navigate with a map and compass, as well as terrain association. The army orientation phase is an introduction to the organization of the U.S. Army, role of the army officer, and other related specific considerations of the army profession. Military skills taught in the class will be put to practical use during field exercises. Field trips to off-campus locations may be required and transportation will be provided.

MIL 102 Developmental Skills (2). This course is designed to give the student a multifaceted approach to the study of leadership, in both military and a civilian setting. Emphasis is placed upon human behavior, communication, the individual as a leader, group dynamics, and the military’s interface with society. Requires attendance at a three-day, off-campus field training exercise.

MIL 201 Basic Leadership (3). Prepares cadet to become an effective small unit leader. Topics include leadership doctrine, ethics, communications, first aid, and land navigation.

MIL 202 Team Building and Military Doctrine (3). Introduces cadets to military doctrine and tactics, values and ethics, and officership. The latter includes extensive work in military oral and written communications skills as well as the role of the United States Army from the Vietnam War to the present. Prerequisite: MIL 201 or permission of instructor.

MIL 210 Leader’s Training Course (LTC) (6). This is the army’s two-year ROTC program entry point. Through the LTC, students without ROTC Basic course experience can examine the Army without incurring an obligation. This course is a substitute for MIL 101, 102, 201, and 202. Course will qualify students for advanced course entry. The army observes these students and determines their officer potential in a leadership oriented, challenging, and motivating 5-week training program at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Prerequisites: the student must meet academic and physical standards established by the Army and permission of instructor.

MIL 301 Military Leadership and Management (4). Course is designed to give the student a multifaceted approach to the study of leadership, in both military and civilian setting. Emphasis is placed upon human behavior, communication, the individual as a leader, group dynamics, and the military’s interface with society. Requires attendance at a three-day, off-campus training exercise. Prerequisites: MIL 210 or permission of instructor.

MIL 302 Military Leadership and Advanced Tactical Skills (4). This course is designed to give the student an exposure to selected leadership and management problems in various military subjects. Topics covered are army personnel management, training methods, military correspondence, and staff procedures. Requires attendance at a three-day off-campus field training exercise. Prerequisites:  MIL 210, 301, or permission of the instructor.

MIL 333 Military History of the United States (3). This course is designed to give the student a multifaceted approach to the study of American military history from colonial times to the present day. Topics covered include the causes of war, methods of recruitment, military policies, and the effect of the industrial revolution and technology of war. Required for all military science students working toward a commission as an army officer. (Same as HIS 333.)  

MIL 401 Professional Leadership Skills (4). This course is designed to give the student an exposure to selected leadership and management problems in various military subjects. Topics covered are army personnel management, training methods, military correspondence, and staff procedures. (Includes leadership laboratory once a week.)  Requires attendance at a three-day off-campus field training exercise.  Prerequisites:  MIL 301, 302 or permission of instructor.

MIL 402 Role of the Army Officer (4). Course focuses on army combat operations,  logistics, administration, readiness, military justice, leadership/management, and preparing for commissioning. (Includes leadership laboratory once a week.) Requires attendance at a three-day off-campus field training exercise. Prerequisites: MIL 301, 302, 401 or permission of instructor.

MIL 410 Leader Development and Assessment (6).  This course is designed to develop leadership through an intensive five-week summer field course of rotating leader/command roles, practical experience in problem analysis, decision making and troop leading while providing in-depth coverage of technical subjects at a military installation. Successful completion of this course is required for a U.S. Army commission and military science minor. Prior to enrollment, the student must meet the physical and academic standards established by the army. Prerequisites:  MIL 301, 302 or permission of instructor.

MIL 490 Military Leadership Seminar (1-3). This course is designed to enable the student to pursue independent study in selected areas of military science. Requires attendance at a three-day off-campus field training exercise.  Prerequisites:  Permission of instructor.


Marketing
(MKT)
MKT 260 Introduction to Marketing (3). An introductory KET course that covers marketing as it relates to contemporary living and society’s changing needs. Students learn how a marketing manager interacts with diverse areas of business as well as basic marketing principles. Helpful for the managerial candidate who has not had any formal training in marketing. Credit is not allowed for both MKT 260 and 360. Students who declare a business major or area should consult their advisor on receiving credit for MKT 360.

MKT 360 Principles of Marketing (3). An integrated study of the interrelationship of marketing to the other primary functions of business through an analytical survey of problems related to product planning, pricing, promotion, channels of distribution, and legislation affecting marketing activity encountered in distributing goods and services to markets. Emphasis is on the role of the consumer. Prerequisites:  junior standing.

MKT 361 Selling and Sales Management (3). A thorough study of the elements that contribute to success in the field of selling and sales management. In selling, attention will be given to researching and understanding the needs of business and retail customers, developing long-term relationships with customers, learning and applying the basic steps in the sales presentation, and negotiating with customers. Related to sales management, attention will be given to structuring and determining the appropriate size of the sales force, recruiting, selecting, motivating, compensating, training, evaluating salespeople, and supervising day-to-day sales operations. Prerequisites:  MKT 360 and junior standing.

MKT 369 Retailing Management (3). A study of the fundamentals of successful retail store management and merchandising. Some of the topics discussed are store organization, location, layout, fixtures and equipment. Aspects of merchandise planning and control, buying, sales promotion and customer services are emphasized. Prerequisites: junior standing; MKT 360.

MKT 390 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3). This course examines the tools and activities entrepreneurial businesses can utilize to develop an effective marketing strategy, considering severe time, budget, and marketing information constraints. The course emphasizes understanding the important role that marketing plays in the entrepreneurial process. Prerequisites: junior standing; MKT 360.

MKT 396 International Marketing Seminar (3). Designed to give participants a high exposure to the international environment and business practices outside the U.S. The seminar includes an intensive travel-study program in various European countries. Prerequisite: junior standing.

MKT 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

MKT 460 Principles of Advertising (3). A study of advertising and its uses, media and role in sales promotion. Emphasis is placed on the business and economic aspects of advertising as it relates to the distribution of products and the management of business firms. Prerequisite:  MKT 360 or consent of instructor.

MKT 461 Principles of Purchasing (3). This course provides in-depth exposure to the ideas and concepts of purchasing or procurement. These areas include:  procurement objectives, ethical standards, strategies and policies, the basic purchasing process, organizing and staffing, supplier selection and relations, international purchasing, price/cost analysis, negotiation, legal aspects, and managing material flows. A focus on the career opportunities in procurement, materials management, and logistics management will be provided.

MKT 462 Sales Management (3). A study of the managerial aspects of marketing, with special emphasis upon problems involved in determining markets; planning sales campaigns; selection, training and management of sales and service personnel; and control of sales operations. Prerequisite:  MKT 361.

MKT 463 Consumer Behavior (3). An overall view of some of the basic perspectives of consumer behavior. An interdisciplinary approach will be stressed including the fields of economics, psychology, sociology and anthropology as they relate to marketing. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamental processes of motivation, perception and learning, as well as analysis of individual predispositions and group influences in marketing. May not be taken by M.B.A. students. Prerequisite:  MKT 360 or consent of instructor.

MKT 469 Retail Merchandising (3). A problem-solving course of tools used in buying, pricing, stock control, sales promotion, and expense control. Prerequisite: MKT 369.

MKT 470 Logistics Management (3). A survey of the broad field of physical distribution and business logistics. Emphasis is placed on supply chain management (SCM) theories, practice, and problems. An integrated systems approach to procurement, transportation, inventory control, materials handling/packaging, and warehousing will be stressed. Prerequisite:  MKT 360 or consent of instructor.

MKT 475 Marketing Strategies for E-Commerce (3). Addresses Internet and other technology applications in marketing. Concepts and techniques important for understanding electronic marketing and virtual marketplaces are emphasized. As part of the course requirements, students will apply the concepts and skills learned by researching, designing, and building a virtual storefront. Prerequisites: BPA 355 and MKT 360.

MKT 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MKT 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MKT 499 Senior Seminar (1). Seminar for students of the Managing and Marketing Department’s programs with a primary focus on employment preparation and professional development. Recommended for students enrolled in their next-to-last undergraduate semester.

MKT 564 Marketing Channels (3). The methods and processes used in the distribution of consumer and industrial products and services. Emphasis is on the way certain basic distribution functions are carried out in an integrated channel system. The role of a variety of manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers as parts of this system is analyzed. Prerequisite:  MKT 360.

MKT 565 Marketing Research (3). An introduction to research methods and procedures used in the marketing process. Areas given emphasis include sources of market data, sampling, surveys, interpretation of data and the relationship of market research to the policies and functions of the business enterprise. Prerequisites:  MKT 360 and senior standing.

MKT 566 Marketing Management (3). A problems course dealing with specialized marketing strategies for consumers as well as industrial markets, new product development, sales promotion, sales organization, and prices and pricing. Attention is given to marketing research as a determinant of policy. Cases are used extensively to emphasize analysis and decision-making. Prerequisites:  MKT 360 and senior standing.

MKT 567 Marketing Planning and Strategy (3). This course is designed to develop a comprehensive integrated knowledge of the broad field of marketing. The course will synthesize material presented in basic marketing; however, the major emphasis will be on systematic analytical problem-solving, and the dynamics of decision-making as faced by marketing management. Prerequisite:  MKT 360.

MKT 568 Global Marketing Management (3). This is the undergraduate capstone marketing course. It covers the practice of marketing in a global economy. Major topics include (1) multi-national environmental scanning, (2) marketing planning and strategy in a global context, (3) tactical international marketing decisions, (4) assessment of international market opportunities, and (5) ethical considerations in global marketing. Prerequisite:  MKT 360.

MKT 569 Promotional Management (3). A study of the relationship of promotional activities to other marketing activities of business and non-profit organizations. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships and activities of promotional devices such as advertising, personal selling, publicity and sales promotion. Prerequisite: MKT 360.

MKT 595 Special Problems (1-3). This course consists of independent study in some area of marketing. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


Modern Languages
(MLA)
MLA 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

MLA 101 Elementary Modern Language I (3). A thorough study of the basic structure and sounds of a particular language which is not regularly offered at Murray State University. Equal emphasis will be placed on the four skills of speaking, writing, listening and reading. The languages taught under this title will vary.

MLA 102 Elementary Modern Language II (3). A continuation of MLA 101. Prerequisite:  MLA 101 or equivalent.

MLA 104 A Cultural Introduction to Languages (3). A general introduction to the origin, development, nature, and importance of English, French, German, and Spanish. A broad study of the culture of the people and the lands where these languages are spoken.

MLA 105 Introduction to Contemporary Culture (3). A survey of the contemporary culture of a selected country or geographic region with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social and political systems and achievements of that culture. Conducted in English. No prerequisite.

MLA 110 Basic Conversational Language (3). A conversation-oriented introduction to the sound system and basic structural patterns of a modern language. Pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing of material related to conversational situations are included. Not applicable toward a major or minor in foreign language. No prerequisite. Only taught abroad.

MLA 201 Intermediate Modern Language I (3). A continuation of MLA 102. Prerequisite:  MLA 102 or consent of instructor.

MLA 202 Intermediate Modern Language II (3). A continuation of MLA 201. Prerequisite:  MLA 201 or consent of instructor.

MLA 205 Western European Culture (3). This course, taught in English, focuses on the contemporary cultural character of Europe. It will combine traditional class work with carefully planned excursions to cultural centers. To be taught only in the Kentucky Institute for International Studies.

MLA 210 Intermediate Modern Language Conversation (3). A course to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year’s study of the same foreign language in college or its equivalent. Prerequisite:  101 and 102 of the same  language.

MLA 400 Senior Seminar (3). In this course, students complete a comprehensive departmental portfolio, present for evaluation the senior research project, and explore professional matters relating to the language major including career opportunities. Students will also evaluate their academic and extracurricular experiences in the Department of Modern Languages and at MSU. Prerequisite:  senior standing.

MLA 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

MLA 510 Applied Linguistics for Second Language Teaching (3). An overview of the basic concepts, scope, and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects, including topics and issues in current linguistic studies. The primary systems of language, psycholinguistics and comparative phonology are treated in depth. Prerequisite: ENG 310. Junior standing or above. (Same as ENG/TSL 510.)

MLA 514 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages (3). Designed to prepare students for the teaching of foreign languages in the public school. Current teaching philosophies, techniques and materials, curriculum innovation and extracurricular activities discussed. Limited observation and performance in a language classroom. Prerequisite:  EDU 303. Junior standing or above.

MLA 520 Computer Assisted Language Learning (3). An introduction to computer assisted language learning (CALL), an overview of its specialized vocabulary and a review of research regarding its effectiveness. (Same as TSL 520.) Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

MLA 523 Testing and Evaluation in Second Language Teaching (3). A review of a number of current methods for classroom/standardized language testing and evaluation. Prerequisite:  junior standing or above.

MLA 533 Language and Culture (3). A study of the relationship among language, society and the individual’s concept of reality. The course examines a variety of anthropological and ethnographic concepts and findings as they relate to language and language learning in its broadest context. The course will also examine socio- and comparative linguistics, the relationship between culture and language, and the implications for second language teaching. (Same as ENG/TSL 533.) Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

MLA 551 Directed Study in Modern Language I (1-3). Independent work in areas of language, culture or literature designed to meet the needs and interests of individual students. May be repeated up to a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite:  two years in college of the same foreign language or the equivalent. Junior standing or above.


Music
(MUS)
Note:  Variation in all applied music courses is related to the degree program of the student. Admission of non-music majors is by permission of the chair only.

MUS 098 Recital Attendance and Assembly (0). All music majors are required to complete successfully six semesters of enrollment unless excused by department chair. Successful completion of the course is achieved by certified attendance at 13 approved recitals per semester and no more than one absence from scheduled assemblies. Graded pass/fail.

MUS 099 Freshman Orientation (1). The course is designed to provide information for the freshman music student about the academic and musical life of the music major. Emphasis will be placed upon university resources and services found on campus. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

MUS 100 Developmental Music Theory (1). A five-week course providing instruction in reading pitches, simple meters, intervals and key signatures. All music major or minors must take this course concurrently with MUS 170 unless a score of 70 % or better is achieved on the music theory diagnostic examination. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements.

MUS 104 Introduction to Jazz History (3). A survey of the many facets of jazz music. Designed to follow stylistic trends as jazz developed from nineteenth-century African and European influences to the modern forms of today. The study of significant composers, compositions, performers and terminology associated with this uniquely American musical form through listening assignments, reading and discussion activities.

MUS 105 Introduction to Music History (3). Understanding and appreciation of music for the beginner. Designed to acquaint the student with the place music holds in heritage through studying and listening to great musical works; to acquaint the student with composers and the influence of history on their compositions; and to create the ability to understand and enjoy music in the world around us. Not open to music majors. Note: students may not count both MUS 105 and 206 toward University Studies requirements. A student cannot have credit for both this course and HON 162.

MUS 106 Music in Film (3). Course will present a survey of the history of film music from the silent era to the present. Students will develop critical listening, viewing, and analytical skill sin relation to music’s function in film. For the viewing of complete films, extra meetings may be held on campus. Students will be expected to view current release films in a local theater.

MUS 109 Introduction to Music Theory (3). Course for the music consumer with an interest in the presentation of the fundamentals of music as they affect music performance, music listening and music understanding.

MUS 114 Freshman Percussion Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 115 Freshman Wind Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 116 Freshman Organ (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 117 Freshman Piano (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute  individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 118 Freshman Violin, Viola, Cello, String Bass or Guitar (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 119 Freshman Voice (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 120 Beginning Classical Guitar Class (1). Instruction for those with limited or no musical background. Note reading, strumming, and theory fundamentals are stressed. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 121 Intermediate Classical Guitar Class (1). Student must be able to read music and have had previous class or private instruction. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 122 Band:  Community (1). Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 123 Introduction to Music Education (3). This course is the initial course for all students seeking a degree in music education. It is designed to provide students with an introduction to the field of music education. Included are topics related to learning theories, curriculum, historical and philosophical foundations of music education, resources for teaching, and twentieth century developments in music education.

MUS 130 Class Voice for Non-Majors (1). A class designed to help non-music major students develop effective and healthy vocal techniques through classical and musical theatre repertoire.

MUS 131 Percussion Methods (1). This class is designed to acquaint the music education major with percussion instruments and pedagogical techniques through participation.

MUS 132 Woodwind Methods (1). This class is designed to acquaint the music education major with woodwind instruments and pedagogical techniques through participation.

MUS 133 String Methods (1). This class is designed to acquaint the music education major with string instruments and pedagogical techniques through participation.

MUS 134 Voice Methods (1). Class designed to help students develop effective and healthy vocal techniques through classical and musical theatre repertoire.

MUS 135 Brass Methods (1). This class is designed to acquaint the music education major with brass instruments and pedagogical techniques through participation.

MUS 136 Fundamentals of Keyboard Accompanying (1). Study of the basic principles of keyboard accompanying. Normally offered during the spring semester. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MUS 150 Instrumental Ensemble (1). Small ensembles concentrating on chamber music literature. Emphasis will be placed upon developing chamber ensemble skills. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 151 University Orchestra (1). The ensemble will study and perform symphonic literature from a variety of style periods. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 152 Marching Band (1). The marching band prepares field performances for all home football games as well as selected away games and exhibitions. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership open.

MUS 153 Brass Choir (1). Designed to give brass and percussion players experience in the study and performance of large brass ensemble literature. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 154 Wind Ensemble (1). The wind ensemble develops an understanding of representative wind band literature through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 155 Jazz Ensemble (1). The jazz ensemble develops an understanding of representative jazz styles and skills through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 156 Jazz Combo (1). Concentration on development of improvisatory techniques through performance and listening skills. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MUS 157 Symphonic Band (1). The symphonic band develops an understanding of representative concert band literature through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership open.

MUS 160 University Chorale (1). University Chorale is dedicated to the study and performance of a wide variety of choral literature from all the major stylistic periods and genres. The development of basic musical skills and proper vocal function is emphasized. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is open.

MUS 161 Concert Choir (1). Concert Choir is dedicated to the study and performance of the masterworks of choral literature from all periods, genres and styles. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is by audition.

MUS 162 Chamber Singers (1). The Chamber Singers study and perform a wide variety of choral literature from all periods, genres and styles with special attention to that body of work composed specifically for small vocal ensembles. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is by audition with concurrent enrollment in MUS 161-361.

MUS 163 Choral Union (1). Choral Union is an ensemble comprised of students and community members and is dedicated to the study and performance of extended choral works, often with orchestra. Prior vocal experience is encouraged. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is open.

MUS 164 Opera Workshop (1). Practical experience in a workshop situation of scenes from opera and/or musical theatre. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 170 Theory I (3). The fundamentals of music through part-writing and analysis. Course content includes key signatures, scales, intervals, triads, and an introduction to figured bass. Taken concurrently with MUS 171 and 172.

MUS 171 Aural Skills I (1). This course is to be taken concurrently with MUS 170 and 172. It offers a  practical application of the materials studied in MUS 170 and provides the necessary drill in the skills of sight-singing and aural perception.

MUS 172 Functional Keyboard I (1). Class instruction in elementary level piano technique, functional keyboard skills and keyboard literature for music majors. This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 170 and 171.

MUS 173 Theory II (3). A continuation of MUS 170 emphasizing inversions of triads, the dominant-seventh chord, non-harmonic tones, and elementary modulations through part-writing, composition and analysis with and without figured bass.  This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 174 and 175. Prerequisite:  MUS 170.

MUS 174 Aural Skills II (1). This course offers a practical application of the materials studied in MUS 173 and provides necessary drill in the skills of sight-singing and aural perception. This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 173 and 175. Prerequisite:  MUS 171.

MUS 175 Functional Keyboard II (1). A continuation of MUS 172. This course should be taken concurrently with MSU 173 and 174. Prerequisite:  MUS 172 or equivalent.

MUS 200 Public School Music I (2). A course designed to prepare the classroom teacher to meet the needs of the music program in the self-contained classroom. Fundamentals of music are stressed along with learning to play the song bells, autoharp, recorder and keyboard. Minimum proficiencies are required.

MUS 214 Sophomore Percussion Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 215 Sophomore Wind Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 216 Sophomore Organ (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 217 Sophomore Piano (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 218 Sophomore Violin, Viola, Cello, String Bass or Guitar (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 219 Sophomore Voice (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 225 English and German Diction for Singers (1). A course designed to give voice majors rules for pronouncing sung English and sung German.

MUS 226 French and Italian Diction for Singers (1). A course designed to give voice majors rules for pronouncing sung French and sung Italian.

MUS 241 Composition I (2-3). The student studies several small-scale compositions by composers from different historical periods, writes original music based on his/her findings and employs compositional techniques acquired in the theory sequence. One or more original compositions will be performed during the semester. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisites:  MUS 173 and 174.

MUS 242 Composition II (2-3). A continuation of MUS 241, this course allows the student to use advanced compositional techniques and permits stylistic freedom. One or more original compositions will be performed during the semester. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisites:  MUS 241 and consent of instructor.

MUS 270 Theory III (3). A continuation of MUS 173, emphasizing diatonic seventh chords, modulation types, secondary functions and chromaticism through composition and analysis. This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 271 and 272. Prerequisite:  MUS 173.

MUS 271 Aural Skills III (1). This course offers a practical application of the materials studied in MUS 270 and provides necessary drill in the skills of sight-singing and aural perception. This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 270 and 272. Prerequisite:  MUS 174.

MUS 272 Functional Keyboard III (1). Class instruction in intermediate level piano technique, functional keyboard skills and keyboard literature for music majors. This course should be taken concurrently with MSU 270 and 271. Prerequisite:  MUS 175 or equivalent.

MUS 273 Theory IV (3). A continuation of MUS 270, emphasizing the Neapolitan and augmented-sixth chords, complex modulations and key schemes, extreme chromaticism, and an introduction to 20th century compositional practices through composition and analysis. This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 274 and 275. Prerequisite:  MUS 270.

MUS 274 Aural Skills IV (1). This course offers a practical application of the materials studied in MUS 273 and provides necessary drill in the skills of sight-singing and aural perception. This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 273 and 275. Prerequisite:  MUS 271.

MUS 275 Functional Keyboard IV (1). A continuation MUS 272. This course should be taken concurrently with MUS 273 and 274. Prerequisite:  MUS 272 or equivalent.

MUS 300 Public School Music II (2). Methods and materials for teaching music in the elementary classroom with an emphasis on integrating music across the curriculum. Prerequisite:  MUS 200.

MUS 301 General Music Methods (3). Fundamentals of music teaching are continued along with procedures for selecting materials, teaching musical concepts, and assessing progress in the musical growth and development of the student. Prerequisites:  Junior standing, all Theory courses completed; Vocal Proficiency must be successfully completed. Prerequisite: MUS 123.

MUS 302 Choral Methods (2). Methods, materials and pedagogy related to the teaching of choral music in the elementary, junior high/middle school and senior high school choirs. Students must be of junior standing. Required for all music education majors. Vocal Proficiency must be successfully completed. Prerequisite: MUS 123.

MUS 303 Instrumental Methods:  Elementary and Middle School (2). Methods, materials and pedagogy related to the teaching of instrumental music in the elementary and middle schools will be studied. Students must be of junior standing and completion of instrument techniques courses is recommended. Vocal proficiency must be successfully completed. Prerequisite: MUS 123.

MUS 304 Advanced Instrumental Methods (2). Methods, materials, organization, administration and pedagogy related to the teaching of instrumental music in the secondary schools. Students must be of junior standing and completion of instrument techniques courses is recommended. Vocal Proficiency must be successfully completed. Prerequisites: MUS 123 and MUS 303 or permission of instructor.

MUS 313 Introduction to Music Synthesis (1). This course emphasizes a study of the concepts and selected applications of computer music in a digital music studio. Course content includes computer techniques, music sequencing, sound design, sound sampling, and the use of MIDI. One or more original compositions using the technology will be performed during the semester. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisites:  MUS 170 and 171.

MUS 314 Junior Percussion Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 315 Junior Wind Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 316 Junior Organ (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 317 Junior Piano (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 318 Junior Violin, Viola, Cello, String Bass, or Guitar (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 319 Junior Voice (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 320 Vocal Pedagogy for the Music Educator (2). This course is designed to acquaint the vocal music education major with the structure, function, and development of the vocal mechanism. Students will learn how to protect and develop the vocal instrument in group instructional settings. Topics include the physiology of the singing voice, basics of singing, characteristics of voices at various ages, teaching singing in the music classroom and in the choral rehearsal, choosing appropriate repertoire, assessing results, and developing musical artistry. Prerequisites:  Junior status, B.M. in Music Education program.

MUS 321 Choral Repertoire (2). Students will explore the evolution of choral forms through the major stylistic periods. Special emphasis will be placed on repertory appropriate for elementary, middle and high school choirs. Prerequisites:  MUS 302:  Choral Methods.

MUS 323 Basic Conducting (2). Fundamentals of instrumental and choral conducting. The course will emphasize basic skills and techniques related to conducting instrumental and choral ensembles.

MUS 326 Marching Band Administration (2). Fundamentals of organization, arranging, charting of shows and aspects of public relations and program development.

MUS 327 Instrumental Arranging (2). An exploration of the principles of instrumental arranging through study of the instruments involved, the traditional and nontraditional groups and their practical application. Prerequisites: MUS 270 and 271.

MUS 328 Choral Arranging (1). A study of the common arranging practices/principles observed in choral music. Special attention is placed on arranging for specific voice configurations commonly observed in public schools. An examination of the copyright law is included. Required for all music education majors on the comprehensive or vocal tracks. Prerequisites: MUS 273 and 274.

MUS 336 Piano as an Ensemble Instrument (1). Ensemble playing, piano duo literature, accompanying and chamber music performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisites:  MUS 136 and consent of instructor.

MUS 350 Instrumental Ensemble (1). Small ensembles concentrating on chamber music literature. Emphasis will be placed upon developing chamber ensemble skills. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 351 University Orchestra (1). The ensemble will study and perform symphonic literature from a variety of style periods. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 352 Marching Band (1). The marching band prepares field performances for all home football games as well as selected away games and exhibitions. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership open.

MUS 353 Brass Choir (1). Designed to give brass and percussion players experience in the study and performance of large brass ensemble literature. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 354 Wind Ensemble (1). The wind ensemble develops an understanding of representative wind band literature through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 355 Jazz Ensemble (1). The jazz ensemble develops an understanding of representative jazz styles and skills through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 356 Jazz Combo (1). Concentration on development of improvisatory techniques through performance and listening skills. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MUS 357 Symphonic Band (1). The symphonic band develops an understanding of representative concert band literature through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership open.

MUS 360 University Chorale (1). University Chorale is dedicated to the study and performance of a wide variety of choral literature from all the major stylistic periods and genres. The development of basic musical skills and proper vocal function is emphasized. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is open.

MUS 361 Concert Choir (1). Concert Choir is dedicated to the study and performance of the masterworks of choral literature from all periods, genres and styles. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is by audition.

MUS 362 Chamber Singers (1). The Chamber Singers study and perform a wide variety of choral literature from all periods, genres and styles with special attention to that body of work composed specifically for small vocal ensembles. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is by audition with concurrent enrollment in MUS 161/361.

MUS 363 Choral Union (1). Choral Union is an ensemble comprised of students and community members and is dedicated to the study and performance of extended choral works, often with orchestra. Prior vocal experience is encouraged. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership is open.

MUS 364 Opera Workshop (1-2). Practical experience in a workshop situation of scenes from opera and/or musical theatre. Only major operatic leads may take MUS 364 for two credits with permission of the instructor. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Membership by audition.

MUS 365 Opera Production (2). Practical experience in costuming, stage management, construction of scenery, and stage lighting for the lyric stage. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 381 Music History and Literature I (3). The study of musical styles and literature from the fifth century B.C. through 1750. A survey of the musical heritage of western music and cultures including such topics as early Christian church music, Middle Ages secular song, Renaissance vocal and instrumental music and Baroque opera, keyboard and instrumental music. Prerequisites: MUS 270 and 271 or permission of instructor.

MUS 382 Music History and Literature II (3). The study of musical styles and literature from 1730 through 1900. A survey of the musical heritage of western music and cultures including such topics as the Pre-Classic composers, Classic-Era symphonies, chamber music, keyboard and wind concerti, and opera and oratorio through Romantic-Era lieder, symphonies, symphonic poems, opera, oratorio, chamber music and concerti. Prerequisite: MUS 381 with a minimum grade of C.

MUS 383 Music History and Literature III (3). The study of musical styles and literature since 1900. A survey of the musical heritage of western music and cultures including modern artistic ideas and styles, music between the two world wars, and new concepts and directions in live and pre-recorded musical media. Special focus will be included on world music from a variety of non-western cultures.  Prerequisite: MUS 381 with a minimum grade of C.

MUS 396 Repertoire/Pedagogy (2). A study of methods and materials available for teaching purposes as well as appropriate repertoire and pedagogical techniques available for various levels of learning.

MUS 398 Junior Recital (0). Bachelor of Music in Performance degree candidates of junior standing enroll in this course the semester of their junior recital.

MUS 414 Senior Percussion Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 415 Senior Wind Instruments (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 416 Senior Organ (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 417 Senior Piano (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 418 Senior Violin, Viola, Cello, String Bass or Guitar (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 419 Senior Voice (1-4). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 423 Instrumental Conducting (2). An in-depth study of instrumental conducting techniques, with emphasis on practical conducting experiences using instrumental ensembles. Attention will be given to the selection, preparation and conducting of literature appropriate to various public school ensemble levels. Prerequisite: MUS 273, 274, 323, or permission of instructor.

MUS 424 Choral Conducting (2). An in-depth study of choral conducting techniques, with emphasis on practical conducting experiences using choral ensembles. Attention will be given to the selection, preparation and conducting of literature appropriate to various public school ensemble levels. Prerequisite:  MUS 273, 274, 323, or permission of instructor.

MUS 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

MUS 439 Harpsichord (1). One 25-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. For keyboard studies majors only. Prerequisite: MUS 116-316 or 117-317.

MUS 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MUS 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MUS 490 Senior Seminar (1). A course designed to provide an opportunity for students in all three degree programs to meet with the music faculty to explore topics of mutual concern; a culminating experience in which students examine uniquenesses and differences of their programs in consideration of trends and concepts in music, the arts and places of these in human experience; a forum for verbal and non-verbal program assessment.

MUS 496 Repertoire/Pedagogy (2). A continuation of MUS 396. Required of B.M. degree students. Prerequisite: MUS 396 or equivalent.

MUS 497 Final Project (0). The final project may be a research paper, a musical composition or other work acceptable to both student and advisory committee. Bachelor of Arts in Music candidates in the research track enroll in this course during the seventh or eighth semester of study.

MUS 498 Senior Recital (0). Undergraduate degree candidates enroll in this course during the semester of their senior recital.

MUS 499 Concerto Performance (0). Undergraduate degree candidates in the Bachelor of Music in Performance program enroll in this course the semester of their concerto performance.

MUS 510 Pedagogy of Theory (2). An examination of current materials and practices in the teaching of theory; discussion and research of the problems of theory teaching with particular emphasis on application to and place in the secondary school and the junior college. (On demand)

MUS 511 Techniques of Twentieth-Century Music (3). Looks at elements of tonal theory to understand how music progressed toward new trends in the twentieth century. Compositional techniques in the music of selected twentieth-century composers will be studied and a determination of theoretical practices will be made. Standards of judgment, justification of practices and current trends in musical composition will be evaluated. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MUS 273 and 274.

MUS 512 Counterpoint (3). Contrapuntal practices from the 16th century to the modern era. There will be particular emphasis on contrapuntal writing of the 18th century as exemplified in the works of J.S. Bach. Study of species counterpoint, analysis of representative composition, and writing of contrapuntal works. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MUS 273 and 274.

MUS 513 Form and Analysis (3). A study in harmonic analysis and the forms of composition throughout the history of music. Prerequisites: MUS 273 and 274 with a grade of C or better.

MUS 514 Applied Music Study—Percussion Instruments (1-3). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of 400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 515 Applied Music Study—Wind Instruments  (1-3). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of 400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 516 Applied Music Study—Organ (1-3). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 517 Applied Music Study—Piano (1-3) One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 518 Applied Music Study—String Instruments (1-3) One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 519 Applied Music Study—Voice (1-3) One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.
 
MUS 520 Keyboard Literature and Performance Practice (2). Keyboard literature from the pre-Baroque era through the 20th century. Stylistic considerations, performance practices, ornamentation, etc., for each period researched and discussed. Prerequisite:  consent of the instructor. (On demand)

MUS 530 Special Topics (3). A study of selected musical topics:  composers, genres, etc. The course will allow students to study topics in a concentrated, in-depth manner. Specific topics will vary by semester according to student and faculty advisor interests. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite:  instructor approval.

MUS 533 String Techniques (2). Techniques of teaching stringed instruments through participation. Special reports and discussions on the development of string programs in schools required. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of department chair. Prerequisite:  MUS 133 or equivalent. (On demand)

MUS 535 Double Reed Techniques (2). Course designed to acquaint the student with idiomatic problems related to the construction and use of bassoon, oboe and English horn reeds; study includes reed construction with observation of characteristics and relationship of the reed to tone production and quality. Prerequisite:  MUS 132 or equivalent.

MUS 540 Piano Pedagogy (2). Piano teaching including the examination and evaluation of beginning and intermediate teaching methods, analysis of technical approaches, research into the history of piano pedagogy. Observations and supervised practice teaching required. Prerequisite:  consent of the instructor. (On demand)

MUS 541 Vocal Pedagogy (2). Techniques, practices and materials used in the teaching of singing. Discussion of psychological and physical developmental growth principles applied to individual and group performance. (On demand)

MUS 550 Independent Study in Music (1-3). Independent study for selected students. Topics, methodology and evaluation procedures to be approved in advance by the instructor. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite:  consent of department chair and instructor.

MUS 593 Workshop in Music for Teachers (1-3). A variable credit workshop with selected topics appropriate to music educators. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.


National Student Exchange
(NSE)
NSE 300 National Student Exchange (6-15).


Nutrition
(NTN)
NTN 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Same as CDI/EXS/HEA/REC 099.)

NTN 230 Nutrition (3). Principles of nutrition related to normal health include ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that determine eating patterns; nutrient components of foods and their functions; physical and chemical processes of using food nutrients. Lecture, three hours.

NTN 231 Principles of Food Science and Preparation (3). Emphasis on understanding and applying the basic physical and chemical properties of foods. Development of skills in recipe interpretation, cooking methods, storage, sanitation, and kitchen management. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours.

NTN 233 Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle (3). Identification of the nutritional needs and problems of individuals as they relate to physiological functions of the body at various stages of the life cycle. Specific health problems that require dietary intervention will be examined. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisite: NTN 230.

NTN 235 Quantity Food Production Practicum (1-2). Field experience to help students apply basic food preparation techniques, safety and sanitation procedures, work organization, and styles of service in quantity food establishments. Three clock hours per week for 1 credit hour, six clock hours per week for 2 credit hours. Corequisite:  NTN 372.

NTN 312 Community Nutrition and Health (3). Study of problems in community nutrition and health including family and personal health issues, governmental health agencies and the development of community nutrition programs. Lecture, three hours.

NTN 332 Meal Management (3). Production and service of nutritious meals for groups in a restaurant type environment. Students manage the meal service incorporating nutrition guidelines as well as resource management principles. Four hours of laboratory and one hour of lecture per week. Prerequisite:  NTN 230, 231. NTN 372 recommended.

NTN 372 Quantity Food Production and Purchasing (3). Principles of quantity food production: production flow, distribution and control. Use of the menu as a purchasing and production tool in accordance with budgetary, personnel and equipment constraints. Understanding principles of inventory and cost control.  Corequisite:  NTN 235.

NTN 373 Management of Food Service, Personnel and Facilities (3). Functions of management applied to food service systems; cost analysis and control systems; design of physical facilities and selection of equipment; and training and development of personnel. Prerequisites:  NTN 372.

NTN 374 Food Service Management Practicum (3). Supervised work experience to help students apply concepts of food service management. Prerequisites: NTN 235, 372. Corequisite: NTN 373.

NTN 399 Senior Seminar (1). Seminar for students in dietetics, nutrition, or food management focusing on professional issues, the internship application process, employment opportunities, interview skills, resume and portfolio development, and related problems. Recommended for students in the senior year.

NTN 402 The Market Trip (1-3). Field experience at a major market for apparel, design, housing, food or retail businesses. The internship assignment would be an agreement by both department and the participating employer and credit will be determined accordingly. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

NTN 432 Experimental Foods (3). Objective and sensory methods of evaluating chemical and physical qualities of food; the interpretation of related research and writing of simple technical papers. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. Prerequisites:  NTN 231, some chemistry.

NTN 434 Clinical Dietetics Practicum (1). Field experience in clinical dietetics to help students apply classroom instruction in a community facility under the supervision of a Registered Dietitian.  Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and NTN 230, 233, and 440, 535, or 536.

NTN 440 Clinical Dietetics (3). An introduction to patient care practices involving nutrition and dietetics, nutritional assessments, medical record documentation processes, and information needed in the practice of dietetics. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites:  NTN 230, 233, chemistry and biology or consent of instructor.

NTN 480 Special Problems in Nutrition and Foods (1-3). Course designed to enable the student to pursue independent study in selected areas of nutrition, dietetics, or food management. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: consent of the department chair and instructor supervising the project.

NTN 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

NTN 531 Food Economics (3). A study of the economical, legislative, physical and microbiological factors that affect the food supply during processing, packaging and distribution. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, arranged.

NTN 532 Advanced Nutrition (3). Advanced study of nutrition and human metabolism with emphasis on recent research. Diet pattern inter-relationship in physical health; research procedures and interpretation used in an individual project. The field of dietetics, its professional roles and responsibilities. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites:  NTN 230, chemistry and biology.

NTN 535 Medical Nutrition Therapy and Disease (3). Understanding the role of nutrition in the pathophysiology of disease:  developing therapeutic diets in the treatment of common medical condition.  Prerequisites:  BIO 101, CHE 105, NTN 230 and 233.

NTN 536 Methods in Medical Nutrition Therapy (3). Understanding medical nutrition therapies involving diseases of carbohydrate metabolism and protein metabolism.  Comprehensive approaches to nutrition therapy via oral, enteral and parenteral methods. Prerequisites:  BIO 101, CHE 105, NTN 230 and 233.

NTN 597 Trends and Issues in Nutrition and Foods (1-3). Topics may differ from semester to semester depending on program needs. Investigation of current problems, issues and topics in food, nutrition and dietetics. May be repeated when topic differs.


Nursing
(NUR)
NUR 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

NUR 200 Introduction to Nursing Concepts (3). This course introduces the student to professional nursing. Focus of the course is on the concepts of nursing, person, health and environment with an emphasis on human development and health promotion.

NUR 201 Nursing Assessment (3). A course providing learning experiences needed to acquire assessment knowledge and skills for eliciting a sound data base. Activities involve interviewing, recognizing psychosocial-developmental status, performing physical examination, interpreting test findings, documenting findings and stating nursing diagnoses. Differentiation of nursing responsibilities associated with a variety of health states and developmental levels is addressed. Two hours theory and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 200, pre- or co-requisite; RNs-admission to program.

NUR 204 Nursing Practice Fundamentals (6). A course designed to offer opportunities for the student to gain knowledge and fundamental skills essential to client care and health promotion. Focus of the course is on using the nursing process to assist individuals in coping with health problems and in achieving and maintaining optimal health. Three hours theory and nine hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 200, 201 and 205 (pre- or co-requisites).

NUR 205 Pharmacology in Nursing (3). This course is designed to present basic facts and principles upon which therapeutic pharmacology is founded. Areas discussed are major drug classifications, desired drug actions, and undesirable side and/or toxic effects of drugs. Emphasis will be placed on the nurse’s legal responsibilities in administering these drugs and specific implications which are inherent in drug therapy. Prerequisites:  admission to nursing, NUR 200 and 201, (pre- or co-requisite).

NUR 303 Nursing Care of the Childbearing Families (5). Care of the childbearing family is a course designed to provide the student with the opportunity to gain knowledge and skills necessary to give nursing care to the expanding family. The impact of pregnancy upon the mother’s physical status and the family’s emotional and developmental status is studied in depth. Emphasis is placed on the growth and development of the individual from conception throughout the first four weeks of life. Three hours lecture and six hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 200, 201, 204, 205; BIO 229, 300; NTN 230.

NUR 304 Nursing Care of Childrearing Families (5). A study of the nursing of children from infancy through adolescence at any position on the health continuum. Emphasis is placed on health promotion through primary prevention, assessment for actual or potential health problems, teaching and counseling children and their families, and helping children to adapt to physical and psychosocial stress. Theoretical principles are applied in various clinical settings. Three hours lecture and six hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 303.

NUR 311  Nursing Care of Adults I (5). A combined theory/clinical course which presents physiological and psychological concepts relevant to nursing practice. Theory focuses on the nursing process during phases of common major dysfunctions. The clinical focus is on the implementation of the nursing process in the care of ill adults and their families. Three hours lecture and six hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 200, 201, 204, 205; BIO 229, 300; NTN 230.

NUR 312 Nursing Care of Adults II (5). A combined theory/clinical course which presents physiological and psychological concepts relevant to nursing practice. Theory focuses on the nursing process during phases of common and less common major dysfunctions. The clinical focus is on the implementation of the nursing process in the care of ill adults and their families. Three hours lecture and six hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 311.

NUR 314 Introduction to the Process and Practice of Professional Nursing (3). Designed to provide the student with concepts and theories basic to baccalaureate nursing education. Professional nursing practice is emphasized. Analysis and synthesis of knowledge from other disciplines are incorporated into the practice of nursing. Prerequisites:  admission to the RN-BSN program and required semester of admission.

NUR 320 Holistic Approach to Women’s Health Issues (3). A course designed to provide the student with the opportunity to gain knowledge necessary to give nursing care to women across the life-span. Issues specific to women are studied in depth. Prerequisites: NUR 304, 312; RN to BSN students-NUR 314.

NUR 340 Sociology of Medicine (3). An examination of sociological perspectives on systems of medical care. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the structure and organization of health care institutions and societal responses to problems of illness and disease. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor. (Same as GTY/SOC 340.)

NUR 401 Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (5). The focus of this course is individuals and groups with actual or potential psychiatric/mental health needs. Students are provided the opportunity to utilize knowledge and promote mental health across the life span. Also included is an exploration of the mental health care delivery system and community resources available. The course offers opportunities for students to enhance personal and interpersonal awareness. Knowledge synthesized from classroom and laboratory experiences provide the base for psychiatric/mental health nursing practice. Three hours lecture and six hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: GUI 592 or approved elective; NUR 304 and 312.

NUR 403 Community Health Nursing (5). An overview of the philosophy of community health care and trends in community health services delivery. The emphasis is on prevention of illness and promotion of health of individuals, families, communities, and related socio-cultural and environmental factors. A brief description of the political and financial structure at the local, state and national level is presented along with community health nursing’s relationship to it. Three hours lecture and six hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 401, 405, 406; GUI 592 or approved course; RNs-NUR 314, pre- or co-requisite.

NUR 404 Leadership and Management in Nursing (5). A study and/or review of leadership and management concepts relevant to working with groups of people in providing care for groups of clients. Opportunity for application of these concepts and integration of nursing knowledge and skills is provided through experiences in a clinical setting. The student is expected to work collaboratively and to increase his/her competence and confidence in providing nursing care. Three hours lecture and six hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisite:  NUR 401, 405, 406; RNs-NUR 314, pre- or co-requisite.

NUR 405 The Nursing Profession and Health Care Delivery (3). An identification and analysis of the current and emerging issues in nursing and those forces impinging upon the nursing profession and health care delivery. Nursing as an independent profession, and the interdependent and collaborative relationships with other health related professions will be explored. Prerequisites:  NUR 304, 312; RNs-NUR 314, pre- or co-requisite.

NUR 406 Introduction to Research in Nursing (3). This course is designed to assist the student to become a knowledgeable consumer of research in nursing. Methods and strategies utilized for research in nursing are examined. A major focus is on increasing the student’s ability to analyze, criticize, and interpret research and its application to clinical practice. Prerequisites: Descriptive and Inferential Statistics, MAT 135, PSY 300 or 591; admission into the BSN program; RNs-NUR 314, pre- or co-requisite.

NUR 407 Integration Practicum (4). A combined seminar/clinical course to allow clinical integration of all study in previous nursing courses. The focus of the course is on clinical application of physiological and psychological concepts in caring for clients with complex health problems and their families in acute care settings. The seminar component is to provide direction in using the nursing process in the care of ill adults and families with complex health problems. One hour lecture and nine hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  all courses in the nursing curriculum and NCLEX Readiness Test.

NUR 411 Problems in Nursing (1-3). Designed to permit special study in selected problems of nursing. Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and approval of written proposal.

NUR 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

NUR 440 Directed Study (1-3). Faculty directed study is available for students, individually or in groups, who want to investigate special problems extending study begun in course work in clinical nursing. Prerequisites:  approval of written proposal and consent of the instructor directing the study. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours.

NUR 445 The Professional Nurse as Client Educator (3). Patient education is an elective course in nursing designed to assist the nurse to develop those skills and intellectual competencies necessary for providing comprehensive health education across the lifespan. The role of the professional nurse as client educator will be explored. Two hours lecture/seminar and three hours clinical laboratory weekly. Prerequisites:  NUR 204 and 205 or R.N. status.

NUR 447 Stress Management (3). This course is designed to acquaint the student with methods of personal stress and lifestyle management. It provides a foundation in wellness and stress management concepts and practices that the student can use in both professional and personal realms throughout the lifespan.

NUR 450 Independent Study (3). Faculty supervised individual study and/or investigation of selected areas of nursing related to student’s academic and/or career goals. Prerequisites:  senior standing and consent of department chair.

NUR 460 Special Topics (3). Course designed to assist students in expanding their knowledge base and developing additional skills in the field of nursing. Topics may vary depending on current issues and practices. Course may be repeated once with instructor’s approval. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

NUR 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

NUR 515 Medical Ethics (3). Study of moral issues in medical ethics such as the rights of patients (truth-telling, confidentiality), the duties of health professionals, the allocation of scarce medical resources, and euthanasia. (Same as PHI 515.)

NUR 520 Critical Care Concepts and Application (3). A theoretical course which presents physiological and psychological concepts and their application relevant to critical care nursing practice. Theory focuses on the nursing process during phases of common major dysfunction. The application of theory is addressed through a case study format with use of simulated clinical lab experiences. For graduate credit, three credit hours distributed as two credit hours theory; one credit hour clinical practicum. This is to meet clinical hour requirement for certification for advanced practice.

NUR 537 Complementary Healing Modalities (3). A combined theory/clinical course which explores complementary healing modalities as therapeutic nursing interventions that can be used with traditional medical practices or when traditional medical practices offer no cure or relief. A specific complementary healing modality (therapeutic touch) will be fully examined and practiced in the field setting. Prerequisites:  NUR 204 or R.N. status; both must meet clinical requirements.

NUR 540 Directed Study (1-3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

NUR 550 Independent Study (1-3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


Occupational Safety and Health
(OSH)

OSH 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Meetings with advisors, department personnel, service areas, and campus field trips comprise the main involvement. Availability of university resources is stressed with emphasis on personal needs. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

OSH 101 Emergency Medical Training (7). Designed to cover the overall role and responsibilities of the emergency medical technician -basic in performing both the emergency care and operational aspects of his/her job. Also covers diagnosis and all emergency treatment procedures short of those rendered by physicians. Successful completion of all required coursework and examinations will qualify the student to apply for state and national registry certification.

OSH 192 Introduction to Occupational Safety and Health (3). Development of accident-prevention and loss-control methods, procedures, and programs in industrial establishments; application of codes and safety-engineering and management principles.

OSH 287 OSHA Standards for General Industry and Construction (3). A study of OSHA regulations for general industry and construction, comparing parallel standards in 29 CFR 1910 and 29 CFR 1926. The course will cover topics addressed in the 10-hour OSHA outreach courses. “Best practices” related to mandatory standards will also be discussed. Students will learn how to create a coherent company safety manual that combines program management topics, mandatory standards and general good safety practices in a user-friendly format.

OSH 299 Professional Development Seminar I (1). Seminar for students in occupational safety and health, focusing on the job search process, employment opportunities, interviewing techniques and related problems. Introductory-level course recommended for students preparing for their first internship, generally in the sophomore or junior year. Graded pass/fail.

OSH 301 Product Liability (3). An examination of the problems and current practices in both industry and government pertaining to the design, production, testing and economic consideration of product hazards. Attention will be given to the impact of design deficiencies on the public and the liability involved. Prerequisite:  ITD 120.

OSH 310 Fire and Emergency Preparedness Preplanning (3). Analysis of the historical perspective of fire science and examination of the various fields of study that make up the fire science curriculum. Fire control through building construction, occupancy, occupancy hazard control, life-saving tactics and knowledge. Control of flammable gases, solids, liquids, dusts, chemicals and explosives. In addition, the course is designed to develop an awareness and comprehension of the disasters known to modern man, including a detailed description of their characteristics and physical destructive potential, and to develop student awareness of all agency, public and individual responsibilities prior to, during and after the occurrence of any type of disaster. Prerequisites:  CHE 105 and OSH 192.

OSH 311 Hazardous Materials and Emergency Planning (3). This course is designed to develop an awareness and comprehension of disaster response programs, operations and responsibilities emphasizing the transportation, storage and handling of hazardous materials. Prerequisite:  CHE 105 and OSH 192.

OSH 320 Environmental and Occupational Health Engineering Technology (3). An environmental overview course that examines scientific causes and engineering solutions to water and air pollution problems. Focus is on adverse effects, generation sources, scientific principles, and EPA engineering control strategies. Solid and hazardous waste disposal methods are also covered.  Prerequisites:  BIO 101, CHE 105 and OSH 192.

OSH 353 Prevention of Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Workplace (3). A course examining the occurrence and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in the workplace. Emphasis is on recognizing and identifying MSD signs and symptoms, contributing risk factors, control methods, training and prevention program development and implementation, and management issues. Prerequisites:  OSH 192.

OSH 370 Professional Internship I (3). Work experience or training in industry. Evaluation of work experience made by department. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  junior standing or consent of instructor.

OSH 371 Professional Internship II (3). Work experience or training in industry. Evaluation of experience made by department. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  junior standing or consent of instructor.

OSH 384 Construction Safety (3). Course will include management techniques necessary to address the unique needs of the construction workplace as contrasted to general industry, as well as a study of applicable standards and methods of recognition, avoidance and prevention of potential hazards. This course builds on OSH 287. It is assumed that student has a good grasp of the general industry standards. Prerequisite:  OSH 287 or consent of instructor.

OSH 420 Industrial Hygiene I (3). An introduction to the field of industrial hygiene, including the chemical, physical, and biological agents which affect the health and safety of employees; the application of control measures for the various agents; study of threshold limit values and occupational health toxicology. Prerequisites:  CHE 105, CHE 210/215, MAT 230 and PHY 125.

OSH 425 Physical Agents (3). The study of physical agents including noise, radiation (ionizing and non-ionizing forms), abnormal atmospheric pressure, and heat and cold stresses in the workplace. Emphasis is given to properties, measurements, health effects and engineering controls recommended and practiced by OSHA. Prerequisite: OSH 420.

OSH 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

OSH 445 Fundamentals of Loss Control (3). An analysis of actual or potential exposures to hazards and their resultant losses posed by agents, energy forms, forces, and substances in the workplace; measuring the loss exposures created by those hazards; and managing the appropriate counter measures to compensate for perils presented by those losses. Field experiences required. Prerequisites: OSH 192, 287, 353, and 420.
 
OSH 450 Practical Application Lab (2). Course designed to assist students in understanding the various instruments that are utilized in occupational safety and health (industrial hygiene, ergonomics, and environmental sciences) and give them the chance to fully understand the way these instruments are calibrated and applied as well as their advantages and disadvantages. Intended for students in their junior or senior year. Field experience required. Prerequisites: OSH 320, 420, 425, and/or instructor’s approval.

OSH 452 Systems Approach to Hazard Control (3). This course is designed to identify the broad spectrum of actual and potential hazards such as biological, mechanical, and human factors, involving product safety, system development, and the workplace and to apply a systems approach to their resolution. Includes such areas as product and preliminary hazard analysis, failure mode and effects analysis, and fault tree analysis. Prerequisite:  OSH 192.

OSH 453 Human Factors in Safety Engineering (3). An analysis of the man-machine relationship and the biological, physiological and psychological factors that contribute to accident causation; examination of theoretical and applied research findings. Prerequisites:  OSH 192 and PSY 180.

OSH 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

OSH 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

OSH 499 Professional Development Seminar II (1). Seminar for students students in occupational safety and health, focusing on the transition to the world of work and related problems. Recommended for students in the senior year. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  OSH 299.

OSH 511 Hazardous Waste Site Operation (3). This course will train the student to become a hazardous materials specialist. The course will explore the various aspects of the hazardous waste site (especially Superfund Sites), including rights and responsibilities, hazard recognition and monitoring.

OSH 523 Occupational Diseases (3). Survey of occupational diseases covering routes of entry and modes of action. In particular, the pathogenicity, epidemiology and diagnosis of occupational diseases will be stressed as they relate to chemical, biological and radiological hazards, dermatoses, airway diseases, plant and wood hazards, chemical carcinogens, and pesticides. Prerequisite:  CHE 210.

OSH 527 Air Contaminants and Industrial Ventilation (3). A course examining air contaminant problems, gas calculations, and industrial ventilation. This course covers the EPA laws and regulations, and the scientific principles and controls of classical air pollution problems. It also focuses on the engineering evaluation and design of industrial ventilation systems. Prerequisite:  OSH 320 or consent of instructor. (Same as CET 527.)

OSH 536 Motor Fleet Safety (3). A basic introduction to problems and practices of motor fleet safety programming with emphasis on regulatory requirements.

OSH 545 Loss Control Measurement and Management (3). An analysis of actual or potential exposures to hazards and their resultant losses posed by agents, energy forms, forces and substances in the workplace; measuring the loss exposures created by those hazards; and managing the appropriate counter-measuring to compensate for perils presented by those losses. Prerequisite:  OSH 192, 287, 353, and 420.

OSH 546 Fundamentals of Risk Control (3). An analysis of risk control as a component of risk management, the systematic process of managing an organization’s risk exposures to achieve its business objectives in a manner consistent with public interest, human safety, environmental factors, and the law. Risk control consists of the administrative, procedural and engineering activities undertaken with the intent of preventing accidental or unplanned loss consistent with the organization’s overall risk management plan. Prerequisite:  OSH 192 and 287.

OSH 550 Safety and Health Program Management and Training (3). The concepts, relationships and principles of managing the occupational safety and health function and the development of training procedures and practices to integrate that function into the organization. Prerequisite:  OSH 192 and 287.

OSH 571 Problems in Safety and Health (1-3). Individual study and research relating to safety and health. May be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisites:  approval of problem before registering for course and junior standing.

OSH 578 Workshop in Safety and Health (1-3). Workshops on topics pertinent to industry and technology. May be repeated for additional credit.

OSH 591 Engineering and Technical Aspects of Safety (3). A study of the properties and applications of industrial materials, manufacturing processes, engineering graphics, electricity, materials testing, selected plant facilities and other aspects of the work environment. Emphasis is placed on the application of this information to safety practices, hazard mitigation and loss control. Prerequisites:  OSH 192 and ITD 120.


Office Systems
(OSY)
OSY 101 Keyboarding (1). Development of basic touch keyboarding skills for computer or typewriter use.

OSY 120 Introduction to Information Processing (3). An introduction to the operation of information processing equipment —microcomputers. The students develop skills in using data processing and word processing hardware and software.

OSY 140 Beginning Word Processing (1). A course to provide a basic understanding of fundamental word processing concepts. The students will receive hands-on instruction in the use of microcomputer word processing applications packages and have access to a microcomputer laboratory.

OSY 141 Beginning Spreadsheets (1). A course to provide a basic understanding of fundamental spreadsheet concepts. The student will receive hands-on instruction in the use of microcomputer spreadsheet applications packages and have access to a microcomputer laboratory.

OSY 142 Beginning Database (1). A course to provide a basic understanding of fundamental database concepts. The student will receive hands-on instruction in the use of a microcomputer database applications package and have access to a microcomputer laboratory.

OSY 210 Word Processing (3). This course builds on basic keyboarding techniques. The development of occupation-level formatting/production skills is stressed. Prerequisite:  keyboarding and microcomputer skill.

OSY 214 Office Information Systems (3). This course provides an overview of office systems emphasizing technology and procedures as they impact productivity. It enables students to develop skills in office procedures and tasks involved in the efficient day-to-day operation of an office. Prerequisites:  OSY 210 with minimum grade of C or consent of instructor.

OSY 240 Advanced Word Processing (1). A course to provide an advanced understanding of word processing concepts. The students will receive hands-on instruction in the use of microcomputer word processing applications packages and have access to a microcomputer laboratory.

OSY 241 Advanced Spreadsheets (1). A course to provide an understanding of advanced spreadsheet concepts. The student will receive hands-on instruction in the use of microcomputer spreadsheet applications packages and have access to a microcomputer laboratory.

OSY 245 Graphic Presentations for Business (1). A course to provide an understanding of fundamental graphic application concepts. The student will receive hands-on instruction in the use of microcomputer graphic applications packages and have access to a microcomputer laboratory.

OSY 315 Office Systems Applications (3). A course which acquaints students with administrative support positions and concentrates on advanced office technologies — hardware, desktop publishing software, scanners and automated office operations. Prerequisites:  junior standing; OSY 120, CSC 199 or consent of instructor.

OSY 320 Integrated Information Processing (3). This course is a review of fundamental word processing, spreadsheet and file management functions. An introduction to advanced word processing, spreadsheet and graphics presentation functions is included. Prerequisites:  junior standing; OSY 120 or CSC 199.


Physical Education
(PHE)
PHE 101 Physical Education for the Exceptional Student (1).

PHE 205 Teaching Lifetime Sports (3). At least four of the following sports will be taught:  fitness, golf, tennis, bowling, badminton, archery and outdoor leisure activities. Prerequisite: HPE 175 (may be taken simultaneously).

PHE 206 Teaching Team Sports (3). To provide the prospective physical education teacher with information and skill related to at least four team sports. Prerequisite: HPE 175 (may be taken simultaneously).

PHE 285 Football and Basketball Officiating (2). Football and basketball rules and theories of officiating.

PHE 286 Football Officiating Laboratory (1). Football officiating experiences will be provided. Prerequisite:  PHE 285 (may be taken simultaneously).

PHE 287 Basketball Officiating Laboratory (1). Basketball officiating experiences will be provided. Prerequisite:  PHE 286 (may be taken simultaneously).

PHE 289 Officiating Soccer (1). This course is intended to prepare students for a role as a certified soccer official. Certification is optional. The student will learn the laws of the game of soccer through a United States Soccer Federation certified instructor. The format of the class will be lecture and class participation. Each class will last four hours for four nights, one night per week.

PHE 306 Teaching Dance and Gymnastics (3). The course is designed to provide the prospective physical education teacher with the skills necessary to teach dance and gymnastics at the elementary and secondary school level. Prerequisite: HPE 175 (may be taken simultaneously).

PHE 310 Fundamentals of Athletic Coaching (2). This course is designed to introduce prospective athletic coaches and physical education teachers to the theory and applied practice of athletic coaching.

PHE 312 Coaching Football I (2). This course will present the technique and strategy in the various styles of offense and defense. Laboratory experience will be provided.

PHE 314 Coaching Basketball I (2). The various systems of defense and offense in basketball will be discussed and demonstrated. Laboratory experience will be provided.

PHE 316 Coaching Baseball I (2). The strategy and fundamentals of baseball will be discussed and demonstrated. Laboratory experience will be provided.

PHE 318 Coaching Track and Field I (2). The basic fundamentals of track and field will be presented and demonstrated. Laboratory experience will be provided.

PHE 319 Coaching Soccer (2). This course is designed to introduce basic soccer coaching techniques. During the class students will learn various soccer practice drills, conditioning, and ball handling techniques through actual practice and lecture material. Students will have the opportunity to compare and contrast various styles of soccer, e.g. European, South American and American styles. This class will be taught once a week for two hours.

PHE 400 Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary Schools (3). Investigation, appraisal and practice of methods, techniques, and materials for development of motor skill learning in the elementary school child. Prerequisite: HPE 175, junior or senior standing, or permission of program coordinator.

PHE 404 Adapted Physical Education (3). Designed to develop understanding, knowledge and skills that encompass the theory and practice in physical education programs for special populations. Field experience required. Prerequisite: HPE 175, junior or senior standing, or permission of program coordinator.

PHE 405 Physiology of Exercise and Fitness (3). Concepts of physiology as applied to exercise and fitness directed toward the needs of physical education teachers. Occasional integrated experimental laboratories.

PHE 412 Coaching Football II (2). Presentations of philosophies, strategy, and skills that the aspiring football coach will need to develop professionally in the football coaching field. This course will include techniques of scouting; preparation of team for games; practice preparation; offense, defense, and kicking game strategy and skills; personnel; pre-game and post-game evaluation. Prerequisite:  PHE 312 or consent of instructor.

PHE 414 Coaching Basketball II (2). An in-depth study of basketball strategy and team play, involving such areas as the fast break, team offense, team defense, presses, and special situations. Also, various teaching, communication, and motivational techniques. Prerequisite:  PHE 314 or consent of instructor.

PHE 416 Coaching Baseball II (2). A review of baseball fundamentals, strategies, theories of coaching, scouting and the intricacies of offensive and defense play will be stressed. Prerequisite:  PHE 316 or consent of instructor.

PHE 418 Coaching Track and Field II (2). Advanced methods and philosophies of coaching will be presented with special emphasis upon preparation of athletes in specialized events. Prerequisite:  PHE 318 or consent of instructor.

PHE 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

PHE 530 Intramurals and Interscholastic Athletics (3). A study of the administration policies and problems of intramurals and athletic programs on the high school level. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work.


Philosophy
(PHI)
PHI 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

PHI 103 Critical Thinking (3). Course provides an introduction to reasoning in everyday life. It focuses on recognizing and evaluating arguments in advertising, news, politics, and ordinary conversation. Students will learn how to recognize and avoid informal fallacies and other common errors in reasoning, including use of statistics and misuse of data or incomplete information.

PHI 201 Introduction to Philosophy (3). An introduction to fundamental questions in philosophy about self-knowledge, moral decision-making, knowledge about the world and others, the limits of knowing, and the perennial search for meaning. Emphasis will be given to the evaluation of arguments, philosophical inquiry, and reflection on the nature of human existence. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102, or ENG 104.

PHI 202 Ethics (3). Introduction to classic and contemporary problems of personal and social morality and to the systems and methods proposed by philosophers, past and present, in response to questions of good and evil. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102, or ENG 104.

PHI 303 Symbolic Logic (3). A systematic study of the fundamentals of logic, focusing on the concepts and methods of contemporary logics systems, which will include learning proofs of reasoning using mechanical decision procedures such as truth tables and truth trees.

PHI 304 History of Philosophy I: Ancient/Medieval (3). This course examines the birth of Western philosophy in Ancient Greece from its pre-Socratic origins, through Classical and Roman thought and extenuations within Judaic, Christian, and Islamic traditions, and ending with neo-Platonic thought and the medieval period. Prerequisite: PHI 201.

PHI 305 History of Philosophy II: Modern/19th Century (3). This course examines major figures and themes in the development of modern thought, focusing on the Rationalist and Empiricist traditions and the development of modern science, and ends with an examination of the emergence of Idealism and Romanticism in the 19th Century. Prerequisite: PHI 201

PHI 307 Epistemology (3). A study of issues in knowledge and justification, which will include such topics as the nature of knowledge, skepticism, perception, theories of justification, and the structure of belief. Prerequisites: PHI 201 or consent of instructor.

PHI 308 Metaphysics (3). A study of the fundamental nature of reality, causation, the external world, free will and determinism, God, the mind-body problem, temporality, identity, substance and theories of possible worlds. Prerequisites: PHI 201 or consent of instructor.

PHI 310 American Philosophy (3). An examination of the philosophical traditions shaping American culture past and present that will include influences from the Puritan tradition, Slavery, and Native American narratives, and intellectual movements such as Transcendentalism, Pragmatism, and Neo-pragmatism. Prerequisite: PHI 201 or consent of instructor.

PHI 315 Social and Political Philosophy (3). A study of the theoretical foundations of political and social thought that include theories of the state, justice, and revolution. Philosophers whose work influences our understanding of justice, government, gender roles, work, and other political/ cultural institutions today will be examined. Prerequisites: PHI 201 or consent of instructor.

PHI 321 Philosophy of Religion (3). A study of basic philosophical issues in the consideration of religion, such as the basis for religious belief, the nature of religion, the cogency of talk about God, the meaning of evil. (Same as RGS 321.)

PHI 322 Philosophy of History (3). A study of some of the basic philosophical theories of history as found in the writings of such thinkers as Augustine, Hegel, Marx, Spengler and Collingwood.

PHI 325 Philosophy of Art (3). Study of historic and contemporary theories of art that will focus on questions such as what constitutes art, beauty, and artistic activity, and will also explore the role of institutions in relation to art and criticism. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102, or ENG 104.

PHI 330 Medical Ethics (3). Study of ethical questions related to availability of healthcare and duties of healthcare workers, patients’ rights-including the right to die, and current topics. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or 104).

PHI 340 Special Topics (1-3). A study of a philosophical subject chosen for its particular topical or thematic interest. Topics will vary. May be taken up to three times for credit with the permission of the program director.

PHI 350 Philosophy of Science (3). Survey course introducing students to descriptions of scientific method and theory construction, which may include topics such as the relationship between theory confirmation, explanation, prediction, and discovery, as well as theories of change and scientific rationality. Prerequisite: PHI 201 or consent of instructor.

PHI 356 Continental Philosophy (3). An introductory survey of philosophical trends in Europe from the end of the 19th Century to the present, which will focus on issues and thinker within the Existentialist and Phenomenological traditions, the new Marxism, structuralism, post-structuralism, and deconstruction. Prerequisites: PHI 201 or consent of instructor.

PHI 357 Feminist Philosophy (3). A survey course covering feminist theoretical perspectives and current themes in feminist research , such as the body and gender, ethics, epistemology, and how gender informs social life and political/ institutional frameworks. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

PHI 360 Literature and Philosophy (3). Interdisciplinary look at ways in which literature raises philosophical questions and also how philosophical writings articulate a relationship between philosophy and literature. Topics may include the role of imagination and emotion in reasoning, interpretation, rhetoric, and the role of literature in moral reasoning. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 or 102, ENG 104. (Same as ENG 360)

PHI 372 Philosophy of Cognitive Science (3). A study of philosophical questions raised by advances in cognitive science, and psychology, including the possibility of a language of thought, mental imagery, reductive explanations of the mind and consciousness, artificial intelligence and connectionism, and the application of cognitive science to traditional philosophical questions. Prerequisite: PHI 201 or consent of the instructor.

PHI 376 Environmental Ethics (3). This survey course exploring views of the relationship between human beings and the natural world will examine current questions in environmental studies regarding ethical and epistemological frameworks. Topics may include the Gaia hypothesis, ecofeminism, and deep ecology. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104)

PHI 378 Teaching and Philosophy (3). An examination of the philosophical foundations of pedagogical approaches, this course will also consider ways philosophy might enrich elementary and secondary curriculum. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

PHI 380 Philosophy of Language (3). A study of philosophical questions of meaning, truth and reference, including such topics as the nature of propositional attitudes, theories of meaning and reference, internalism and externalism, ordinary language philosophy, and theories of truth. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

PHI 382 Philosophy of Social Science (3). An examination of the structure and nature of the social sciences and their foundation in philosophy, this course will focus on the relationship between social theory/ criticism and practice, in view of social theory as practical knowledge. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

PHI 383 Philosophy of Diversity (3). An introduction to diverse philosophical perspectives in contemporary culture that will focus on issues of race, gender, class, sexual orientation, and identity, drawing from African American, Native American, gender studies, and feminist perspectives. Prerequisites: ENG 101 and 102 (or ENG 104).

PHI 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

PHI 442 Business Ethics and Environments (3). This course  involves a study of modern and classical approaches to both business and personal ethics as well as the other major components of the business environment:  the political, international, ecological, social and cultural environments. Prerequisites:  LST 240, MGT 350, FIN 330, MKT 360, and senior standing. (Same as BPA 442.)

PHI 498 Major Figures (3). An intensive study of a major philosophical thinker and/or thinkers, such philosophers as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, among other, whose spheres of influence have engendered broader philosophical movements. May be taken up to three times for credit, at the discretion of the program director. Prerequisite: PHI 201.

PHI 499 Senior Research Project (3). A research/writing course designed to develop proficiency in research in philosophy and in logical argumentation, culminating in a scholarly paper that will demonstrate these skills. Required for philosophy majors.

PHI 540 Seminar (3). Selected topics or the thought of a particular philosopher. This course may be repeated for credit.

PHI 550 Directed Study (1-3). Readings or other study in advanced topics. This course may be repeated for credit.


Physics and Engineering
(PHY)
PHY 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Same as ETE 099.)

PHY 125 Brief Introductory Physics (4). Topics in introductory physics including mechanics, heat, wave motion, electricity, light, modern physics. Combination conceptual and quantitative approach with emphasis on applications not requiring vector analysis. A student may not receive credit for both PHY 125 and either PHY 130 or PHY 132. Four hours lecture per week. Prerequisite:  MAT 140 or equivalent. Co-requisite:  PHY 126.

PHY 126 Brief Introductory Physics Lab (1). Laboratory to accompany PHY 125. Two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  MAT 140 or equivalent. Co-requisite:  PHY 125.

PHY 130 (120) General Physics I (3). Elementary mechanics, heat, and wave motion. Fundamental laws of nature, definitions, and physical measurements are stressed. Prerequisite:  MAT 140 or equivalent. Co-requisite: PHY 131.

PHY 131 (122) General Physics I Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany PHY 130. Two hours laboratory per week. Corequisite: PHY 130.

PHY 132 (121) General Physics II (3). Elementary electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. Prerequisite:  PHY 130 or equivalent. Co-requisite: PHY 133.

PHY 133 (123) General Physics II Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany PHY 132. Two hours laboratory per week. Corequisite: PHY 132.

PHY 135 Introduction to Physics (4). The fundamental concepts of physics are developed from a demonstration, experimental approach with computer-assisted data analysis. Basic course for those who intend to concentrate in science and engineering.

PHY 140 Introduction to Computing Applications in Science and Engineering (3). A course to introduce students to computational techniques employed in scientific, engineering, mathematical and statistical applications. C++ language will be used in several related programming projects, including graphics. The course is designed to meet the needs of students in physics, engineering physics and related sciences in the use of the microcomputer as a tool for the solution of problems and in particular where graphics are required.

PHY 150 Light and Lasers in Action (4). A laboratory course in general physics intended for non-physics majors with an interest in scientific, medical, engineering or education-related fields. This course will use the visual appeal of light and lasers as vehicles for the introduction of fundamental physical principles including energy, waves and fields. It will rely heavily on demonstrations of optical effects with student participation and interaction. Practical applications of the use of light and lasers in cultural and technical aspects of society will be demonstrated and discussed.

PHY 195 Methods of Engineering Physics (2). An introduction to the application of basic tools and methods used in the engineering physics curriculum. Primary emphasis on the use of symbolic computational software packages (such as Mathcad) for organizing, performing, and visualizing complex or tedious calculations. Introduction of fundamental statistical definitions and methods of data analysis.

PHY 235 Mechanics, Heat and Wave Motion (4). Introduction to classical mechanics. Topics include kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, wave motion, and the laws of thermodynamics. Calculus and vector notation used. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 236. Three lectures and two recitation meetings per week. Corequisite:  MAT 250.

PHY 236 Mechanics, Heat and Wave Motion Laboratory (1). Laboratory course must be taken concurrently with PHY 235. Two hours laboratory per week.

PHY 240 Thermodynamics I (3). Fundamental engineering concepts of power systems, cooling systems and system efficiency. First and second law analysis. Entropy; exergy; reversible and irreversible processes. Ideal gases. Application to simple physical, chemical and engineering problems. Three lectures per week, incorporating laboratory activities for students and demonstrations as appropriate. Prerequisite:  PHY 235. Corequisite: MAT 308.

PHY 255 Electricity, Magnetism and Light (4). Electric and magnetic fields, circuits, electromagnetic oscillations, and optics. Calculus and vector notation used. Must be taken concurrently with PHY 256. Three lectures and two recitation meetings per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 235. Corequisite:  MAT 308.

PHY 256 Electricity, Magnetism and Light Laboratory (1). Laboratory course must be taken concurrently with PHY 255. Two hours laboratory per week.

PHY 259 Statics (3). Force systems:  moments, couples, equivalent force systems, distributed force systems. Equilibrium equations, free body diagrams, special cases of equilibrium, static indeterminancy, trusses, friction. For engineers. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 235.

PHY 264 Linear Circuits I (4). DC and AC steady state circuit analysis. Resistive circuits, Kirchhoff’s laws, nodal and mesh analysis, loop analysis, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, superposition, capacitors, inductors, diodes, and operational amplifiers. Also includes AC steady state circuit analysis using complex number algebra, introduction to three phase circuits, and computer simulation of steady state circuits. Three lectures per week plus laboratory. Prerequisites:  PHY 255. (Same as ETE 264.)

PHY 299 Introduction to Research (1-3). Designed primarily for freshman and sophomore level students. The student participates in an on-going research activity or supporting function. The student will average four hours per week in the activity for each hour of credit. May be repeated for a maximum of four hours of credit. Prerequisite:  open to students majoring in physics and with the consent of the directing staff member.

PHY 316 Introductory Astrophysics and Space Physics (3). Introduction to astrophysics and space physics. Space physics is concerned with understanding the environment between the sun and the earth’s upper atmosphere. Topics include coronal mass ejections, the solar wind, magnetospheric storms, and auroral precipitation. Astrophysics is the study of planetary system formation and evolution, stellar structure and evolution, galactic structure, and cosmology. Phenomena of interest include quasars, black holes, supernovas, and the cosmic microwave background radiation. Prerequisites:  PHY 140 and 255. Co-requisite: PHY 370 or PHY 580; or consent of instructor. (Same as AST 316.)

PHY 330 Dynamics (3). Study of motion and forces with application to engineering systems. Planar and three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics of a particle and of rigid bodies; equations of motion; work and energy; impulse and momentum; vibrations. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  PHY 255.

PHY 340 Wave Analysis of Dynamic Systems (3). The analysis of vibrating and oscillating systems are introduced and developed in applications to mechanical systems, electric circuits, optics, acoustics, and quantum theory. Necessary mathematical and computational tools required for this study are also introduced as needed. The course is designed to serve as a transition between the introductory survey courses and the more rigorous advanced courses in physics and engineering. Prerequisite:  PHY 255.

PHY 342 Thermodynamics II (3). Gas mixtures, air-water vapor mixtures. Air conditioning system design. Principles and design of energy conversion devices, power and refrigeration cycles. Principles of combustion, chemical equilibrium, one-dimensional gas dynamics. Applications to typical engineering problems. Prerequisites:  PHY 240. Corequisite: MAT 309.

PHY 344 Fluid Mechanics (3). Fundamental principles and applications of hydrostatics and fluid flow for engineers. Three lectures per week, incorporating laboratory activities for students and demonstrations as appropriate. Cannot be taken for graduate credit by physics majors. Prerequisite:  PHY 240. Corequisite: MAT 411.

PHY 346 Heat Transfer (3). Basic principles and applications of heat transfer for engineers. Problems in convection-, conduction-, and radiation-transfer. Three lectures per week, incorporating laboratory activities for students and demonstrations as appropriate. Cannot be taken for graduate credit by physics majors. Corequisites:  PHY 240 and MAT 411.

PHY 359 Mechanics of Materials (3). A study of stress and strain in deformable solids; tension and compression of axial members; stress and strain transformations; stress-strain relations; torsion of shafts; bending of beams; buckling of columns. Three lectures per week, incorporating laboratory activities for students and demonstrations as appropriate. Prerequisites:  PHY 259. Corequisite: MAT 308.

PHY 365 Linear Circuits II (3). DC and AC transient circuit analysis. First and second order circuit solutions using differential equations, Fourier Series, Laplace and Fourier transforms. Also includes magnetically coupled circuits, variable frequency circuits, and transistor switching. Prerequisites:  PHY 264. (Same as ETE 365.)

PHY 366 Analog Electronics I (3). Transistor amplifiers, feedback circuits, filters, frequency response of circuits, power supplies and switching circuits. Computer simulations of circuits will be emphasized. Prerequisite:  PHY 365 and MAT 309. (Same as ETE 366.)

PHY 370 Introduction to Modern Physics (3). Concepts of atomic, nuclear, solid state, and particle physics. Philosophical, historical and cultural aspects are discussed. Prerequisite:  PHY 255 or 121.

PHY 375 Materials Science (3). An introductory study of the science of materials utilization, structure of solid phases, the atomic and electrical processes in solids. Prerequisite:  PHY 255.

PHY 378 Logic Design I (4). Introduction to digital logic design techniques: binary arithmetic, Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential circuits, registers, counters, memory units and programmable devices. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  PHY 140 or knowledge of a high-level computing language and PHY 255. (Same as  ETE 378.)

PHY 379 Logic Design II (3). Design of digital systems. Topics include CPU control and timing, machine organization, instruction set architecture, addressing modes, I/O interfaces, cache memory and virtual memory. Prerequisite:  PHY 378.

PHY 388 International Experience in Engineering (3). A short-term (10-14 day) study abroad experience highlighting selected historical and modern contributions to engineering and physics from another country and culture. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

PHY 390 Engineering Measurements (3). General considerations of signals and utilization of instruments to measure physical properties of systems. Review and introduction of useful mathematical concepts such as statistical data analysis. Introduction to digital data acquisition and signal processing. Application to the design of instruments which measure displacement, motion, count, strain, force, pressure, level, fluid flow and temperature. Prerequisites:  Junior standing or consent of instructor; Corequisite:  MAT 411.

PHY 398 Principles of Design (3). The task of engineering design, which includes the formulation of the problem, creative approaches to design problem solution, analysis, material selection and economics, is considered in design decisions from conception to final product. Prerequisites:  working knowledge of a high level computer language and junior standing or consent of the instructor. (Same as ETE 398.)

PHY 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

PHY 450 Laser Physics (3). Fundamental principles of laser operation. Lectures include a survey of different types of lasers and their application in various fields. Prerequisites:  PHY 255 and 370.

PHY 460 Electricity and Magnetism I (3). Electric fields, potential dielectrics, steady currents, magnetic fields and electromagnetic induction. Three lectures per week. Graduate credit for M.A.T. candidates only. Prerequisites:  PHY 255 and MAT 411. (Same as ETE 460.)

PHY 461 Electricity and Magnetism II (3). Magnetic materials, alternating currents, transient phenomena and electromagnetic radiation. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 460. (Same as ETE 461.)

PHY 470 Optics (3). Reflection, refraction, thin lenses, interference, diffraction, polarization and selected optical devices. Prerequisite:  PHY 255 or 121 and MAT 250.

PHY 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PHY 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PHY 495 Advanced Laboratory I (1-2). A laboratory for advanced students in physics. The experimental program will be planned on an individual basis with experiments chosen from optics, electricity and magnetism, classical mechanics, thermodynamics, atomic, nuclear and solid state physics. Two to four hours laboratory per week. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours. Prerequisites:  PHY 255 and 256.

PHY 496 Senior Seminar (3). Capstone course for students completing the undergraduate physics curriculum. Students will be involved in discussions and presentations on a variety of topics in physics. Students will also prepare and deliver written and oral presentations on technical topics. Prerequisite:  Senior standing or permission from instructor.

PHY 498 Senior Engineering Design I (3). Through discussions with the faculty advisor and other faculty members, students will determine the design-related engineering problem they wish to study. A detailed written project proposal will be submitted to and approved by the student’s faculty project director prior to midterm. Working as individuals or in teams, students will apply the design process by developing projects from the proposal stage to the test, evaluation and implementation stages. Students are expected to follow this course with PHY 499. Prerequisite:  senior standing in the program or consent of instructor. (Same as ETE 498.)

PHY 499 Senior Engineering Design II (3). A continuation of PHY 498. Prerequisite:  PHY 498. (Same as ETE 499.)

PHY 505 Meteorology (3). Descriptive treatment of weather phenomena. Course covers weather changes, air masses and fronts; collection and use of meteorological data; study of maps and weather forecasting. Not applicable toward master of science degree. Graduate credit for M.A.T. candidates only.

PHY 513 Principles of Astronomy and Meteorology (3). An examination of the principal objects of the solar system and the stellar universe and the fundamental theories concerning them. Examination and discussion of the composition and structure of the earth’s atmosphere. Atmospheric motions, weather systems and weather forecasting. Graduate credit for M.A.T. candidates only.

PHY 515 Special Topics (3). Topics of current interest in physics and engineering. Delivery methods may include lecture, seminar, directed study, and laboratory. May be repeated for credit as different topics are featured. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PHY 520 Independent Study (1-3). Supervised reading course in specialized topics for upper-division students of high standing. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours. Prerequisites:  major and consent of instructor.

PHY 530 Mechanics I (3). Dynamics of particles, coordinate transformation, and non-inertial reference systems. Celestial mechanics. Dynamics of systems of particles. Prerequisites:  PHY 255 and MAT 411 (or concurrent registration).

PHY 531 Mechanics II (3). General motion of rigid bodies. Lagrangian mechanics, theory of small vibrations and special theory of relativity. Prerequisite:  PHY 530.

PHY 535 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3). Fundamental course in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Prerequisite:  PHY 580 or concurrent registration.

PHY 565 AC and DC Circuit Analysis (4). Kirchoff’s laws, Thevenin and Norton’s theorems, super-position and reciprocity theorems, properties of L, C, R circuits, filters and resonance. Graduate credit for M.A.T. candidates only.

PHY 567 Communications Systems (4). Filtering and signal bandwidth. Introduction to information theory, encoding and decoding, linear and digital electronic implementation. Two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 366.

PHY 568 Digital Memory Systems (4). Memory hierarchy. Automatic error detection and correction. Shared and multiport memory systems. Interprocessor communications. Introduction to computer networking. Prerequisite:  CSC 405 or PHY 378.

PHY 569 Microprocessor Techniques (3). Architecture of various microprocessors, assembly of useful microcomputers using one or more of the popular microprocessors, technique of interfacing to microcomputers, programming microcomputers, importance of microcomputers in logic design. Prerequisite:  PHY 378.

PHY 570 Introduction to Modern Physics (3). Concepts of atomic, nuclear, solid state and particle physics. Philosophical, historical and cultural aspects are discussed. Prerequisite:  PHY 255 or 121. Open to graduate, non-physics students only. Restriction:  A student cannot receive credit for PHY 570 if the student has credit for PHY 370.

PHY 575 Solid State Physics (3). Fundamental physical properties of the solid state of matter. Prerequisite:  PHY 460.

PHY 580 Modern Physics I  (3). An investigation of the physical phenomena explained since 1900 by the introduction of the discreteness of nature and the wave-particle duality, leading to the development of wave mechanics. Topics include Planck radiation, photoelectric and Compton effects, pair production and annihilation, the nuclear atom and Bohr theory, the deBroglie hypothesis, the Schroedinger equation and applications to atomic physics. Prerequisites:  PHY 460 or 530.

PHY 581 Modern Physics II (3). Continuation of PHY 580 including angular momentum theory, perturbation theory, L-S coupling, Zeeman effects, nuclear properties, reactions and structures, particle accelerators and elementary particle physics. Prerequisite:  PHY 580.

PHY 583 Applied Optics (3). Fresnel diffraction, polarization, Maxwell’s equations, laser theory and application, holography, spatial filtering and applications. Prerequisites:  PHY 350 and 460.

PHY 590 Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering I (3). Applications of mathematics to physical and engineering problems, curvilinear coordinates, analytic functions, transform theory, convolutions, Fourier series. Prerequisites:  MAT 411, PHY 330 or 530 or consent of instructor.

PHY 591 Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering II (3). Solutions of partial differential equations, special functions, Green’s function. Prerequisite:  PHY 590 or consent of instructor.

PHY 592 Problems in Advanced Physics and Engineering I (3). An applied course for advanced students in physics and engineering. The problems will be planned on an individual basis with topics including Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, fluidized-bed and numerical fluid dynamics, surface physics, cloud and aerosol physics, crystal growth and analog modeling of experiments. Students will be required to design, implement and test appropriate strategies for the solution of the chosen problem using their knowledge and understanding of basic physics and engineering principles. Prerequisite:  CSC 420 or MAT 442 or consent of instructor.

PHY 593 Problems in Advanced Physics and Engineering II (3). A continuation of PHY 592. Prerequisites:  PHY 592 or consent of instructor.

PHY 595 Advanced Laboratory II (1-2). A continuation of PHY 495. Two to four hours laboratory per week. May be repeated for a maximum of two hours. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PHY 596 The History of Modern Physics (3). A detailed examination of the origin of quantum theory. Consideration is given to the notable works of Planck, Lorentz, Einstein, Stark, Haas, Sommerfeld, Nernst, Bohr and others. Senior standing in physics with a 3.25 average in major. Lectures and conferences.

PHY 599 Senior Research (1-3). Introduction to research practices, periodicals and literature of physics. Problems arranged individually with staff members. Formal, scientific report of work required. Prerequisites:  senior standing and permission of staff.


Planning, Urban and Regional
(PLN)
PLN 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PLN 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PLN 500 Recreation Geography and Planning (3). Practical application of problem-solving techniques and processes to recreational management and planning. Focus placed on site planning and development. (Same as GSC 500.)

PLN 502 Internship in Urban and Regional Planning (3). Practical, on-the-job training and experience in the field of urban and/or regional planning. Student spends one semester working under the direction of a professional planning practitioner.

PLN 503 Internship in Urban and Regional Planning (3). Practical, on-the-job training and experience in the field of urban and/or regional planning. Student spends one semester working under the direction of a professional planning practitioner.

PLN 504 Internship in Urban and Regional Planning (3). Practical, on-the-job training and experience in the field of urban and/or regional planning. Student spends one semester working under the direction of a professional planning practitioner.

PLN 507 Urban and Regional Land Use Planning (3). Analyze the principles and techniques utilized in the planning process. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of planning — the needs, problems and proposed solutions. (Same as GSC 507.)

PLN 521 Geographic Information Systems (3). Techniques course that introduces digital georeferenced information systems, including data capture, editing and encoding techniques, data storage structures, database  management systems, data analysis and model development, and information display methods. (Same as GSC 521.)

PLN 523 Problems in Urban Geography and Urban Planning (3). Theories, techniques and research in urban geography and planning. Focus placed on the designs and strategies addressing present day urban problems. (Same as GSC 523.)


Political Science
(POL)
POL 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Required from all entering freshmen and transfer students with less than 12 hours of earned credit prior to their first semester at Murray State University. Graded pass/fail. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation.

POL 140 American National Government (3). The American political system, its constitution, institutions and processes. An approved social science University Studies elective.

POL 240 State and Local Politics (3). Study of the three branches of state government coupled with an examination of the politics, organizations and functions of counties, townships and special districts.

POL 250 Introduction to International Relations (3). The nature of international society and the forces affecting the behavior of states in their relations with one another. An approved social science University Studies elective.

POL 252 Contemporary Political Systems (3). This course provides the student with comparative and evaluative concepts and approaches necessary to developing an intelligent understanding and appreciation of the world’s diverse political systems. An approved social science University Studies elective.

POL 261 Introduction to Political Theory (3). Introduction to the concepts, enduring questions, and significant thinkers associated with political philosophy. Specific attention will be given to differing conceptions of human nature, politics, the state, civic obligations and rights, freedom, justice, and democracy.

POL 341 County and Rural Governments (3). The legal basis, organization and functions of county and rural government in the United States, with special emphasis on administration and problems of non-urban cities.

POL 342 Ethnic Politics (3). An examination of the role played by ethnicity in American politics. Special emphasis will be placed on the Black American, Native American, Spanish American, and Oriental American.

POL 343 Kentucky Government and Politics (3). A meaningful examination of the political processes and governmental machinery essential to an adequate understanding of government and politics in Kentucky.

POL 344 Press and Politics (3). The roles of newspaper, television, and radio in the American national political process. (Same as JMC 344.)

POL 345 Campaigns and Elections (3). Considers the practical aspects of campaigning for public office on all levels of government including strategy, financing, organization, research, and media.

POL 360 Research Methods (3). An introduction to basic research principles and methods designed to enable students to understand the critical and scientific methodologies political science uses to discover knowledge and ascertain its validity.

POL 370 Introduction to Public Administration (3). The theory and practice of the administration and management of governmental operations; politics, policy and the bureaucracy.

POL 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

POL 440 Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3). The nature, development, organization and functions of American political parties and interest groups.

POL 441 Legislative Process (3). The behavior of American legislative bodies and legislators.

POL 443 Executive Process (3).  An examination of the origin, development, and current status of the executive process with primary emphasis on the American Presidency.

POL 444 Judicial Process (3). A political science course that surveys the nature, functions and sources of law and the role of politics and the courts in the administration of justice. (Same as CRJ/LST 444.)

POL 450 (550) Modern Africa (3). A study of Africa since about 1880, including the transformation of African societies and their political development, with emphasis on the contact with other cultures, the growth of nationalism and nationalist movements, and the questions of African unity and neocolonialism. (Same as HIS 450.)

POL 455 (555) Modern Middle East (3). A study of the Middle East from 1800 to the present, with emphasis on the historical and political forces that have affected and still influence the region. (Same as HIS 455.)

POL 460 (260) Political Behavior (3). An introduction to major concepts and systems of thought useful in explaining and understanding political behavior.

POL 461 Classical and Medieval Political Thought (3). The development of political thought from the classical Greeks to the Renaissance with emphasis on Plato, Aristotle, Augustine and Aquinas.

POL 462 Modern Political Thought (3). The development of political thought from the Renaissance to the present with emphasis on Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Marx, and the contemporary malaise.

POL 463 American Political Thought (3). The American political tradition from its colonial origins to the present with emphasis upon the major political writers.

POL 480 Topical Seminar in Political Science (3). Inquiry into selected topics and problems in the field of political science. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours provided topics vary.

POL 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

POL 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

POL 498 Senior Seminar in International Affairs (3). An examination of selected international issues and problems with particular reference to students’ interest and experience. Prerequisite: open only to students majoring in international affairs with senior standing.

POL 499 Senior Seminar in Political Science (1).  The capstone course in political science required of all majors with senior standing.  The course has three objectives: (1) the completion of a research paper which demonstrates sound research, reasoning, and writing skills; (2) the examination of career opportunities in political science and use of the University Placement Office; and (3) an evaluation of student competence in the discipline through a series of assessment examinations.  Offered spring semester only.  Graded pass/fail.

POL 542 Government and Business (3). The role of government and politics in the regulation of business activities and the administration of major legislation enactments.

POL 545 Constitutional Law I: Developments & Trends (3).  A political science course that surveys the development of and historic trends in selected subjects of constitutional law. (Same as LST 545.)

POL 546 Constitutional Law II: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3).  A political science course that studies the leading court decisions and their impact on the development of American Constitutional Law in the subject areas of civil liberties (Amendment I), civil rights (Amendments IV, V, VI, VIII, and IX), and the equal protection and due process clauses of Amendment XIV.  Prerequisites: none.  (Same as LST 546.)

POL 551 Government and Politics of Western Europe (3). The governmental institutions and political processes of Western European powers, with primary emphasis given to the United Kingdom, France, and Germany.

POL 552 Government and Politics of the Soviet Union (3). The governmental institutions and political processes of the nations of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics with a special emphasis upon the Russian nation.

POL 553 Government and Politics of Latin America (3). The dynamics of change in the political systems of Latin America, focusing on the problems and patterns of political and economic development.

POL 554 Government and Politics of Asia (3). The governmental institutions and political processes of China, Japan, and other selected states in Asia.

POL 556 American Foreign Policy (3). The formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy.

POL 557 International Law and Organizations (3). The origin and development of international law and international organizations.

POL 558 The United States in Indochina (Vietnam) (3). An examination of the United States’ experience in Indochina with special emphasis on Vietnam. With reference to national self-interest and the relationship of Indochina to world affairs, the course will examine the extent of American involvement from the end of World War II to the present.

POL 571 Public Policy (3). Consideration of social, economic, and political values and their influence on the formation and direction of public policy with special emphasis on current issues.

POL 572 Public Planning and Evaluation (3). An examination of major planning and evaluation techniques of governmental programs.

POL 573 Public Budgeting and Finance (3). This course examines budgeting as a tool of governmental economic and political policy. Specifically, the course considers the evolution and purposes of budgeting with special attention given to recent efforts to improve government resource allocation. Required of all M.P.A. students.

POL 575 Human Resource Administration  (3). An intensive examination of personnel administration in federal, state, and local governments, including such topics as merit systems, recruitment, testing, selection, and equal employment opportunity.

POL 577 Labor Law and Public Policy (3). Traces the development of the principles of labor law and labor legislation as well as their administration at the national, state, and local levels in the United States. Uses administrative and court decisions and policy analysis to examine issues of current significance concerning labor relations. Prerequisite:  MGT 350 or consent of instructor. (Same as MGT 577.)

POL 590 Internship (3). Independently sponsored programs to which qualified students are assigned for practical experience in public administration and the legislative process at the federal, state, or local level. For juniors and seniors majoring or minoring in political science. Must have a 2.5 overall GPA and a 2.8 in POL courses taken for the major or minor. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  POL 140 and two courses from:  POL 240, 250, 252, 260, 370.

POL 595 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised readings or research in selected subjects designed to supplement regular course offerings. Requires chair’s approval. Restricted to senior students. May be repeated up to six hours. Only three hours may count toward major.


Psychology
(PSY)
PSY 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

PSY 180 General Psychology (3). A basic survey course introducing the student to the methods, concepts and terminology of the field. Note:  This course is a prerequisite to all other courses in psychology.

PSY 199 Developing Psychological Skills (1). An applied course for students interested in enhancing their psychological skills. This course is recommended for persons in performance fields (e.g., psychology, physical education, social work, nursing, performing arts, business, etc.) who wish to improve their mental skills such as emotional and attentional control. Does not count toward Psychology major, minor, or University Studies requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: PSY 180.

PSY 210 Career Planning Seminar (2). Seminar for psychology majors, focusing on career exploration, employment opportunities, the job search process, graduate school, and related issues. Recommended for students in their sophomore or junior year. Does not count toward Psychology major, minor, or University Studies requirement. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  PSY 180 and sophomore standing or higher.

PSY 221 Psychology of Human Sexuality (3). A presentation of the psychological aspects of human sexuality as well as an exploration of contemporary psychological research and theory in the field. Topics are addressed from various perspectives (behavioral, social, cultural and biological) and include homosexuality, pornography, sexually transmitted disease, early sexual learning, adult sexual lifestyles and sexual dysfunction and treatment. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 222 Sport Psychology (3). This course is a survey of theory and research regarding the psychological aspects of sport and physical activity. Topics addressed include history of sport psychology, research methods and testing, learning, personality, attention, arousal, intervention, motivation, attribution, aggression, leadership, group dynamics, and audience effects as they relate to athletes, coaches and officials. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 223 Psychology of Sport Fans (2). This course will be a survey of theory and research regarding the psychological and sociological significance of sport fandom and spectating. Topics addressed will include the prevalence of sport fandom, factors affecting involvement in sport as a fan and spectator, spectator aggression, the psychological impact of spectating, and the societal impact of spectating. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 245 Law and Psychology (3). An overview of the area of forensic psychology. Topics covered include aspects of criminal behavior, the insanity defense, competency, commitment of the mentally ill, and professional issues. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 260 Lifespan Development (3). A survey course of theory and research examining the changes and consistencies associated with human development from conception to death. Infancy, childhood, adolescence, and early, middle, and late adulthood will be examined. Prerequisite: PSY 180.

PSY 261 Child Psychology (3). A study of the biological, social, affective and cognitive aspects of the development of children from conception to adolescence. The implications of this development for present and future behaviors are presented. The research, principles, concepts and theories of child psychology are emphasized. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 262 Adolescent Psychology (3). A study of the biological, social, affective and cognitive aspects of the development of adolescents from puberty to young adulthood. The relationship of these developmental aspects to the individual’s past, present and future behaviors are stressed. The research, theories, concepts and principles pertaining to adolescent psychology are presented. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 263 Psychology of the Adult (3). An in-depth study of the normal developmental issues of adults as related to each stage of adulthood. Biological, affective, cognitive, vocational, social and cultural aspects of adult development will be emphasized. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 264 Psychology of Aging (3). The study of the biological, cognitive, affective and social aspects of the aging process. The normal and pathological conditions of aging are emphasized. The interaction of the aged and society is also considered. Prerequisite:  PSY 180. (Same as GTY 264.)

PSY 265 Psychology of Death (3). A study of the place of death in the process of human development. Two viewpoints will be stressed:  death of self and death of others. Emphasis will be given to the cultural, social, biological and affective aspects related to the final stage of life. Customs, medical practices, financial concerns, legal matters and scientific issues will be considered. Prerequisite:  PSY 180. (Same as GTY 265.)

PSY 300 Principles and Methods of Statistical Analysis (3). An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics as used in the behavioral sciences and human services. Computer-based techniques of statistical analysis are emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisites:  Psychology majors:  concurrent enrollment in PSY 301 and a minimum math ACT score of 20, or MAT 105; Non-Psychology majors:  a minimum math ACT score of 20 or MAT 105.

PSY 301 Principles and Methods of Psychological Research (3). An introduction to research techniques and resources in the field of psychology, covering scientific foundations of psychology; empirical research methods, both experimental and non-experimental; data analysis and report writing; literature search procedures; ethical issues. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 (or 104) and 204, PSY 180; concurrent enrollment in PSY 300 and the completion of nine additional hours of PSY courses.

PSY 302 Topical Seminar (3). A particular topic or combination of topics will be covered when there is sufficient student interest. Students will be expected to contribute to discussions on the basis of readings in the selected areas. May be repeated. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 303 Social Psychology (3). A survey of current theory and research regarding social behavior. Topics addressed include person perception, self-perception, attitude change, influence, pro-social behavior, transgressive behavior and group phenomena. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 304 Psychology of Learning and Memory (3). Concerned with the principles and concepts of animal and human learning, and their bases in research. The student is introduced to learning theories. Prerequisites:  PSY 300 and 301, or consent of instructor.

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology (3). An introduction to physiological psychology as the study of the relationships between biological events and behavior. The structure and function of the human nervous system are studied. Prerequisites:  BIO 101 or 221 and PSY 300, 301 or consent of instructor.

PSY 321 Perception (3). A study of theories of perception, psychophysical methods, research findings, and the physiological bases of perception with an emphasis on the visual system. Prerequisite:  PSY 301 or consent of instructor.

PSY 322 Motivation (3). Presentation of basic concepts of motivation and emotion. Prerequisite:  PSY 301 or consent of instructor.

PSY 324 Psychological Measurement (3). This course presents concepts and methods in measurement and scaling as they are involved in experimental and differential investigations. Prerequisite:  PSY 301 or consent of instructor.

PSY 325 Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3). An introduction for undergraduate students to the field and profession of clinical psychology. Topics covered include the historical and cultural context of the field, its scientific and theoretical aspects, the nature of psychological assessment, and the various intervention approaches in current use. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 326  Psychology of Language  (3). A survey of psychological research on language behavior and the role of language in social and cultural contexts. Emphasis on understanding language processes in both the adult speaker and the child acquiring language. Prerequisite:  PSY 180, PSY 301 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

PSY 327 Problem-Solving and Decision-Making (3). An introduction to behavioral decision making theory, research. Topics include the roles of memory and knowledge organization in critical thinking, logic and reasoning in problem-solving, decision-making under uncertainty, heuristics and biases, and multidisciplinary applications. Prerequisite: PSY 180.

PSY 360 Directed Individual Study (1-3). Individual programs involving readings or conducting a research project in psychology. Note: Arrangement for faculty supervision is required prior to enrolling. May be repeated to a maximum of nine hours. Does not count toward Psychology major, minor, or University Studies requirements. Prerequisites:  approval by a faculty sponsor and the department chair.

PSY 373 Psychology of Consumer Behavior (3). A survey of current psychological theory and research regarding behavior of consumers. Topics addressed include perception, cognition, learning and memory, emotion and motivation, intentions, buying behaviors, effects of social contexts, effects of cultural contexts, sales interactions and applications to not-for-profit settings. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 390 Animal Behavior (3). This course is a survey of categories of behavior and the variables that influence these behaviors across species. Prerequisite:  PSY 301 or consent of instructor.

PSY 403 History and Systems of Psychology (3). A survey of the systems and theories of psychology with emphasis on their historical development. Modern psychology is studied  in the context of its philosophical roots and the evolution of the other sciences. Prerequisites:  PSY 303, 304, 305, and 581 (for psychology majors), or consent of instructor.

PSY 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

PSY 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PSY 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PSY 499 Senior Honors Thesis (3). An undergraduate research thesis for outstanding senior majors only. Prerequisite:  permission of the department upon nomination by a faculty member.

PSY 503 Psychology of Small Group Behavior (3). A survey of current theory and research regarding the behavior of individuals in groups. Topics addressed include group formation and development, physical environment, personal characteristics of group members, group composition, group structure, leadership and group tasks. Students enrolled for graduate credit will have additional requirements to fulfill in this course. Prerequisite:  PSY 303.

PSY 540 Drugs, Alcohol and Behavior (3). This course provides a survey of the social, biological and psychological aspects of substance abuse, chemical dependency and addictive disorders. Prerequisite:  PSY 180. (Same as CRJ 540.)

PSY 545 Behavior Modification (3). This course presents assumptions, concepts and methods of behavior modification. Emphasis is on broad psychological theory and application to human problems. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisites:  PSY 180 and consent of instructor.

PSY 570 Applied Research Design and Analysis (4). An advanced course designed to develop a comprehensive, integrated, and applied knowledge of issues surrounding the design, implementation, analysis, and evaluation of psychological research. Topics covered include research ethics, reliability and validity, descriptive and experimental design issues, and advanced statistical techniques. Students will be expected to design, conduct, and report the results of an original research project. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisites:  PSY 300 and 301 or  consent of instructor.

PSY 581 Abnormal Psychology (3). Introduction to the definition, classification, causes and treatment of abnormal behavior. Research methodologies and findings receive emphasis equal to that of “clinical” or applied considerations. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 584 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3). A survey of current theory and research regarding human behavior in industrial and organizational settings. Topics addressed include selection and placement, training and development, motivation, job satisfaction and performance, leadership, work environment, human factors, engineering and safety. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 589 Personality (3). The organization of the psychological characteristics which contribute to the uniqueness of the individual. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 591 Statistics (3). Basic concepts of statistics are stressed. Specific topics include techniques dealing with single distributions, some correlational methods, probability, and an introduction to inferential statistics. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 595 Culture, Language and Personality (3). Roles of culture and language, personality-language, and personality-culture. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisites:  PSY 180.


Reading
(REA)
REA 095 Reading Workshop (1). A college reading course designed for Community College freshmen. Offers enhancement of basic comprehension skills, development of critical thinking, and active reading strategies for the COM 161 text and the assigned readings for ENG 095. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements.

REA 100 Fundamental Reading Skills (1). Designed to prepare students for college level reading through individualized and group practice in reading comprehension and vocabulary strategies. The course is required for entering freshmen with ACT scores below 18, unless admission status places the student in REA 095. Credit earned in this course may not be counted toward graduation requirements. Graded pass/fail.

REA 120 College Study Skills (1). Designed for all college students who desire instruction in improving study skills. Emphasis is placed on time management, note-taking and test-taking skills, content area study strategies, and vocabulary development.

REA 121 Advanced Reading and Study Skills Improvement (1). Continuation of REA 120. Designed for all college students who desire individualized help in improving reading and study skills. Emphasis is placed on course-specific comprehension and study skills, vocabulary development, and spelling improvements. To be taken in conjunction with a University Studies requirement.

REA 306 Teaching Reading in Elementary P-5 (3). An introduction to content and teaching methodology in reading. Topics include reading process, motivating readers, literacy development, word recognition, and comprehension. Field experiences required. Prerequisite:  EDU 303.

REA 407 Middle School Reading (3). Course provides an overview of research-based literacy practices appropriate for teaching students in the middle grades. Emphasis is placed on teaching strategies designed to enhance comprehension and vocabulary development for students across the curriculum. Field experiences required. Prerequisites:  EDU 103, EDU 303, MID 270.

REA 412 Practicum in Reading Instruction P-5 (3). A practicum providing clinical or classroom experiences in applying current methods and materials in teaching reading to individuals and/or groups. Prerequisite:  admission to Teacher Education.

REA 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

REA 527 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School (3). Designed to help the secondary school teacher teach reading in the content areas. Topics covered are reading process, word recognition skills, comprehension, diagnostic prescriptive instruction and reading in the content areas.


Recreation
(REC)
REC 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail. (Same as CDI/EXS/HEA/NTN 099.)

REC 100 Bowling (1).

REC 101 Introduction to Recreation and Leisure Services (3). An overview of the history, philosophy, aims, and objectives of the recreation and leisure profession.

REC 102 Camp Leadership and Counseling (2). Introduction to the history and objectives of organized camping with emphasis on the role of the modern camp counselor.

REC 103 Beginning Fencing (1).

REC 105 Volleyball (1).

REC 106 Racquetball (1).

REC 107 Badminton (1).

REC 108 Golf (1).

REC 110 Wrestling (1).

REC 112 Open Water Scuba Diving I (2).

REC 115 Beginning Tennis (1).

REC 116 Techniques of Tennis (1).

REC 117 Beginning Judo (1).

REC 118 (Tai Chi Chuan (2).

REC 119 Beginning Karate (1).

REC 120 Beginning Swimming (1).

REC 121 Techniques of Swimming (1).

REC 122 Open Water Scuba II (1).

REC 123 Aerobic Kickboxing (1).

REC 125 Modern Dance (1).

REC 126 Social Dance (1).

REC 127 Folk Dance (1).

REC 128 Social Dance II (1).

REC 129 Basic Canoeing (1).

REC 130 Gymnastics (1).

REC 132 Open Water Scuba III (1).

REC 133 Physical Fitness (1). May be repeated once for credit.

REC 134 Weight Training (1).

REC 135 Bicycle Touring (1).

REC 150 Seminar in Recreational Activities (1). A course designed to investigate various types of dynamics of recreational activities. The acquisition of traditional and nontraditional recreation activities will be demonstrated and performed by each student.

REC 156 Advanced Tennis (1).

REC 159 Advanced Tae Kwon Do (2). A course designed to explain and develop the fundamentals of Tae Kwon Do.

REC 160 Basic Sailing (2). An introduction to basic sailing and seamanship. Three lecture/laboratory hours per week.

REC 162 Backpacking and Outdoor Living (1).

REC 163 Caving (1).

REC 164 Rock Climbing (1).

REC 165 Fundamentals of Chess (1). The course is designed to introduce the non-tournament player (including those who have played occasionally) to the analytic and decision-making skills that are involved in playing chess. Topics include the movement and relative value of the pieces, basic tactical maneuvers, and elementary strategical ideas.

REC 166 Advanced Racquetball (1). Prerequisite: PHE 106 or racquetball tournament experience.

REC 170 Weight Control (1).

REC 202 Recreation Program Planning (3). Techniques in organizing, planning, and evaluating various types of recreation programs with emphasis on guidance and leadership.

REC 207 Inclusive Recreation (3). A survey of the characteristics and recreational needs of the various types of exceptional children and adults. (Same as GTY 207.)

REC 212 Open Water Scuba Diving IV (3).

REC 218 Intermediate Tai Chi Chuan (2). This course builds on the student’s previously acquired skills in the basic practices and techniques of the art of Nanlaoshu, which encompasses Yi Jin Jing foundation exercises, Neigong Tai Chi Chuan, and meditation. Two weekly two-hour labs will be arranged.

REC 235 Lifeguarding (1). This course leads to certification as an American Red Cross lifeguard. It is required prior to enrollment in PHE 240. Prerequisites:  PHE 121 and 500-yard swim using five basic strokes, or consent of instructor.

REC 240 Water Safety/Lifeguard Instructor (2). This course leads to certification in American Red Cross Water Safety Instruction or Lifeguard Instructor. Strong swimming skills are mandatory. Teaching sequences are an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: REC 235 or current lifeguarding certificate.

REC 302 Advanced Program Leadership (3). Course designed to introduce recreational learning and develop direct program planning and implementation techniques appropriate to camps, nature centers, historic sites, special events, and day camp areas. Individual styles and applications will be developed using a wide variety of resources with special emphasis on communication analysis and strategy.

REC 303 Community Leisure Organizations (3). Study of administrative and leadership procedures related to leisure organizations in the community. (Same as GTY 303.)

REC 304 Community Leadership (1). Observation and participation in community recreation programs. Direct responsibility in working with youth agencies, city recreation programs, and school-sponsored recreation activities. Majors only. Prerequisite: REC 101.

REC 311 Leadership in Adventure Education (3). Course will provide a thorough study of leadership in adventure education programs. Topics will include leadership styles, trip planning, risk management, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: One of the following: REC 129, 162, 163, or 164.

REC 350 Canoeing and Wilderness Camping (3). Designed to develop skills in canoeing, wilderness camping and outdoor survival.

REC 400 Survey of Therapeutic Recreation (3). An overview of the history, philosophy, objectives and services provided through the field of therapeutic recreation.

REC 401 Research and Evaluation in Recreation (3). A study of methods and techniques of research and evaluation as applied to recreation and park services. Prerequisite:  junior or senior standing.

REC 403 Managing Recreation Areas and Facilities (3). Emphasis on planning, design, principles, and construction of buildings, playgrounds, parks, pools, camps and athletic facilities for schools and communities.

REC 405 Organization and Administration of Recreation (3). A study of the organizational and administrative practices of commercial, public and voluntary recreation agencies.

REC 411 Principles of Challenge Education (3). This course provides a study of theory and practice of challenge education programs. The student will have first-hand experience in facilitating challenge education activities. Students will participate in and lead cooperative games, group initiatives, trust activities, and low and high ropes challenge courses. Prerequisite:  REC 150.

REC 421 Professional Experience (2-12). Direct work experience in various recreation agencies for the purpose of giving the student practical experience in the field of his/her specialization. Supervision is provided by both the instructional staff of the university and the cooperating agency. Graded pass/fail.

REC 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

REC 440 Outdoor Recreation in Therapeutic Recreation (3). A course designed to provide information concerning the outdoor recreation opportunities for exceptional children and adults.

REC 450 Recreational Use of Natural Resources (3). This course will provide a thorough investigation of the recreational use of natural resources in the United States, as well as an overview of conditions around the world. The information presented will focus on the primary issue of “preservation versus use” of natural resources.

REC 465 (565) Interpretive Services in Park Management (3). An introduction course designed to study techniques appropriate to historical, cultural and natural interpretation in park management. Analysis and development of a better appreciation of interpretive programs and visitors information services will be discussed. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work.

REC 475 Therapeutic Recreation Programming (3). Focuses on the principles of organizing, planning, and evaluating various types of recreation programs for special populations. Prerequisite: REC 207.

REC 476 Natural Resources and Park Management (3). This course is a study of the theories, principles and techniques of management applied to parks and natural resource areas. General topics include natural resource management theory, management strategies for natural resources, visitor management, and service management.

REC 480 Special Problems in Recreation (1-3). Prerequisite: prior consent of instructor.

REC 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

REC 490 Outdoor Recreation and Rural Tourism Consortium (3). This course is designed to facilitate the study of outdoor recreation and rural tourism through a residential experience at a national outdoor recreation area. Students from universities throughout the country will study outdoor recreation and rural tourism management, programming and planning. Practicing professionals, faculty from participating universities, and recognized authorities and leaders in the outdoor recreation field will provide instruction. Students will complete an in-depth problem-solving assignment directed toward analyzing an existing outdoor recreation problem or need.

REC 499 Senior Seminar (3). The capstone course for the outdoor recreation major. A primary aim of this course is to complete and evaluate the electronic portfolio that is a graduation requirement. The course will include involvement in professional societies, and preparation for transition to the work force. Prerequisite:  senior standing and completion of 15 hours of recreation major courses.

REC 515 Leisure in Therapeutic Recreation Services (3). Concepts of leisure functioning and methods of leisure assessment, attitudinal changes, and skill development that enhance successful leisure participation.

REC 520 Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as EXS/GTY 520.)


Real Estate
(RES)
RES 132 Real Estate Principles I (3). A study of the basic essentials involving real estate transaction, terms, law, financing, and the general operation of the numerous specialties of the real estate business. License law requirements and professional ethics are considered.

RES 134 Real Estate Marketing I (3). An introduction to real estate market analysis and marketing techniques. Emphasizes the study of basic essentials of listing, prospecting, qualifying clients, showing of real estate, advertising and the organization of time.

RES 136 Real Estate Appraising (3). Analyzes the basic principles of property use and value, and the locational factors affecting valuation. Treats the theory and practice of real estate appraisal, introduces the cost, market and income approaches, the appraisal process and the techniques of area and site analysis. Report writing and the appraisal report are covered as is the scope of real estate appraising and the ethics of the professional appraiser. Prerequisites:  RES 132.

RES 226 Real Estate Finance (3). The study of the money and capital markets and institutions as they influence real estate finance, mortgage banking, government activity in the financing of real estate, interest rate changes and their influence, and the major real estate financing instruments. Prerequisite:  RES 132 or consent of instructor.

RES 242 Real Estate Law (3). Comprehensive survey of the law of realty as it effects the real estate professional. A study which involves historical and recent developments in legislation and court precedent affecting real estate, with emphases in license law, real estate commission rules and regulations and professional ethics. Prerequisite:  RES 132 or consent of instructor. (Same as LST 242.)

RES 246 Advanced Appraising (3). A continuation of RES 136, Real Estate Appraising. Prerequisite:  RES 136, or consent of instructor.

RES 338 (238) Real Estate Brokerage Management (3). A compilation of the planning, procedures and techniques needed to establish a successful real estate brokerage management system. This course is intended to meet brokers’ licensing requirements pursuant to the Kentucky Real Estate Commission and Kentucky Administrative Regulations 201 KAR 11:450.

RES 342 Real Estate Law II (3). This course is a comprehensive survey of the law of realty as it affects the real estate professional. A study which involves historical and recent developments in legislation and court precedent affecting real estate, which emphasis in license law, real estate commission rules and regulations and professional ethics. Prerequisite: RES 242. (Same as LST 342)


Religious Studies
(RGS)
RGS 200 Introduction to Comparative Religion (3).  An introduction to the essential beliefs and practices of various world religions, together with an exploration of comparative themes in the study of religion.

RGS 300 Foundations of Judaism and Christianity (3). Introduction to the development of distinctive traits and traditions of Judaism and Christianity; cultures, beliefs, practices, institutions, and experience from biblical times to the present.

RGS 301 Western Religious Thought in the Modern World (3). Response of Western religious thinkers to major challenges to traditional religious faith posed by the emergence of modern intellectual, social, political norms. This course may be repeated, subject to approval of religious studies coordinator.

RGS 302 Medieval Europe (3). A survey of the major events in Western history from the Fall of Rome to the Renaissance, with special emphasis on those political, economic, social and cultural-intellectual forces and institutions that helped form the modern world outlook. (Same as HIS 302.)

RGS 309 Survey of World Religions (3). A study of the historical development of Christianity, Islam, Buddhism and other world religions, with emphasis placed upon their similarities and differences. (Same as HIS 309.)

RGS 316 The Bible as Literature (3). A study of the Bible as a literary source. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102. (Same as ENG 316.)

RGS 317 Literature and Religion (3). Course that explores the intersections between literature and religion within larger cultural contexts. Depending on individual research needs and the interest of the group, mandatory field experiences may be scheduled. Prerequisites: CIV 101, 102; HUM 211, 212 or equivalent. (Same as ENG 317.)

RGS 321 Philosophy of Religion (3). A study of basic philosophical issues in the consideration of religion, such as the basis of religious belief, the nature of religion, the cogency of talk about God, the meaning of evil. (Same as PHI 321.)

RGS 322 History of Religion in the United States (3). The historical development of organized religion in America, with emphasis placed upon the relationships between religion and other features of American society. (Same as HIS 322.)

RGS 350 Special Topics (3). A study of religion by examining a subject chosen for its particular topical or thematic interest. Specific topics will vary according to student and faculty interests. May be taken more than once for credit.

RGS 355 Islamic Middle East (3). History of the Middle East from the 7th century to the 19th century. The course will examine the apostleship of Muhammad, the question of succession and the Sunni-Shi’ah schism, the government, society, and culture of the High Caliphate, the decline of Arab power and the rise of the Turks, the Islamic perspective of the Crusades, the revival of Islamic power under the Gunpowder Empires, and the decline of Islamic civilization in the face of Western expansion. (Same as HIS 355).

RGS 356 The Art of Non-Western Cultures (3). Study of the arts of Asia, Oceania, Africa, and the Pre-Western Americas. (Same as ART, MCG 356.)

RGS 395 Archaeology of Religion (3). A survey of the archaeological evidence for religions throughout the world, from the earliest expressions of spirituality to the modern world religions. Emphasis is placed on the archaeological evidence for recognizing religious expressions in general, and for the emergence of modern world religions. Archaeological interpretations of New World, African, and Australian religions will be considered in comparative perspective. Fieldwork to a house of worship or cemetery will be required. Prerequisite: ARC 150 or permission of instructor. (Same as ARC 395.)

RGS 417 Medieval Art (3). Topics in the history of art from the Early Christian through the Gothic period. Prerequisite:  ART 211 or permission of instructor. (Same as ART 416.)

RGS 420 Sociology of Religion (3). A study of the interrelationships of society, culture and the institution of religion. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 420.)

RGS 425 Art of Asia (3). A history of the art of India, Central and Southeast Asia, China, Korea, and Japan. Prerequisites: Both ART 211 and 212, or ART 356, or permission of instructor. (Same as ART 425.)

RGS 500 Seminar (3). Selected topics. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  advanced undergraduate standing or consent of instructor.

RGS 510 Directed Study (1-3). Readings or other study in advanced topics. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

RGS 511 Milton (3). A study of Milton’s works and their historical and critical contexts. (Same as ENG 501.)


Science
(SCI)
SCI 101 Introduction to Science I, Physical Systems (4). An inquiry-based and multidisciplinary course that introduces concepts in chemistry, geosciences, and physics. This course concentrates on physical systems and reflects the National Science Teacher Education Standards.

SCI 102 An Introduction to Science II, Biological Systems (4). An inquiry-based and multidisciplinary course that introduces concepts in biology, chemistry, and environmental science. This course concentrates on ecological systems and reflects the National Science Teacher Education Standards.

SCI 300 Understanding Scientific Communication (2). Course concentrates on the methods for preparation and presentation of scientific papers, posters, and oral communication. Students will utilize a data set to produce a publication quality manuscript, a poster suitable for a scientific meeting; and a 15-minute presentation such as would be given at a scientific meeting. Topics covered include abstracts, nature of scientific writing, structure and organization of scientific publication, use of literature, graphics and graphic design, and methods of polishing the oral presentation. Credit can not be given also to BIO 696 unless approved by dean, College of Science, Engineering and Technology. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.


Secondary Education
(SEC)
SEC 402 Senior Seminar (2). A discussion and analysis of contemporary education issues, topics, problems, and curriculum innovations.

SEC 420 Practicum in Secondary Schools (2). A concentrated practicum experience for upper division students, which will include planned and supervised mini-teaching experiences with middle school and/or senior high students as well as laboratory and field experiences in the development of teaching strategies and curriculum materials. (20 hours of field placement in a public school classroom.)  Credit cannot be earned for both SEC 420 and SEC 620. Prerequisites: EDU 303 or discipline specific methods course.

SEC 421 Student Teaching in the Secondary School (7-14). Student teaching in the secondary school should allow the individual to participate in the work and duties of the school that are generally expected of the classroom teacher. Student teachers will be supervised by a public school teacher as well as a university coordinator. (Will involve 7-14 weeks of placement in a public school classroom.)  Graded pass/fail.

SEC 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

SEC 528 Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School (3). A study of the processes of teaching social studies, including methods, procedures, materials and research in the field.

SEC 529 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (3). A study of teaching science in junior high and high school, including materials and procedures, organizations and operation of laboratories, research and curriculum innovations.


Special Education
(SED)
SED 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

SED 110 Practicum (3). Includes direct involvement with children in highly supervised, pre-academic situations, such as Headstart, local day care centers and afternoon recreation programs. Graded pass/fail.

SED 210 Practicum (1). Direct involvement with children in highly supervised situations such as afternoon recreation programs, comprehensive care centers and regular or self-contained public school classes. Graded pass/fail.

SED 226 Introduction to Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (3). A study of the needs of young children with disabilities and their families. Prerequisites:  FCS 111.

SED 241 Precision Teaching (2). Introduction to the principles of precision teaching which is a system for monitoring the progress of learners. The course also deals with continuous measurement procedures and use of a standard behavior charting system.

SED 300 Educating Students with Disabilities (3). This course introduces students to state and federal laws impacting the education of students with disabilities, prepares them to work collaboratively with other professionals and parents, and teaches them a variety of effective instructional techniques/strategies. It also increases their awareness of the special organizations, associations and other resources that will assist them in meeting their professional needs, the needs of families, and the needs of students with disabilities. Field experience required.

SED 350 Roles and Procedures in Special Education (3). Includes an overview of the legal requirements in the process of determining eligibility and delivery of special education services including the individual education plan (IEP) component of federal and state laws. Participants will gain skill in writing individual education plans for students with mild disabilities and information regarding service delivery models. Prerequisite:  SED 300.

SED 400 Characteristics and Individualized Planning for Children and Youth with Mild Disabilities (3). Includes an overview of the educational characteristics of children and youth with mild disabilities and legal requirements of the individual education plan component of federal and state laws. Participants will gain skill in writing individual education plans for students with mild disabilities and information regarding service delivery models. Prerequisites:  SED 300.

SED 421 Student Teaching in Special Education (6-14). Student teaching in the secondary school should allow the individual to participate in the work and duties of the school that are generally expected of the classroom teacher. Student teachers will be supervised by a public school teacher as well as a university coordinator. (Will involve 6-14 weeks of placement in a public school classroom.)  Graded pass/fail.

SED 425  Specialized Reading for Students with Mild Disabilities (3). This course is designed to emphasize the detection and remediation of reading difficulties that are typical for students with mild disabilities. Students will be shown how to recognize and remediate reading difficulties. This course would be appropriate for any education major. Prerequisite:  SED 400 and nine hours of general reading/language arts.

SED 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

SED 442 Individual Educational Plans (1). Course content involves actual development of IEPs for specific children based on the results of assessments made by the teacher-in-training in contiguous courses.

SED 443 Curriculum and Instruction for Children and Youth with Mild Disabilities (3). Development of specific competencies in instruction and curriculum requisite for the development of a personalized educational program for children and youth with mild disabilities. Content includes behavior objectives, task analysis, precision teaching and use of technology relevant to curriculum and instruction. Prerequisites:  SED 300 and 400.

SED 455 Practicum (3). Course will provide opportunities for supervised direct involvement with individual children. Students will implement strategies and procedures used in the education of students with mild disabilities. Repeatable for a total of six credit hours. Prerequisites:  SED 300, 400, 443, and 552. SED 443 and 455 may be taken simultaneously.

SED 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

SED 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

SED 504 Parent-Professional Relationships (1). Course content will focus on the characteristics and roles of parents and other professionals in the education of exceptional children. Skills in interpersonal relations with parents and other professionals will be a major component within the course.

SED 505 Special Education Procedures and Strategies in IECE (3). Students will develop skills in writing Individual Education Programs and Individualized Family Service Plans. Students will be introduced to relevant special education legislation, laws and policies. Students will develop skills in matching intervention strategies to the strengths and needs of young children with disabilities and their families. Students will acquire skills in the development and implementation of the Individual Education Program and the Individualized Family Service Plan in a variety of settings. Prerequisites:  EDP 260, EDU 103, FCS 310, 311 and SED 300, or permission of instructor.

SED 526 Introduction to Early Education of Children with Disabilities (3). Study of young children with disabilities or who are at risk for disability in terms of their personal, family and educational needs. Prerequisite:  SED 300.

SED 530 Education of Exceptional Children (3). An introduction to and a survey of the characteristics and educational needs of exceptional children. This course is an overview to give teachers and personnel in related fields an overall concept of the educational implications of the exceptional child as well as of special education as a profession. (Can be taken for credit only by students who have not completed SED 230.)

SED 531 Nature and Needs of Individuals with Moderate to Severe Disabilities (3). Survey of classification, identification, diagnostic techniques and intervention procedures used in the education and training of individuals with moderate to severe disabilities.

SED 535 Field Study in Special Education (1-3). A practicum for students majoring or minoring in special education. Supervised practicum in a school, community and/or residential program. May be repeated up to six hours. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

SED 537 Diagnostic Methods (3). Instruction which leads to demonstrated competence with instruments utilized in assessment and programming. Field hours are required.

SED 540 Procedures for Classroom Management and Discipline (3). The content of this course provides educators with the information and skills needed to increase their knowledge of advanced methods, and techniques of classroom management procedures. Field hours are required.

SED 551 Transdisciplinary Assessment of Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities (3). This course involves procedures for assessment of the behavioral and educational performance of individuals with moderate to severe disabilities, task analysis, sequencing behavioral skills and designing individual instructional programs. Students will be provided experience in conducting assessments, developing individual education plans and use of program evaluation techniques related to individuals with moderate to severe disabilities.

SED 552 Functional Behavior Analysis (3). The content of this course provides the student experience in understanding why individuals behave the way they do and how behavior may be taught, changed, and modified. Topics will include behavior management, training strategies, implementation, data-based programming, and field-based teacher research methods. Field hours are required. Prerequisites:  SED 300.

SED 553 Special Methods for Children and Youth with Phys/Sensory Disabilities (3). This course involves preparation in the use of special methods needed to teach children and youth with physical and sensory disabilities. Adaptations, prosthetic devices and technology used in educational programming as well as communication systems and self-care techniques will be included.

SED 554 Classroom Management of Individuals with Mod/Sev Disabilities (3). Study of the techniques and methods necessary for the organization and operation of educational programs for individuals with moderate to severe disabilities. Included are specialized teaching techniques such as precision teaching and behavior management applied to the learning environment as well as scheduling approaches, curriculum models and commercially available materials.


Sociology
(SOC)
SOC 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

SOC 133 Introduction to Sociology (3). This course will introduce students to sociology and the sociological perspective by focusing upon contemporary societies. Through a study of key concepts such as culture, society, group behavior, population, family,, stratification, community, social institutions and change, students will be given the tools by which to understand better their society and others around the world.

SOC 231 Social Problems (3). This course is intended to provide the student with a conceptual framework within which to examine social problems. The class will examine the links between technological development, population growth, environmental degradation, social change and disorganization, social inequality, deviance and crime. An approved social science University Studies elective.

SOC 250 Global Sociology (3). This course will provide students with a better appreciation of the value of the sociological perspective in understanding different societies and cultures. The course will focus upon demographic factors shaping societies, values and norms, social inequality, and agents of social changes such as globalization.

SOC 303 Introduction to Research Methods (3). This course will introduce students to sociological research methods. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding the scientific approach to knowledge, research design and analysis, qualitative and quantitative methods of research, and the many uses of social research.  Prerequisite:  junior standing or permission of instructor.

SOC 305 Social Issues (3). This seminar will cover an important topic or related topics. Both student and faculty interest will determine the topic. Students will both contribute and lead discussions of the readings. Research paper is required. May be repeated. Prerequisite:  SOC 133.

SOC 315 Addiction: Treatment and Society (3). An overview of current theories, models and definitions of addictive disorders, with focus on both the addictive and recovery processes. The role of the social worker/helping professional in identification, intervention and treatment will be stressed. The needs of special populations, diverse populations and family and adolescent issues will be addressed. Prerequisite: junior standing (Same as CRJ 315 and SWK 315).

SOC 320 Music, Culture, and Society (3). An examination of contemporary musical expression and the ways in which music can be considered a discursive practice. Cultural determinants such as class, ethnicity, gender, ideology, and race are studied critically. The course explores the production, use, and evaluation of music as social processes that constitute social status and cultural identity. Prerequisite: SOC 133.

SOC 331 The Family (3). This course will examine the contemporary family system in America. To gain an understanding, an historical perspective on the family will be provided along with some cross-cultural data on other family systems. Contemporary research findings will be presented on such topics as subcultural variations, gender roles, power, romantic love and mate selection, marriage and divorce, and alternative family structures. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or consent of the instructor.

SOC 332 Socialization of Youth (3). A study of problems of youth during adolescence, subcultures, development tasks, and preparation for adulthood. Prerequisite:  SOC 133.

SOC 334 Population Problems (3). An examination of the dynamics of population change, with emphasis placed upon the factors contributing to and the problems resulting from rapid population change at the world and national levels. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 335 Sociology of Formal Organization (3). Theories of formal organization, bureaucratic systems, alternative systems and organizational change; special emphasis will be placed on the relationship between the organization and its environment. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or permission of the instructor.

SOC 336 Individual and Society (3). An examination of the sociological perspective of the relationship between the individual and social institutions. Topics for study include anomie, alienation, modernity, authoritarianism, intellectual flexibility and self esteem. Recent research findings will be emphasized. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or ANT 140.

SOC 337 Social Stratification (3). An examination of the distribution of class, status and power in society. The course will focus upon theories of stratification, contemporary class systems, class differences in values and life styles, social mobility, consequences of stratification, and evolution of modern stratification. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 338 Criminology (3). An exploration of the body of knowledge regarding crime as a social phenomenon. Special focus is given to the study of crime patterns, theories of crime causation, and differences in crime types. The connections between crime, other social processes, the law, and policies of corrections are also explored. Prerequisites:  SOC 231 and CRJ 100.

SOC 339 Rural Sociology (3). Deals with the principles underlying the organization, structure and processes of rural life. Demographic and institutional aspects of rural communities will be given particular emphasis. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or consent of the instructor.

SOC 340 Sociology of Medicine (3). An examination of sociological perspectives on systems of medical care; particular emphasis will be placed upon the structure and organization of health care institutions and societal responses to problems of illness and disease. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor. (Same as GTY/NUR 340.)

SOC 341 Social Gerontology (3). An introduction to the sociocultural dimensions of the problems of the process of aging and its impact on individuals and society. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or consent of the instructor. (Same as GTY 341)

SOC 342 Sociology of Retirement (3). Examination of retirement as a process, an event and a role. Aspects of retirement as a special institution are reviewed with emphasis upon the implications for the social system. Prerequisite:  SOC 341. (Same as GTY 342.)

SOC 343 Minorities in the United States (3). Identity, goals, and organization of minority groups, dynamics of prejudice; processes of communication, conflict, and accommodation. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or anthropology, or consent of instructor. (Same as ANT 343.)

SOC 344 The Black Experience (3). An analysis of the African American way of life utilizing anthropological and historical approaches. Major themes in black culture will include religion, family relations and political empowerment. Biographical, autobiographical and ethnographic materials will be utilized. (Same as ANT 344.)

SOC 345 Cultural Ecology (3). An examination of how humankind has used the various aspects of the social structure to adapt to the physical environment. Current ecological theories will be utilized to examine social evolution from hunting and gathering to industrial societies. (Same as ANT 345.)

SOC 346 Urban Culture (3). A study of the origin, growth and structure of the urban community. Particular attention will be paid to the nature of and possible solutions to problems which come in the wake of rapid urbanization. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology and/or anthropology or consent of instructor. (Same as ANT 346.)

SOC 355 Perspectives on Women (3). Introduction to the study of women’s issues in contemporary society. The course will include an overview of the history of the feminist movement and its role in human liberation. The socialization of women and their status in relationship to economic, social and political institutions will be emphasized. Particular attention will be given to these issues as they relate to women of color, older women and lesbian women. Prerequisite:  junior standing or consent of instructor. (Same as SWK 355.)

SOC 380 Society and Technology (3). This course will examine how technology, ranging from simple to complex, both shaped by society and culture. Controversies that stem from various technologies will be examined, such as bioethical issues, privacy, and the environment.

SOC 400 Senior Seminar (1). In this course, students will complete preparation for and take a comprehensive departmental examination over sociological theory and methodology. Career opportunities for sociology majors will also be explored. Required of all majors. Graded pass/fail.

SOC 420 Sociology of Religion (3). A study of the interrelationships of society, culture and the institution of religion. Prerequisite:  SOC 133 or consent of the instructor. (Same as RGS 420.)

SOC 430 American Culture (3). This course analyzes the culture of American society focusing upon American values, cultural symbols, production and distribution of culture, cultural conflicts within American society, and culture and change.

SOC 434 Social Theory (3). A study of the great classical tradition in sociological theory and the expression of this tradition in contemporary theory. The course will include (but not be limited to) such theorists as Weber, Marx, Durkheim, and Spencer.

SOC 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

SOC 442 Law and Society (3). An analysis of legal institutions from a sociocultural perspective, with emphasis placed on the interrelationships among social change, social problems, social policy and law. Prerequisite:  junior standing or consent of instructor.

SOC 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

SOC 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

SOC 499 Senior Honors Thesis (3). An undergraduate research thesis for outstanding senior majors only. Prerequisite:  permission of the department upon nomination of a faculty member.

SOC 500 Directed Studies (1-3). Selected topics in sociology as arranged by the students and a professor. Prerequisites:  at least twelve hours of sociology and permission of departmental chair.

SOC 521 Issues in Social Gerontology (3). A study of theory and research on aging and policies and programs related to nutrition, retirement, health and housing of the elderly. Prerequisite:  SOC/GTY 341 or consent of instructor. (Same as GTY 521.)

SOC 532 Collective Behavior and Social Movements (3). The analysis of collective behavior and movements and the consequent social change generated by this type of human behavior. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 533 Juvenile Delinquency (3). Nature and extent of delinquency; competing explanatory theories; evaluation of programs for prevention and control; role of police, detention, juvenile courts and corrections. Prerequisites:  nine hours in sociology or criminology and corrections, and consent of instructor. (Same as CRJ 533.)

SOC 535 Sociology of Work (3). This course will examine the nature of work in contemporary societies by focusing upon the impact of specialization and bureaucratization; it will examine the different types of work; workers’ response to the workplace; impact of work on family, health; role of age, gender, race in the workplace; and finally, the future of work. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 536 Sociology of Sport (3). Theories, methods and substantive issues in a sociological approach to sports. Prerequisites:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 538 Sociology of Deviant Behavior (3). Sociological frame of reference for studying deviant behavior, with emphasis placed upon problems of definition, social processing and evaluation of significant theory and research in deviant behavior. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 555 Environment and Social Policy (3). Examines the effects of population and economic growth on the environment. The course will focus on factors related to population and economic growth, as well as public measures designed to mitigate the impact of this growth on the natural environment. Population and economic growth and policies as they pertain to industrial and developing countries will be emphasized. Prerequisite:  SOC 334 or consent of instructor.


Spanish
(SPA)
SPA 101 Fundamental Communication in Spanish (3). Basic Spanish in which students learn to describe themselves to someone from another culture; to express preferences, abilities, needs, and obligations; to ask for information; to describe people, places, and things in their world; and to report their typical activities to a Spanish speaker.

SPA 102 Social Interactions in Spanish (3). Expanding upon skills built in SPA 101, students move toward increasing linguistic and social awareness of Spanish-speaking cultures. Students learn to use past tenses to talk about typical activities or to tell a story; to expand their basic vocabulary and ability to communicate in simple Spanish; and to demonstrate basic understanding of aspects of Spanish- and Latin-American cultures that may differ from their own. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or equivalent.

SPA 103 Elementary Spanish Conversation I (1). Designed to provide additional structured practice in the language for students enrolled in SPA 101. Emphasis is on the development of the speaking skill. Cannot be used for major, minor, or B.A.

SPA 104 Elementary Spanish Conversation II (1). A continuation of SPA 103. For students enrolled in SPA 102.

SPA 105 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3). A survey of the contemporary culture of Spain and Spanish America with emphasis on values, behavioral characteristics, social and political structures and achievements. Conducted in English. No prerequisite.

SPA 110 Basic Conversational Spanish (3). A conversation-oriented introduction to pronunciation, essential structures, and vocabulary. Designed to enable students to communicate in simple Spanish in everyday situations in Spanish-speaking countries. Pronunciation, listening comprehension, speaking and simple reading and writing of material related to conversational situations are included. No continuation offered. Not applicable toward Spanish major or minor. Only taught abroad. No prerequisite.

SPA 201 Intercultural Communications in Spanish (3). Students strengthen their basic language skills while continuing to broaden cultural awareness of Spanish-speaking societies. Students relate experiences, produce brief reports on course topics, and express opinions concerning a variety of themes. Students learn to communicate on a more complex level in Spanish. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite:  SPA 102 or equivalent.

SPA 202 Practical Applications in Spanish (3). Students advance their speaking, writing, reading, and listening language skills in this interactive course focused on the practical application of the language in contemporary Spanish-speaking countries. Activities include role-play, projects, reports, and discussions of texts. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite:  SPA 201 or equivalent.

SPA 203 Spanish for the Working World (3). A continuation from Spanish 201, this course is a practical application of Spanish for the working world together with grammar review and with emphasis on communication skills on the formal level. Includes further practice in listening, conversation, reading and writing. Students may be required to attend and write a report on two approved cultural events or complete alternative cultural assignments. Taught in Spanish. Students may receive credit for Spanish 202 or 203, but not both. Spanish 203 counts toward the minor and the major. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or equivalent.

SPA 210 Intermediate Spanish Conversation (3). A course designed to develop the vocabulary and oral communication skills of the student with a background of one year of college Spanish or equivalent. Emphasis will be placed on bringing the student into contact with Spanish native speakers and various aspects of their culture. Either SPA 210 or 211 may count as an elective for the major or minor. Only taught abroad. Prerequisites:  SPA 102 or equivalent.

SPA 211 Introduction to Spanish Culture (3). Focuses on the contemporary cultural character of Spain. Combines traditional class work with carefully planned excursions to cultural centers. Also designed to increase linguistic proficiency and is conducted in basic Spanish.

SPA 301 Conversation and Composition I (3). Intensive practice in speaking and writing based on a variety of topics and materials. Prerequisite:  SPA 202 or equivalent.

SPA 302 Conversation and Composition II (3). Additional practice in speaking and writing based on a variety of topics and materials. Prerequisite:  SPA 301 or consent of instructor.

SPA 306 Introduction to Literature in Spanish (3). A course designed to develop skills in reading, writing and oral expression which will prepare students to study authentic literature in Spanish. In addition, the rudiments of literary analysis and/or theory will be introduced through a variety of texts which might include short story, poetry, theater and film. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or consent of instructor.

SPA 310 Conversation and Composition Abroad (3). Intensive practice in speaking and writing based on the student’s interaction with native speakers and the international setting. Only taught abroad. Counts toward the major and minor approved electives. Prerequisites:  Two years of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPA 311 Business Spanish (3). Designed for students with interest in international business who have had at least two years of college Spanish or equivalent. The course integrates oral and written business communications, with an emphasis on the vocabulary of business in the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite:  SPA 202 or equivalent.

SPA 323 Spanish Culture and Civilization (3). A cultural survey of Spanish history with emphasis on twentieth-century Spain. Classes conducted in Spanish with extensive use of visual aids. Prerequisite:  SPA 301 or consent of instructor.

SPA 324 Mexican Culture History (3). Introduction to Mexican culture from a contemporary and a historical perspective taught in Spanish. Focus will be on the area’s geography, history, social and political institutions, and the cultural achievements of its people. It will also explore the values and behavioral characteristics of Mexican people in order for students to better adjust to residence abroad. Course will be taught in Mexico. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or equivalent.

SPA 325 Spanish-American Culture (3). A cultural survey of Spanish-American history with emphasis on twentieth-century Spanish America. Taught in Spanish with extensive use of visual aids. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or consent of instructor.

SPA 331 Advanced Language Practice (3). Course will offer students the opportunity to expand their cultural and linguistic knowledge of Spanish-speaking cultures through a central conceptual framework, such as an international conference, an apartment building, a hotel, or a business. Students will engage in extensive role-play and creative exercises to establish contexts, choose fictive identities, and improvise a series of encounters.  Prerequisite: SPA 202 or consent of instructor.

SPA 332 Phonetics (3). A study of the vocal apparatus, phonetic transcription, and analysis of the contrast between Spanish and English phonology with individual work designed to improve pronunciation. Prepares prospective teachers to teach correct pronunciation effectively. Prerequisite:  SPA 202 or consent of instructor.

SPA 401 Survey of Spanish Literature (3). A panoramic study of the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or 306 or consent of instructor.

SPA 403 Survey of Spanish-American Literature (3). A panoramic study of the literature of Spanish America from pre-Columbian times to the present. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or 306 or consent of instructor.

SPA 421 Topics in Spanish Literature (3). Course content will vary according to the needs of the Spanish program. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credit hours. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or 306 or consent of instructor.

SPA 422 Topics in Spanish American Literature (3). Course content will vary according to the needs of the Spanish program. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or 306 or consent of instructor.

SPA 430 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3). Designed for students with at least two years of college Spanish or equivalent. The main purpose is to develop greater fluency and better pronunciation. Oral and written reports will be required. Emphasis will be placed on idiomatic structures and vocabulary building. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or consent of instructor.

SPA 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

SPA 441 Topics in Spanish Cultural Studies (3). Course content will include a variety of factors that contribute to and reflect the cultural life, social themes, and national perspectives of Spanish society. The course content will vary  according to the needs of the students in the Spanish program. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite:  SPA 301 or consent of instructor.

SPA 450 Literary Masterpieces in Spanish (3). A general survey of the literary periods, major authors, and initial acquaintance with their work. May be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours. Prerequisite:  SPA 301 or 306 or consent of instructor.

SPA 451 Directed Study (1-3). Independent work in the area of language, culture or literature, designed to meet the needs and interest of individual students. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

SPA 460 Studies in a Genre (3). The course will explore a particular genre, e.g., the novel, novella, drama, poetry, short story, and the theory behind the respective genre and an examination of a variety of works within that genre. May be repeated as a second course for up to six credit hours provided that the second course covers a different genre. Prerequisite: SPA 301 or 306 or consent of instructor.

SPA 503 Golden Age Literature (3). Spanish literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 504 Don Quixote (3). Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 505 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature (3). Romanticism through Naturalism. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 507 Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature (3). A survey of representative authors. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 511 Spanish-American Short Story (3). The origin and development of the short story in Spanish America, with emphasis placed upon the twentieth century. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 512 Spanish-American Novel (3). Representative works from the major literary movements and most regional types will be studied. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 521 Topics in Spanish Literature (3). Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of students. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 522 Topics in Spanish-American Literature (3). Topics will vary. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 531 Advanced Grammar (3). A specialized study contrasting Spanish and English grammatical structures and usage. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 532 Phonetics (3). A study of the vocal apparatus, phonetic transcription and analysis of the contrast between Spanish and English phonology with individual work designed to improve pronunciation. Prepares prospective teachers to teach correct pronunciation effectively. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 551 Directed Study I (1-3). Course work designed to meet specific needs and interests on an individual basis. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 552 Directed Study II (1-3). Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 555 Study Abroad (3-9). Credit given to students for approved travel and study in Spain and Spanish America. Repeatable up to nine hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.


Social Work
(SWK)
SWK 099 Freshman Orientation (1). This course is designed to aid students majoring in social work with their orientation to the social work program and curriculum, and to acquaint them with campus-wide services and programs that may assist them in their academic pursuits and adjustment to college life. This course is required of all first-semester social work students including transfer students. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation. Graded pass/fail.

SWK 100 Introduction to Health Sciences and Human Services (1). A survey course of the areas included in the College of Health Sciences and Human Services. Course content will help students understand the similarities and differences between the various areas of study, understand the skills and aptitudes needed to become a successful professional in each area, and become aware of the types of jobs available. Graded pass/fail.

SWK 101 Introduction to Social Work. A course designed to provide an overview of the field of social work and the various methods and areas of social work practice. Current response to human needs as well as trends and issues affecting the profession of social work will be explored.

SWK 120 Preparation and Selection of Foster and Adoptive Parents (2). Course designed to give students an understanding of the skills necessary for a successful experience in the area of foster care and adoption services. The course includes content on Kentucky’s policies and procedures with regard to child welfare; strengths and needs; grieving; the cycle of need; and, partnership efforts necessary between birth parents, foster parents, adoptive parents, social workers, therapists and others involved in the support and care of a child. Graded pass/fail.

SWK 121 Child Sexual Abuse Issues for Foster and Adoptive Parents (2). Course designed to give students an understanding of the specialized insights and skills necessary for working with children and birth families where there has been sexual abuse. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: SWK 120.

SWK 201 Social Work and Social Welfare (3). An introduction to the institution of social welfare and the profession of social work; includes the historical development of conflicting social philosophies and modern social welfare programs, as well as the historical development of the profession of social work. Prerequisites:  ENG 102 and if the student has not taken SWK 101, he/she must take it concurrently with this course.

SWK 225 Human Diversity (3). This course is designed to give students an understanding of the concept of human diversity. It includes content on race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical and mental ability, age and national origin.

SWK 301 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3). Focus on  developmental processes (biological, psychological, and social) throughout the life span of individuals (pre-birth to old age) while emphasizing the interdependence between people and the environment in which they live. In addition, students learn to critically analyze theories related to human development and human behavior. Builds on general education courses including psychology, sociology, anthropology, and biology. Prerequisites:  BIO 101, PSY 180, SOC 133, SWK 101, and 225.

SWK 302 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3). Primary  focus is on models, theories, and knowledge related to larger systems such as families and other small groups, organizations, communities, and political systems. Corequisite:  PSY 303.

SWK 303 Principles and Methods of Research (3). An introduction to quantitative and qualitative methods of research designed to enable students to understand the critical and scientific methodologies their discipline uses to discover knowledge and ascertain its validity. Ethical issues and program evaluation will also be discussed. Enrollment will be limited to social work and criminal justice majors and minors or by permission of instructor. Prerequisite:  MAT or approved statistics course. (Same as CRJ 303.)

SWK 304 Quantitative Analysis (3).  Basic concepts of statistics are covered including descriptive and inferential statistics, up to and including linear regression.  Students also learn to use The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) to enter data and calculate statistics.  Prerequisite: ACT math standard score of at least 20 or MAT 105.

SWK 305 Services to Older Americans (3). An examination and study of the social problems experienced by older Americans and the modes of social intervention employed by society, through the Aging Network, to assist the aging and the aged. Prerequisite:  junior standing. (Same as GTY 305.)

SWK 310 Social Work Practice I (3). This is the first course in the social work practice sequence and presents the generalist model with emphasis on work with individuals and families. Social Work Practice I is designed to introduce the student to the skills and processes of social work. Content will include the theoretical and philosophical bases of the generalist model, intervention processes, and the legal and ethical parameters of practice. Fundamental principles of interviewing and record-keeping will be presented. The focus of the course is on the ethical application of practice theory. Participation in experiential activity and demonstration of basic helping skills are expected. Prerequisites:  admission to the social work program; SWK 101, 201, 225, 301, and 302.

SWK 311 Social Work Practice Skills (3). This is the second course in the social work practice sequence and presents a laboratory-like interaction, which builds on the theoretical information presented in SWK 310. Fundamental principles of interviewing and record-keeping will be presented. The focus of the course is on the ethical application of practice theory. Participation in experiential activity and demonstration of basic helping skills are expected. Prerequisites:  SWK 101, 201, 225, 301,  and 310.

SWK 312 Social Work Practice II (3). This is the second course in the social work practice sequence and continues the study of social work practice with an emphasis on social work with groups. It is designed as an intermediate level investigation and study of the practical application of the generalist model within a group framework. Content will include conceptual framework and techniques of group work. Prerequisites:  SWK 101, 201, 225, 301, 302, and 310.

SWK 313 Social Work Practice III (3). This is the third course in the social work practice sequence and continues the study of social work practice with an emphasis on social work with organizations and communities. It is designed as an intermediate level investigation and study of practical application of the generalist model within an organization and community framework. Content will include conceptual framework and techniques of social work in organizations and communities, models of organizational and community practice, and evaluation of practice. Prerequisites: admission to the social work program, SWK 101, 201, 225, 301, 302, and 310.

SWK 315 Addiction: Treatment and Society (3). An overview of current theories, models and definitions of addictive disorders, with focus on both the addictive and recovery processes. The role of the social worker/helping professional in identification, intervention and treatment will be stressed. The needs of special populations, diverse populations and family and adolescent issues will be addressed. Prerequisite: junior standing (Same as CRJ 315 and SOC 315.)

SWK 336 Family Violence (3). A comprehensive examination of the effects of violence on the American family, and the ways in which social service agencies and practitioners respond to the unique needs created by this social problem. Prerequisite:  junior standing. (Same as CRJ 336.)

SWK 345 School Social Work (3). A historical and contemporary perspective on school social work; emphasis is placed on the development of skills for effective service to children, families, personnel of the local education agency, and the community. Prerequisite:  junior standing.

SWK 350 Social Welfare Policies and Services (3). This course examines historical and contemporary legislative and political responses to the social and economic problems that confront society. A major focus is on the preparation of students, as generalist social workers, to systematically analyze social welfare policies and effectively impact the development of social policy. Prerequisite:  ECO 140, POL 140, SWK 201, and 310.

SWK 355 Perspectives on Women (3). Introduction to the study of women’s issues in contemporary society. The course will include an overview of the history of the feminist movement and its role in human liberation. The socialization of women and their status in relationship to economic, social and political institutions will be emphasized. Particular attention will be given to these issues as they relate to women of color, older women and lesbian women. Prerequisite:  junior standing or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 355.)

SWK 365 Crisis Intervention (3). This course will focus on the techniques and management skills employed by social workers in dealing with emergency and crisis situations. Short-term, limited goal interventions will be emphasized. Prerequisite:  SWK 310, 311 or consent of instructor.

SWK 370 Gerontological Social Work Theory (3). Course will examine the broader context of the social/cultural meaning of aging in contemporary American society and what social work professionals must know in order to provide social services to those classified as elderly. The emphasis in this course will be on social gerontological theories relevant to work with older people.

SWK 375 Social Work in Health Care Settings (3). A study of the role and scope of social services in health care settings. Focus will be placed on the multidisciplinary team approach to service delivery. Prerequisite:  SWK 310 or consent of instructor.

SWK 385 Social Work in Mental Health Settings (3). A study of the role and scope of social services in behavioral health settings. Focus will be placed on the interdisciplinary team approach to service delivery. Prerequisite: SWK 310 or consent of instructor.

SWK 395 Substance Abuse Prevention (3). This course is designed to provide an overview of substance or drug abuse and the various strategies used in preventive efforts. The role of prevention in the continuum of care will be examined from a historical perspective. A variety of problems associated with substance abuse, including legal, health and impairment problems, will be explored. Prerequisite: junior standing.

SWK 405 Child Abuse and Neglect (3). This course is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to child abuse and neglect from a social work perspective. The course will focus on the extent of the problem, its effects on children, treatment issues, the social worker’s role in a multi-disciplinary team approach to intervention and advocacy for individuals and families. This course is the first of two specific course requirements for the Public Child Welfare Certification Program available through Murray State University’s Social Work Program and the Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

SWK 410 Enhancing Safety and Permanency (3). Course prepares undergraduate students in the College of Health Sciences and Human Services to develop knowledge and skills in the delivery of services to children and youth in foster care and other out of home care situations in the context of an ecological and family solutions framework. Prerequisite: SWK 120

SWK 415 Child Abuse Interventions (3). This course is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to practice skills and treatment interventions related to social work with abused and neglected children and their families. This course will focus on the development of specific practice skills in collecting data and assessing situations with a variety of client types. This course is the second of two specific course requirements for the Public Child Welfare Certification Program available through Murray State University’s Social Work Program and the Kentucky Cabinet for Families and Children. Prerequisites:  SWK 405 and consent of instructor.

SWK 425 HIV Disease:  The Individual and Society (3). This course is an overview of HIV disease and its impact on individuals and society. This course will focus on the history of the illness, as well as, current medical and epidemiological information. Current treatment, legal and ethical issues, social responses, and personal and societal values will be explored. Prerequisite:  junior standing.

SWK 426 Spirituality and Social Work Practice (3). Course is designed to assist students in understanding the role of spirituality in a person’s life and how to engage in spiritually sensitive practice. Time will be spent exploring how the social worker’s spirituality influences their practice and the importance of including information regarding client spirituality when completing an assessment.

SWK 437 Senior Honors Thesis (3). A faculty-supervised thesis and/or project which allows Honors Program students with a senior standing to undertake advanced research. A thesis paper and/or written review of the exhibit or performance is required.

SWK 460 Topical Seminar (3). Seminar dealing with various social work topics. Topics may differ from semester to semester depending on program curricular needs and demonstrated interest of students. May be repeated for credit under different topical course titles. Prerequisite:  junior standing. (Same as CRJ 345.)

SWK 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of social work program director.

SWK 489 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite:  permission of social work program director.

SWK 498 Senior Seminar (3). The final social work practice course designed to prepare students for beginning professional entry-level generalist practice. This course will explore issues related to agency based work environments, service delivery in a generalist framework, current issues in the field, and focus on the professional use of self. The process of arranging the field practicum (SWK 499) takes place as part of this course and the practicum is arranged for the subsequent fall or spring semester. Prerequisites:  formal admission to the social work program, SWK 310, SWK 311, and SWK 312; SWK 313 may be taken concurrently.

SWK 499 Field Practicum (12). Internship in a community social service agency. Field practicum is designed to give students an educational work experience in which they apply generalist social work practice theory and skills. Concurrent field seminar class meets regularly on campus to explore current issues related to service delivery to individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Field practicum requires a full semester (500 clock hours) of full-time agency-based work. Prerequisites: formal admission to the social work program, consent of field education review committee and SWK 498.

SWK 500 Independent Study (3). Faculty supervised independent study and investigation of selected topics related to the student’s academic and/or career goals. Prerequisites:  social work major with advanced standing and consent of instructor. This course cannot be used as a social work elective.

SWK 520 Interdisciplinary Palliative Care (3). This course is designed to give graduate and undergraduate student in the College of Health Sciences and Human Services an understanding of both the philosophy and practice of palliative care. The course includes content on symptom assessment and management, spiritual care, psychological support, and special patient populations. This course is also suitable for students from other colleges who have an interest in evidence-based end-of-life care.

SWK 525 Case Management: Theory and Practice (3). This course will address the theory and practice of effective case management and the skills necessary to assess the client situation and to optimize client functioning. This course will focus on a diverse population of vulnerable clients across various practice settings. The settings emphasized include medical/health, educational, psychiatric and services to the elderly. Policy issues will be addressed, as they relate to advocacy, service planning, and program design. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Same as HCA 525)


Theatre and Dance
(THD)
THD 098 Theatre Attendance and Assembly (0). All theatre majors must enroll for this course each semester. Theatre minors must enroll each spring semester. Successful completion of the course requires certified attendance at all theatre productions offered by the department and completing the work required on productions prior to graduation. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  theatre major or minor.

THD 099 Freshman Orientation (1). Introduction to policies and guidelines for the department. Transfer students to the theatre program are encouraged to participate. Only one freshman orientation course will count towards graduation. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: none.

THD 101 Dance Appreciation (3). Orientation to dance as an art form: historical and aesthetic perspectives, basic dance elements, and the relationship to other arts and to the culture. Lectures, films, demonstrations and practical dance experience.

THD 104 The Theatrical Experience (3). Critical analysis of the theatre as an art form. Emphasis is on the play in production, not the play as literature. A student cannot have credit for both this course and HON 163.

THD 110 Movement for the Actor (3). Introduction to basic physical skills needed for acting:  relaxation, flexibility, manipulation of the body at rest and in motion.

THD 111 Acting I (3). Course designed for theatre majors/minors and vocal music performance majors/minors who plan to teach theatre or work professionally in the field. Basic stage terminology and orientation, location and utilization of proper audition materials and audition techniques, formal script analysis and scoring techniques, proper stage etiquette and professionalism will be explored.

THD 120 Play Analysis (3). Study and application of the basic concepts and skills needed to successfully comprehend and approach a play in production.

THD 200 (160) Classical Dance Technique (3). Foundations of dance theory as it applies to various classical dance techniques. Basic and intermediate level of vocabulary, aesthetics, and practices will be discussed and performed. The student will be required to dance in this course. A research paper on an approved dance subject will be required of each student.

THD 203 Dance Company I (3). Studio dance course. The student will participate as a member of the MSU Dance Company. Practical dance is required. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: audition into the MSU Dance Company and consent of instructor.

THD 210 Voice for Performance (3). Emphasis on vocal production, vocal projection, and the International Phonetic Alphabet as it relates to the stage.

THD 220 Creative Dramatics (3). Theatre games, group expression, improvisation, and storytelling will be examined. Using drama to educate children will be the emphasis for the class.

THD 225 Children’s Theatre Touring Company (3). Audition-based touring organization. Performances will take place at K-12 institutions each semester. May be repeated once for credit towards the theatre major. Prerequisite: audition entry to the company.

THD 230 Theatre and Stage Management (3). Examination of theoretical and practical aspects of working as a theatre manager and stage manager.

THD 240 Theatre Production (4). Introduction to the basic workings of the crews and tools of the scene and costume shops. Fundamental techniques of construction will be covered. Practical work on productions is required outside of lecture.

THD 241 Theatrical Makeup (3). The basic principles of stage makeup are explored through lecture demonstration and application.

THD 253 Modern Dance I (3). Study of the theory, techniques and history of modern dance. Practical dance experience is utilized in this course.

THD 260 Music Theatre Dance I (3). Exploration of choreographers and their styles as they relate to musical theatre genres. Practical dance experience is utilized in the course.

THD 262 Jazz Dance I (3). Study of the theory, technique, and history of jazz dance. Practical dance experience is utilized in the course.

THD 301 Acting for Non-Majors (3). Introductory course for non-majors that introduces basic body and vocal techniques through theatre games and scenes.

THD 302 World Dance (3). Principles, theory and practical experience in dance from around the globe. Practical dance experiences is utilized in the course.

THD 303 Dance Company II (3). Continued work in the MSU Dance Company. Practical dance is required. May be repeated twice for credit.  Prerequisite: audition into the MSU Dance Company and consent of instructor.

THD 310 Acting II (3). Acting theories (Stanislavski, etc. ) are introduced and utilized along with formal script analysis and scoring techniques as they relate to the actor-audience relationship. Prerequisites:  THD 111 and 120.

THD 320 Playwriting (3). A study of the principles and practices of dramatic construction of play scripts. Prerequisites:  THD 120.

THD 322 International Studies in Theatre (3). Study of current theatrical productions in a foreign country.  A residency outside of the United States is required for this course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

THD 346 Acting Shakespeare (3). Advanced study of Shakespeare’s work as it relates to acting. Scripts analysis, interpretation, and Shakespeare’s scripts in performance will be emphasized. Prerequisite: THD 120, 310.

THD 347 Storytelling (3). Interpretation of a script as it is performed by a single performer and relating that script to an audience. Prerequisite: THD 120, 310 and Junior standing.

THD 348 Advanced Costume Construction (3). Advanced study of costume construction for the theatre. Practical work on university theatre productions required. Prerequisite: THD 240.

THD 349 Advanced Stagecraft (3). Advanced study of technical theatre practices. Practical work on university theatre productions required. Prerequisite: THD 240.

THD 350 Scene Design (3). Aesthetics of set design as it relates to the stage. Emphasis is placed on principles and theories of design. Practical work on university theatre productions is required. Prerequisites:  THD 120 and 240.

THD 351 Lighting Design (3). Aesthetics of lighting design as it relates to the stage. Emphasis is placed on principles and theories of design. Practical work on university theatre productions is required. Prerequisites:  THD 120 and 240.

THD 352 Costume Design (3). Aesthetics of costume design as it relates to the stage. Emphasis is placed on principles and theories of design. Practical work on university theatre productions is required.  Prerequisites:  THD 120 and 240.

THD 353 Modern Dance II (3). Continued study of Modern Dance as it relates to THD 261. Prerequisite: THD 261.

THD 354 Theatre Pedagogy (3). Theoretical and practical methods of teaching theatre as it relates to K-12 curriculums. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

THD 360 Music Theatre Dance II (3). Continued study of music theatre dance as it relates to THD 260.  Prerequisite:  THD 260.

THD 362 Jazz Dance II (3). Continued study of jazz dance as it relates to THD 262. Prerequisite:  THD 262.

THD 400 Special Topics (3). Studies in theatre arts or dance topic not offered in the curriculum on a regular rotation. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

THD 410 Acting III (3). A study of acting styles for period literature. Prerequisites:  THD 111, 120, and 310.

THD 420 Theatre History and Literature I (3). A study of Western theatre history and literature from its beginnings to the English Restoration.

THD 421 Theatre History and Literature II (3). Continued study of Western theatre history and literature from the English Restoration to the modern era.

THD 422 Contemporary Theatre (3). A study of contemporary theatre trends, practitioners and literature from 1970 to the present.

THD 430 Directing I (3). Principles and methods of stage direction, script analysis, and the directing concept as they relate to play production. Prerequisites:  THD 120 and junior standing.

THD 462 Dance History (3). A study of major dance movements from around the world. Prerequisite: junior standing.

THD 463 Choreography (3). Principles of dance theory and composition utilizing spatial, dynamic, and rhythmic elements. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

THD 465 Directing II (3). Practical application of principles learned in THD 430. Prerequisites:  THD 120, 430, and senior standing.

THD 470 Senior Seminar (3). Capstone experience involving an exhibition of the student’s work in the department. This exhibition can be a performance, portfolio review or other appropriate medium that is completed via a written treatise. Professional development as it relates to further study or job placement in the entertainment industry will also be covered. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

THD 590 Directed Independent Study in Theatre Arts (3). Individual projects of special interest under the direct supervision of a theatre or dance faculty member. Prerequisites: graduate or senior standing and consent of the chair of the department.


Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 
(TSL)

TSL 510 Applied Linguistics for Second Language Teaching (3). An overview of the basic concepts, scope, and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects, including topics and issues in current linguistic studies. The primary systems of language, psycholinguistics and comparative phonology are treated in depth. Prerequisite: ENG 310. (Same as ENG/MLA 510.)

TSL 520 Computer Assisted Language Learning (3). An introduction to computer assisted language learning (CALL), an overview of its specialized vocabulary and a review of research regarding its effectiveness. (Same as MLA 520.)

TSL 530 Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL (3). Knowledge derived from the linguistic sciences about the nature of language and how it is learned serves as the basis for the exploration and evaluation of various methods, techniques and approaches to the teaching of English as a Second Language.

TSL 533 Language and Culture (3). A study of the relationship among language, society and the individual’s concept of reality. The course examines a variety of anthropological and ethnographic concepts and findings as they relate to language and language learning in its broadest context. The course will also examine socio- and comparative linguistics, the relationship between culture and language, and the implications for second language teaching. (Same as ENG/MLA 533.)

TSL 580 Practicum (3). An intensive teaching/learning experience in which participants work in a classroom setting under the supervision of a master teacher. Prerequisite:  TSL 530.


Telecommunications Systems Management
(TSM)
TSM 099 Introduction to the Profession (1). A student  (transfer or regular) who has not enrolled in and earned 12 hours prior to his/her first semester at Murray State University must take freshman orientation. Graded pass/fail. Only one freshman orientation course will count toward graduation.

TSM 110 Electrical Systems (4). A study of the utilization of electricity as a source of energy and a method of information transmission.  Basic DC and AC circuits, with introduction to the application of electro-magnetic fields. Lecture and laboratory provide learning experiences with basic test instruments, circuits and components. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisites:  MAT 130 or 150.

TSM 118 Telecommunications Electronics I (3). A theoretical overview of the electronic building blocks involved in the field of telecommunications. Prerequisites: ACT standard score of at least 20 or MAT 105.

TSM 120 Introduction to Telecommunications (3). An overview of the telecommunications industry including history, fundamentals, regulations, the marketplace, educational requirements, and job/career opportunities. The class will focus on telecommunications terminology, overviews of specific technologies and their business application.

TSM 132 Network Technical Support (3). Primarily lab-based course, studying microcomputer concepts, with emphasis on network technician practices. Students learn to operate, install, configure, troubleshoot, upgrade, and maintain microcomputers and gain an introductory understanding of computer networks. Two hours lecture and two hours lab.

TSM 210 Electrical Systems II (4). A continuation of Electronics I through the study of semiconductor devices and their applications, and particularly how electronic technology is applied to the field of data transfer and communications. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:  TSM 110. (Fall)

TSM 218 Telecommunications Electronics II (3). A continued theoretical overview of the electronic building blocks involved in the field of telecommunications. Prerequisite: TSM 118.

TSM 219 Electronic Skills Lab (3). Electrical, electronic and related mechanical drafting; printed circuit board layout and masking techniques; introduction to CAD techniques; industrial documentation procedures. Four contact hours.  (Fall)

TSM 232 Network Operating Systems (3). A primarily lab-based course, studying network operating systems and network administrative functions necessary to implement and maintain modern Local Area Networks (LAN). One hour lecture and four hours laboratory.

TSM 241 Networking Essentials and Hardware (3). A technical overview of the evolution of the networking industry from early voice communications through modern-day high-speed data and voice networks. Prerequisite:  TSM 110.

TSM 321 Wireless Communications (3). Introduction to wireless communications fundamentals, including analog and digital techniques, as well as data procession algorithms used in modern communication systems. Prerequisite: TSM 218 and 241. (Fall)

TSM 322 Wireless Communications II (3). Course provides a comprehensive technical foundation in Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA), Global System for Mobile (GSM), Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA), Enhance Data for GSM Evolution (EDGE), and higher generations of CDMA wireless access technologies. Prerequisite: TSM 218.

TSM 323 Wireless Mobile Internet (3). Course will develop a comprehensive understanding of the wireless internet describing the standard activities and the current status of wireless IP (Internet Protocol), and detailing network models and specific associated techniques. Prerequisite: TSM 322.

TSM 331 Digital Electronics (4). A study of Boolean algebra, binary number systems, and small- and medium-scale digital integrated circuits. Emphasis is placed upon the TTL and CMOS logic families. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:  TSM 210.

TSM 332 Microprocessors (4). A study of advanced digital systems and their relationships to microprocessor-based systems, general microprocessor architecture, and an in-depth study of a Motorola 6800-family microprocessor. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:   TSM 331. (Fall)

TSM 340 Information Security Management (3). An overview of the problems, techniques, and practices associated with establishing and maintaining information security. Prerequisite:  TSM 241.

TSM 341 Communications Electronics I (4). An introduction to communications electronics including AM transmission and reception, single-sided-band communications, and FM transmission and reception. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisite:  MAT 130 and TSM 210.

TSM 342 Communications Electronics II (4). A continuation of TSM 341 including pulse and digital communications, television, telephone systems, microwave communications, fiber optic systems, transmission lines, wave propagation, and antennas. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  TSM 341. (Spring)

TSM 343 Protocol Analysis (3). A primary lab-based course, studying the hardware and software necessary to implement and maintain modern Local Area Networks (LAN).  Prerequisite: TSM 232.

TSM 352 Systems Security (3). A lab-based course, studying security issues associated with network operating systems. One hour lecture and four hours laboratory. Prerequisites: TSM 340 and 343.

TSM 353 Network Security (3). A lecture and lab course that concentrates on the techniques for securing data networks and network operating systems. Two hours lecture and four hours lab. Prerequisite: TSM 352.

TSM 380 Internship (3). These students, upon approval of the TSM faculty, are placed with cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training in telecommunications systems management. Work experience supervised by faculty; written reports are required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: Permission of program director.

TSM 411 Network Design, Operations and Management (3). An in-depth study of network design and administration from a technical point of view. Issues of efficiency, reliability, risk analysis, disaster recovery, and security will be addressed. Students will learn to do needs assessment, costing, and payback calculation. Students will apply principles learned in TSM/CIS 304 and TSM/CSC 510. Prerequisites:  TSM 206 and 510.

TSM 421 Mobile Satellite Communications (3).  Course will examine elements of the architecture of mobile satellite service networks.  Air interface, systems for processing and completing telephone and data calls, and the regulatory issues that hamper the creation of a viable business will be integral components of the course.  Prerequisite: TSM 322.

TSM 440 Information Policy and Security Auditing (3). Detailed study of security auditing and policy making, which will serve as a capstone to the security option. The entire process of information policy writing and security auditing will be examined including:  inspection, protection, detection, reaction, and reflection. Prerequisites: ACC 201; TSM 340 and 352.

TSM 441 Advanced Information Security (3).  Introduction to advanced aspects of information security and assurance.  This course provides the students with an understanding of the issues associated with encryption algorithms and techniques, the different types of malicious software including how to stop it, and how computer forensics apply to incident handling.  Prerequisites: TSM 340, TSM 352.

TSM 443 Telephone Technology (3). A study of telephone systems including central offices, private branch exchanges, local loops and distribution, multimedia teleconferencing centers, and Wide Area Network technologies. Engineering matters are the emphasis, but regulatory and market issues are also considered as appropriate. Lecture, laboratory demonstration, laboratory and tours of area facilities are included.  Prerequisite:  TSM 341.

TSM 450 Telecommunications Policy and Strategies (3). Course will cover social, ethical, legal, strategy, technical, and professional issues encountered in a business environment in the information age. The students will discuss telecommunications policy and regulations in the United States and other nations, and how these regulations impact the telecommunications industry. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of the instructor.

TSM 488 Cooperative Education/Internship (1-3). A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive  academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

Technology Teacher Education
(TTE)
TTE 182 Basic Concepts Concerning Education (3). The main thrust of this course is to survey the basic concepts of education, including a study of educational theories, the development of technology and the elements of technological systems. Emphasis is placed on the impacts and interrelationships among technological subsystems and the student’s involvement in the actual technology education classroom/laboratory setting. (Same as CTE 182.)

TTE 451 Manufacturing Systems (4). A study of the practices used in the manufacturing industry. Emphasis is placed on the theory and processes used to convert the needs and wants of consumers into distributed products. Technical aspects of materials, processes, equipment, products and occupations relating to the manufacturing industry will be explored. Problem-solving, research and experimentation will be used to establish an enterprise to select, design, test, mass produce, market and service products. Recycling and the impacts on and relationship to societal institutions, the environment and the individual are introduced and explored. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITE 101 and 120, upper division standing or instructor approval.

TTE 452 Communications Systems (3). Introduction to the systems and techniques used to transfer and/or process ideas, knowledge and information. Problem-solving, research and experimentation will be used to experience encoding, transmitting, decoding, storing, retrieving and using information. Students will develop technical expertise in the design, construction, analysis and evaluation of the components, devices and subsystems of communication systems. The impacts on and relationship to societal institutions, the environment and the individual are introduced and explored. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITD 101 and upper division standing or instructor approval.

TTE 453 Transportation Systems (3). A study of systems used to move goods and transport people. Students will research, experiment and solve problems related to the design, development, evaluation and operation of subsystems and components of terrestrial, marine, atmospheric and space transportation as well as the transformation and transportation/transmission of energy to support those transportation systems. Students will select, design, construct, analyze and evaluate solutions to transportation problems. The impacts on and relationship to societal institutions, the environment and the individual are introduced and explored. Prerequisite:  upper division standing or advisor approval.

TTE 455 Exploring Diverse Technological Systems (3). This course provides an overview of diverse technological systems. It explores technological aspects of how technology is designed, and used to meet the wants and needs of individuals and society. The problem-solving and design processes are examined in the context of production, communication and transportation systems. Emphasis is placed on teaching technical content and using the systems approach to develop technical understanding, rudimentary technical skills and problem solving expertise in the technology education classroom/laboratory setting.

TTE 470 Foundations of Technology and Vocational Education (3). A study of the social, historical and philosophical foundations of technology education and vocational education. Includes critical examination of the influences of the foundations of technology and vocational education on contemporary curricular developments, selection and organization of course content and teaching techniques. Lecture/discussion. Credit may not be received for both CTE 270 and TTE 470.  (Same as CTE 570.)

TTE 471 Instructional Methods in Technology and Technical Education (3). The presentation and application of instructional materials, methods, techniques and devices relevant to teaching technology and vocational education at the orientation, exploration and preparation levels. Students will explore current research on methods of instruction, then plan and execute teaching units for both individual and group instruction, selecting content and instructional strategies based on the goals and objectives appropriate to the content organizers of technology. Activities will include development of lesson plans, organization of materials, and presentation of psychomotor, affective and cognitive instruction as well as establishment of student expectations and a student behavior policy. (Same as CTE 571.)

TTE 472 Facility Planning, Operation and Maintenance (2). A study of the methods and procedures used in planning, utilizing, equipping, operating, maintaining and evaluating technology education classroom and laboratory facilities. Exploration of the laboratory management skills and techniques (including safety, inventory, record-keeping, requisitioning equipment and materials, maintenance and budgeting) necessary to develop, maintain and improve an educational environment which accommodates the instructional process in the technology education classroom. Lecture and laboratory.

TTE 474 Instructional Media and Curriculum Development (3). A study of current trends and issues in curriculum development and instructional media for technology and vocational education. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the curricular considerations unique to the application of other areas of knowledge to technological problem-solving. Research and problem-solving skills will be utilized to adapt instructional media and existing teaching units to both individual and group instruction. Students will link content and instructional strategies based on goals and objectives appropriate to the content organizers of technology. (Same as CTE 574.)

TTE 475 Computer Assisted Instruction (3). Utilization of the computer as a classroom instructional and management tool. Emphasis on systems terminology, hardware and software maintenance and steps or procedures for converting traditional teacher-lecture materials to computer-managed instruction for technical education. Students will have opportunities to experience and evaluate interactive and non-interactive instructional programs for use in technology-based instruction.

TTE 512 Instructional Materials and Equipment (3). A study of the psychological, physiological and pedagogical justification of the uses of audiovisual aids in teaching. Through experiences in the preparation and use of various audiovisual media, the student will develop proficiency in the application and operation of current instructional technology equipment and software as well as skill in the preparation of instructional materials for use in the technology education classroom and laboratory.

TTE 550 Advanced Study in Construction (3). A directed study of selected areas within the fields of residential, civil and light commercial construction. Prerequisite:  approved course work and/or experience.

TTE 554 (454) Teaching in the Modular and Systems Environment (3). This course is designed to be the capstone course for pre-service technology education teachers. Emphasis is placed on teaching technical content using both the systems and modular approaches to develop technical understanding, rudimentary technical skills and problem solving expertise in the technology education classroom/laboratory setting.

TTE 575 Managing Instruction for Learners with Special Needs (3). A study of the basic ideas, perspectives and techniques critical to the planning, management and evaluation of instruction for special needs learners. Classroom situations involving diverse populations and handicaps will be examined. A student-generated field experience is required. (Same as CTE 575.)


Youth  and Nonprofit Leadership
(YNL)
YNL 290 Trends and Issues in Youth and Human Services (3). A study of the effect of current results, educational, social, economic environmental issues on youth and human service organizations. Includes student involvement in a community service organization.

YNL 350 Program Administration in Youth and Human Service Organizations (3). An analysis of the historical background, development, organization and purpose of youth agencies. An emphasis on the structure, program, financing, policies, and future problems which confront major youth and nonprofit organizations.

YNL 351 Leadership and Support Systems in Youth and Human Service Organizations (3). An analysis of the leadership components involved in directing youth and human service programs. An emphasis on the development of support systems including staff, volunteers, financial and other resources.

YNL 400 Youth and Human Service Agency Administration Internship (3-6).

YNL 450 Senior Seminar (1).

YNL 485 Seminar on Leadership Development (3).

YNL 501 Seminar on Youth and Human Service Organizations (3). An introductory survey course on the nonprofit/voluntary human service organization. Agency governance, policy, board relations, planning cycles, programs, problems, staffing, volunteer management and personnel issues are treated using a case-study approach. Extra assignments required of graduate students.

YNL 502 Workshop in Financial Resource Development (3). Currently successful methods of finance management are examined including United Way, grantwriting, sustaining membership enrollment, endowment development, special events and accounting. Emphasis is placed on identifying and cultivating prospective contributors, capital campaigns, financial support systems and trends of philanthropy. Extra assignments required of graduate students.

YNL 580 Special Problems in Youth and Human Service Organizations (1-3). Prerequisite:  prior consent of instructor.