Graduate Courses
12

 
All of the courses herein are offered by Murray State University for undergraduate and/or graduate credit. The university reserves the right to make any adjustments in the Bulletin which are deemed necessary. The subject-matter areas and course prefixes are shown below and appear in that order on the following pages. Courses numbered 500 and above are graduate-level courses. Students desiring graduate credit for a graduate-level course must be admitted to graduate status before enrolling in the course. 
ACC
ADE
ADM
AED
AGR
ANT
ARC
ART
AST
BED
BIO
BPA
CDI
CET
CHE
CIS
COM
CRJ
CSC
CSP
CTE
ECO
EDP
EDU
ELE
ENG
Accounting
Adult Education
Administration and Supervision
Agricultural Education
Agriculture
Anthropology
Archaeology
Art
Astronomy
Business Education
Biology
Business and Public Affairs
Communication Disorders
Civil/Construction Engineering Technology
Chemistry 
Computer Information Systems
Communication
Criminal Justice
Computer Science
College Student Personnel
Career and Technical Education
Economics
Educational Psychology
Education
Early Elementary Education
English
ENT
ETE
EXS
FCS
FIN
FRE
GCM
GER
GSC
GTY
GUI
HCA
HEA
HIS
IET
INT
ITD
JMC
JPN
LIB
LST
MAT
MGT
MID
MKT
MLA
Engineering Technology
Electrical Telecommunications Engineering
Exercise Science
Family and Consumer Studies
Finance
French
Graphic Communications Management
German
Geosciences
Gerontology
Guidance
Health Care Administration
Health
History
Industrial and Engineering Technology
International Studies
Industrial Technology and Design
Journalism and Mass Communications
Japanese
Library Science
Legal Studies
Mathematics 
Management
Middle School Education
Marketing
Modern Languages
MUS
NTN
NUR
OSH
PHE
PHI
PHY
PLN
POL
PSY
REA
REC
RGS
SEC
SED
SOC
SPA
SWK
THD
TSL
TSM
TTE
WSC
YNL
Music
Nutrition
Nursing
Occupational Safety and Health
Physical Education
Philosophy
Physics
Planning, Urban and Regional
Political Science
Psychology
Reading
Recreation
Religious Studies
Secondary Education
Special Education
Sociology
Spanish
Social Work
Theatre and Dance
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 
Telecommunications Systems Management
Technology Teacher Education
Water Science
Youth and Nonprofit Leadership

 
ACCOUNTING
(ACC)
ACC 500 Advanced Accounting (3). A comprehensive examination of some of the most complex accounting problems including consolidated financial statements, partnerships, foreign subsidiaries, estates and trusts, and consignment and installment sales. Prerequisite:  ACC 301.

ACC 501 Accounting for Governmental and Nonprofit Entities (3). Accounting and reporting principles, standards and procedures applicable to (1) state and local governments, including counties, cities, townships and villages; (2) the federal government; and (3) other not-for-profit institutions such as universities and hospitals. Prerequisite:  ACC 200, ACC 201 and ACC 202 with minimum grades of C in each course, or ACC 490 with a minimum grade of C.

ACC 502 Advanced Income Tax (3). Continued study of the Internal Revenue Code and Regulations with emphasis on the advanced aspects of income; deductions, exclusions and credits, especially as they are related to the tax issues of individuals, corporations, and partnerships. Prerequisite:   ACC 302.

ACC 503 Advanced Cost Accounting (3). The study of selected advanced cost accounting topics including cost management, discretionary cost control, inventory management, capital budgeting, transfer pricing, performance evaluation and reward structures. Traditional and contemporary operational environments are emphasized. A business simulation requires the use of cost and managerial accounting models in planning, control, performance evaluation, decision making and product costing. Prerequisites:  ACC 303 and 308.

ACC 506 Principles of Auditing  and Assurance Services (3). An in-depth study of the principles of auditing and the performance of attest services. The purposes of audit and attest services, qualifications of the auditor, classes of attest services, professional ethics, legal responsibilities, professional standards, audit and attest procedures, and audit and attestation reports are among the topics covered. Prerequisites:  ACC 301, ACC 303 and ACC 308.

ACC 507 Professional Issues (1). Study of contemporary issues in accounting. Topics include professional certifications, emerging practices, career preparation, and professional development. Restricted to accounting area students. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  ACC 301.

ACC 509 Accounting Theory (3). Designed as a critical examination of relevant AICPA literature,  especially accounting research bulletins, accounting principles board opinions and statements, and the financial accounting standards board statements. Contemporary developments are examined in the accounting literature and through reports. Prerequisite:  ACC 301.

ACC 511 Survey of Accounting Principles for the Nonprofit Organization (3). Fundamentals of accounting procedures are discussed in detail. Concepts unique to accounting systems in nonprofit/volunteer organizations, such as types of funds and account groups are introduced. Budgeting, internal control and related tax issues are also discussed. Extra assignments will be required of graduate students.

ACC 586 International Experience in Accounting (3). A short-term study abroad program highlighting selected historical and modern contributions to accounting and business from another country and culture. Course will also meet weekly during the semester. Graded pass/fail. Graduate credit cannot be received for both ACC 586 and ACC 644. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ACC 595 Special Problems (3). Research by students in fields of special interests. Includes project research studies and intensive reading programs, accompanied by conferences with professors in fields involved. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

ACC 602 Tax Planning and Research (3). The study of tax research methodology. Emphasis is placed on the sources of tax law and their relationship to tax research. Administrative tax procedures and principles of tax planning as related to tax research are explored and evaluated. Prerequisite:  ACC 302 or equivalent.

ACC 604 Quantitative Financial Controls (3). An in-depth study of management accounting techniques and methods needed for effective management of business enterprises. The trade-offs management makes in acquiring and using accounting information for decision-making and control are discussed. Specific topics include cost behavior and estimation, short-term decision making, budgeting, performance evaluation, cost allocation, and product costing.  Prerequisites: ACC 201 or ACC 490.

ACC 606 Auditing Theory and Practice (3). Emphasizes independent auditing services that CPAs provide. Engagement planning and documentation, internal control, evidence accumulation for major categories of processes and accounts, reporting, statistical sampling, and audits of computer-based systems are the major topics. Prerequisite:  ACC 506 or equivalent.

ACC 608 Seminar in Accounting Information Systems (3). A seminar course in contemporary accounting information systems. Research in selected systems topics is required, along with a formal research paper. A few examples of the research topics include: internal control, the systems development life cycle, artificial intelligence and expert systems, database and distributed systems, electronic commerce, networks, and telecommunications. Students present and discuss their research findings in class. Prerequisite:  Either ACC 308, an upper-level course in information systems, or consent of instructor.

ACC 609 Issues in Corporate Financial Reporting (3). An examination of corporate financial reporting issues including the application of accounting techniques and theory under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to financial reports of large companies. In addition to covering traditional financial reporting issues, the course also emphasizes financial reporting issues related to initial public offerings, mergers and acquisitions, environmental contingencies, international accounting standards, and other contemporary topics. Prerequisite:  ACC 300 and ACC 301.

ACC 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ACC 695 Special Problems (3). Entails research by graduate students in fields of special interests. Includes specialized research projects and intensive reading assignments that are accompanied by conferences with professors in the fields involved. Prerequisites:  12 hours of graduate credit in business and consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 6 credit hours.

ADULT EDUCATION
(ADE)
ADE 550 Adult-Community Education in a Changing Society (3). Study of the concept of community education and the fast-developing and emergent field of adult education as they relate to designing and implementing a program of total and lifelong education for the community.

ADE 551 Creative Adult Learning (3). An analysis of the adult as a learner. The process of aging, its implications for learning occupations, effect on families, and social views are considered. Actualizing conditions for relationships between personal developments and a free society.

ADE 555 Foundations of Adult and Community Education (3). Provides a historical understanding of adult and community education and how these two concepts evolved in modern twentieth century education theory, with particular emphasis on related aspects of progressive education as first envisioned and as revised and refined in recent  years.

ADE 599 Workshop in Adult Education (1-3). This course covers workshops conducted for certified teachers who additionally work with adults in evening adult education classes. Accumulated credits are not allowed to exceed six credit hours.

ADE 652 Education for Disadvantaged Adults (3). The motivation, experiences and uniqueness of adult basic education students are considered. Practical and theoretical bases for creative learning programs are stressed.

ADE 653 Adult Program Curriculum Development (3). Designed to help teachers and administrators select and develop appropriate adult programs that meet the needs of the adult learner. Appropriate methods and materials needed to support specified adult programs will be examined and/or developed.

ADE 655 The Community Education Center (3). An examination of models of community education based on relationships of community education to the K-12 curriculum in schools and to other agencies within a community.

ADE 668 Practicum in Adult Education (3). Closely supervised instruction in an adult learning center and in adult evening classes. Practicum consists of helping adults learn through a systematic approach of individualized instruction.

ADE 669 Practicum in Adult Education Administration (3). Closely supervised instruction in adult education program to include visitation to class sites, evaluation committee meetings, and attendance at teacher and paraprofessional pre-service and in-service training sessions.


ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION
(ADM)
ADM 600 Introduction to Educational Leadership (3). This introductory course examines the theoretical concepts and organizational patterns of governance and management of schools within the social and philosophical structure of our culture. Field research project required. Note:  Recommended initial course in school administration.

ADM 624 School and Community Relations (3). A study of the local community and its relationship to the school program, an analysis of proven communication processes and principles and their use in two-way communication strategies to strengthen the school’s resources. Field research project required.

ADM 627 School Law and Finance for Teachers (3). Designed for the classroom teacher. A study of the laws and finance pertaining to teachers as they work with students, administrators, colleagues and community interest groups. (Same as EDU 627.)

ADM 630 Methods of Research (3). A study of procedures used to locate sources of information, organize and interpret collected data, and apply results of published research. Various research methods are studied and used.

ADM 644 Survey of Research in Effective Schools (3). A survey of research in the school as it pertains to effective teaching, learning and leadership. The components covered will include (but not be limited to) the following areas: accountability, curriculum, expectations-goals, leadership, monitoring student feedback and organization.

ADM 645 Educational Resources Management (3). A survey of resources available to a public institution to support the mission of the institution and related programs. This is a general overview of public finance, site-based budgeting techniques, linking of resources to programs based on data and accountability. Identification and reallocation of resources will be tied to the learning mission of the unit. Resources other than financial will be included and special emphasis will be given to human resources including personnel and site-based councils.

ADM 650 Clinical Supervision (3). A study of clinical supervision principles and practices for the aspiring supervisor or principal. Topics include the nature and functions of supervision, strategies for use in supervision and the coaching nature of supervision as well as skills in observing and analyzing along with in-service programs and staff development. Field research project required.

ADM 655 Curriculum and Program Development (3). A study of the supervisory functions dealing with curricular and program evaluation and analysis and techniques for bringing about program and curricular change and improvement within the local school system. Field research project required.

ADM 657 Educational Policy and Ethics (3). Provides a historical overview for the science of institutional policy development in the United States. The relevance, overlap, and interplay of educational policy and ethics at the local, state, and national levels will be explored.

ADM 663 School Law (3). A study of the legal aspects of education. Critical legal content from constitutional law, court decisions, state statutes, state administrative regulations, attorney general opinions, and local school district policies will be covered. Note:  Course may be taken as an elective by a person not pursuing an administrative certificate.

ADM 664 School Principal (3). A study of modern administrative theories, processes and techniques applicable to the school, grades P-12. The emphasis is on the principal’s role as the instructional leader engaged in needs assessment, collection and use of data, formulation of educational goals, design and implementation of improvement strategies. Field research project required.

ADM 667 Pupil Personnel Accounting (3). The specific procedures in pupil accounting which are the responsibility of the director of pupil personnel. A study of systematized records management including some attention to machine data processing. Field research project required.

ADM 668 Practicum/Seminar in Educational Leadership (3). Managed field practicum experience where the student works with a building principal to develop depth of experience in areas of responsibility such as scheduling , professional development, school improvement planning, etc. At intervals, students will be convened to share and gain a broader perspective on their experiences. This course is recommended to be taken last, but may be in the last nine hours.

ADM 669 Seminar in School Administration (3). For advanced graduate students in school administration. Deals with current problems and issues and stresses independent investigation.

ADM 670 Topics in Educational Technology (3). Critical aspects of the management and administration of educational technology will be addressed. Topics covered may include administration and instruction, school and classroom management, networking, distance learning, statistical reporting, pupil scheduling, information retrieval systems, and technology policy issues.

ADM 674 Directed Study in School Administration (3). Designed for advanced graduate students who want to do in-depth research on special problems. Requires advanced study and analysis of literature and preparation of substantial research documents. May be repeated once for credit.

ADM 675 Introduction to Alternative Education Settings (3). Course serves as an overview to effective teaching and administrative practice in the alternative education settings. Students enrolled in the course must maintain a portfolio of course assignments and documentation of field experiences for evaluation for university credit. Field hours are required.

ADM 677 Crisis Management in Educational Settings (3). The content of this course provides educators with the skills and information to analyze safety data, plan for both school safety interventions and procedures and to manage crises in an educational setting. Field hours are required.

ADM 720 Advanced School Personnel Evaluation (3). A study and application of appropriate techniques used to evaluate the act of teaching. All ethical and legal aspects along with a sustained articulation methods, personnel records, and necessary personal skills will be covered. Study will exceed state and local evaluation systems and requirements.

ADM 723 Advanced School Program Evaluation (3). A study  and application of appropriate techniques used to evaluate methods, programs, and strategies used in public elementary and secondary education. All legal and ethical aspects along with an accurate assessment of the results of school programs will be covered. Study will include the relationship of goals, objectives, and activities related to the learning outcomes. Extensive data will be collected, organized, analyzed and presented as a measurement of program effectiveness.

ADM 725 Advanced Methods of Quantitative Research in Education (3). A study of quantitative research methods and statistics used in educational studies. Preparation for quantitative research and conducting an abbreviated inquiry, collecting and analyzing data as well as improving professional writing skills are the focus of this class. Prerequisite:  ADM 630 or comparable research course.

ADM 730 Advanced Educational Research (3). The knowledge and skill necessary to conduct educational research at an advanced level. Preparation to conduct research at the doctoral level is emphasized.

ADM 739 The School Superintendency (3). The role of  the school district superintendent is analyzed with reference to job responsibilities of the position, knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary to serve successfully in the position are examined.

ADM 749 School District Administration (3). This performance-based course focuses on school system operations including financial management and policy, administration of auxiliary services, human resources planning and management, federal and state programs, facilities planning and management and curriculum and instructional support. The emphasis throughout the course will be on the skills needed to perform the functions of the superintendent and the underlying policy development and implications.

ADM 759 Strategic Planning in Education (3). An examination of planning processes used by leaders to direct educational change and improvement. Includes strategic planning approaches designed to address macro and micro goals of organizations.

ADM 779 The Superintendency Practicum (1-3). An analysis of the role of the school district superintendent in practice with emphasis on changes in society and schools as well as with reference to job responsibilities of the position. Students enrolling in the practicum are expected to spend time interacting with practicing school administrators at school district locations. (Student will be required to take a total of three hours credit.)

ADM 798 Specialty Study (3). This course is designed to enable the student, with the supervision of his/her graduate faculty committee, to select a problem directly related to the student’s area of concentration, survey the research literature, collect and analyze research data and prepare the research paper.

ADM 799 Specialty Study (3). Continuation of ADM 798.


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
(AED)
AED 580 Methods in Teaching Agricultural Education (3-6). Philosophy and objectives of teaching agricultural education in a comprehensive program. Course concepts include preparing and delivering lesson plans that involve problem-solving method, lecturing, and laboratory based modules. Additional methods include instruction in supervising occupational experience programs and coordinating FFA programs. Learning theory, multicultural education and education of the exceptional child are also included. Field and clinical experiences are also employed. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit. Prerequisite: AED 380.

AED 581 Instructing Out-of-School Groups (3). Philosophy of vocational education for out-of-school youth and adults in agricultural occupations. Application of principles and techniques for organizing, conducting and evaluating instructional programs. Field-clinical experiences. (Spring)

AED 582 Supervision in Agricultural Education (3). Application of principles and techniques of supervising individuals and groups in the field of agricultural education. (With sufficient demand)

AED 583 Practicum in Agricultural Education, Extension and Public Service Leadership (1-3). Individual problems in areas of special interest in the field of agricultural education. May be repeated up to six hours. (Fall, Spring or Summer)

AED 680 Research in Agricultural Education (3). Advanced individual problems of special interest in the field of agricultural education. May be repeated once for a maximum of six hours. (Fall, Spring or Summer)

AED 681 Supervising Student Teachers in Agricultural Education (3). Competencies needed by the local supervising teacher to develop effective techniques of working with student teachers in agricultural education. Orientation, communication, supervising and evaluating student teachers. (With sufficient demand)

AED 682 Determining Course Content in Agricultural Education (3). Developing and using four-year course of study for high school students in agricultural education. Includes gathering and interpreting local data as a basis for course building. (With sufficient demand)

AED 683 Instructional Material in Agricultural Education (3). Selecting, procuring, developing and using instructional materials in the field of agricultural education. (With sufficient demand)

AED 684 Beginning Teacher Workshop (1-2). Problems of beginning teachers of agriculture relevant to planning, developing, implementing and evaluating local instructional programs. May be repeated for a total of three credits. (Fall)

AED 685 Advanced Instruction for Out-of-School Groups (3). Gathering and interpreting local data as a basis for program planning and course building for out-of-school youth and adults. Organizing and conducting classes. (With sufficient demand)

AED 686 Administration and Supervision in Agricultural Education (3). Principles of administration and supervision. Organizational structure of the various levels, including the state plan. Primarily for agriculture teachers, supervisors, counselors and school administrators. (With sufficient demand)

AED 687 Teaching Agricultural Mechanics (3). Role of agricultural mechanics in the vocational agriculture curriculum. Course building, selecting, procuring, developing and using instructional aids in teaching agricultural mechanics with emphasis on demonstrating use of such materials. Building and equipment needs. (With sufficient demand)

AED 688 Modern Problems in Agricultural Education (3). Classwork, not individual problem work, on modern problems in the field of agricultural education common to the group of students enrolled. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. (With sufficient demand)


AGRICULTURE
(AGR)
AGR 501 Diseases of Livestock (3). Distribution, general nature, methods of dissemination, sanitation, prevention and eradication of common infectious and parasitic diseases of domestic animals; hygiene and preventive medicine, with emphasis on the transmissible diseases. (Fall)

AGR 502 Advanced Nutrition (3). A study of physical and chemical properties of feeds. Digestion, absorption and metabolism of nutrients and factors affecting these functions are emphasized. The nutrient requirements of farm animals and effects of nutrient deficiencies are also studied. (Fall)

AGR 503 Animal Breeding (3). Study of hereditary traits in livestock, breeding designs, progeny testing and herd analysis. (Spring)

AGR 506 Reproductive Physiology (3). A study of the reproductive processes in mammals with primary emphasis on domestic farm animals. Will include the anatomy, endocrinology, behavior and general physiology of the reproductive processes. Artificial insemination, estrous control, ova transplants and other practical production practices will be covered. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. (Fall)

AGR 510 Animal Anatomy and Physiology (3). Deals with the anatomy of body systems, how these systems interrelate, and the physiology of body organs. Species covered include porcine, bovine, equine, canine and feline. Three one-hour lectures per week. Prerequisite:  AGR 310. (Spring)

AGR 511 Animal Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory (2). Deals with the anatomy of body systems, how these systems interrelate, and the physiology of body organs. Species covered include porcine, bovine, equine, canine and feline. Two hour laboratories twice per week. Prerequisite:  AGR 310. (Spring)

AGR 512 Beef Cattle Management Systems (3). A study of beef production, forage management and marketing systems. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Prerequisites:  AGR 100 and 311. (Fall)

AGR 514 Teaching Students Horsemanship (3). Designed for students interested in teaching techniques of teaching horsemanship. Course includes preparation and application of lesson plans. Prerequisite:  AGR 304 or 306. (Fall)

AGR 523 Artificial Insemination Techniques for Cattle (3). Designed to train students to become competent A.I. technicians. Topics discussed will include reproductive processes, health, nutrition, facilities and management of breeding herd. Techniques concerning semen handling, heat synchronization and heat detection will be taught. Laboratories will be designed to give students actual experience in inseminating cattle. Prerequisites:  AGR 100 and AGR 311 or consent of instructor. (Summer, with sufficient demand)

AGR 530 Advanced Agricultural Prices (3). Methods of price analysis and forecasting. Index numbers, time series data commodity flows and statistical techniques as applied to price analysis. Special emphasis will be placed upon the use of commodity futures markets in estimating cash prices and in protecting producers from cash price fluctuations. (Fall, even years)

AGR 531 Agricultural Finance (3). A study of the needs and problems of financing farm and farm service businesses, including a study of credit institutions serving American agriculture. (Fall)

AGR 532 Farm and Land Appraisal (3). A study of the methods and procedures of land and farm property valuation with attention to appraisal programs of the credit and farm service institutions. Prerequisite:  AGR 130. (Fall)

AGR 533 Seminar in International Agriculture Systems (3). A course designed to enhance student’s understanding of international agriculture systems and how they relate to the overall impact on world food processing and production. An emphasis is placed on systems which have the potential to impact and add-value to American agriculture, as well as those which hold key relationships to U.S. based agricultural trade and food development.

AGR 534 Types and Systems of Farming and Agribusiness (3). Includes a general statistical analysis of U.S. agriculture with attention to major agricultural regions of the nation and types of farming areas of Kentucky. Special emphasis is given to the organization of West Kentucky and regional farms and agribusinesses. Field trips, interviews and financial analysis of successful firms. (Summer, with sufficient demand)

AGR 535 Agricultural Policy (3). The history, principles, setting objectives and means of policy as applied to agriculture in our society. Prerequisite:  AGR 336. (Spring)

AGR 536 Quantitative Methods for Agribusiness (3). A study of the use and theory of mathematics as it applies to the fields of agriculture, finance and economics. Attention is given to the elementary uses of algebra, matrix algebra and the calculus as they apply to optimization problems in resource use efficiency. The same mathematics will be applied to time value of money topics. Prerequisites: ECO 230, 231 and MAT 140. (Spring, odd years) Must be admitted to graduate studies prior to registering for this course to receive graduate credit.

AGR 537 Seminar in Agricultural Business Systems (2). Course designed to enhance student’s understanding of, and experience in, agricultural business systems. Emphasis will be placed on strategies of managing a successful agribusiness operation and /or farmer-owned cooperatives. Prerequisite: AGR 130. Must be admitted to graduate studies prior to registering for this course to receive graduate credit.

AGR 538 Seminar in Production Agricultural Systems (2). Designed to enhance student’s understanding of, and experience in, production agriculture systems and how they relate to a successful farming operation. An emphasis is placed on systems, which have the potential to impact and add-value to the local, regional and national agriculture economy, through classroom as well as laboratory experiences. Must be admitted to graduate studies prior to registering for this course to receive graduate credit.

AGR 539 Advanced Computer Applications for Agriculture (3). An intensive course designed to enhance the computer skills of agriculture students and to give them the skills necessary to generate useful information and solve a variety of agriculturally specific problems. Students receive instruction on advanced word processing concepts, budget generation, statistical analysis, agribusiness related software and global positioning systems in agriculture. Prerequisite:  AGR 339.

AGR 540 Veterinary Surgery and Anesthesia (4). Clinical principles, practices and procedures involved in the field of veterinary medicine. For animal health technology students with senior standing. Prerequisites:  AGR 310, 322, 329, and 332. . (Fall and Spring)

AGR 542 Plant Breeding I (3). Basic principles and methods used in the improvement of important agronomic and horticultural crops. (Fall, even years)

AGR 546 Integrated Pest Management (3). Principles of plant pest control as related to developmental stages of crop plants. Evaluation of pest problems, alternative control methods and effects on the ecosystem. Emphasis on economic control of insect and disease vectors that affect agricultural crops. (Spring, even years)

AGR 547 Crop Management (3). Study of the distribution, economic importance and management of forage, grain crops and tobacco. (Fall)

AGR 548 Crop Physiology (3). Basic principles of crop physiology; the effect of environment and management practice on physiological processes, growth and development of crops. (Spring, odd years)

AGR 549 Weeds and Their Control (3). A study of the introduction, methods of dissemination, reproduction and control of weeds by the most reliable methods and techniques. Prerequisite:  AGR 160 or 240. (Fall)

AGR 550 Applied Pharmacology (3). Advanced clinical principles, practices and procedures in the field of veterinary medicine. Prerequisites:  CHE 105 and 106, or CHE 201 and 202. (Fall and Spring)

AGR 551 Selected Studies in Agriculture (1-3). An intensive study of an agriculture topic that will vary from semester to semester. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours. (With sufficient demand)

AGR 554 Soil and Plant Analysis (3). A study of the chemical and analytical procedures used on soils and plants along with instruction and theory of the use of common analytical equipment. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. Prerequisite:  AGR 250. (Fall)

AGR 555 Advanced Soil Fertility (3). The chemistry of the essential elements in soils and the use and the manufacturing processes of various fertilizer materials are considered. Prerequisite:  AGR 250. (Spring)

AGR 563 Arboriculture (3). Classification, identification and care of ornamental trees, shrubs and vines, including pruning, bracing, surgery, transplanting, insect and disease control, and fertilization, as related to large areas of organized plantings. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours. (Spring, odd years)

AGR 566 Advanced Greenhouse Management and Production (3). A study of the principles and practices used in the production of specific important greenhouse crops. Considerable emphasis will be placed on the manipulation of environmental conditions during production. (Fall, even years)

AGR 569 Plants for Interior Design (2). A study of the basic plants used for interior design and decoration. This study includes identification, nomenclature, growing requirements, insect and disease problems and proper use of these plants in interiors.

AGR 571 Advanced Precision Agriculture  (3). Designed for students who desire to apply and expand knowledge of the acquisition and analysis of geographically referenced data for the management of crop production systems, data formats, geographic information systems, grid sampling, soil fertility and physical properties, herbicide management, yield monitoring, variable-rate application, crop modeling and economics.

AGR 573 Agricultural Processing Systems (3). An analysis of systems and methods for harvesting, processing and storing agricultural products. Includes drying and curing principles, grinding, mixing, cleaning, sorting, material handling and structural environmental design. (Fall, even years)

AGR 574 Agricultural Irrigation and Water Systems (3). Includes determining water needs, water sources, pumps, fundamental pipeline hydraulics and designing a complete irrigation and/or water system for the farm.  (Spring, even years)

AGR 575 Combine and Grain Handling  Systems (3). Developing a complete grain harvesting, handling, drying and storage operation. A study of combine operation and the materials flow concept, closed loop handling, psychrometrics, grain drying, drying methods, facility layout and facility management. Combine comparison, selection and utilization.

AGR 576 Agricultural Electrification Systems (3). Study of the basic principles of electricity, the fundamentals of wiring and selection, the operation and economics of agricultural electricity equipment. (Spring)

AGR 577 Tractor Power Principles (3). Study of the principles governing the selection and application of tractors and power driven machines. Emphasis is placed on operating systems of engines, including compression, ignition and carburetion. Mechanical principles of tractors and preventive maintenance included. (Fall, odd years)

AGR 578 Research and Development of Agriculture Tractors and Equipment (3). Tours of the major agriculture tractor and equipment industries. The tours include:  research and development, engineering, foundries, and the assembly of engines, transmissions, final drives, combines, cotton pickers, and planting equipment. (Summer)

AGR 580 Veterinary Products (3). This course deals with old and new products currently available in the veterinary market. Market will include the ordering and purchasing of wholesale products, selling, inventory control, computer programming, marketing, and pricing of products utilized in a veterinary practice. (Fall)

AGR 582  Veterinary Practice and Operations (3). Course will deal with the day to day events centered around the operation of a veterinary practice. Supervisory skills, communication skills, inventory, bookkeeping, planning, and advertising are the main areas stressed in this course.
 
AGR 585 Specialized Journalism/RTV (1-3). Directed individual study. Can be a journalistic effort in areas such as science, sports, government, religion, graphics, etc., or a project in radio or television such as a major production or series, an extensive research project and paper, or other approved project. Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and written approved proposal required prior to registration.

AGR 590 Internship in Animal Technology (3-6). Practical full-time work experience to be arranged through an animal-related facility during the fall, spring or summer session. Site to be arranged by the student and approved by the course coordinator. May be repeated for a total of six credit hours. Prerequisites:  AGR 100, 300, 331, 332, 340, 351 and 400. Enrollment only by consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours of credit. (Fall, Spring or Summer)

AGR 600 Research in Agriculture (1-3). May be repeated for a total of three hours credit with approval of the department chairman. An approved proposal signed by the faculty member supervising the project must be submitted prior to registration. Requires a minimum GPA of 3.0. (Fall, Spring, or Summer)

AGR 601 Forage Management System (3). An intensive study of forage production and management systems for livestock. (Fall)

AGR 605 Advanced Ration Formulation (3). An advanced study in formulating balanced diets to meet the requirements for lactation, growth and reproduction in livestock. Practice in formulating least-cost rations and designing feeding programs. Prerequisite:  AGR 300. (Spring)

AGR 620 Agricultural Experimental Design and Analysis (3). An introduction to planning and designing agricultural experiments, stating the objectives, describing the experiment, outlining the statistical analysis, and interpreting quantitative results. Topics include random sampling, normal distribution, student’s test, analysis of variance, mean separation, chi-square and simple regression analysis. (Fall)

AGR 621 Graduate Seminar I (1). Reports concerning current topics in agriculture including student and/or faculty discussions. Graduate students must enroll in this course during the first semester of full-time graduate enrollment and must complete all relevant paperwork to pass the class. Prerequisite: admission to the agriculture graduate program.

AGR 622 Graduate Seminar II (1). Reports concerning research projects, creative components, thesis defense, and/or work experience including student and/or faculty discussions. Graduate students must enroll in this course during the last semester of graduate enrollment. Prerequisite: admission to the agriculture graduate program.

AGR 633 Production Economics for Agriculture (3). The techniques and principles of production theory as applied to the organization and allocation of resources in agricultural production. (Spring)

AGR 635 Research Methodology (3). Selection, planning and conduct of investigation with reference to alternative scientific methods. Oriented toward all the disciplines of agriculture. Students present research problems coordinated with their advisor. (Fall)

AGR 639 Agribusiness Management (3). A study of the problems confronting agricultural marketing agencies and an application of alternative techniques of analyzing these problems; integration, new technology, selling, purchasing, warehousing, etc. (Summer, with sufficient demand)

AGR 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

AGR 645 Biotechnology and Agriculture (3). With the use of biotechnology, many new agricultural products are entering the market. This course is a descriptive study of biotechnology and its use in the production of these new products. The class would include basic information about this technology, current capabilities, current limitations, and future prospects.

AGR 648 Weed Science (3). A study of specific problem weeds of the region, their growth habits, life cycles, competitive effects, and the mode of action of herbicides used in their control.

AGR 672 Advanced Metal Work (3). Application of the principles of arc, MIG, TIG and oxyacetylene welding in design. Primarily for vocational agricultural teachers. Application of the principles of electric and oxyacetylene welding in design and construction of agricultural projects. (Spring, odd years)

AGR 676 Advanced Agricultural Electrification (3). Troubleshooting and repair of electric motors and controls. Their utilization in handling and processing of agricultural products. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. (Fall, odd years)

AGR 677 Agricultural Power and Machinery (3). Analysis of agricultural machines, power units and equipment. Securing, adjusting and preventive maintenance in order to obtain maximum efficiency. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, four hours. (Fall, odd years)

AGR 698 Thesis (3).

AGR 699 Thesis (3).


ANTHROPOLOGY
(ANT)
ANT 500 Directed Studies (1-3). Selected topics in anthropology as arranged by the student and a professor. May be repeated up to nine hours credit. Prerequisites:  at least 12 hours of anthropology and permission of department chair.

ANT 596 The Minority Elderly (3). This course focuses on the minority elderly including racial, ethnic and lower income groups. Applicable concepts and theories in social gerontology will also be covered. Prerequisite:  nine hours of anthropology, gerontology or sociology or consent of instructor. (Same as GTY 596.)


ARCHAEOLOGY
(ARC)
ARC 500 Directed Studies (3). Selected topics in archaeology as arranged by the student and a professor. May be repeated for up to nine hours. Prerequisites:  At least 12 hours of archaeology and permission of department chair.

ARC 501 History of Archaeological Thought (3). A historical overview of the history and development of archaeological thought from ancient times to the modern world. Prerequisites: ARC 150, 300, or permission of the instructor.

ARC 505 Environmental Archaeology (3). The study of past human interactions with the natural world, including plants, animals, climate, and landscapes. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ARC/GSC 390, or permission of the instructor.

ARC 510 Advanced Archaeological Field Work (3-6). Advanced field training in the strategy and tactics of archaeological survey and excavation. Intensive instruction in recovery and documentation of cultural remains and data from archaeological sites, the organization and logistics of archaeological field projects, and supervision of field crews. Six weeks of continuous field work. Usually offered only during the summer session. Prerequisite:  ANT 302 or equivalent and permission of instructor.

ARC 555 Archaeology of the Kentucky Green River (3). An in depth study of prehistoric cultures of Kentucky’s Middle Green River Region. Prerequisites: ARC 150, 300, 330, 370, 501, or permission of the instructor.

ARC 556 Remote Sensing Applications in Archaeology (3). Course includes a discussion of aerial and terrestrial remote sensing techniques and how those techniques are employed in archeological research. Same as GSC 556. Prerequisites: ARC 150, 300; GSC 202, 512, or permission of instructor.

ARC 592 Historic Preservation (3). This course will provide a general overview of the different aspects of historic preservation, including downtown revitalization, neighborhood organization, historic house management, preservation legislation, preservation education and historic architecture. Much of the class is taught in a laboratory atmosphere, with students making on-site visits to a variety of historic preservation projects. Emphasis is given to the study of the development of American architectural styles, so that students can recognize historic houses and place them in a wider context. (Same as HIS 592.)

ARC 598 Museum Studies (3). This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of museum work. Topics included will be the history and philosophy of museums; the social, economic and political trends that shape museums; the staffing, management and financing of museums; and the multiple functions of museums — collection and care of objects, exhibition design and interpretation, educational programs, research activities and public relations. This course will be taught using the resources of the National Boy Scout Museum. (Same as HIS 598.)

ARC 605 Archaeological Information Systems (3). An exploration of the use of computer applications in archaeology, including data base design and management, electronic publication and digital archiving, use of internet resources, virtual archaeology, and predictive modeling with GIS and CAD mapping techniques. Prerequisites: ARC 150 and GSC 202, or equivalents, or permission of the instructor.
 
ARC 609 Advanced Archaeological Method and Theory (3). History, theory, and methods of archaeology; introduction to problems and techniques of field and laboratory research (mapping, recording, artifact classification, reporting). Lectures and laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: ARC 150 or permission of instructor.

ARC 610 Landscape Archaeology (3). A survey of the concepts and methods of landscape archaeology, and its relationship with historical geography and historical ecology. The class will emphasize the investigation of cultural values embedded in landscapes and the ecological interactions of human societies and their environments as evident in the archaeological record. Prerequisites: ARC 150, 360, 390, or permission of the instructor.

ARC 650 Advanced Contract Archaeology (3). Course includes an in-depth explanation of the federal and state laws that mandate contract archaeology, how to prepare cost estimates for prospective clients and respond to Section 106 RFPs, and how to conduct Phase I, II, III cultural resource management studies. Prerequisites: ARC 150, 300, 330, 370, 501, or permission of the instructor.


ART
(ART)
Note:  In 500-level studio and art history courses, students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work.

ART 501 Special Topics in Art History (3). Changing seminar topics to be determined by the instructor and student interest. May be repeated up to nine credit hours. Prerequisite:  ART 211 and 212, or permission of instructor.

ART 503 Drawing VIII (3). Concentrated exploration of drawing with emphasis on personal expression. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  two drawing courses or permission of instructor.

ART 504 Drawing IX (3). Continuation of ART 503. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 503 or permission of instructor.

ART 511 Metalsmithing VI (3). A concentrated exploration of the use of metals in jewelry-making and holloware. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in metalsmithing or permission of instructor.

ART 512 Metalsmithing VII (3). Continuation of ART 511. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 511 or permission of instructor.

ART 513 Wood VI (3). Advanced problems in functional design. Students will design and build functional pieces of their choosing. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in functional design or permission of instructor.

ART 514 Wood VII (3). Advanced problems in functional design. Students will design and build functional pieces of their choosing. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 513 or permission of instructor.

ART 515 Greek and Roman Art (3). Topics in the history of the art and architecture of ancient Greece and Rome through the late-Antique. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 211 or permission of instructor.

ART 516 Medieval Art (3). Topics in the history of art from the Early Christian through the Gothic period. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 211 or permission of instructor.

ART 518 Renaissance Art (3). History of the art of the Renaissance. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 519 Baroque Art (3). History of the art of the Baroque period, mainly in Europe. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 528 Nineteenth-Century Art (3). History of 19th Century Western art. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 529 Art from 1900 to 1960 (3). History of Western art from 1900 to 1960. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 530 Contemporary Art, 1960 to the Present (3). History of contemporary art from 1960 to the present. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisite:  ART 212 or permission of instructor.

ART 533 Painting VI (3). Concentrated exploration of painting with emphasis on personal expression. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two painting courses or permission of instructor.

ART 534 Painting VII (3). Continuation of ART 533. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 533.

ART 540 Foundations of Art Education (3). Survey of the fields contributing to art education. Includes human development, art supervision, teacher preparation, studies in philosophies of the aesthetic, history and criticism of both art and education. Reference is made to research methodology and to its relevance in education. Course may be taken by art education majors as an elective.

ART 544 Art Experiences for Elementary Teachers (3). Course for the in-service teacher or for elementary majors who desire a further involvement with art beyond that offered in ART 343. Course may be taken by art education majors as an elective. Six hours per week.

ART 545 Art Experiences for Secondary Teachers (3). Course for in-service teachers or secondary majors who wish to pursue studio practice and theory as they apply to the special needs of secondary school children. Course may be taken by art education majors as an elective. Six hours per week.

ART 551 Graphic Design VI (3). Additional refinement of graphic techniques, discussion and criticism. An emphasis on individual investigation concentrating on producing a unified body of work suitable for a portfolio or professional show. The student and the instructor will design a program of study directed toward this goal. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 452.

ART 552 Graphic Design VII (3). Advanced specialization; continuation of ART 551.

ART 561 Sculpture  VI (3). Selected problems involved in the sculpture process. Opportunity for directed individual study and studio work in a variety of three-dimensional media or processes. Emphasis on developing a cohesive, creative body of work. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 462 or permission of instructor.

ART 562 Sculpture VII (3). A continuation of ART 561. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 561 or permission of instructor.

ART 571 Ceramics VI (3). Concentrated exploration of selected ceramic processes with emphasis on personal expression. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in ceramics or permission of instructor.

ART 572 Ceramics VII (3). Continuation of ART 571. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 571 or permission of instructor.

ART 580 Printmaking VI (3). Advanced problems. Concentrated study of selected printmaking processes with emphasis on personal expression. Individual direction and technical proficiency are emphasized. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two advanced courses in printmaking or permission of instructor.

ART 581 Printmaking VII (3). Advanced problems. Continuation of ART 580. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 580 or permission of instructor.

ART 583 Photography VI (3). Concentrated exploration of individual problems, culminating in a unified body of work such as a book or portfolio. Individual expression, discussion and criticism. Six hours per week. Prerequisites:  two courses in photography or permission of instructor.

ART 584 Photography VII (3). Continuation of ART 583. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 583 or permission of instructor.

ART 593 Workshop for Teachers of Art (1).

ART 603 Drawing X (3). Concentrated exploration of drawing ideas with emphasis on personal expression. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 504 or permission of instructor.

ART 604 Drawing XI (3). Continuation of ART 603. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 603 or permission of instructor.

ART 605 Weaving (3). Continuation of ART 506 with an emphasis on a personal direction. Research and a teaching assignment required. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 506 or permission of instructor.

ART 606 Weaving (3). Continuation of ART 605. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 605 or permission of instructor.

ART 607 Surface Design (3). Continuation of ART 508 with emphasis on personal direction in printing, batik or both. Research and a teaching assignment required. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 508 or permission of instructor.

ART 608 Surface Design (3). Continuation of ART 607. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 607 or permission of instructor.

ART 611 Metalsmithing VIII (3). Concentrated exploration of the use of metal in jewelry-making and holloware. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 512 or permission of instructor.

ART 612 Metalsmithing IX (3). Continuation of ART 611. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 611 or permission of instructor.

ART 613 Wood VIII (3). A concentrated exploration of three-dimensional design, with self-direction in design techniques and media. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 514 or permission of instructor.

ART 614 Wood IX (3). A continuation of ART 613. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 613 or permission of instructor.

ART 633 Painting VIII (3). Self-directed work in any media. Criticism and discussion. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 534 or permission of instructor.

ART 634 Painting IX (3). Continuation of ART 633. Six hours per week. Prerequisite: ART 633 or permission of instructor.

ART 641 Art Education Philosophy (3). In-depth study of varied philosophies of art education. Research from contributing areas such as education, psychology, aesthetics, art history, museum practice and other disciplines. Lectures, discussions, with research and in-depth reading.

ART 642 Art Education Curriculum (3). Study of practices and problems, including recent curriculum developments, methods and materials, media experiences, planning the instructional area and program, implications of research in the fields of art and education, museum practice, etc. Lectures, readings, visitations and research study are included.

ART 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ART 651 Graphic Design VIII (3). Advanced specialization; continuation of ART 552.

ART 652 Graphic Design IX (3). Advanced specialization; continuation of ART 651.

ART 661 Sculpture VIII (3). Selected problems involved in the sculpture process, opportunity for directed study and studio work in a variety of three-dimensional media or processes. Emphasis on developing a cohesive, creative body of work. Studio and lecture. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 562 or permission of instructor.

ART 662 Sculpture IX (3). Continuation of ART 661. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 661 or permission of instructor.

ART 671 Ceramics VIII (3). Concentrated study of selected ceramic processes and techniques. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 572 or permission of instructor.

ART 672 Ceramics IX (3). Continuation of ART 671. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 671 or permission of instructor.

ART 680 Printmaking VIII (3). Advanced problems. Concentrated study of individual problems culminating in a unified body of work. Individual expression, technical proficiency, criticism and discussion are emphasized. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 580 or ART 581 or permission of instructor.

ART 681 Printmaking IX (3). Advanced problems. Continuation of ART 680. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 680 or permission of instructor.

ART 683 Photography VIII (3). Concentrated study of individual problems dealing with black and white, color prints and slides, and multi-screen media presentations. Criticism and discussion. Format is structured for individual’s needs and desires. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 584 or permission of instructor.

ART 684 Photography IX (3). Continuation of ART 683. Six hours per week. Prerequisite:  ART 683 or permission of instructor.

ART 690 Special Problems in Studio Art (3). An independent problems course in studio art for graduate students under the direction of a faculty member. The student must submit and receive approval of a detailed study plan prior to registration. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and permission of department chair.

ART 691 Special Problems in Art History (3). An independent problems course in art history for graduate students under the direction of the art history faculty. The student must submit and receive approval of a detailed study plan prior to registration. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prerequisites:  consent of supervising faculty member and permission of department chair.

ART 692 Special Problems in Art Education (3). An independent problems course in art education for graduate students under the direction of the art education faculty. The student must submit and receive approval of a detailed study plan prior to registration. Does not count as a studio elective. May be repeated up to three times for credit. Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and permission of department chair.

ART 698 Practicum (6). A final project of independent studio work to be developed and exhibited by the M.A. candidate in studio art. Documentation (slides/video), poster and a written statement (which includes a description of the direction and influences upon the student’s work) must accompany the exhibition. The candidate must pass an oral examination covering all areas of the exhibited work.


ASTRONOMY
(AST)
AST 515 Special Topics (1-3). This course is designed to fulfill special needs not met by other courses. It may be a lecture or seminar course. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


BUSINESS EDUCATION
(BED)
BED 510 Methods and Materials-Teaching Business/Marketing Education Subjects (3). A required course for business/marketing students emphasizing the latest methods and materials for teaching business and marketing subjects. Must be completed before doing student teaching. Field experience required. Field trips may be required. Prerequisite: CTE 503 or EDU 303.

BED 517 Coordinated Occupational Experience (3-6). This course provides an internship in modern business and office positions. Related class meetings deal with orientation to cooperative education, school and business relationships, office procedures, systems, records management and maintenance, business English, and career opportunities. Not open to students who have had OSY 517.

BED 595 Special Problems (3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

BED 601 Seminar in Business and Marketing Education (3-6). This seminar consists of a study of current topical concerns related to the field of business and marketing education.

BED 607 Business Office Education Workshop (1-3). Seminar-type workshop dealing with current problems in business and office education.

BED 610 Foundations of Business and Marketing Education (3). This course is designed to present the history, purposes, principles, practices, problems and trends of business and marketing education.

BED 611 Improvement of Instruction in Office Skills Subjects (3). Deals with materials, tests, standards and teaching procedures in keyboarding, desktop publishing and office procedures. Special attention will be given to problems encountered in teaching office skills subjects.

BED 612 Improvement of Instruction in Accounting and Basic Business Subjects (3). Deals with materials, tests, standards and teaching procedures in bookkeeping, general business and related subjects. Special attention will be given to teaching problems of the students in the class.

BED 613 Supervised Readings in Business and Marketing Education (3). A reading course specifically for business and marketing education teachers. Current literature, unpublished theses and books in the field of business and marketing teacher education are used. A paper suited to the student’s special problem of interest is required.

BED 615 Current Problems in Business and Marketing Education (3). A study of employment trends in office occupations, objectives of high school business and marketing programs, and the provisions of the Carl Perkins Vocational Education Act of 1944 pertaining to business education. Recent research and current thought in business and marketing education are studied.

BED 616 Administration and Supervision of Business and Marketing (3). This course deals with the development of effective techniques of administering the business and marketing program at the secondary school and junior college levels. The values of local and state supervision, leadership and professional development will be studied.

BED 619 Advanced Information Processing for Educators (3). A study of the methods and materials used in teaching advanced information processing. The course will emphasize the latest in advanced electronic document preparation principles, including an exploration of the Internet and a study of the software and hardware needed to incorporate advanced information processing in classrooms.

BED 620 Business Education in the Middle School (3). An examination of the business curricula for the middle school, teaching methodology appropriate for the early teens, and development of classroom materials.

BED 627 Youth Organizations — Business and Marketing (3). This course is designed for teachers to develop competencies in planning and implementing youth organization activities.

BED 628 Promoting Business and Marketing Education Programs (3). Designed to provide the teacher with the tools to unite the goals of business and marketing education with the needs of the community.

BED 695 Special Problems (3). This course deals with pressing problems in business and marketing education as a result of legislation, technological changes and innovation. Problems growing out of the needs and interests of the class are emphasized. Prerequisite:  12 hours of graduate work and consent of instructor.


BIOLOGY
(BIO)
BIO 500 Pathogenic Microbiology (4). Study of the organisms causing disease as well as the effect of these organisms on the host. The normal bacterial flora and its role in the infection process are discussed. Laboratory entails identification of the pathogenic organisms. Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 300. (On demand)

BIO 501 Immunology (4). A discussion of immune response, formation of antibodies, structure of antibodies, antigen-antibody reactions, hypersensitivity, and allergic response. Laboratory includes techniques and methods for production and detection of antigen-antibody reactions. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 300. BIO 321 recommended. (On demand)

BIO 503 Virology (3). Introduction to the principles of virology with emphasis on animal viruses. The nature and classification of viruses, techniques for analysis and the role of viruses in disease will be covered. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 300 and 321. (On demand)

BIO 504 Medical Cell Biology (3). A discussion of cell biology as related to the field of medicine and clinical knowledge. Emphasis is placed on the most recent applications of cellular and molecular techniques used in the research, diagnosis and treatment of clinical conditions. Considerations will be given to a wide range of topics, including cancer, neural regeneration, wound healing, aging, gene therapy, congenital deformation, AIDS and other prevalent disease states. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 321. (On demand)

BIO 506 Advanced Field Biology (4). For students who wish to learn the identification principles and actual identification of living organisms. Course work will include a study of the ecological aspects of the various organisms and their distribution. Techniques of teaching about nature will be emphasized. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing for science educations majors or graduate standing for science teachers. (Summer)

BIO 510 Cell Physiology (4). The study of the life processes of the individual cell as related to structure. Particular emphasis is placed on current molecular aspects of biological mechanisms, including growth, cell division and macromolecular synthesis. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 321, CHE 310, and four hours of physics. (On demand)

BIO 511 Cell Metabolism (4). Cellular metabolism including photosynthesis, respiration, and the synthesis of lipids and proteins. Emphasis is placed on enzymatic mechanisms and metabolic pathways. Two lectures and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 321 and CHE 530. (On demand)

BIO 512 Microscopy and Microtechniques (4). Techniques in bright field, phase contrast, interference contrast, and photo microscopy are emphasized. Standard methods in fixation, embedding, microtomy, and staining of specimens are covered. Darkroom techniques for the biological sciences are also included. Prerequisites:  BIO 221 and 222. (On demand)

BIO 514 Scanning Electron Microscopy (4). Course designed to teach students the theory, principles and applications of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After a predetermined number of instructional hours, the student is expected to successfully complete a test which measures the competency of the individual in SEM operation. Subsequently, the student is required to complete a short research project utilizing SEM. Prerequisites:  BIO 221 and 222. (Summer, on demand)

BIO 521 Cell Biology Laboratory (3). An experimental approach to modern laboratory techniques in Cell Biology. An emphasis will be placed on the mastery of common cellular and molecular techniques used in clinical, industrial and research settings. Six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 321. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 522 Pathophysiology (3). Introduction to physiological abnormalities in disease. For advanced students in, or headed for, careers in health related fields. Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 229 and 230, or BIO 322, or equivalent. (On demand)

BIO 528 Neurobiology (3). Examines vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems at the cellular and systems levels. Topics include: (1) cellular processes of neurons and glial cells, (2) synapses and synapse formation, (3) sensory systems, (4) motor systems, and (5) learning and memory. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: BIO 321 or 322 recommended. (On demand)

BIO 530 Systematics and Bioinformatics (4). This course will focus particularly on systematics and phylogenetic analyses, although other bioinformatics-related topics such as genomics and geographic information systems will be included. Students will search bioinformatic data sources, retrieve and edit data, and perform computer analysis on protein, DNA, and morphological data. Underlying biological processes will also be discussed. Three hours lecture and two hours computer lab per week. Prerequisite: BIO 333 (Genetics).

BIO 533 Molecular Genetics (3). A lecture course which involves discussions of general concepts of DNA structure, replication and translation. Current concepts in bacterial and bacteriophage genetics, such as gene transfer, recombination, gene regulation, and recombinant DNA technology will be examined. Prerequisites:  BIO 300 and 333, or consent of instructor. (Spring)

BIO 535 Watershed Ecology (3). The study of the movement of water through the environment and its relationship to biotic systems. Areas emphasized include the hydrologic cycle and its influence on groundwater, lotic, and lentic systems; the effect of water on plant and animal communities; and the influence of human activity on watershed structure and function. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Same as GSC 535.)  (Spring, even years)

BIO 536 Evolution (3). A study of evolutionary concepts. Prerequisite:  BIO 333. (On demand)

BIO 537 Experimental Biochemistry (3). This course will emphasize a mastery of modern biochemical laboratory techniques and the analysis of experimental data. One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 530 or consent of instructor. (Same as CHE 537.)

BIO 538 Animal Behavior (4). An introduction to the principles of animal behavior. Ecological and evolutionary implications of animal behavior are emphasized. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 541 Phycology (4). A detailed study of the taxonomy and ecology of freshwater algae. Topics include the influence of physiochemical and biological factors on growth, productivity, succession and periodicity. Laboratories will stress not only taxonomy but also quantitative measurements of populations and productivity. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 543 Algal Ecology (4). A detailed study of the influence of physicochemical and biological factors on growth, succession, periodicity and productivity of phytoplanktonic populations. Laboratories stress methods for quantitative measurements of changes in these populations. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 546 Stream Ecology (4). The interactions of stream organisms with each other and their abiotic environments will be examined. An area stream will be used as an example for physical and chemical characteristics of a stream and adaptations of organisms to their environments. One weekend field trip required. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Summer)

BIO 547 Aquatic Vascular Plants (4). A general survey of local aquatic flora, including freshwater algae, aquatic mosses, ferns and angiosperms. Particular emphasis is placed on the morphology, taxonomy, ecology and economic importance of organisms. Field work comprises an integral part of the course. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 548 Wetland Ecology (4). An introduction to the hydrology, geomorphology, biogeochemical cycling and biology of wetlands. Emphasis is placed on understanding the physical, chemical and biological processes responsible for wetland functions. Procedures for identification of wetlands and assessment of wetland functions will be taught. Each student selects either a management or research class project. Several field trips (some overnight) are required. Students should expect to get wet and muddy. Prerequisites:  Two semesters of undergraduate laboratory science or permission of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 550 Morphology of Vascular Plants (4). A study of the seed plants and ferns with reference to life histories, distinguishing characteristics, relations to environment and economic importance. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 553 Field Botany (4). A survey of the flora of West Kentucky and surrounding states. This course should be of interest to anyone interested in the plants of the region. Emphasis will be placed on field identification of common species, identification using keys, collection, and preparation of herbarium specimens, and general plant ecology of the region. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (Summer)

BIO 555 Plant Physiology (4). Study of the growth, development, water, mineral, environmental and regulatory processes of the plant. Intermediary plant metabolism. Characterization of the photosynthesis and metabolic pathways of biosynthesis. Prerequisite:  BIO 222. (On demand)

BIO 558 Field Parasitology (4). An ecological approach to the study of parasites in the wildlife of West Kentucky. Will be oriented to appeal to those interested in wildlife management, public health and veterinary medicine. Prerequisite:  BIO 221. (On demand)

BIO 561 Freshwater Invertebrates (4). Functional anatomy, ecology and taxonomy of the freshwater invertebrates. Emphasis will be placed on collection, preserving and identifying invertebrates of this region. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 221. (On demand)

BIO 562 Field Entomology (4). The study of insect diversity in the field. Students become acquainted with about 200 Families of insects living in the terrestrial and aquatic habitats of the Midwest along with biotic and abiotic factors underlying their distribution, abundance, and dynamics. Each student conducts a small field project on some aspect of insect ecology, behavior, or natural history. Prerequisite: BIO 330.

BIO 563 Aquatic Entomology (4). The study of the ecology, natural history, life cycles, taxonomy and systematics of lotic and lentic insects. The class will include several field trips to aquatic habitats and the preparation of a working collection. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 565 Biogeochemistry (3). Survey and discussion of the scientific literature on global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and man-made chemicals with special emphasis on the biogeochemical and ecological processes that affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course will focus on interdisciplinary themes that incorporate new research results form the fields of biology, chemistry, and geosciences. Prerequisite: junior or higher standing in biology, chemistry or geosciences. (Same as CHE/GSC 565.)

BIO 570 Ichthyology (4). Natural history of fishes, their systematics and some anatomical and physiological relationships with the environment. One weekend fieldtrip required. Three lectures and one afternoon of lab per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 221. (Spring, even years)

BIO 572 Herpetology (4). A study of the taxonomy, morphology and natural history of reptiles and amphibians. Emphasis is placed on those species occurring in the central United States. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 573 Ornithology (4). Study of avian biology with emphasis on anatomy, physiology and classification of birds. Three lectures and two laboratory hours per week. Requires weekend field trip. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Spring, even years)

BIO 574 Mammalogy (4). A study of the classification and biology of mammals. Identification and collection of mammals, particularly those of the central United States, will be emphasized in laboratory. Two lectures and  four hours of laboratory per week. Some weekend and Saturday field trips required. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Fall, odd years)

BIO 575 Field Vertebrate Paleontology (4). The study of vertebrate fossils in both field and lab, including collection, processing and identification. Field work may include trips throughout the continental United States and occasionally overseas. (Usually taught during summer.)  Prerequisites:  completion of two semesters of undergraduate laboratory science and upper-class or graduate standing. (Same as GSC 575.) (On demand)

BIO 577 Population and Conservation Genetics (3). Course is an advanced study of the theories of genetic change in populations. Emphasis will be placed on theoretical aspects of change in gene frequencies as well as practical applications in the field of conservation biology.  Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 330 and  BIO 333. (Spring, even years)

BIO 578 Conservation Biology (4). An advanced study of the conservation of life at numerous levels of organization. Emphasis will be placed on modern empirical and theoretical studies of the maintenance, loss, and restoration of biological diversity, endangered species, and habitats. Three one-hour lectures and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 330. (Fall, even years)

BIO 580 Principles of Wildlife Management (4). Application of ecological principles of management of wild animals, wildlife agencies and their function in wildlife management; economic, social, biological and other values of wildlife. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Requires Saturday field trips. Prerequisite:  BIO 380. (Fall, even years)

BIO 582 Fisheries Management (4). Ecology and management of freshwater fishes. Methods of fishery investigation will be emphasized. Three lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  BIO 330. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 584 Wildlife Policy and Administration (4). Emphasis is placed on the management of natural resources with particular focus on fish and wildlife. Topics will include an overview of natural resources agency structures and functions, the planning and management cycles, and ethical public relations techniques for multiple-use management in the public domain. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Spring, odd years)

BIO 586 Limnology (4). A study of the interrelationships of the physical, chemical and biological features of lakes and streams. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Spring, even years)

BIO 587 Freshwater Biology (4). Study of the aquatic organisms, their biology, distributions, and ecology in natural aquatic communities and habitats in Kentucky Lake, streams, springs, and wetlands near the Hancock Biological Station. Aquatic organisms to be surveyed include bacteria, algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate animals. Includes two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIO 330.

BIO 588 Groundwater Ecosystems (3). Course is a survey of the dynamics and functioning of groundwater ecosystems at various scales from organisms and their habitats to more complex interactions occurring within large aquifers and subsurface drainage basins. Course content is aimed at juniors, seniors and graduate students interested in groundwater quality and habitats. Students must be admitted to graduate status for graduate credit to be earned. A previous course from the following list is highly recommended: BIO 535, 546, 586, 589, 669, 670, GSC 515, 560, or 665. (On demand)
 
BIO 589 Reservoir Ecology (4). An examination of the variation in chemical and biological phenomena that characterize river impoundments. Literature reading and discussion is followed by 1) learning techniques of observation to identify pattern and process in nature, and 2) designing and conducting field experiments to assess cause and effect relationships. (On demand)

BIO 595 Wildlife/Fisheries Internship (1-4). A practical experience/study situation where the student works a 40-hour week in the field under the supervision of a wildlife biologist. Bimonthly progress reports are required to be submitted to both the university staff and the wildlife biologist. Students must have junior standing to be considered. (Summer)

BIO 596 Field Studies in Ecology (4). Two weeks or more will be spent living at a field site(s) studying the ecology of a selected ecosystem(s) (e.g., tropical rainforest, coral reef, mangrove swamp, pine forest). Students will gain an understanding of the selected ecosystem’s structure and function, including the roles of human cultural and economic influences. Studies are expected to occur in geographic areas other than western Kentucky. (On demand)

BIO 620 Advanced Physiology (3). A detailed discussion of physiology from the cellular and molecular level to the systems level.  Prerequisite:  Previous course in physiology recommended. (On demand)

BIO 623 (523) Physiological Ecology (3). An examination of physiological diversity in relation to the environments in which organisms live or have lived. This encompasses aspects of behavior, morphology, biochemistry and evolutionary biology among other fields. Problem-solving approaches involving problem posing, problem probing, and peer persuasion will be stressed to promote the learning of strategies of scientific research. Students will design and conduct research projects. Prerequisites:  BIO 330; BIO 322 is recommended. (On demand)

BIO 630 Animal Ecology (4). Ecological principles in relation to animal populations, including human populations. Emphasis is placed on recent literature and the approach involves lecture, seminar and field activities. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (Spring, even years)

BIO 631 Plant Ecology (4). A general study of the interactions of individual plants and plant communities with their environment, emphasizing the nature and energetics of environment-organism interrelationships and species-community dynamics. Methods of analysis and interpretation of field data are stressed. Field work comprises an integral part of the course. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 and either BIO 154, 350, and 553. (On demand)

BIO 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). A meaningful, planned and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which both pay and graduate credit may be received. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

BIO 645 Microbial Ecology (4). A study of the basic principles, concepts and function of microbes (eubacteria, archebacteria and cyanobacteria) in the environment. Emphasis will be placed on energy relationships and the role of microbes in mineral cycling in soils, sediments, and fresh water. Two 75-minute lectures and one 2-hour lab per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 300 or consent of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 650 Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology (3). Course intended to give students an in-depth understanding of a variety of regulative strategies cells use to maintain existence. Topics included will be selected from modern interpretations of cell systems; including metabolic strategies, differentiation, cell energetics, and gene control systems. The course will be taught from a perspective of applied bioinformatics as related to genome diversity. A specific emphasis will be placed on the most recent advances in the field of cell and molecular biology, as revealed by current primary literature sources. (On demand)

BIO 655 Molecular Evolution (3). Advanced study of the theories of genetic change on the molecular level. Emphasis will be placed on theoretical aspects of change in DNA sequence (change at the nucleotide level), the evolution of macromolecules and the reconstruction of evolutionary history of genes and organisms. Prerequisites: BIO 333.

BIO 662 Biology of Mollusca (4). Systematics, anatomy, ecology and zoogeography of freshwater and terrestrial mollusks. A museum-quality collection and extensive literature review are required. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory and field work per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 330. (On demand)

BIO 667 Advanced Parasitology (3). This course is designed to cover current topics in all aspects of parasitology. Emphasis is placed on each individual student reviewing selected topics in detail. Library work comprises an integral part of the course. Prerequisite:  BIO 467. (On demand)

BIO 669 Biological Limnology (3). A study of the structure and function of aquatic communities and the influence of physicochemical and biological factors on the occurrence and distribution of aquatic organisms. Emphasis will be on lake and reservoir communities. Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor. (On demand)

BIO 670 Limnological Analysis Laboratory (4). This course will provide a conceptual framework and techniques for measurement of physical, chemical and biological phenomena in lakes and reservoirs. Emphasis will be placed on experimental approaches to field and laboratory studies. Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor. Should follow BIO 586 or GSC 665 and BIO 669. (On demand)

BIO 681 Advanced Fisheries Management (4). The concepts of population dynamics and of the interaction of reproduction, growth and mortality in fish populations. Use of those concepts in fish population management. Prerequisite:  BIO 582. (On demand)

BIO 682 Waterfowl Management (4). Ecological principles and techniques involved in management of waterfowl with emphasis on habitat and hunter manipulation. Readings in current research. Includes all-day Saturday field trips to refuges. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  BIO 580. (On demand)

BIO 689 Introduction to Graduate Study (1)  The objective of this course is to orient the new graduate student to graduate study. Topics include the library, literature search, the research plan, choosing a research topic, scientific graphics and photography, scientific writing, scientific presentation seminars. The course is usually team-taught and offered in the evening. Prerequisite:  Admission to the graduate program. (Fall)

BIO 691 Topics in Biology I (1). Students explore topics within the biological sciences under the direction of individual faculty. These individually arranged learning experiences may include various combinations of library assignments, conferences, laboratory and field investigation. Written descriptions of the course of study must be approved by the student’s advisor and be filed with the chair within two weeks of the beginning of a term. This course sequence may contribute no more than eight credit hours toward the graduate degree requirements.

BIO 692 Topics in Biology II (2).

BIO 693 Topics in Biology III (3).

BIO 694 Topics in Biology IV (4).

BIO 695 Biological Research (4). This course provides research experiences for students pursuing the non-thesis option. The course entails selection of a research problem, collection and interpretation of data, and submission of results in a research paper. Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and approval of graduate committee.

BIO 696 Understanding Scientific Communication (2). The course concentrates on the methods for preparation and presentation of scientific papers and oral communications. Students will utilize a data set to produce 1) a publication-quality manuscript and 2) a 15-minute presentation such as would be given at a scientific meeting. Topics covered include abstracts, nature of scientific writing, structure and organization of scientific publication, use of literature, graphics and graphic design, and methods of polishing the oral presentation. The course is required of all biological sciences graduate students in their first spring semester of residence and is open to all other graduate students with consent of instructor. One two-hour course meeting per week. (Same as GSC 696.) (Spring)

BIO 697 Seminar (1). Graduate students anticipating completion of the thesis or BIO 695 must register for this course and defend their research before the department faculty and their fellow graduate students.

BIO 698 Thesis I (3).

BIO 699 Thesis II (3).


BUSINESS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS
(BPA)
BPA 515 Communicating in International Business Environment (3). This course is designed to acquaint students with the challenges of international business communication, provide guidelines for successful cross-cultural business communication, and give practice in solving international business problems through the use of the guidelines.

BPA 521 CPS Review I (3). Team-taught course which is designed to aid the professional secretary in a comprehensive review. Should be valuable to any professional secretary and especially helpful to those secretaries preparing for the Certified Professional Secretaries Examination. Covered in this section is a review of business and public policy, economics of management, and office procedures. Graded pass/fail.

BPA 522 CPS Review II (3). Team-taught course which is designed to aid the professional secretary in a comprehensive review. Should be valuable to any professional secretary and especially helpful to those secretaries preparing for the Certified Professional Secretaries Examination. Covered is a review of environmental relations in business, financial analysis in mathematics of business, and communication and decision-making. Graded pass/fail.

BPA 595 Special Problems (3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

BPA 596 International Business Seminar (3). Designed to give participants firsthand exposure to cultures and business practices outside the United States. The seminar includes travel, study, visits to corporate and governmental offices, and other experiential assignments in various countries. At the instructor’s discretion, the seminar may focus on a specific topic or theme. This course includes an individual research project approved by the instructor.

BPA 597 Commonwealth Business Seminar (3). A travel-study program that will allow university students enrolled in Kentucky universities to be exposed firsthand to the business environment and practices in Kentucky.

BPA 605 Research Methods in Business (3). Will introduce students to research methods used in business. The class will examine research projects which involve a variety of data collection and analysis methods. Topics include research proposals, research design, survey writing, sources and collection of data, data analysis, and presentation of research results. The class will develop students’ oral and written communication skills.

BPA 615 Communication Skills for Managers (3). A course designed to increase the student’s management communication effectiveness and give him/her practice in solving business problems through the use of written correspondence, research and report writing, and oral communications. Prerequisite:  BPA 215 or consent of instructor.

BPA 695 Special Problems (3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


COMMUNICATION DISORDERS
(CDI)
CDI 548 Linguistics (3). Study of normal linguistic development and linguistic development of children with language disorders. Prerequisites:  CDI 205, 340, 345, and 472.

CDI 550 Neuromuscular Disorders (3). The study of pathology, etiology, diagnosis and speech rehabilitation of cerebral palsy and other neuromuscular disorders.

CDI 555 Audiometry (3). A lecture and laboratory course designed to develop skill in administering audiometric tests. Prerequisite:  CDI 310 or consent of instructor.

CDI 572 Diagnostic Methods (3). In-depth study and practical use of contemporary tests used by the speech-language pathologist. Includes formal and informal evaluation procedures. Prerequisites:  CDI 325, 345, and 470.

CDI 582 Communication Programming for Individuals with Severe Disabilities (3). This course will include diagnostic and therapeutic implications for communication characteristics of individuals with severe disabilities. Emphasis will be on communication development and disorders of this population; vocal, unaided, and aided communication systems; assistive technology; various service delivery models; integrating communication skills into functional activities; and feeding implications. Prerequisite:  CDI 205 or 292, and CDI 550.

CDI 584 Communication Disorders of Aging (3). Course will include information relative to the effect of communication disorders on the aging population and to acquaint the student with intervention techniques appropriate for the communicatively handicapped older person.

CDI 598 Directed Study:  Communication Disorders (3). Available for students who want to investigate special problems. Can be repeated up to six credit hours. Prerequisites:  senior standing and consent of instructor directing the study.

CDI 601 Seminar in Current Trends and Issues (2). Study of professional issues in speech-language pathology. Includes current issues in certification, licensure, ethical and legal aspects of service delivery, program administration and interaction with allied professionals.

CDI 615 Instrumental Methods for SLPs (3). An investigation of technologies and methodologies for assessing and documenting human communication processes. Demonstration and training are provided for evidence-based practice and research. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the speech-language pathology program or permission of instructor.

CDI 620 Phonological Disorders (3). Course will include advanced training in diagnosis and treatment of phonological disorders. Includes an extensive review of current literature.

CDI 621 Student Teaching in Speech Language Pathology (5). The study and clinical practice of speech-language pathology in the public schools. A seminar component includes current issues in certification, licensure, ethical and legal aspects of service delivery, program administration and interaction with allied professionals.

CDI 624 Disorders of Voice (3). Study of voice pitch, quality, and intensity, including etiology, diagnosis and therapy for functional and organic problems. Course includes a study of alaryngeal speech. Prerequisite:  advanced standing in communication disorders or consent of instructor.

CDI 625 Fluency Disorders (3). A study of theories and varying characteristics of stuttering, including therapy programs, methods, procedures and materials for treatment of stuttering of different ages and with different characteristics. Prerequisite:  advanced standing in communication disorders or consent of instructor.

CDI 635 Graduate Seminar in Communication Disorders (1-3). Topical seminar in speech and hearing. May be repeated to a maximum of six hours.

CDI 640 Individualized School Placement (4-6). Provides opportunities for students to participate in all activities and duties generally expected of a speech-language pathologist in the public schools. Specific supervision will be provided. This course is designed for students with at least one year of teaching experience and seeking a new certificate (students with less than one year of experience must take CDI 621). Course activities include planning, preparation and therapy under on-site supervision. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the speech-language pathology program or permission of instructor.

CDI 646 Research Methods for Speech-Language Pathologists (3). Review of research procedures and designs that have relevance to special populations. Special emphasis will be given to those skills (understanding, assumption, reading and abstracting articles, interpreting data, and evaluating results) needed to understand the relationships between research strategies, clinical problem solving and the assessment of clinical effectiveness in speech-language pathology. Prerequisites: graduate standing in speech-language pathology or permission of instructor.

CDI 648 Advanced Language Disorders (3). A study of theories of language development and language disorders.

CDI 654 Educational Audiology (3). A study of contemporary issues and practices relative to the education of hearing-impaired children.

CDI 656 Advanced Audiology (3). An in-depth study of audiology and hearing science as they relate to speech communication. Emphasis will be on clinical theory and application for special problems in audiology.

CDI 658 Hearing Conservation and Industry (3). An introductory course on noise control regulations and implementation of industrial audiology.

CDI 660 Motor Speech Disorders (3). A study of dysarthria and apraxia of speech with emphasis on differential diagnosis and current clinical theory and application. The course will also include assessment and treatment of swallowing disorders.

CDI 670 Practicum Seminar (1). This seminar is a companion course to the graduate practicum experiences in communication disorders. It explores topics on the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of communication problems of individuals across all ages. This course also serves as a forum for introduction and discussion of current professional issues that impact diagnosis and treatment. One hour lecture, two hours clinical practicum. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the speech-language pathology program or permission of instructor. Corequisite: CDI 674.

CDI 674 Practicum (1-3). Supervised clinical practice with communication disorders. May be repeated up to seven hours. Prerequisites:  CDI 470 and CDI 472.

CDI 676 Medical/Clinical Placement (5). Supervised clinical practice within medical and health care settings including hospitals, rehabilitation centers, home health and private practice. Assessment and treatment population will be mainly adults with neurogenic communication disorders. May be repeated to a maximum of 10 hours.

CDI 677 Clinical Pathologies (3). Course will include a review of the various pathologies that the master’s level clinician will encounter. Also included will be an overview of relevant educational and medical issues pertinent to the speech pathologists.

CDI 678 Administrations and Supervision of Speech and Hearing Programs (2). Methods, techniques and procedures for planning, developing, managing and evaluating speech and hearing programs. Clinical supervision of clients at the clinic as well as writing of grant proposals and evaluating speech and hearing programs.

CDI 680 Adult Neurogenic Communication Disorders (3). An in-depth  study of the characteristics of aphasia, right hemisphere disorders, and dementia. The cognitive, linguistic, and communicative aspects of each disorder will be explored as the foundation for differential diagnosis and clinical intervention. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the speech-language pathology program or permission of instructor.

CDI 684 Craniofacial Anomalies (3). A study of etiology, assessment and treatment of the oral cleft and other oro-facial anomalies. Includes a survey of the roles of various specialists represented on the oral cleft team.

CDI 686 Swallowing Disorders (3). A study of normal and disordered swallowing processes. The course includes a review of the anatomy and physiology of the swallowing mechanism and the etiology of acquired swallowing disorders. Special emphasis is placed on current clinical theory, application, and technology in differential diagnosis and treatment. Prerequisite:  Graduate or postgraduate student or status.

CDI 694 Advanced Clinical Practicum (1-3). Supervised clinical practice in communication disorders. Course activities include supervised planning, preparation and therapy. Prerequisites: completion of CDI 670 and CDI 674. Enrollment may be repeated for up to six hours of credit.

CDI 695 Independent Study (3). Available for selected students who desire to investigate a special area or problem. A final written paper will be submitted to the instructor. May be repeated up to six credit hours. Prerequisites:  graduate status and consent of instructor directing the study.

CDI 698 Thesis (3).

CDI 699 Thesis (3).


CIVIL/CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
(CET)
CET 527 Air Contaminants and Industrial Ventilation (3). A course examining the chemical and particulate air contaminants occurring in the industrial working environment and their potential health hazards. Emphasis is given to industrial ventilation techniques, inhalation control measures and air contaminant treatment methods. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (Same as OSH 527.)

CET 555 Environmental Regulatory Affairs (3). Laws and regulations pertinent to the management of water and wastewater, hazardous and toxic wastes, air contaminants, underground storage tanks and other timely environmental issues are studied. General legal concepts, the relationships among industries and local, state, and federal agencies, environmental audits and community right-to-know requirements are among the topics included. Prerequisite:  CET 341, 342 and 353 or consent of instructor.

CET 585 Remediation Technology (3). Study includes process design and operations for biological and physical/chemical systems used to remove organic and inorganic contaminants from soil and groundwater. Prerequisite:  CET 341 or consent of instructor.

CET 586 Unit Treatment Process Laboratory (3). A laboratory course with emphasis on designing, setting up and performing treatability studies for engineering treatment evaluations and water quality research. Actual treatment projects will be selected for purposes of treatment design, performance, optimization and troubleshooting. Prerequisite:  CET 387.

CET 587 Bioresiduals Management and Natural Wastewater Treatment Systems  (3). Course focuses on regulatory requirements, design, and operations of bioresiduals handling and disposal systems. The course includes design and operations of bioresiduals land application systems and natural wastewater treatment systems. Prerequisite:  CET 341 or consent of instructor.

CET 589 Environmental Modeling (3). Computer modeling of environmental/ecosystem phenomena including predictive impact of pollution discharges and engineering hydrology will be stressed. Prerequisite:  ENT 382.

CET 610 Geodetic Survey Systems (3). Mathematical and conceptual elements of advanced survey systems including instrument calibration and error detection, coordinate system rotation and translation, gyroscopic surveys, and applications of calculus to survey computations. Prerequisites:  CET 381 and MAT 308.

CET 620 Advanced Geodetic Surveying (3). Concepts and procedures for advanced horizontal and vertical control surveys designed to support geographic information systems; least squares adjustment of both traditional and Global Positioning System observations; digital terrain modeling using triangulated irregular networks and various polynomials. Prerequisites:  CET 381.

CET 681 Pollution Assessment and Control (3). A seminar/laboratory class that covers selected  course areas within the environmental technology field. Pollution assessment and control will be introduced and specific topics will include environmental science and ecological principles; sampling and analytical techniques; regulatory considerations; and natural wastewater treatment systems. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

CET 682 Industrial Environmental Management (3). The focus includes study of environmental planning and design to effect Total Quality Environmental Management (TQEM). Industrial economic impacts amid regulatory agency prescriptions and philosophical trade-off regarding energy conversion and pollution remediation and/or avoidance are addressed.

CET 686 Environmental Assessment and Remediation (3). Legislation, field investigations, risk assessments, feasibility studies, and overall administrative and technical approaches related to environmental site assessments and remediation. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

CET 687 Environmental Systems Design (3). A study of the engineering methods of evaluating and selecting unit treatment processes and combining these into an integrated treatment system facility design.

CET 688 Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention (3). Organization and management of industrial pollution prevention programs. Emphasis is placed upon advanced and innovative pollution prevention and treatment technologies which may be waste and/or industry specific. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.


CHEMISTRY
(CHE)
CHE 502 Fundamentals of Toxicology (3). This course surveys the scope and fields of toxicology, including the methods and design of toxicity studies with attention to toxic chemicals, their effects and regulatory considerations. Prerequisite:  CHE 320 or consent of instructor.

CHE 503 Industrial Chemistry (3). Discussion of the application of chemistry principles to industrial processes. Three lectures per week.

CHE 511 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3). Practical aspects of wave mechanics and bonding theories for covalent and ionic compounds; considerations of symmetry; properties and theories associated with the solid state, acids, bases, and coordination compounds. Limited descriptive chemistry; the course focuses on organo-metallic, multi-metal, and icosahedral borane and carbaborane derivatives. PES, NMR, IR, and UV/VIS spectroscopy applications in modern inorganic chemistry. Two 75-minute lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 420 or its equivalent at another four-year institution with a grade of C or better.

CHE 512 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (2). Syntheses, characterization and introduction of techniques of inorganic chemistry. Four hours of laboratory per week. Corequisite:  CHE 511.

CHE 513 Environmental Chemistry (3). Studies related to chemicals in the environment as to origin, identification, distribution, modification and effect on biological systems. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 320 or consent of the instructor.

CHE 518 Instrumental Analysis (Non-Thesis Only) (3). Discussion of instrumental concepts of spectroscopy, chromatography and electrometric methods used in analytical chemistry. Theory, calculations and techniques stressed. Three lectures per week. This course will substitute for CHE 519 upon approval for graduate students with extensive instrumental laboratory experience only.

CHE 519 Instrumental Analysis (5). Theory, calculations, and use of modern analytical techniques, such as visible, ultraviolet, infrared and Raman spectrometry, flame methods, gas chromatography, electrometric methods of analysis and magnetic resonance. Two lectures and six hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 523 Radiochemistry (3). Theory of nuclear radiations, their interactions, detection and chemical applications. Laboratory experiments utilizing ionization chambers, Geiger counters, proportional gas-flow counters, solid crystal and liquid scintillation detectors, gamma ray spectrometers and experimental simulations. Two lectures and three hours laboratory per week. Corequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 525 Biochemical Toxicology (3). A study of the basic biochemical aspects of toxicology including adverse chemico-biological interactions and chemical and biologic factors modulating these interactions, descriptions of effects of specific chemical classes, and biochemical mechanisms of toxic effects. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  CHE 502 and 330, 530, or consent of instructor.

CHE 527 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3). An intensive survey of modern organic chemistry with emphasis on theoretical concepts, reaction mechanisms and syntheses. Three lectures per week. Prerequisites:  CHE 320 and 420.

CHE 530 Fundamentals of Biochemistry I (3). Survey of the chemical properties and biological functions of proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Topics include: protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, and elements of organismal metabolism, including a description of glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. Three lectures per week. Credit for either CHE 530 or 330, but not both, can count toward a major or minor in chemistry. Prerequisite:  CHE 320.

CHE 537 Experimental Biochemistry (3). This course will emphasize a mastery of modern biochemical laboratory techniques and the analysis of experimental data. One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 530 or consent of instructor. (Same as BIO 537.)

CHE 540 Fundamentals of Biochemistry II (3). Continued study of the elements of metabolism, including their chemical reactions, energetics and regulation. Additional topics include hormones, biochemical function of various organs and replication, transcription and translation of genetic information. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 530.

CHE 545 Glassblowing (1). Laboratory demonstrations and exercises. Mastery of the different types of seals used in construction of scientific glass apparatus. Three hours of laboratory per week. Course restricted to chemistry majors. Prerequisite:  Senior standing. Cannot be used as an elective for ACS-accredited area.

CHE 560 Modern Chemistry for Middle School Science Teachers (1-3). For middle school science teachers with limited preparation in chemistry, basic organic and inorganic chemistry, emphasizing atomic structure, chemical bonding and solution chemistry. Although content-oriented, special effort is made to enable the participants to immediately implement relevant applications into their respective science programs.

CHE 561 Modern Chemistry for High School Science Teachers (1-3). For high school science teachers with limited preparation in chemistry. Basic organic and inorganic chemistry, emphasizing atomic structure, chemical bonding and solution chemistry. Although content-oriented, special effort is made to enable the participants to immediately implement relevant applications into their respective science programs. One to three lectures per week.

CHE 565 Biogeochemistry (3). Survey and discussion of the scientific literature on global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and man-made chemicals with special emphasis on the biogeochemical and ecological processes that affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course will focus on interdisciplinary themes that incorporate new research results from the fields of biology, chemistry, and geosciences. Prerequisite: junior or higher standing in biology, chemistry or geosciences. (Same as BIO/GSC 565.)

CHE 569     Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds (2). Course dealing with the theory and applications of the following methods to the structural analysis of organic compounds:  IR, NMR, UV-Vis, and MS. Two lectures per week. Prerequisites: CHE 320 and 519.

CHE 581 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3). Continuation of some topics included in the one-year physical chemistry course and inclusion of new topics. Among these topics are quantum chemistry, bonding, statistical thermodynamics, spectroscopy, macromolecules and the solid state. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 591 Special Problems in Chemistry (1). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics. Minimum of three hours per week. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites:  Senior standing and consent of instructor. 

CHE 592 Special Problems in Chemistry (2). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics. Minimum of six hours per week. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites:  Senior standing and consent of instructor.

CHE 593 Special Problems in Chemistry (3). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics. Minimum of nine hours per week. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites:  Senior standing and consent of instructor.

CHE 601 Seminar (1). Reports concerning current chemical literature including student-faculty discussions.

CHE 602 Seminar (1). Reports concerning recent research carried out in the department including student-faculty discussions.

CHE 610 Chemical Thermodynamics (3). Mathematical treatment of the laws of classical thermodynamics with special emphasis on the applications to chemical systems.  Prerequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 611 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II (3). A continuation of CHE 511 with increased emphasis on the descriptive chemistry of the various groups of elements as rationalized by bonding concepts and periodic trends studied in CHE 511. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 511.

CHE 620 Chemical Kinetics and Mechanisms (3). Rate theory, experimental methods, treatment of data, simple and complex reactions, reaction mechanisms. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 420.

CHE 641 Spectroscopy and Group Theory (3). Applications of group theoretical considerations of observed spectra. Spectra are discussed with emphasis on inorganic compounds. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 511.

CHE 660 Topics in Teaching Chemistry in Middle School Science Classes (1-3). For middle school science teachers with limited preparation in chemistry. Safety issues and laboratory teaching techniques will be focused on in this course. This course is designed to enable the participants to immediately implement relevant applications into their respective science programs.

CHE 661 Topics in Teaching Chemistry in High School Science (1-3). For high school science teachers with limited preparation in chemistry. Safety issues and laboratory teaching techniques will be focused on in this course. This course is designed to enable the participants to immediately implement relevant applications into their respective science programs.

CHE 670 Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (1-3). Selected topics which may include chemical applications of group theory, coordination compounds, organometallic compounds, and chemistry of less familiar elements. May be repeated for credit as different topics are featured. One to three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 511.

CHE 671 Special Topics in Physical Chemistry (1-3). Topics of current interest in physical chemistry. May be repeated for credit as different topics are featured. One to three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 581.

CHE 672 Special Topics in Analytical Chemistry (1-3). Topics of current interest in analytical chemistry. May be repeated for credit as different topics are featured. One to three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 518 or 519.

CHE 673 Topics in Organic Chemistry (1-3). Advanced study in selected areas of organic chemistry. May be repeated for credit as different topics are featured. One to three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 320 with 527 very strongly recommended.

CHE 674 Topics in Biochemistry (1-3). Advanced study in selected areas of biochemistry. May be repeated for credit as different topics are introduced. One to three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 530 or consent of instructor.

CHE 676 Polymer Chemistry (3). The chemistry and physical properties of natural and synthetic polymers of practical importance, coupled with the instrumental and spectroscopic methods of their evaluation. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 320.

CHE 677 Physical Organic Chemistry (3). A study of the mechanisms of organic reactions and the effect of structure on reactivity in organic reactions as interpreted from experimental data. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 527.

CHE 687 Graduate Cooperative Education I (5). Consists of on-site training in modern analytical techniques utilized by environmental laboratories, including determination of metals, BOD/TOC/TSS, autoanalyzers, specific ion/titrimetric, sample preparation for chromatography, liquid chromatograph. Enrollment restricted to students in environmental chemistry option of non-thesis M.S. Prerequisite:  permission of department chair.

CHE 688 Graduate Cooperative Education II (5). A continuation of CHE 687, with emphasis shifted to chromatographic analyses of pesticides/herbicides and mass spectrometry with its appropriate hyphenated techniques. Enrollment restricted to students in environmental chemistry option of non-thesis M.S. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CHE 689 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3). An extension of CHE 519 in which additional aspects of chemical instrumentation are covered such as the application of computers in analytical chemistry. Other topics covered will depend upon the interests of the students enrolled. Three lectures per week. Prerequisite:  CHE 519.

CHE 691 Special Problems in Chemistry (1). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics, minimum of four hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate status in the department of chemistry.

CHE 692 Special Problems in Chemistry (2). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics, minimum of eight hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate status in the department of chemistry.

CHE 693 Special Problems in Chemistry (3). Laboratory and/or library investigations on special topics, minimum of 12 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate status in the department of chemistry.

CHE 698 Thesis Research (3). Problems and hours arranged individually with staff members directing the research. Registration must be approved by the chair of the department.

CHE 699 Thesis Research (3). Continuation of CHE 698, which is a prerequisite.


COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
(CIS)
CIS 500 Internship (3). Graded pass/fail.

CIS 507 Fundamentals of Distributed Database Applications (3). This course covers the fundamental concepts of distributed database management systems. The emphasis is on the concepts, algorithms and the protocols. It includes an overview of the architecture, database design, query processing algorithms, concurrency control, recovery and replication strategies. Prerequisite: CIS 307 or equivalent.

CIS 508 Computer Simulation (3). A study of computer simulation models of systems and processes. Simulation methodology, simulation model development, simulation computer languages, and the analysis of simulation results are considered. The course makes use of simulation computer software. Prerequisites:  CIS 343 and CSC 199 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

CIS 525 Overview of E-Business Technologies (3). This course provides an overview of important technologies that underlie and enable E-Business. A solid understanding of the common E-Business models and their underlying enabling technologies will be examined using a practical case-based approach. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CIS 530 (430) Systems Planning (3). The primary focus of the course is to understand the development of a systematic planning cycle for implementing and maintaining an organization’s Information Technology (IT)/Information Systems (IS). Specifically to understand the complex but direct relationship between “business planning” commonly called the “Corporate Strategic Plan (CSP)” and “systems planning” also call “Information System Plan (ISP)”. Students will explore the theory and practice of IS planning through case study analysis. Students will understand how IT/IS projects and the planning involved in the projects implement the ISP. Prerequisite:  CIS 304 or consent of instructor.

CIS 545 Enterprise Resource Planning (3). This course provides the knowledge required to appreciate the functions and benefits of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. Students will learn the impact of an ERP system, how ERP software integrates business functions, and how to make current business functions compatible with ERP system. The students will also develop an appreciation of live, interactive information from an ERP system and the value of its availability throughout the organization. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CIS 553 Quantitative Business Analysis (3). A study of quantitative methods used in business and industrial organizations. Topics covered include linear programming, inventory models, PERT and CPM, simulation and waiting-line models. Prerequisite:  MGT 443.

CIS 595 Special Problems (3). This course consists of independent in-depth study of some problem in computer methods and/or quantitative methods. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

CIS 609 Data Warehousing and Data Mining (3). This course provides the student with the technical skills required to plan, implement and maintain a data warehouse using appropriate software.

CIS 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CIS 645 Decision Support and Expert Systems (3). Study of the theories and techniques of computerized decision support and expert systems. The practical application of these systems to problems of business and industrial organizations is stressed. A major part of the course will be devoted to the use of appropriate decision support and expert system computer software. Prerequisite:  BPA 355 or consent of instructor.

CIS 646 A Manager’s Guide to Database (3). This course places the database environment in an organizational context. Information is an increasingly valuable corporate resource. Allocation of resources is a primary managerial responsibility. This course provides managers with the background necessary for making decisions regarding the information resource. Topics include information resource planning, managing implementation in the database environment, human factor in the database environment, and software and hardware selection. Prerequisite:  BPA 355 or consent of instructor.

CIS 647 Systems Analysis and Design for End User/Manager (3). This course presents an overview of information systems (IS) and the systems development life cycle for the systems analyst. The course will focus on tools and techniques that the end user, analyst and/or programmer can use to document IS. Classical and structured tools for describing data flow, data structure, process flow, file design, input and output designs, and program specifications will be applied to documenting systems. The course will also survey other important topics for the systems analyst such as data gathering and reporting, project management, cost/benefit analysis, and computer-aided system engineering (CASE) technologies. Prerequisite:  BPA 355 or consent of instructor.

CIS 650 Software Methodologies (3). Explores methodologies and practices used in the contemporary software development projects from the managerial and technical perspectives. From the managerial perspective, it covers software life cycle models, object oriented methodologies, rapid development methodologies, agile modeling, software design principles and methods, verification and testing methods, and software process maturity models. On the technical side, it explores solutions that are currently available that aid in implementing these models and methodologies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CIS 653 Management Science for Managerial Decision-Making (3). A study of the operations research models and methods which are most frequently used in business and industrial organizations. Topics include linear, goal and integer programming and sensitivity analysis, network models for project management, inventory management models, computer simulation, waiting-line models, decision analysis, and time series analysis and forecasting. Prerequisites:  CIS 443.

CIS 654 Management Science Models and Methods (3). A continuation of CIS 653 with an in-depth study of one or more of the topics from CIS 653. Prerequisite:  CIS 653.

CIS 655 Multivariate Statistical Analysis (3). A study of multivariate statistical analysis techniques. Topics include multiple regression analysis, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminate analysis and factor analysis. Emphasis is on practical application of these techniques to the problems of business and industrial organizations. Prerequisite:  CIS 443.

CIS 680 Information Technology Policy and Strategy (3). Course incorporates a case study strategy to actively develop the student’s ability to analyze information technology issues from the overall perspective of the organization.

CIS 695 Comprehensive Project in Computer Information Systems (3). This course consists of an independent, in-depth study of a topic or problem in computer information systems under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisites:  12 hours of graduate work in computer information systems or computer science and consent of the instructor.


COMMUNICATION
(COM)
COM 551 Supervision of Forensic Activities (3). A survey of current problems in administering a speech and theatre activity program. Includes tournament management and judging. Practicum in supervision of festival and tournament activities facing the instructor, such as preparing the contestant for duet acting, the contest play, interpretive and forensic events.

COM 553 Advanced Small Group Processes (3). An examination of the communication processes in various types of small groups. The course will consider the ways in which leadership, norms and conflict relate to the social and decision-making processes in groups.

COM 557 Organizational Learning and Dialogue (3) Explores organizations as systems of learning based on productive alternative forms of human communication. Theories and tools of dialogue and organizational learning are applied to contemporary workplace practices. Prerequisite: COM 385.

COM 581 Seminar in Interpersonal Communication (3). A study of the contemporary approaches to interpersonal communication with opportunities for practical application of those approaches in diverse interpersonal situations.

COM 585 Advanced Organizational Communication (3). Survey of theory and research relevant to the study of organizational communication. Students will examine how communication processes shape and reshape the activities of organizing within and between organizations. Prerequisites:  senior standing and COM 385 or graduate status.

COM 589 Directed Individual Study in Communication Theory (3). A course designed to meet the needs of individuals and groups who wish to explore topics not covered in other organizational communication  courses or to do in-depth study of an issue introduced in another course. A proposal for study must be approved by the instructor during the first week of classes. General areas of study from which specific topics can be drawn include interpersonal communication, small group communication, and communication within organizations. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. Graded pass/fail.

COM 599 Internship (3-6). A course designed for students to get experience in the application of theory to practical situations. Businesses and organizations selected to participate draw from qualified students with skills in organizational communication, forensics, technical theatre or acting. May be repeated for a total of six hours. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of instructor.

COM 600 Seminar in International and Intercultural Communication (3). Analysis of theories and research in international communication and intercultural communication. Focus on such variables as interaction among racial, ethnic, and cultural groups; transnational information flow; and the role of media in facilitating international and intercultural knowledge and understanding. (Same as JMC 600.)

COM 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

COM 645 Foundations of Organizational Communication (3). A survey of the development of organizational communication from early communication thinkers to contemporary individuals who have contributed theory and influenced the discipline.

COM 661 Theories of Persuasion and Argumentation (3). Classical and modern theories of persuasion and argumentation. Behavioral theory and research are examined and the effects of various forms of argument and attitude change are studied. Ethical standards of persuasion and argumentation are explored.

COM 672 Communication in Instructional Environments (3). Communication in a variety of instructional contexts with focus on introductory courses at the college level. Emphasis is placed on the literature, philosophies and theories concerning communication instruction.

COM 673 Organizational Training and Development (3). Specific problem areas in communication structures within particular organizations are identified. A concentrated examination is made of the areas of assessment, diagnosis, prescription, intervention and evaluation of communication problems and the training and development opportunities resulting from those problems within organizations.

COM 681 Seminar in Conflict Resolution (3). Designed to illustrate the central role of communication in resolving conflict within various organizational entities. The course will focus on conflict resolution skills required in such environments as management and labor, public administration, families and education. A particular area of concentration will be selected each semester.

COM 683 Seminar in Communication Variables (3). Variables affecting communication including perception, language, attitudes and cognitive processes. Research related to each variable will be examined.

COM 685 Seminar in Organizational Communication (9). Detailed studies in organizational communication of interest to faculty and students. A contemporary topic, to be announced one semester in advance, is examined each time the course is offered. Past topics include consulting, subordinate-superior relations, gender communication, mentoring and intercultural communication. The course may be repeated for a total of nine hours. Prerequisite:  COM 585 or consent of instructor.

COM 690 Research Methods in Organizational Communication (2). Review of research methodologies used in the study of communication variables.

COM 692 Research Practice (2). Application of research methods used to study communication variables. Miniature thesis required. Prerequisite:  COM 690.

COM 693 Readings in Communication Research (3). Students read 4,000-5,000 pages of research in a particular area of interest. Usually the product is a research paper written in a publishable format. Permission of the graduate advisor is required prior to enrollment. Graded pass/fail.

COM 694 Directed Individual Study in Organizational Communication (1-3). The student has the opportunity to pursue specific areas of research under the supervision of the participating faculty member. Particular expectations are negotiated between the student, department and faculty member. May be repeated once for a maximum of six hours. Graded pass/fail.

COM 698 Thesis (3).

COM 699 Thesis (3).


CRIMINAL JUSTICE
(CRJ)
CRJ 522 Issues in Policing (3). Examines police function, history, operational strategies, ethics, deviance, use of force, policy, accreditation, accountability, and other contemporary issues. Prerequisite: CRJ 220 or permission of instructor.

CRJ 533 Juvenile Delinquency (3). Nature and extent of delinquency; competing explanatory theories; evaluation of programs for prevention and control; role of police, detention, juvenile courts and corrections. Prerequisite:  CRJ 320 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 533.)

CRJ 537 Juvenile Justice Procedures (3). The organization, function and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies; police referrals, preventive techniques and youth divisions; juvenile court procedures and juvenile statutes. Prerequisite:  CRJ 320 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

CRJ 544 Constitutional and Legal Issues in CRJ (3). A comprehensive examination of the constitutional law that affects criminal justice professionals, citizens, suspects, and incarcerated individuals, with considerable attention given to both civil and criminal legal issues surfacing in the criminal justice field. Topics will include due process, search and seizure, self-incrimination, bail, and right to counsel and a fair trial. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 573 Victimology (3). Analysis of major perspectives on victimization. Emphasis on patterns of victimization, the role of victims in the generation of crime, and the experience of the victim in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 575 (570) Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3). An examination of non-American criminal justice systems. Specific areas of comparison will include but not be limited to, the police, judiciary, and criminal corrections of selected foreign systems. Prerequisite: CRJ 140 with a grade of C or better.

CRJ 605 Seminar in the Administration of Justice (3). An overview and evaluation of policies and practices in the administration of justice.

CRJ 610 Seminar in Critical Justice Issues (3). An assessment of selected issues in justice currently under attack and the development of strategies to meet those challenges.

CRJ 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of division director.

CRJ 645 Graduate Internship (3). Supervised internship placement in a criminal justice agency. Students are expected to examine administrative, operational, legal and ethical issues faced by the placement agency. Prerequisite: permission of division director.

CRJ 695 Special Problems (3). Individual study and projects designed to meet the needs of each student. Requires consent of division director.

CRJ 698 Thesis (3-6).


COMPUTER SCIENCE
(CSC)
CSC 500 Compiler Construction (3). Review of program language structures, translation, loading, execution and storage allocation. Compilation of simple expressions and statements. Organization of a compiler including compile-time and run-time symbol tables, lexical scan, syntax scan, object code generation, error diagnostics, object code optimization techniques and overall design. Use of writing languages and bootstrapping. Prerequisites:  CSC 415.

CSC 503 Automata and Formal Languages (3). Alphabets, languages and grammars:  finite automata, regular expressions and type E grammars, context-free languages and push down automata, Turing machines and unsolvability. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of instructor.

CSC 510 Data Communications and Networking (3). An introduction to data communications and computer networking including transmission media, protocols, standards, and the OSI model, multiplexing, data compression, error detection and correction; encryption and decryption; local and wide area networks; distributed computing and client-server systems; network planning, installation, management, and inter-networking. Students will install, configure and test networks of personal computers using several popular network operating systems. Prerequisite:  Permission of instructor.

CSC 515 Computer Graphics Programming (3). Course to cover computer graphics programming techniques and algorithms. Topics include:  graphical systems and models, defining geometric objects and applying geometric transformations, techniques for rendering and viewing, shading algorithms, hierarchical and object-oriented graphics, mathematical methods for generating curves and surfaces, physics-based modeling, and utilizing special graphics display hardware. Prerequisite: knowledge of a high-level programming language or permission of instructor.

CSC 520 Numerical Analysis II (3). A thorough treatment of solutions of equations, interpolation and approximations, numerical solution of initial value problems in ordinary differential equations. Selected algorithms will be programmed for solution on computers. Prerequisites:  CSC 420 and MAT 411 or consent of instructor.

CSC 525 Special Topics I (3). This course is designed to fulfill special needs not met by other courses. It can be a lecture or seminar course. May be repeated one time. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

CSC 526 Special Topics II (3). Special topics in computer science. May be repeated one time.

CSC 530 Graphical User Interface Development (3). Presents an introduction to human-computer interaction, graphical user interface design and implementation. Requires the development of a significant software application using a selected user interface development tool. Corequisite: CSC 531, 532, 533 or 534. Prerequisites:  knowledge of a high-level programming language and consent of instructor.

CSC 531 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Graphics and Visual Computing (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and graphics and visual computing. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 532 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Net-Centric Computing (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and net-centric computing. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 533 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Embedded Systems Programming (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and embedded systems programming. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 534 Graphical User Interface Development Project in Applications Programming (0). Project course to accompany CSC 530. The chosen project will be related to graphical user interface development and applications programming. This course must be taken with CSC 530. Graded pass/fail.

CSC 540 Social, Ethical and Professional Issues in the Information Age (3). This course emphasizes social, ethical, legal, technical and professional issues encountered in the information age including the historical and social context, professional responsibilities, risks and liabilities, and intellectual property. Prerequisite:  senior standing.

CSC 545 Advanced Computer Architecture (3). In-depth discussion of some topics from CSC 405, high-speed functional units, distributed architecture, multiprocessors, pipelining, parallel computers and other topics. Prerequisite:  CSC 405.

CSC 551 Microprogrammed Logic Design (4). Combinational and segmented logic implementation using selectors, multiplexers, PLA, ROM and RAM. Architecture of logic emulation. Virtual machines. Vertical and horizontal microprogramming. Simulation studies of microprogrammed systems. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratories per week. Prerequisite:  CSC 405.

CSC 560 UNIX System Administration (3). This course covers the fundamental principles of administering the family of UNIX operating systems. Topics that will be covered include installation, configuration, administration and management of one flavor of this operating system.

CSC 565 Embedded Systems Design (3). Architecture of various microcontrollers and their uses in embedded systems applications are studied. One or more of the popular microcontrollers will be selected for practice in hardware design and programming, including methods for interfacing with computers, sensors and control systems.  Prerequisite:  CSC 405 or consent of instructor.

CSC 575 Computer Animation and Game Development (3). This course builds on the computer animation techniques of CSC 515. Topics covered include lighting techniques, texture mapping, atmospheric effects, collision detection, joystick and game pad inputs, and sound effects. Physics modeling, real-time animation, AI behavior modeling and other fundamentals of fame design are introduced. Prerequisites: CSC 515 or permission of instructor.

CSC 580 Introduction to Computer Programming Education (3). A computer science methods course for education majors. General introduction to teaching computer programming in the secondary school environment including state program requirements in computer science and information systems, use of teaching aids with special application to the teaching of computer programming and computer laboratory management. Prerequisite: a course in a high-level programming language.

CSC 581 Educational Programming Languages (3). Designed to introduce students to programming languages currently being used in the educational environment. Having been introduced to BASIC in the prerequisite course, students will also cover that language in greater detail. Prerequisite:  CSC 580.

CSC 595 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised independent study of specialized topics in computer science. May be repeated one time. Prerequisite:  senior standing and/or consent of instructor.

CSC 630 Client Application Development (3). This course concentrates on the client component of client-server applications to include designing, implementing, managing, maintaining, training and refining the user interface of interactive software. Special emphasis will be placed on developing easy-to-use and easy-to-learn user interfaces. A significant software application will be developed using one or more commercial application development tools.

CSC 632 Server Application Development (3). This is an advanced programming course that introduces the concepts of writing distributed server applications. Emphasis is placed on practical server application development for e-commerce. Students develop expertise in the use of a server applications development tools using object-oriented analysis and design. The course develops an understanding of interrelationship between the technical architecture and the organizational policies and procedures.

CSC 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

CSC 695 Comprehensive Project in Computer Science (3). This course consists of an independent, in-depth study of a topic or problem in computer science under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisites:  12 hours of graduate work in computer science or computer information systems and consent of the instructor.


COLLEGE STUDENT PERSONNEL
(CSP)
CSP 615 Introduction to Student Affairs in Higher Education (3). The historical and philosophical development of the student affairs profession will be explored and discussed. Major topics include an in-depth study of the departments that typically constitute the division of student affairs. This includes history, function, trends, issues and significant personnel. Class content will be presented in seminar format.

CSP 616 The American College Student (3). The characteristics of the contemporary American college student will be examined. Major topics will include an examination of the motivations for entering institutions of higher education, developmental theory related to college students, problems and challenges specific to the American concept of making higher education accessible to a large percentage of the population, and the impact of contemporary economic and social trends on the college population.

CSP 617 Current Issues in Student Affairs (3). Current topics shaping the profession of student affairs will be examined. These will include issues involving the relationship between the student and the university, student development, funding and governance, as well as current issues involving the impact of changing social trends on the work of the student affairs professions. A case study method will be used in the presentation of the course.

CSP 618 Practicum and Seminar in College Student Personnel Work (3). Practical aspects of college student personnel work will be examined through the use of appropriate placements in working professional settings. A seminar will accompany these placements to provide a forum for a structured discussion and development of concepts observed while in the field placement settings.


CAREER AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION
(CTE)
CTE 500 Analysis of Global Influences on the Workplace. (3) Course focuses on the global influences that are changing the workplace for teachers and trainers of today. The primary emphasis is on the scope, origins, and current trends that influence the classroom and other learning contexts, including business and government. Students are asked to research and explore global effects on their own current or prospective work environments.

CTE 501 Teaching through Application (3). Course is designed to provide new and pre-service teachers with an introduction to the field of career and technical education. Included are topics related to motivation, and learning theory, curriculum, school organization, funding, laboratory management and historical, sociocultural, psychological and philosophical foundations of career and technical education. Field experience required.

CTE 502 Instructional Media, Curricula and Assessment in CTE (3). Course will provide an overview of current trends and issues in instructional technology and curricula in the technology rich instructional environment. The focus is on instructional approaches unique to and appropriate for the career and technical education classroom and laboratory. Field experience required.

CTE 503 Planning and Implementing Instruction in CTE (3). Course will provide an overview of current trends and issues in planning and implementing instruction in the media rich career and technical education classroom and laboratory. Includes exploration of such varied methods as lecture, discussion, group instruction, projects and instructional modules.

CTE 510 Introduction to Technical Training Programs for Industry (3). A study of the organization, planning, delivery and evaluation of adult education, development and training as conducted within business and industry.

CTE 540 School and Occupational Relations (3). A course designed to provide instruction in establishing a working relationship between vocational schools and industry. Attention is given to organizing and maintaining an occupational advisory committee, occupational surveys, field based instruction and student follow-up.

CTE 560 Seminar in Career and Technical Education (3). Individual and group investigations of current problems and issues in the field of vocational-industrial and technical education. Each student will be expected to plan and complete a minor research project and present his findings to the seminar.

CTE 561 Planning Technical Education Facilities (3). Principles and practices underlying the planning and designing of shops and laboratories for vocational, industrial and technical education, and implementation of legislation such as OSHA.

CTE 562 School and Community Relations for the Technical Instructor (3). A systematic approach to school-community relations that treats the community as an active participant with the vocational staff in the development and operation of an effective occupational-oriented educational program.

CTE 563 Evaluation of Instruction in Industrial Technical Education (3). A course designed to provide instruction in the process of instructional evaluation. Emphasis is given to the establishment of student performance criteria, the assessment of student performance in the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains, and the assigning of grades. An independent study project or research report is required.

CTE 565 Program Planning and Evaluation (3). Procedures and techniques in planning and evaluating programs in vocational and technical education.

CTE 566 Special Problems in Career and Technical Education (1-6). Provides an opportunity for individual study, laboratory practice and research in vocational education. The student must show a real need for such study and have the proposed problem approved before registering for the course. May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

CTE 567 Managing and Organizing Student Organizations (3). A study of procedures for organizing clubs, suggestions to club sponsors, employer-employee banquets, publications, open-house, field trips, etc.

CTE 568 Independent Study in Career and Technical Education (3-6). Supervised readings or independent investigative projects in the various aspects of administration, supervision and coordination of vocational programs. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

CTE 569 Practicum in Career and Technical Education (3). This course is designed for vocational education personnel who are interested in working within special areas in vocational education such as administration, coordination and implementation of legislation such as metrics, OSHA, etc.

CTE 570 Foundations of Career and Technical Education (3). A study of the social, historical and philosophical foundations of technology education and vocational education. Includes critical examination of the influences of the foundations of technology and vocational education on contemporary curricular developments, selection and organization of course content and teaching techniques. An independent study project or research report is required. (Same as TTE 470.)

CTE 571 Instructional Methods in Career and Technical Education (3). The presentation and application of instructional materials, methods, techniques and devices relevant to teaching technology and vocational education at the orientation, exploration and preparation levels. Students will explore current research on methods of instruction, then plan and execute teaching units for both individual and group instruction, selecting content and instructional strategies based on the goals and objectives appropriate to the content organizers of technology. Activities will include development of lesson plans, organization of materials, and presentation of psychomotor, affective and cognitive instruction as well as establishment of student expectations and a student behavior policy. An independent study project or research report is required. (Same as TTE 471.)

CTE 572 Managing Career and Technical Learning Facilities (3). Principles and practices for planning, organizing, and maintaining school shop, laboratory and classroom facilities used in teaching vocational subjects. Emphasis is given to classroom management and control, supply inventory, equipment maintenance and safety. An independent study project or research report is required.

CTE 573 Occupational Field Experience (3). Directed work experience in various vocational settings for the purpose of giving the student practical experiences in the field. Supervision is provided by both the instructional staff of the college and the cooperating agency. Students are expected to maintain a full record of activities and assignments and to prepare periodic progress reports.

CTE 574 Instructional Media and Curriculum Development (3). A study of current trends and issues in curriculum development and instructional media for technology and vocational education. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the curricular considerations unique to the application of other areas of knowledge to technological problem-solving. Research and problem-solving skills will be utilized to adapt instructional media and existing teaching units to both individual and group instruction. Students will link content and instructional strategies based on goals and objectives appropriate to the content organizers of technology. An independent study project or research report is required. (Same as TTE 474.)

CTE 575 Managing Instruction for Learners with Special Needs (3). A study of the basic ideas, perspectives and techniques critical to the planning, management and evaluation of instruction for special needs learners. Classroom situations involving diverse populations and handicaps will be examined. A student-generated field experience is required. (Same as TTE 575.)

CTE 576 Emerging Trends in Instructional Technology (3). A study will be made of trends in industrial technology affecting vocational technical education, including competency-based education, management by objectives, objectives exchange systems, information storage and retrieval, instructional models, etc.

CTE 577 Educator Externship, Field Experience in the Workplace (3). Emphasis on behavior patterns and changes in adults. Theories of occupational development, levels of occupational maturity, effects of personality traits, and socio-psychological environmental influences. Projects and field studies will be utilized.

CTE 578 Vocational Guidance (3). Problems and procedures involved in assisting individuals to choose, prepare for, enter upon and become adjusted in their vocations. Students will develop skills which enhance their ability to teach identification and clarification of values, as well as enhancement of decision-making, career planning and job acquisition skills. Technology education teachers, vocational education teachers and counselors will develop insight into the principles involved in evaluating occupational outlooks and the skills and traits required for success in selected careers.

CTE 622 Student Teaching Seminar (3). A professional experience to be provided concurrently with student teaching to provide theory, research base, and a forum to support the performance in the school assignment. Topics arising from problems encountered in the classroom as well as other current topics will be studied. This course will only be for the students seeking initial certification at the master’s level in career and technical education majors.  Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: Admission to student teaching and concurrent registration in student teaching.

CTE 640 Student Teaching Practicum in Career and Technical Education (6). This course provides opportunities for students to participate in all activities and duties generally expected of a career and technical education teacher. Student will observe, participate, and teach under the supervision of a faculty member and a cooperating teacher. Includes experience in lesson planning, classroom management, record keeping, development and use of instructional materials and delivery of instruction. Graded pass/fail.

CTE 671 Philosophy of Career and Technical Education (3). A study of the social, historical and philosophical development and current philosophical beliefs of technology-based studies. Exploring the various philosophies of technology education and vocational education, the student will develop a philosophy and understanding of technology or vocational education, then apply that philosophy and understanding to technology-based education about the technological attitudes and skills to understanding new or different past-present-future technology systems. The meaning of technology-based education to the individual and society, as well as the nature and impacts of technology on the individual and society will be introduced and explored. (Same as TTE 671.)

CTE 673 Supervision of Career and Technical Education (3). A study of the competencies needed to supervise and develop effective techniques of working with technology and vocational education teachers. Problems and methods of orientation, communication and supervision of teachers and instruction are discussed. (Same as TTE 673.)

CTE 675 Experienced Teacher Practices in Career and Technical Education (3). A study of contemporary industrial theory, practice and trends in Kentucky. Through problem solving, and development of instructional activities, the student will explore the relationship between exemplary experienced teacher practices/behaviors and educational research as it related to instructional improvement and enhancement of learning. Students will develop portfolio entries that demonstrate skill and best practice in focusing industrial technology education classroom instruction toward achievement of Kentucky’s academic learning expectations under the mandates of KERA and the teacher expectations described in Kentucky’s Experienced Teacher Standards for Preparation and Certification.

CTE 676 Organization and Administration of Career and Technical Education (3). A study of the organization and administration of technology, vocational and technical education programs on the various school levels and the development and coordination of external advisory boards. The students will experience development of a strategic plan that includes a mission statement, rationale for change, goals and objectives, action steps, as well as a program evaluation strategy. State and national legislation affecting technology and vocational education will be studied. (Same as TTE 676.)

CTE 677 Practices in Cooperative Occupational Education (3). The philosophy, purpose, problems and procedures in the operation of cooperative part-time and evening school programs.

CTE 678 Review of Professional Literature in Vocational Education (3). Review and analysis of outstanding professional literature in the various fields of vocational education. Survey of research and professional papers from other disciplines that relate to vocational education will be made. Critical analysis of selected publications will be required.

CTE 694 Research in Career and Technical Education (3). A study of techniques and procedures used in designing, conducting, interpreting and evaluating research in industrial, training, and technical education settings. Applications, advantages and limitations of various research methods are studied and explored. Graduate status is required. (Same as IET 694)

CTE 698 Thesis (3).

CTE 699 Thesis (3).


ECONOMICS
(ECO)
ECO 500 Foundations of Economic Analysis (3). A rigorous introduction to economics including the application of the basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. This course is designed for nontraditional students who would like to refresh their understanding of economics and for graduate students and advanced undergraduates who lack prior proper training in economics. Students cannot receive undergraduate credit for this class and ECO 230 and/or ECO 231. In addition, this class cannot be used to fulfill graduate requirements in the M.B.A. or M.S. in economics program. Prerequisites:  MAT 117, 120, 140 or 150; or an ACT math standard score of at least 23; or consent of instructor.

ECO 505 Internship in Economics (1-3). Open to junior and senior economics majors. Students are placed with cooperating firms or government agencies to receive on-the-job training in economic analysis. Work experience is supervised by faculty and written reports are required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of departmental chair.

ECO 530 Intermediate Macro Theory (3). A review of the macroeconomic problems that face society, the theories that have arisen to describe the economy, and policy implications of possible solutions. Outside research as specified by the instructor will be required. Credit cannot be given for both ECO 330 and ECO 530. Prerequisites:  ECO 230 and MAT 220 or consent of instructor.

ECO 531 Intermediate Micro Theory (3). An analysis of price and distribution theory. Outside research as specified by the instructor will be required. Credit cannot be given for both ECO 331 and ECO 531. Prerequisites:  ECO 231 and MAT 220 or consent of instructor.

ECO 538 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (3). An appraisal of the federal government’s efforts to promote full employment and price stability. Prerequisite:  ECO 330 or consent of instructor.

ECO 539 Microeconomic Policy (3). An analysis of government policy affecting business firms and consumer choice. Prerequisite:  ECO 331 or consent of instructor.

ECO 540 Market Structure and Firm Behavior (3). This course examines non-competitive market structures such as monopoly, oligopoly and monopolistic competition. The course will focus on output and pricing decisions of such firms, the economic impact of these market structures, and the regulation of non-competitive markets. Prerequisite:  ECO 230 and 231.

ECO 550 Public Finance (3). A survey of the principles and practices of raising and spending public revenues. Prerequisite:  ECO 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 570 Labor Economics (3). A survey of the economics of labor, the conditions of employment, wages and the development of labor organizations in the United States. Prerequisite:  ECO 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 595 Special Problems (1-3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

ECO 597 Teaching and Application of Economic Principles:  K-12 (3). A survey of content, materials, teaching methodology and practicum in program design for incorporating economic principles into grades K-12. The course is designed for those with little or no formal economic background. (Same as EDU 597.)

ECO 625 Managerial Economics (3). An application of economic theory to business problems. Prerequisites:  ECO 230, 231 or equivalent, MAT 220, CIS 443, or consent of instructor.

ECO 630 Macroeconomic Theory (3). An advanced analysis of the major theories of national income, price level, interest rate, and employment determination; in particular the short-run impact of policy choices and shocks within the major models.  Prerequisite:  ECO 330 or consent of instructor.

ECO 631 Microeconomic Theory (3). An advanced treatment of price theory, emphasizing the use of differential calculus and linear algebra to formally model the decision-making of individual economic agents. Prerequisite:  ECO 331 or consent of instructor.

ECO 633 History of Economic Thought (3). A study of the evolution of important economic thought. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

ECO 635 Advanced Monetary Theory (3). The evolution of money, monetary theory, monetary policy and the closely related topic of fiscal policy. Prerequisite:  ECO 330  or consent of instructor.

ECO 639 Microeconomic Policy and Application (3). An application of basic microeconomic theories to the analysis of the effects of various governmental policies on individual consumers, firms, industries or resource owners. The topics that will be covered in any particular semester will vary, being drawn primarily from policy issues of current importance. Prerequisites:  ECO 230 and 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (1-3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ECO 650 Theory of Public Finance (3). Reviews the problem of resource allocation within the framework of government revenue and expenditure policies, and the impact of these policies on the economy. Prerequisite:  ECO 231 or consent of  instructor.

ECO 660 International Business and Finance (3). A review of international economic and financial theories and applications, including international trade, payments, investment and currency markets. Prerequisite: ECO 230 & 231 or consent of instructor.

ECO 680 Quantitative Methods of Economics and Business (3). A rigorous presentation of the fundamental quantitative methods most frequently encountered in the graduate study of economics and business. Topics covered include matrix algebra, partial differentiation, constrained and unconstrained optimization and comparative statics. Prerequisites:  ECO 230, 231 and MAT 220 or consent of instructor.

ECO 685 Econometrics (3). The theory and application of statistical methods to the analysis of economic and business data. Topics covered include simple and multiple regression analysis, hypothesis testing of linear and nonlinear restrictions, heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, dummy variables and model selection. Prerequisites:  ECO 231 and CIS 343 or consent of instructor.

ECO 690 Forecasting for Business and Government (3). An intuitive presentation of the basic quantitative forecasting techniques widely used in industry and government, including multiple regression analysis, exponential smoothing algorithms and ARIMA modeling (Box-Jenkins). Prerequisites:  ECO 230, 231 and CIS 343 or consent of instructor.

ECO 691 Benefit-Cost Analysis for Business and Government (3). Techniques of benefit-cost analysis and related topics. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

ECO 695 Special Problems (1-3). Independent study of a special problem in economics by students who have the background to do independent work. Prerequisites:  ECO 680 and consent of instructor.

ECO 698 Thesis (3).

ECO 699 Thesis (3).


EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
(EDP)
EDP 675 Advanced Educational Psychology (3). A psychological perspective and research-based examination of the learner, the teacher, and the classroom interaction processes involved in effective educational processes.


EDUCATION
(EDU)
EDU 515 Introduction to Environmental Education (3). An introduction to environmental education which will include philosophy, historical development, resource identification, curriculum development, field trip and other activities designed to use the various subject areas in all grade levels as a vehicle to create an environmental ethic.

EDU 520 NASA Aerospace Science Workshop (3). A course designed for teachers at all levels and subject disciplines. The intent of this course is to introduce teachers to the history, present status and future of the space movement through the efforts of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration agency. Instruction will be provided by Aerospace Education Specialists and College of Education faculty.

EDU 585 Environmental Interpretation (3). A course designed for persons in the fields of natural and cultural history, recreation, education, and media. A focus will be placed upon the philosophy, process and values of environmental interpretation while looking closely into the methods and techniques of interpreting programming. Successful completion of the course will lead to a national certification through the National Association for Interpretation.

EDU 597 Teaching and Application of Economic Principles:  K-12 (3). A survey of content, materials, teaching methodology and practicum in program design for incorporating economic principles into grades K-12. The course is designed for those with little or no formal economic background. (Same as ECO 597.)

EDU 602 Individualizing Instructional Programs (3). This course will provide a practical experience in the design and development of individualized curriculum materials and instructional programs, preparing IEP’s, and in the development of appropriate classroom organizational and management systems to implement these programs.

EDU 603 Systems of Evaluating, Grading and Reporting Pupil Progress (3). Students completing this course would have achieved appropriate skills and understandings to more effectively perform the tasks of evaluating and reporting of pupil progress in the classroom. To include the study of criterion-referenced evaluation, alternative grading practices, teacher-pupil-parent conferencing, alternative reporting systems.

EDU 606 Preparation of Curriculum Materials (3). A course involving the producing of learning materials for use in the elementary and secondary schools.

EDU 609 Education for the Culturally Different (3). A study of the culturally different child with emphasis on causes and cultural responsibilities. Emphasis is given to procedures used to identify, to provide approximate curriculum experiences, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the program.

EDU 614 Direct Study of Children and Youth (3). A group experience in writing and analyzing anecdotal records composed from direct observation by each member, under the guidance of trained leaders and consultants.

EDU 620 Internship in Environmental Education (3). Student spends a directed amount of time working under the supervision of a selected environmental educator. This may be in formal and non-formal settings. May be taken concurrently with EDU 660 if experience and length of internship merits additional credits.

EDU 621 Advanced Methods of Teaching (3). An advanced course that applies theories and practices of models of teaching based upon applied research and practitioners experiences. Prerequisites:  EDU 303 or an equivalent course and at least have had student teaching experiences.

EDU 622 Philosophy of Education (3). A course designed to explore the various philosophies of education; the meaning of education to the individual and society; the nature of thinking; educational aims and values; character education; and the interpretation and evaluation of present day issues and problems in education.

EDU 623 Educational Sociology (3). A course designed to review the major sociological forces which condition education:  the structure of society, major social trends, and social instructions. (Same as SOC 623.)

EDU 625 Theory and Practice in Classroom Management (3). Analysis of the theoretical and practical aspects of selected systems of classroom management and control. To include the study of several approaches that can assist teachers in establishing and maintaining a healthy and productive system of classroom operation.

EDU 626 Integration of Educational Technology (3). Students use a range of traditional, interactive, and emerging technology tools to enhance learning. Students demonstrate knowledge of existing instructional practices as well as compose and produce artifacts using available resources.

EDU 627 School Law and Finance for Teachers (3). A course designed for the classroom teacher. A study of the laws and finance pertaining to teachers as they work with students, administrators, colleagues and community interest groups. (Same as ADM 627.)

EDU 631 Application of Learning and Motivation Principles to the Classroom (3). A course designed to examine theories of human motivation, learning styles, and human growth, teaching behaviors and learning environments necessary to achieve congruency with these theories.

EDU 632 Comparative Education (3). A systematic examination of education in various nations for the purpose of an enlarged critical view of education in the United States.

EDU 633 Curriculum Development (3). A comprehensive analysis of the process of curriculum development. It includes examination of the theoretical dimensions of curriculum development. The process includes consideration of the bases of curriculum, aims and objectives of schools, planning instruction and curriculum evaluation.

EDU 634 Problems in Curriculum Development in the Public School (1-3). Designed for people desiring to work in specific curriculum areas, K-12. Repeatable to six hours.

EDU 635 Problems in Education (1-3). Designed to permit a graduate student to make a study of a problem of instruction in K-12 settings. Repeatable to six hours.

EDU 636 Readings in Education (1-3). Designed to allow for in-depth study of research in education. Repeatable to six hours.

EDU 645 History of Education in the United States (3). A course designed to study of the growth and development of education in the United States from early colonial times to present, including recent trends and movements.

EDU 649 Research in Education (3). This course is a follow-up of ADM 630. The course includes an exploration of elementary statistics as they apply to the completion of an action research project which was proposed and begun in ADM 630. The action research project is to be concluded during this course and presented during a class/departmental colloquium.

EDU 650 Workshops in Education (1-3). Repeatable to six hours. Maximum of six hours from EDU 650 and/or EDU 651.

EDU 651 TQI Workshops in Education (3). Selected workshops in education. Repeatable to six hours. Maximum of six hours of EDU 650 and/or 651. Prerequisite: admission to graduate school.

EDU 653 The Supervision of Student Teachers (3). Designed to explore the competencies needed by the supervising teacher to develop effective techniques of working with student teachers. Orientation, communication, supervision and the objectives of student teaching are discussed.

EDU 655 Creativity in Teaching (3). A comprehensive course designed to help participants: (1) explore and enhance their own creative powers; (2) learn how to teach creative problem-solving techniques and creative habits of mind to others; and (3) become aware of the variety of theoretical frameworks, research results and measurements which are available in the area of creativity.

EDU 656 Newspaper in the Classroom (3). A course designed to prepare teachers in utilizing local, state and national newspapers in teaching different subjects in elementary and secondary schools. A large variety of curriculum materials will be developed for classroom use.

EDU 658 Nonverbal Communication in the Classroom (3). The course will provide an overview of the literature in nonverbal communication, drawing from psychology, anthropology, sociology, linguistics, speech and communication, and education. Applications of that content will be made to the teaching profession.

EDU 660 Special Problems in Environmental Education (1-3). Selected projects in current developments and trends in environmental education. Repeatable to six hours.

EDU 661 Workshops in Environmental Education (1). Selected workshops in environmental education. Graded pass/fall. Repeatable to three hours. Prerequisites: admission to graduate study and permission of the instructor.

EDU 662 Workshops in Environmental Education (2). Selected workshops in environmental education. Graded pass/fall. Repeatable to six hours. Prerequisites: admission to graduate study.

EDU 663 Workshops in Environmental Education (1-3). Selected workshops in environmental education. Repeatable to nine hours. Graded pass/fail.

EDU 664 Techniques of Teaching Environmental Education (3). This course provides opportunities for the development of teaching attitudes and understanding at all grade levels of the basic natural resources of the school environment. Study of the surrounding area is made through field trips.

EDU 665 Field Experiences in Environmental Education (2-3). This course will be conducted at the Land Between the Lakes Environmental Education Center. The workshop will include techniques of using the out-of-doors as a teaching tool, curriculum development skills, methods of using environmental education as a supplement to curriculum areas and localizing environmental education programs to meet the needs of local communities.

EDU 667 Environmental Education in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland (3). Residential study of the mathematical, scientific, social studies, language arts, fine arts, and health connections to the environment in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. This class is offered in conjunction with the Kentucky Institute for international Studies and takes place in Bregenz, Austria (field experiences required). Prerequisites: admission to the graduate program as a regular or visiting student or permission of instructor.

EDU 668 Agriculture and the Environment in the Classroom (3). The study of agriculture and the environment as it relates to origination and production of food and fiber and how this connects to topics, skills, and concepts that are included in the K-12 classroom. This program is conducted in conjunction with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (field experience required). Prerequisites: admission to the graduate program or permission of instructor.

EDU 691 Nature and Needs of the Gifted Student (3). A course to provide opportunities for experienced teachers and teacher trainees to develop knowledge and awareness of the characteristics and needs of gifted children and youth, and provides the individual student with opportunities to apply general educational principles for the gifted and talented to total educational concerns.

EDU 692 Methods and Materials for Teaching Gifted Students (3). This course will focus upon the development of instructional strategies and curriculum materials for use with youngsters with high ability and/or potential. Prerequisite: EDU 691 or permission of instructor.

EDU 693 Educational Programs for Gifted Students (3). A course designed to give experience and develop skills in effective planning, organization and execution of educational programs for gifted students. Prerequisite: EDU 691 and 692, or permission of instructor.

EDU 694 Supervised Practicum in Gifted Education (3). A course designed to provide field experience so the teacher may apply principles and educational procedures for teaching gifted students. Repeatable to six hours. Prerequisites:  EDU 691 and 692; and either EDU 655, 693, or 695.

EDU 695 Multicultural Gifted Education (3). This course is designed for teachers and counselors to learn practical strategies bridging the fields of gifted education and multicultural education. Theory and practice will be considered to enable educators to help gifted students reach their full potential in multicultural settings. Prerequisite: EDU 691 and 692.

EDU 698 Thesis (3-6). Repeatable to six hours.

EDU 798 Specialty Study (3). Selection of problem, collection of data, and interpretation of data in preparation for writing a research paper. Second three hours culminating in a research paper to be approved by the student’s committee. Repeatable to six hours.


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION
(ELE)
ELE 505 Educational Program for Kindergarten Children (3). A study of recent developments in the education of young children, selection in the use of appropriate activities, methods and materials for kindergarten. Prerequisite: ELE 404 or 604.

ELE 600 Teaching Modern Mathematics (3). Designed to give elementary teachers depth in modern mathematics. Students become familiar with current trends and programs and develop competency in guiding children in developing mathematical concepts.

ELE 601 Social Studies in the Elementary School (3). An examination of the broad content of the social studies and recent experimental programs which attempts to correlate subject matter from the disciplines involved. Emphasis is placed on the cultural background of the children, trends, problems, curriculum materials and individualizing program.

ELE 602 Language Arts: Current Issues and Research (3). A study of the current issues and practices of language arts in the elementary school. Writing is emphasized.

ELE 604 Advanced Studies in Kindergarten (3). A study of the historical background of the kindergarten. This course will emphasize the organization of physical facilities for young children in developmentally appropriate environments. This course will also focus on the study of developmental outcomes for young children and study of parent-teacher partnership. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELE 605 Introduction Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (3). A course designed for students entering the field of early intervention and educare services for children birth to primary school and students preparing for Kentucky Interdisciplinary Early Childhood Education (IECE) teacher licensure. It addresses the philosophy of early childhood education, teacher performance, professional development and licensure.

ELE 607 Research in Early Childhood Education (3). Designed to give teachers greater depth in understanding the principles of early childhood education by exploring the development of process and research substantiating current practice.

ELE 608 Science in the Elementary School (3). A laboratory-centered course planned for the development of skills in the design and evolution of experiences for teaching science in the elementary school. Experiences dealing with new elementary science curricula and current research are provided.

ELE 610 Student Teaching in Early Childhood Education (4). Designed for people who are interested in working with the kindergarten child. Provides opportunities to participate in all the work and duties of kindergarten with supervision by the professional staff. Prerequisites:  elementary certification, ELE 505 and 604.

ELE 611 Elementary School Organization for Instruction (3). An exploration of factors, trends, issues and problems in organizing and implementing the curriculum of the elementary school. There is emphasis on the alternatives in vertical and horizontal organization and on the alternatives for staff utilization.

ELE (615) 510 Poetry for Children (3). An in-depth study of poetry written for children.

ELE 616 Research in Children’s Literature (3). An in-depth study of chosen areas in children’s literature with emphasis on books and articles about children’s books.

ELE 647 Curriculum in the Elementary School (3). A study of the elementary school child and programs which meet his/her needs. Consideration is given to curriculum trends in the elementary school.


ENGLISH
(ENG)
ENG 500 Chaucer (3). A study of Chaucer’s works and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 501 Milton (3). A study of Milton’s works and their historical and critical contexts. (Same as RGS 511.)

ENG 502 Early English Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of English literature before 1500, studied partly in translation.

ENG 503 Medieval Drama (3). European secular and religious drama in the Middle Ages, studied partly in translation. Prerequisite: ENG 303 or permission of the instructor.

ENG 504 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of British literature from 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century.

ENG 505 British Romantic Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of British literature of the Romantic Age.

ENG 508 Modern Fiction (3). A critical and historical study of selected European and American prose fiction from 1900 to the present.

ENG 509 Literary Criticism (3). An historical survey of literary criticism, together with some collateral reading of literature.

ENG 510 Applied Linguistics for Second Language Teaching (3). An overview of the basic concepts, scope, and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects, including topics and issues in current linguistic studies.  Prerequisite: ENG 310. (Same as MLA/TSL 510.)

ENG 511 Non-Shakespearean Elizabethan-Jacobean Drama (3). A study of selected plays of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 512 Directed Study (1-4). Directed independent study program, mutually developed by student and instructor, leading to one or more papers or projects. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

ENG 513 Major Authors (3). A major literary figure (or two related figures) will be studied in depth. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisites: ENG 101, 102 and at least one survey of literature course.

ENG 520 Forms of Poetry (3). Explores the question of poetic form from the point of view of practitioners. A course in prosody and the historical development of forms in English and American poetry, including rhymed verse forms, the meters, syllabics, free verse, and prose poetry. Material for discussion will include student poetry and outside texts. This is a capstone course for English majors with an option in creative writing. Prerequisite:  ENG 416 or consent of instructor.

ENG 521 Forms of Fiction (3). A study of literary fiction from the writer’s point of view. Prerequisite:  ENG 415 or consent of instructor.

ENG 524 Historical Principles in Composition Theory (3). An historical survey of rhetorical theories as they originate in the classical era, are reinterpreted by composition theory and pedagogy, and are applied to contemporary writing and writing instruction.

ENG 531 Introduction to Linguistic Science (3). A study of the basic concepts, scope and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects. Not open to the student who has credit for ENG 310.

ENG 532 Approaches to Modern English Grammar (3). A systematic study of the structure of modern English, with attention to recent descriptions of its phonemic, morphemic, and syntactical features. Prerequisite:  ENG 310 or 531.

ENG 533 Language and Culture (3). A study of the relationship among language, society, and the individual’s conception of reality. Prerequisite:  three hours of linguistics. (Same as TSL 533.)

ENG 535 Sixteenth-Century British Literature (3). A survey of non-dramatic British literature from 1500 to 1600, with attention to historical and critical contexts.

ENG 536 Seventeenth-Century British Literature (3). A survey of non-dramatic British literature from 1600-1667, with attention to historical and critical contexts.

ENG 537 British Poetry and Non-Fictional Prose, 1832 to 1900 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 538 British Fiction, 1832 to 1900 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 539 Modern British Literature (3). A critical and historical survey of selected works from 1900 to the present.

ENG 541 American Literature, 1607 to 1820 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 542  American Literature, 1820 to 1870 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 543 American Literature, 1870 to 1920 (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 544 American Literature, 1920 to the Present (3). A survey of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 545 Studies in Southern Literature (3). A survey of southern literature and its historical and critical contexts.

ENG 546 Survey of the American Novel to 1900 (3). A study of the American novel from its beginnings to 1900, with attention to historical and critical contexts.

ENG 547 Topics in African-American Literature (3). A study of selected works of African-American literature and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 548 Proseminar in Literature (3). A study of selected topics in literature in English; may be repeated for credit.

ENG 550 Modern Drama (3). A study of selected European and American plays, with attention to literary backgrounds and technical experimentation.

ENG 560 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction (3). Critical discussion of original student writing. Individual conferences and reading assignments in contemporary literature are included. Prerequisite:  ENG 415 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 561 Advanced Creative Writing:  Poetry (3). Critical discussion of student work, from impulse to final draft. Other topics include the relationships between vision and craft; language and experience; image and idea. Reading assignments in contemporary poetry will help to establish criteria for good work. Prerequisites:  ENG 416 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 571 Documentation Project Management and Standards (3). Techniques and practices for handling documentation projects. Students will learn to manage the work of multiple authors and reviewers, implement successful consulting practices, plan and schedule projects, design style sheets, and create version control systems. The course also covers the dynamics of managing documentation for the implementation of international standards such as ISO 9001. Prerequisites:  ENG 324 or 325, or permission of instructor.

ENG 572 Writing Training Materials (3). An overview of the pedagogy and procedures used to create training materials for business, industry, and government. Prerequisites:  ENG 324 or 325, or permission of instructor.

ENG 573 Writing Proposals and Grants (3). Techniques and practices for writing proposals and grant proposals. The course will help students learn and practice the rhetorical and persuasive skills necessary to plan and create successful proposals. Prerequisites:  ENG 324 or 325, or permission of instructor.

ENG 574 Writing Manuals, Instructions, and Procedures (3). An overview of the principles, conventions, and technologies used to write instructions, manuals, and procedures for business, industry, and government. The course will examine and practice methods for creating instructions and procedures (geared toward processes) and manuals (geared toward products). Prerequisites:  ENG 324 or 325, or permission of the instructor.

ENG 575 Advanced Technical Writing (3). Advanced topics and projects in technical writing, focusing on direct application to business and industry. This course serves as the capstone for the Professional Writing major, Technical Writing minor, and Technical Writing Certificate programs. Prerequisites: at least two 500-level courses from the following: ENG 571, 572, 573, 574.

ENG 580 Approaches to the Writing Process (3). A consideration of the writing process and its implications for teaching writing to students at all levels.

ENG 581 Special Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (3). An examination of contemporary and traditional issues and concerns in the study of rhetoric and composition. The course usually will focus upon an announced topic but will allow students to explore matters of individual concern. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 590 Practicum in Instructional Techniques for Developmental English (3). Practical experience in tutoring individuals and small groups in a writing laboratory. Prerequisites:  senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor.

ENG 600 Research and Bibliography (3). An introduction to principles of research and bibliography as a preparation for further graduate study in English.

ENG 601 Teaching Writing in Schools (3). A workshop course emphasizing principles and practices of effective writing instruction. This course is designed for middle and high school classroom teachers. Prerequisite:  teaching position.

ENG 602 Teaching Literature in Schools (3). A workshop course emphasizing principles and practices of effective literature instruction. This course is designed for practicing middle and high school classroom teachers. Prerequisite:  teaching position.

ENG 603 Teaching English Language Arts in Schools (3). A seminar course emphasizing principles and practices of effective English Language Arts instruction. This class is intended as a capstone course for practicing middle and high school classroom teachers. Prerequisites:  teaching position; ENG 600, 601, and 602 or permission of the graduate coordinator.

ENG 604 Purchase Area Writing Project I (3). An intensive workshop course emphasizing principles and practices of effective writing instruction. Designed for practicing classroom teachers. This course is to be taken in conjunction with ENG 605.  Prerequisites:  K-12 teaching position; application and interview.

ENG 605 Purchase Area Writing Project II (3). Follow-up activities to the Purchase Area Writing Project Summer Institute. Designed for practicing classroom teachers. This course is to be taken in conjunction with ENG 604.  Prerequisites:  K-12 teaching position; application and interview. 

ENG 609 Contemporary Critical Theory (3). An intensive study of recent critical practices and theoretical approaches to understanding literature.

ENG 610 Graduate Writer’s Workshop (3). Supervised independent work in creative writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

ENG 612 Directed Study (3). Supervised independent work in literature, language or writing. Prerequisite:  permission of department chair. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 614 Special Topics in English Studies (3). An intensive examination of issues in the study and/or teaching of English. May be repeated for credit.

ENG 615 Topics in Women’s Literature (3). Topics in literature written by selected women writers. May be repeated once for credit.

ENG 616 Seminar in Critical Theory (3). A seminar focusing on important issues in critical theory.

ENG 621 Colonial and Federal American Literature (3). An intensive study of selected works from 1607-1800 and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 623 American Literature, 1800 to 1870 (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 631 American Literature, 1870 to 1920 (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 633 American Fiction since 1920 (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 635 Twentieth-Century American Poetry (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 641 Old English Language and Literature (3). An intensive study of selected works from the Old English period (c. 449-1100) and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 643 Middle English Language and Literature (3). An intensive study of selected works from the Middle English period (c. 1100-1500) and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

ENG 645 Non-Dramatic English Renaissance Literature (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 647 Shakespeare (3). An intensive study of selected Shakespearean works and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 649 Seventeenth-Century British Literature (3).  An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 652 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 654 Eighteenth-Century British Novel (3). An intensive study of selected novels of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 655 The British Romantic Movement (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 656 Nineteenth-Century British Novel (3). An intensive study of selected novels of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 657 Victorian Literature (3). An intensive study of selected works of the period and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 659 Modern English Literature (3). An intensive study of selected works from 1900 to the present and their historical and critical contexts.

ENG 661 Graduate Fiction Tutorial (6). An advanced tutorial in fiction writing, in which the student works one-on-one with M.F.A program faculty via U.S. mail and/or on-line communication to produce a body of original writing. The tutorial will include a directed reading relevant to the student’s individual project. May be repeated for credit. Only one tutorial per semester. Prerequisite:  admittance into the program or permission of the instructor and program director.

ENG 662 Graduate Poetry Tutorial (6). An advanced tutorial in poetry, in which the student works one-on-one with M.F.A. program faculty via U.S. mail and/or on-line communication to produce a body of original poetry. The tutorial will include a directed reading relevant to the student’s individual project. May be repeated for credit. Only one tutorial per semester. Prerequisite:  admittance into the program or permission of the instructor and program director.

ENG  663 Graduate Creative Non-Fiction Tutorial (6).  An advanced tutorial in creative nonfiction writing, in which the student works one-on-one with M.F.A. program faculty via U.S. mail and/or on-line communication to produce a body of original writing. The tutorial will include a directed reading relevant to the student’s individual project. May be repeated for credit. Only one tutorial per semester. Prerequisite:  admittance into the program or permission of the instructor and program director.

ENG 664 Graduate Field Study (3). Each student, with the assistance of M.F.A. Program faculty, will set up a field study in writing. For suggestions of what this can entail you should consult with your advisor. Prerequisites: Students will have completed two semesters of the M.F.A. program before receiving credit for the Field Study.

ENG 665 Graduate Residency in Fiction (3). The residency experience will comprise workshops, daily seminars, and readings by faculty members and visiting writers. This course may be repeated for credit, but only one Graduate Residency may be completed per semester. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: admittance into the program or permission of the program director.

ENG 666 Graduate Residency in Poetry (3). The residency experience will comprise workshops, daily seminars, and readings by faculty members and visiting writers. This course may be repeated for credit, but only one Graduate Residency may be completed per semester. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: admittance into the program or permission of the program director.

ENG 667 Graduate Residency in Creative Non-Fiction (3). The residency experience will comprise workshops, daily seminars, and readings by faculty members and visiting writers. This course may be repeated for credit, but only one Graduate Residency may be completed per semester. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: admittance into the program or permission of the program director.

ENG 668 Graduate Creative Thesis (6). An advanced tutorial in fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction, in which the student works one-on-one with M.F.A Program faculty to revise a body of original writing produced in previous graduate tutorials. Prerequisites: Three sections of ENG 661, ENG 662, and/or ENG 663. (Student must have completed at least two sections in genre of thesis.)

ENG 671 Special Topics in Creative Writing (3). Study of a special area of creative writing. Content will vary from semester to semester according to the student and faculty interest. The course will combine the careful reading of works by the established writers with analysis of original student work. Students will be required to attend readings sponsored by the creative writing program and encouraged to attend other readings on campus and in the area. This course may be repeated for credit three times with the consent of the instructor and student’s advisor.

ENG 672 Studies in Creative Non-Fiction (3). Study and practice in the literary art of creative nonfiction with particular emphasis on the personal essay. Course requirements will include attendance at readings sponsored by the creative writing program. This course may be repeated three times for credit with the consent of the instructor and student’s advisor.

ENG 682 Language Theory (3). An intensive study of the concepts, process, and limitations of language as a social agent.

ENG 685 Teaching English at the College Level (3). A study of various theoretical approaches to teaching composition and literature; will also include practical applications.

ENG 698 Thesis Writing (3).

ENG 699 Thesis Writing (3).


ELECTRICAL AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING
(ETE)
ETE 510 Computer Design (3). Review of logic design and elementary computer organization.  Asynchronous and synchronous logic design using VHDL and programmable logic.  Design of the central processing unit, memory, control, and input-output portions of a computer.  The VHDL hardware design language will be used.  Three hours lecture per week.  Cannot be taken for graduate credit. Prerequisite:  ETE 366, ETE 378.  Corequisite:  ETE 511.

ETE 511 Computer Design Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany ETE 510  Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Prerequisite:  ETE 366, ETE 378.  Corequisite:  ETE 510.

ETE 520 Digital Signal Processing (3). Discrete-time signals and systems; Sampling and aliasing; Discrete Fourier Transform; Z-Transforms; FIR and IIR filter design techniques; Current applications of digital signal processing.  Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Three hours lecture per week.  Prerequisite:  PHY 264 (formerly PHY 364) or equivalent.

ETE 521 Digital Signal Processing Laboratory (1). Laboratory to accompany ETE 520. Cannot be taken for graduate credit. Prerequisite: ETE 264 (PHY 264). Corequisite: ETE 520.

ETE 542 Physical Electronics (3). Semiconductor fundamentals, energy bands, carrier transport theory, continuity equations, PN junction diodes, Zener diodes, Schottky Barrier diodes, metal-semiconductor contacts, bipolar junction transistors, MOS capacitors, field effect transistors, and microelectronic fabrication.  Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 370.

ETE 550 Communications and Modulation (3). Modulations such as AM, FM, PAM, PPM, PDM, single sideband, vestigial sideband.  Coherent and non-coherent detection, heterodyne action, performance and distortion, circuits for modulating and demodulating.  Cannot be taken for graduate credit.  Three hours lecture per week. Prerequisite:  ETE 420.  Corequisite:  ETE 551.

ETE 551 Communications and Modulation Laboratory (1). Laboratory to ETE 550.  Prerequisite:  ETE 420.  Corequisite:  ETE 550.


EXERCISE SCIENCE
(EXS)
EXS 510 Sociology of Sport and Exercise (3). A critical study of the sociological factors affecting sport, performance, and exercise. Students will learn about the social, cultural, environmental, and racial dynamics involved in sport and exercise. This course will also study the effects sport and exercise have on the social structure of society. (Same as HEA/REC 510.)

EXS 520  Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as GTY/HEA/REC 520.)

EXS 540 Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology (3). This course is designed to introduce the student to applied principles of sport  and exercise psychology. The class consists of approximately half the semester hours spent in a supervised sport/exercise camp or wellness/rehabilitation setting. Prerequisites: EXS 485 or 660, or have the permission of the instructor.

EXS 609 Evaluation in Exercise and Leisure Studies (3). This course is designed to give students a basic knowledge in descriptive and inferential statistics commonly used in exercise science and recreation/leisure research. Statistical procedures covered include correlation and linear regression, t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and two-way ANOVA. Emphasis is placed on understanding and using a statistical package through computer analysis. Recommended prerequisite:  EXS 400. (Same as REC 609.)

EXS 625 Advanced Concepts of Human Performance (3). This course will investigate current topics applicable to the field of Exercise Science. Recent research articles on subjects including, but not limited to nutrition, rehabilitation, health promotion, exercise physiology and sport medicine will be addressed.

EXS 630 Special Topics (3). Seminar for graduate students relating to a current topic in the fields of exercise science and recreation/leisure studies. May be repeated once for credit. (Same as REC 630.)

EXS 640 Techniques of Research in Exercise and Leisure Studies (3). Course is designed to familiarize the student with the various procedures involved in conducting different types of research common in exercise science and recreation/leisure studies. This class builds on previously learned techniques in EXS/REC 609. Students are guided through the process of performing research from the design stage through writing of the research report. Prerequisite:  EXS 609 or consent of instructor. (Same as REC 640.)

EXS 650 Seminar in Exercise and Leisure Studies (1). (Same as REC 650.)

EXS 660 Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology (3). An advanced study of behavior as it relates to sport and exercise. The course will include examination of applied sport psychology intervention programs, assessment techniques of sport and exercise behavior, and psychological skills training programs.

EXS 665 Biomechanical Analysis of Sport (3). A course designed to analyze sport and physical activity from a biomechanical perspective.

EXS 680 Independent Study in Sport and Exercise Psychology (1-3). Prerequisite:  permission of the chair of the department or departmental graduate coordinator.

EXS 698 Thesis (3).

EXS 699 Thesis (3).


FAMILY AND CONSUMER STUDIES
(FCS)
FCS 501 Problems in Family and Consumer Studies (1-3). This course is designed to permit special study in selected areas of family and consumer studies. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.

FCS 507 Internship in Early Childhood Programs (3). Demonstration by students in assuming different professional roles in a nursery school, day care center, or Head Start Program, or other early childhood programs. Practicum supervision in an early childhood program.

FCS 511 Readings in Family and Consumer Studies Topics (1-3). Directed readings of individualized professional family and consumer studies topics. Critique of readings and oral presentation.

FCS 520 Human Relations in Child Studies Programs (3). Study of ways to improve human relationships in early childhood programs. Appraising materials and procedures for promoting better home-school relations. Three lecture hours per week.

FCS 522 Workshop in Child Studies (2-3). Study of topical content in a workshop setting.

FCS 525 Advanced Child Development Programs (3). In-depth study of theories of child development and an examination of current problems and critical issues. Lecture, three hours.

FCS 527 Parenting (3). Principles and theoretical perspectives on the act of parenting. Emphasis on parent-child relationships, establishing and maintaining a nurturing relationship between parents and children, and parent-child communication. Current issues affecting parenting are also studied. Lecture, three hours.

FCS 536 Research Procedures for Family and Consumer Studies (3). A study of quantitative and qualitative research procedures and techniques utilized in family and consumer science professional practice. Reviewing literature, selecting and formulating a research problem, planning methodology, interpreting data, and making conclusions concerning research are studied.

FCS 614 Family Relations and Child Development (3). Problems of the modern family which influence our present-day living; analysis of recent research findings and their implications for family living.

FCS 661 Methods of Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences (3). Development of planning and organizational teaching skills, use of resource materials, and simulated teaching experience. Principles of learning, curriculum planning, and styles of management will be covered. Student may not receive credit for FCS 661 and FCS 461 or 462.


FINANCE
(FIN)
FIN 505 Internship in Finance (1-3). Open to junior and senior finance majors. These students, upon approval of the finance faculty, are placed with cooperating firms to receive on-the-job training in finance. Work experience supervised by faculty; written reports are required. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of department chair.

FIN 520 Risk Management (3). A study of appropriate risk management techniques for the contemporary financial and nonfinancial corporation. Although a wide variety of techniques are covered, the focus is upon use of hedging strategies to reduce risk. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 522 Portfolio Management and Theory (3). An introduction to portfolio management. Emphasis on modern techniques of security selection which are directed toward risk diversification and portfolio balance. Students manage a real portfolio by basing buy/sell decisions on current market data. Computer programs are used in the portfolio selection and evaluation process. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 533 Security Analysis (3). A study of the stock and bond markets using a pragmatic approach. Evaluation methods, economic relationships and market strategies are emphasized. A “hands-on” type of class. Prerequisite:  FIN 333 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 534 Life Insurance (3). A study of the nature and functions of life insurance, with particular attention to policy forms and provisions, reserve and investment problems, company organization, legal aspects, taxation and the application of life insurance to personal and business needs. Prerequisite:  FIN 331 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 535 Property and Casualty Insurance (3). A study of the nature and functions of property and casualty insurance. Special attention is given to the services performed, contracts and benefits of fire and automobile insurance. Prerequisite:  FIN 331 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 537 Commercial Banking (3). Problems of commercial banking from the point of view of bank management are studied. Topics covered are asset reserves, credit analysis, investment policies, equity reserves and capital account. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 595 Special Problems (1-3). Research by students in fields of special interest. Includes project research studies and intensive reading programs, accompanied by conferences with professors in fields involved. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

FIN 602 Corporate Finance (3). Practical application of the finance function in a company with specific emphasis on maximizing the value of the firm for its shareholders. Financial decision-making integrated with the theory of capital markets. Particular attention is given to the areas of investment, capital structure, short-term financing, and working capital management. Prerequisite:  FIN 330 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 612 Capital Investment Analysis (3). An in-depth examination of long-term investment and financing decisions. The material to be covered will include financial analysis and forecasting, the theories and techniques employed in capital investment analyses and capital structure decisions, and the sources and uses of long-term financing. Prerequisite:  FIN 330 or equivalent.

FIN 621 Financial Models (3). Applications of financial models on the microcomputer, leading to the solution of financial problems. Emphasis is placed on (1) building and using models developed in electronic worksheets, and (2) construction of financial systems using database software. Prerequisite:  FIN 330 or equivalent.

FIN 632 Investment Management (3). Study and analysis of financial investments. Emphasis is upon analysis of common stock and bonds with lesser emphasis on derivative securities as potential investments. Students manage a real portfolio by basing buy/sell decisions on current market data. Not available to students who have taken FIN 533. Prerequisite:  FIN 330 with a minimum grade of C.

FIN 633 Analytical Methods in Finance (3). Practical analysis of financial problems in case-oriented format. Financial models will be used to place the data in analytical form to aid the analysis. Emphasis will be placed upon developing logical approaches and methods for problem-solving. Prerequisite:  FIN 330 with a minimum grade of C, FIN 602, or consent of instructor.

FIN 634 Financial Markets and Institutions (3). A global perspective of the operation and functions of financial institutions and markets. Major subject areas include various financial markets, financial institutions, regulations, ethics, and future trends. Prerequisite: FIN 602 or equivalent.

FIN 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

FIN 650 Derivative Securities (3). A study in the understanding of current derivative securities and the markets in which they are traded; the design and testing of innovative derivative securities. Prerequisite:  FIN 330 or equivalent and MAT 220 or equivalent.

FIN 661 International Financial Management (3). Applies theories of managerial and international finance to the problems of international financial management. Topics include investment analysis, financing decisions, identifying, measuring and managing foreign exchange and interest rate risk, financing of trade, and financial control of international operations. Prerequisite:  FIN 330.

FIN 695 Special Problems (1-3). Research by graduate students in fields of special interests. Includes project research studies and intensive reading programs, accompanied by conferences with professors in field involved. Prerequisites:  12 hours of graduate credit in business and consent of instructor.

FIN 698 Thesis (3).
 
FIN 699 Thesis (3).


FRENCH
(FRE)
FRE 501 Middle Ages Literature (3). A study of representative works of French literature dating from 1095 to 1600. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3). A study of representative literary works from the period 1600 to 1795. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 505 Nineteenth-Century Literature (3). A study of representative literary works published between 1800 and 1899. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 507 Twentieth-Century Literature (3). A study of representative literary works published since 1900.

FRE 521 Topics in French Literature (3). Course content at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 531 Advanced Grammar (3). A comparative study of the grammatical structures of French and English. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 532 Phonetics (3). Introduction to linguistic terminology and principles of phonology with intensive individual diagnosis and practice of the French phonological system. Includes study and practice of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

FRE 551 Directed Study I (1-3). Independent work in areas of language, culture or literature, designed to meet needs and interests of individual students.

FRE 552 Directed Study II (1-3).

FRE 555 Study Abroad (3-9). Approved programs of travel and study in French-speaking countries.


GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT
(GCM)
GCM 552 Survey of Graphic Communication Management (3). Exploratory experiences in graphic communications management for those with no prior experience in the field. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of chair.

GCM 554 Printing Production and Manufacturing Management (3). Reviews the current practice and theoretical approaches of printing manufacturing; forecasting, quality control, purchasing and finance, equipment selection, plant layout, environmental, and human relations considerations.  Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM.

GCM 556 Communications Sales Management (3).  Methods and techniques essential to sales and marketing. Includes sales and marketing processes, qualities of sales personnel, submitting proposals, assessing the competition, customer relations, developing new clients, and servicing accounts. Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM or consent of instructor.

GCM 558 Trends in Graphic Communication (3). A study of management trends, technical advances, and problems as they pertain to the future of the communications industry.  The course will include report writing, verbal presentations and a field experience. Prerequisite:  senior standing or consent of instructor.

GCM 560 Plant Equipment Layout and Purchasing (3).  Procedures for planning, equipment and printing plant operation are studied, as well as purchasing supplies, understanding local, state and federal codes, and environmental regulations. Prerequisite:  nine hours of GCM.

GCM 570 Practicum I (4). Cooperative work experience in the printing industry. Recommended for summer between sophomore and junior years. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

GCM 571 Problems in Technology (3). Individual study and research pertaining to special problems in graphic arts technology. Prerequisite:  approval of problem before registering for the course.

GCM 572 Practicum II (4). Cooperative work experience in the printing industry. Recommended for summer between junior and senior years. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

GCM 578 Workshop in Technology (3). Workshops on topics pertinent to graphic arts or printing management. May be repeated for additional credit.

GCM 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

GCM 651 Advanced Printing Press Operation (3). Includes all aspects of printing production using any of the conventional press systems. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  GCM 151.

GCM 697 Research in Technology (3). Independent study under the guidance of a supervising faculty member in a problem related to industry and technology as selected by the student.

GCM 698 Thesis (3).

GCM 699 Thesis (3).


GERMAN
(GER)
GER 501 Literature Before 1600 (3). A study of major works chosen to present prominent themes and important literary developments within the period. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 503 Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3). A study of major works chosen to present prominent themes and important literary developments within the period. Representative authors such as Goethe, Schiller, Novalis, and Kleist will be treated. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 505 Nineteenth-Century German Literature (3). A study of literary developments during the era of the industrial revolution and political reform in Germany. Works by Buchner, Heine, and representative authors of Poetic Realism and Naturalism will be treated, with secondary emphasis placed on the emergence of the Biedermeier tradition. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 507 Twentieth-Century Literature (3). A study of the literature and the policies affecting literature during the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, Post-War Literature, and the Gruppe 47, and contemporary developments. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 521 Topics in German Literature (3). An in-depth course treating a topic in German literature. Selected according to the needs and interests of the students. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 531 Advanced Grammar (3). A specialized study contrasting German and English grammatical structures and usage. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 532 Phonetics (3). Contrastive study of German and English phonology, with individual practice designed to improve pronunciation. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 551 Directed Study I (1-3). Independent work in areas of language, culture, or literature, designed to meet needs and interests of individual students. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 552 Directed Study II (1-3). Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

GER 555 Study Abroad (3-9). Credit given for approved projects of study in a German-speaking country. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.


GEOSCIENCES
(GSC)
GSC 500 Recreation Geography and Planning (3). Practical application of problem-solving techniques and processes to recreational management and planning. Focus placed on site planning and development. (Same as PLN 500.)

GSC 507 Land Use Planning (3). Analyze the principles and techniques utilized in the planning process. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of planning:  needs, problems and proposed solutions. (Same as PLN 507.)

GSC 510 Geophysics (3). Practical aspects of applied and environmental geophysics including gravity, magnetics, electricity, electromagnetic theory and practice. Prerequisite:  MAT 150 or equivalent.

GSC 512 Remote Sensing (4). Emphasis will be placed upon the fundamentals of image interpretation using a wide variety of image types both airborne and spaceborne. The application of remotely sensed data and techniques in many areas such as geoscience, agriculture, forestry and planning will be emphasized. Three hours lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

GSC 513 Photogeology (3). The application of remote sensing technology in the field of geology. Major area of concentration will be the manual interpretation of black and white imagery. Also included will be other imagery types, sensors and digital image processing. Prerequisite:  GSC 336 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

GSC 515 Geochemistry (3). The chemistry of the geologic environment including the distribution of chemical elements in the earth and natural waters, the nature and causes of chemical processes, and the application of chemical laws, methods and data to the solution of geologic problems. Emphasis is on the low-temperature geochemistry as it pertains to sedimentation, weathering and groundwater quality.

GSC 520 Geography of Kentucky (3). A survey of the topography, soils, climate, industries, commerce and population in Kentucky with emphasis upon the interrelationships between these various phenomena.

GSC 521 Geographic Information Systems (4). Techniques course that introduces digital georeferenced information systems, including data capture, editing and encoding techniques, data storage structures, database  management systems, data analysis and model development, and information display methods. (Same as PLN 521.)

GSC 522 Digital Cartography (3). The map as a communication system. Special individual projects dealing with cartographic design and the preparation of maps for publications. Practical experience with computer mapping of spatial data. Prerequisite:  GSC 422, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

GSC 523 Problems in Urban Geography and Urban Planning (3). Theories, techniques and research in urban geography and planning. Focus placed on the designs and strategies addressing present-day urban problems. (Same as PLN 523.)

GSC 524 Conservation and Environmental Geosciences (3). Course will study human population growth and associated resource requirements considering the physical makeup and history of the earth. Natural resource inventory, protection of the environment, geologic hazards and other conservation related topics will be discussed. Use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be emphasized.

GSC 528 History and Philosophy of Geosciences (3). The development of knowledge in the geosciences and the status of the profession as expressed in the writings of the past and present by geoscientists and other individuals in related fields. Emphasis will be placed upon current trends in the geosciences.

GSC 530 Crystallography and Optical Mineralogy (4). Crystallography, crystal chemistry, optical theory and technique. Identification of the common rock-forming minerals by indices of refraction and other optical properties. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 531 Geology for Teachers (4). An introduction of the materials of the earth and the processes to modify them to form our landscapes and create our physical environment. Laboratory is integrated into the classroom lectures and will include study and identification of rocks and minerals and the interpretation of geological maps and photos. The literature of geology teaching will be reviewed with an emphasis on exercises that can be used in the teacher’s classroom or laboratory.

GSC 532 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4). Detailed study of igneous and metamorphic rocks and the processes by which they form. Prerequisites:  GSC 530, CHE 105 or CHE 121.

GSC 533 Paleoecology (3). The study of the formation of the first ecologies with the origin of life on earth, and the continuing changes in the earth’s ecologies through time. Classic paleoecological communities are examined, including Precambrian, Ordovician, Cretaceous and Pleistocene ecosystems. Specific attention paid to the interaction and co-evolution of the organic and inorganic environments. Prerequisites:  GSC 101, BIO 101, or equivalent.

GSC 534 Invertebrate Paleontology (4). The classification, morphology and paleontological significance of fossil invertebrates. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 535 Watershed Ecology (3). The study of the movement of water through the environment and its relationship to biotic systems. Areas emphasized include the hydrologic cycle and its influence on groundwater, lotic and lentic systems; the effect of water on plant and animal communities; and the influence of human activity on watershed structure and function. Prerequisite:  BIO 330 or consent of instructor. (Same as BIO 535.)

GSC 537 Stratigraphy and Sedimentary Petrology (4). A course to focus on sedimentary petrology and stratigraphy pertaining to environmental modeling, an essential component in the field of petroleum geology. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 538 Structural Geology (3). An introductory course in genetic and descriptive aspects of the deformational features of the earth. Two lectures and two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites:  GSC 102 or equivalent.

GSC 550 Well-Log Analysis (3). Open hole well-logging theory and techniques as applied to quantitative analysis of lithology, porosity, permeability and fluid content of subsurface formations. Prerequisite:  GSC 102 or consent of instructor.

GSC 556 Remote Sensing Applications in Archaeology (3). Course includes a discussion of aerial and terrestrial remote sensing techniques and how those techniques are employed in archaeological research. Same as ARC 556. Prerequisites: ARC 150, 300; GSC 202, 512, or permission of instructor.

GSC 560 Hydrogeology (3). Knowledge and experience in the use of hydrologic and erosion models. State-of-the-art surface water, ground water and erosion models will be studied, along with hands-on training in the use of digital computers for applying these models to real-world geological situations. Prerequisite:  MAT 150 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

GSC 561 Precision GIS/GPS Applications (1-3). An introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) applications in natural resources, business and land management. The course is divided into three distinct parts: 1)Introduction to GIS/GPS applications, 2)Business applications, and 3) Precision land management applications. Students must take the introduction phase before continuing with the other two parts. Variable credit hours: 1 credit for Part 1, 2 credits for Part 1 and 2 or 1 and 3, or 3 credits for Parts 1, 2, and 3. Course may be repeated for a maximum of three credit hours.

GSC 565 Biogeochemistry (3). Survey and discussion of the scientific literature on global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and man-made chemicals with special emphasis on the biogeochemical and ecological processes that affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The course will focus on interdisciplinary themes that incorporate new research results form the fields of biology, chemistry, and geosciences. Prerequisite: junior or higher standing in biology, chemistry or geosciences. (Same as BIO/CHE 565.)

GSC 570 Computer Applications in Geosciences (3). Introduction to the use of computers in geoscientific problem-solving and data processing. Students will utilize existing programs and will develop original routines. Prerequisites:  GSC 532 and 538 or GSC 521 or GSC 522, and one of the following:  CSC 136, 145 or 235.

GSC 575 Field Vertebrate Paleontology (4). The study of vertebrate fossils in both field and lab, including collection, processing and identification. Field work may include trips throughout the continental United States and occasionally overseas. (Usually taught during summer.)  Prerequisites:  completion of two semesters of undergraduate laboratory science and upper-class or graduate standing. (Same as BIO 575.)

GSC 580 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3). A project-based course for students seeking greater understanding of GIS theory, technology, and applications. Students will apply GIS to their research interests and gain hands-on experience through using ArcGIS software package. By the end of the class, students will be able to identify the appropriate methods for solving particular research problems, be familiar with current research directions in spatial analysis, and demonstrate their ability to complete a research project.  Prerequisite: GSC 521 or consent of instructor.

GSC 591 Special Problems (1). This course is designed for students who have an aptitude for research in the area of geosciences. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 592 Special Problems (2). This course is designed for students who have an aptitude for research in the area of geosciences. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 593 Special Problems (3). This course is designed for students who have an aptitude for research in the area of geosciences. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor. (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 619 Seminar in Research Techniques (3). Introduces graduate students to the methods and techniques of research in geosciences. Focus is on utilizing modern techniques of problem-solving employing database management systems, digital image processing/remote sensing, geographic information systems, global positioning systems, computer mapping and programming language.

GSC 640 Advanced Remote Sensing (3). The principles associated with the digital processing of remotely sensed imagery. Image enhancement techniques, quantitative accuracy evaluation, unsupervised and supervised, will be stressed. Prerequisite:  GSC 512 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

GSC 641 Digital Image Processing Research (3). Application of digital image processing to remotely sensed and other diverse data; hands-on experience using PC and UNIX-based image processing software, such as ENVI and ERDAS Imagine; data conversions and other processing; simple to complex algorithm development/application using a programming language and/or an image processing software. Prerequisite:  GSC 640 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

GSC 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail.

GSC 660 Spatial Analysis Techniques (3). Introduces students to spatial analysis and spatial statistical techniques. “Hands-on” experience with software packages and associated algorithms is emphasized. Prerequisites:  GSC 640 and CSC 136, or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

GSC 665 Physical/Chemical Limnology (3). This course will consider important physical and chemical processes in lakes and reservoirs. The focus of these processes is their relation to biological processes and their importance to understanding aquatic ecosystem dynamics. Physical processes to be discussed include heat, light, water movement and thermal structure in lakes. The chemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and oxygen will be considered in detail. A few intensively studied lakes will serve as models for integrating the various processes. Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and consent of instructor.

GSC 691 Special Problems (1). (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 692 Special Problems (2). (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 693 Special Problems (3). (May be repeated one time.)

GSC 696 Understanding Scientific  Communication (2). This course concentrates on the methods for preparation and presentation of scientific paper and oral communications. Students will utilize a data set to produce 1) a publication quality manuscript, 2) a scientific meeting quality poster, and 3) a 15 minute presentation such as would be given at a scientific meeting. Topics covered include abstracts, nature of scientific writing, structure and organization of scientific publication. The course is required of all biological sciences graduate students in their first spring semester of residence and is open to all other graduate students with permission of instructor. One, two-hour course meeting per week. (Same as BIO 696.)

GSC 698 Thesis Research (3).

GSC 699 Thesis Research (3).


GERONTOLOGY
(GTY)
GTY 520 Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as REC/HEA/PHE 520.)

GTY 521 Issues in Social Gerontology (3). A study of theory and research on aging, policies and programs related to nutrition, retirement, health and housing of elderly. Prerequisite:  SOC/GTY 341 or consent of instructor. (Same as SOC 521.)

GTY 596 Minority Elderly (3). This course focuses on the minority elderly including racial, ethnic and lower income groups. Applicable concepts and theories in social gerontology will also be covered. Prerequisite:  nine hours of anthropology, gerontology or sociology, or consent of instructor. (Same as ANT 596.)


GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING
(GUI)
GUI 500 Interpersonal Relations in the Classroom (3). A course designed to assist the pre-service individual in developing interpersonal communication skills appropriate to the teaching/learning process. The course will provide a series of training experiences, through interactions, designed to develop skills in the following areas:  (1) attending and responding behaviors (verbal and nonverbal), (2) communication of empathic understanding, respect and warmth, (3) the effect of communication on understanding self and others, (4) effective communications in discipline, (5) establishing comfortable classroom climates for instruction.

GUI 584 Problems (3). This course is designed for upper level undergraduate students who want to work on special problems according to individual needs. Staff supervision should be arranged prior to enrollment. Approval of advisor required. May be repeated for credit up to six hours.

GUI 592 Group Processes (3). A study of the history and characteristics of group processes and structure as well as issues in leadership style and development of a model in small group interaction. May not be used toward school counseling certification.

GUI 615 Behavioral Assessment and Intervention (3). To examine, in theory and practice, issues in behavioral management, which affect behavior change within various school/clinical settings, and to learn techniques applicable to the process of behavior in change.

GUI 616 Marital and Family Counseling (3). A course designed to examine historical and theoretical foundations of family and marital counseling as well as theoretical models and techniques used in the counseling process.

GUI 618 Introduction to Community Counseling (3). A course designed to survey the foundations of community and agency mental health counseling. Topics such as history and philosophy of mental health counseling, administration and supervision of mental health systems, ethical standards and legal aspects, assessment and program development, education and consultation practices, as well as case management and treatment services.

GUI 619 Laboratory in Guidance and Counseling (3). A comprehensive study and skill acquisition of specific models of counseling will be the central focus of the course. Recommended to be taken within first nine hours of the program.

GUI 620 Practicum in Guidance and Counseling (3). Closely supervised practice in guidance and counseling under staff supervision in selected educational and agency settings. Arrangements for the practicum must be made a semester in advance. Also, the student must be admitted to the program.

GUI 622 Practicum in Psychometrics (3). Closely supervised practice in psychometrics under staff supervision in selected educational and agency settings. Arrangements for the practicum must be made a semester in advance. Also, the student must be admitted to the program.

GUI 625 Legal and Ethical Issues (3). This course will present the legal and ethical ramifications that being a counselor in today’s complex society demands. An in-depth examination of current contemporary issues will highlight the course.

GUI 635 Developmental Processes (3). A detailed study of the life-span development of the individual in terms of human growth and development, foundations and dynamics of human behavior, and personality, and learning theories and their application.

GUI 637 Effective Practice in School Counseling (3). This course will focus on effective school counseling practices across the elementary, middle and high school grades with emphasis on developmental concerns. It will utilize the Kentucky Counselor Standards and the American School Counselor’s National Model and National Standards to enhance academic, career, and personal/social development. Specific counselor skills of leadership, teaming and collaboration, counseling and data utilization will be taught. This course will consist of lectures, discussions, group work and skills practice. Prerequisite: GUI 687.

GUI 660 Developing Human Potential Seminar (3). A course designed to familiarize students with those factors which prevent individuals from reaching their full personal, social and professional potential. Emphasis will be on developing student ability to recognize these factors and the skills for positively effecting individual potential.

GUI 670 Multicultural Issues in Human Services (3). The purpose of this course is to focus on the role that cultural environment plays in the lives of people and the implications of that role for helping professions and the helping process. There will be an overview of the different microcultures to which individuals belong and implications for the delivery of services. It is expected that the student will learn how to use the concept of pluralism in the provision of services to multicultural individuals and populations.

GUI 676 Individual Appraisal I (3). This course is designed to prepare students in the knowledge and understanding of human behavior and methods in assessment of mental status. The manner in which clinical appraisal relates to out-patient, in-patient, partial treatment, emergency care and after-care services is emphasized.

GUI 677 Individual Appraisal II (3). Theory and assessment of educational disabilities, and the supervised use of formal and informal diagnostic methods, such as observations, interviews, biographical information, academic tests and behavioral assessments. This course is designed for school psychology students and school counselors seeking the Individual Intelligence Assessment Endorsement. Prerequisites:  GUI 690 and consent of instructor.

GUI 678 Theories of Vocational Development (3). A survey and critical analysis of literature and research regarding effects of sequence of work activity, vocational exploration and career development. Prerequisite:  GUI 636 or 686.

GUI 679 Advanced Practicum: Guidance and Counseling (3). Closely supervised practice in guidance and counseling under staff supervision in selected educational and agency settings. Open only to those possessing a Provisional Guidance Certificate or its equivalent. Must be or have been a practicing counselor.

GUI 683 Tests and Measurements (3). The selection, administration and uses of psychoeducational tests are discussed with emphasis on application in various settings, legal/ethical issues, and measurement concepts. Usually taken within first nine hours. (Same as PSY 683.)

GUI 684 Problems (3). This course is designed for advanced graduate students who want to work on special problems in guidance and counseling according to individual needs. Staff supervision should be arranged prior to enrollment. Approval of instructor required. May be repeated for credit.

GUI 685 Guidance in Elementary Schools (3). This course will examine the role and functions of an elementary counselor. Specifically it will cover counseling children — individually and in groups, consulting with teachers, school staff and parents, child study procedures, and coordinating assessment data with other services.

GUI 686 Educational and Vocational Guidance (3). A survey of the principles, practices and techniques of group instruction and individual guidance of the secondary student in studying, evaluating and choosing an occupation.

GUI 687 Introduction to Guidance (3). An introductory survey course in the philosophy, principles and techniques of guidance, with emphasis on the organization and administration of guidance services in school and non-school settings.

GUI 688 Introduction to School Psychology (3). This course provides an overview and integrates theory and practice of all areas of school psychology. This will include historical evolution of school psychology, professional standards, legal and ethical issues and the roles and functions of the school psychologist.

GUI 689 Individual Testing (3). Supervised practice in the administration and interpretation of a variety of individual cognitive tests such as the WJ-III Cognitive and WISC-IV. This course is designed for individuals in the school counseling, Individual Intelligence Assessment endorsement, and school psychology programs. Prerequisites:  GUI 683 and consent of instructor.

GUI 690 Advanced Individual Testing (3). Supervised practice in the administration and interpretation of a variety of individual cognitive, memory, and adaptive tests such as the KABC-II, WAIS-III, UNIT, SIB-R, and BASC-II. This class is designed solely for school psychology students and those school counselors seeking the Individual Intelligence Assessment Endorsement. Prerequisites:  GUI 689 and consent of instructor.

GUI 692 Group Dynamics in Counseling (3). An experiential course in the dynamics of group behavior. The student will participate in an encounter-type group experience as well as being introduced to theory and techniques of group counseling. In addition, group guidance procedures are emphasized to include meaning, purposes, scope, and methods. Strongly recommended to be taken within the first nine hours of course work.

GUI 693 Theories of Counseling (3). Critical analysis and evaluation of leading theories of counseling and their implications for practice.

GUI 694 Advanced Counseling Techniques (3). An advanced study in individual counseling procedures and technique/applications. Prerequisite:  GUI 619.

GUI 695 Advanced Group Counseling (3). An extension of GUI 692. An advanced study in group counseling, research and technique application. This course is designed for individuals actively planning to lead counseling groups. Prerequisite:  GUI 692.

GUI 696 Advanced Research (3). Emphasis on individual research for advanced students in guidance and counseling. Open only to those students possessing a Provisional Guidance Certificate or its equivalent. Prerequisites:  approval of advisor and consent of instructor.

GUI 697 Organization and Administration of Personnel Services (3). The selection, organization and implementation of personnel services. Analysis of programs, staffing and relationships of programs will be emphasized.

GUI 698 Thesis (3). Designed to enable the student to choose a thesis topic with the consent of the student’s thesis faculty director, implement the topic research design and produce a master’s degree thesis suitable for publication.

GUI 699 Thesis (3). A continuation of GUI 698.

GUI 792 Internship in School Psychology (6). Designed to provide an intensive training/work experience which will consist of a minimum of 600 clock hours in a school setting. Close supervision will be provided by university faculty and on-site professionals as the intern applies the knowledge and skills acquired in the program.

GUI 793 Internship in School Psychology (6). A continuation of GUI 792 consisting of a minimum of 600 clock hours in a school setting for a total of 1200 hours of internship training/supervision.

GUI 794 Internship in Community  and Agency Counseling (6). Designed to provide an intensive on-the-job experience conducted in a setting as similar as possible to that in which the intern subsequently intends to seek employment. Close supervision will be provided by faculty and on-site professionals, and interns are expected to apply the knowledge and skills previously acquired in their program.

GUI 795 Internship in Community and Agency Counseling (6). A continuation of GUI 794, culminating in a minimum of 600 contact hours at the internship setting for the total internship experience.

GUI 798 Specialty Study (3). This course is designed to enable the student, with the supervision of his/her graduate faculty committee, to select a problem directly related to the student’s area of concentration, survey the research literature, collect research data and prepare to write the research paper.

GUI 799 Specialty Study (3). A continuation of GUI 798, culminating in a report suitable for publication.


HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION
(HCA)
HCA 525 Case Management: Theory and Practice (3). This course will address the theory and practice of effective case management and the skills necessary to assess the client situation and to optimize client functioning. This course will focus on a diverse population of vulnerable clients across various practice settings. The settings emphasized include medical/health, educational, psychiatric and services to the elderly. Policy issues will be addressed, as they relate to advocacy, service planning, and program design. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Same as SWK  525)

HCA 602 Clinical Management Models for Health and Human Services (3). Systematic design and analysis of the roles of health service managers and clinicians in the delivery of services for managed care is addressed. The course will analyze health care delivery from an integrated management-clinician perspective. Attention will focus on patient care and the use of clinical algorithms and critical pathways in health care delivery.

HCA 668 Health Education in Managed Care and Human Services (3). Facilitating treatment adherence in managed care is addressed through models of patient health education. Course topics will address treatment adherence, adherence enforcement procedures and the integration of models of education in human services delivery.

HCA 674 Health Counseling and Managed Care (3). Examination of the process of health-related counseling and communication with patients is explored with specific application to acute and chronic conditions. Various models of counseling in the health care setting and the use of prevention interventions will be discussed.

HCA 680 Advanced Topics in Stress and Health Care Delivery (3). Selected topics in assessing and treating stress related disorders in health care delivery are examined. Emphasis on diagnosis, treatment and prevention interventions is explored. Current measures used in assessment along with self-management skills for patients are the focus of this course.


HEALTH
(HEA)
HEA 510 Sociology of Sport and Exercise (3). A critical study of the sociological factors affecting sport, performance, and exercise. Students will learn about the social, cultural, environmental, and racial dynamics involved in sport and exercise. This course will also study the effects sport and exercise have on the social structure of society. (Same as EXS/REC 510.)

HEA 511 Epidemiology (3). This course is designed to examine the principles and practices in the cause, prevention and control of diseases in various community settings. Topics covered include an introduction to epidemiological terminology; the measurement of morbidity, mortality and fertility; descriptive and analytic epidemiology; screening; infectious disease; and occupational epidemiology.

HEA 520 Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as EXS/GTY/REC 520.)

HEA 575 Human Sexuality II (3). This course is an advanced study of issues of sexuality including sexual exploitation, sexual victimization, sexual abuse, sexual harassment, altered body image and sexual function, family structures, the law and sexuality issues, and new research in sexual health. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. Prerequisites:  HEA 500 or equivalent.

HEA 605 Curriculum in Health and Physical Education (3). A course designed to acquaint the student with the aims and objectives of curriculum design; to alert the student to innovations, new techniques and research in this area; and to equip the student with guidelines for good curriculum construction. (Same as PHE 605.)

HEA 620 Current Trends and Issues in Health, Physical Education and Recreation (3). A review of the current research in the fields of health, physical education and recreation.


HISTORY
(HIS)
HIS 500 Comparative History Topics (3). This course is designed to provide upper-class and graduate students with specialized studies of topics (such as racism, industrialism, nationalism, and revolution) that cross national, class, and chronological boundaries. Topics offered will vary with interests of students and instructors. May be repeated for credit with permission of chair and instructor.

HIS 590 Directed Studies (3). Individualized instruction for the exceptional student. Prerequisite:  permission of department chair.

HIS 599 Historic Interpretation Internship (3). This course will provide on-the-job training in historical interpretation for museums, public or private agencies, and historic sites. Each student will be placed in an internship (generally for 12 weeks in the summer) in which he or she will work in an interpretative capacity and conduct a major research project related to the historic interpretation programs of the agency. The student will present the results of this research in a formal paper to a designated advisor in the Department of History. This course will count as a part of the major, but no student will be permitted to repeat the course for credit.

HIS 600 Development of Historical Thinking (3). A reading seminar introducing students to historical problems, interpretations, and methodologies, as well as a study of the history of historical scholarship. Students generally must complete a study of a significant historian or historical problem in European, American or non-Western history. Required of first-year history graduate students.

HIS 601 The French Revolution (3). This graduate course has three main areas of emphasis:  eighteenth-century French society and culture, the causes of the French Revolution, and the career of Napoleon Bonaparte. The main theme of the course is that the French Revolution represented a watershed in history.

HIS 602 Reading in European History (3). A systematic reading of major works on selected topics in European history from 1500 to the present. May be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

HIS 603  Europe Since 1914 (3). An advanced treatment of the social, political, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from World War I to the present. 

HIS 604 Nineteenth-Century Europe (3). A graduate-level treatment of the social, political, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe’s great age, the period from the French Revolution and Napoleon to the outbreak of the First World War. 

HIS 605 Seminar in European History (3). A critical examination of a major topic or selected topics in European history since 1500, using primary sources. Topics vary and the course may be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

HIS 608  The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union (3). A graduate course beginning with the aftermath of the Revolution of 1905, which also covers the rise of the Soviet Union during World War I, after the abdication of Nicholas II.  The Bolshevik Revolution and the Civil War receive close attention, as does the New Economic Policy and the rise of Stalin in the 1930s.  World War II, its impact on the USSR, Stalin’s last years, the Cold War, and the decline of the Soviet Union are also covered. 

HIS 609  Tudor and Stuart England (3). A graduate study of the molding of the British monarchy and of the eclipse of its authority by the social and political groups which came to dominate Parliament by the seventeenth century. 

HIS 610  Modern Britain (3). A study of Britain since the Stuarts, including its age of greatness in the nineteenth century and its decline in the twentieth century.  Political and cultural history are emphasized at an advanced, graduate level. 

HIS 611  Modern French History, 1789-Present (3). An advanced survey of modern French history from the French Revolution of 1789 to the present.  The course will describe and analyze the major events in French history from the time of the Revolution to the twenty-first century, covering social, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments of this era. 

HIS 612  Modern Germany (3). A graduate-level review of the political, socioeconomic, and intellectual history of Germany from 1789 to the present, with particular attention to how the history of Germany differed from that of other Western European nations until 1945, and to Germany’s new role in Europe since 1945. 

HIS 614 Europe from WWI through WWII. Course provides a graduate survey of European history form about 1914 to about 1945. It will describe and analyze the events leading to both World Wars as well as some of the consequences of those wars, delineating the major military figures and the military history of the World Wars.

HIS 615 Women in History (3). This advanced course examines the position and contributions of women in history. Topics will vary, but the major themes and issues relevant to the field of Women’s history will be covered, and the main historiographical traditions in the field will be examined.

HIS 621 Studies in U.S. Social History to 1865 (3). This graduate-level course is a systematic exploration of the social history of the United States from the first settlement by Europeans through the Civil War.

HIS 622 Readings in United States History (3). A systematic reading of major works on selected topics in United States history from colonial times to the present. May be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

HIS 624  United States Foreign Relations Since 1898 (3). An analysis of U.S. relations with other nations since 1898, placing special emphasis on the interplay of ideals and self-interest in foreign relations. 

HIS 625  Studies in U.S. Social History Since 1865 (3). A systematic, graduate-level  exploration of the social history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present. 

HIS 630  Studies in American Colonial History (3). A systematic, graduate-level exploration of the United States from the first European settlement to the beginning of the American Revolution. 

HIS 631 Seminar in United States History to 1865 (3). A critical examination of a major problem in United States history to 1865 using primary sources. Topics vary and the course may be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

HIS 632  Studies in the Era of the American Revolution (3). A systematic, graduate-level exploration of the events that led to the independence of the United States and the establishment of the Constitution. 

HIS 633 Seminar in United States History Since 1865 (3). A critical examination of a major problem in United States history since 1865, using primary sources. Topics vary and the course may be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

HIS 634  Civil War and Reconstruction (3). This graduate offering covers the period from 1815 to the presidential election of 1877, with emphasis on political, military, social, and economic conditions as they related to the sectional controversy raging during this part of the nineteenth century. 

HIS 635  The Transformation of America 1877 to 1929 (3). An advanced study of the transformation of the United States from an agricultural to a modern industrial nation.  Topics included within this broad theme are the rise of big business and labor unions, urbanization, immigration, the closing of the frontier, reform movements, the struggles of blacks and women for equal rights, national politics, and cultural changes. 

HIS 636  Recent America (3).  A graduate study of the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and the subsequent forces that have shaped contemporary American life.  Emphasis is placed on the role of the United States in international relations, the civil rights movement, and domestic economic developments. 

HIS 641 History of the Old South (3). This course is an advanced survey of southern history from colonial times through the Civil War. Emphasis will be placed on examining, among other topics, the development and changing characteristics of slavery, southern economic organization in relation to the international colonial system, women in southern society, the South and the Revolutionary War, the South and the development of the U.S. Constitution, the emergence of southern nationalism, and the coming of the Civil War.

HIS 642  History of the New South (3). An M.A. level survey of southern history from the end of the Civil War to the present, emphasizing the economic, political, social, and cultural aspects of southern history.  A major theme will be the juxtaposition of the enduring characteristics of the South with the process of change since World War II. 

HIS 646 History of Kentucky (3). The process of political, economic and social evolution in Kentucky is traced from early settlement to the modern area in this graduate course. Geographical influences upon the patterns of Kentucky development, Kentucky’s changing role within an expanding union, and the Commonwealth’s participation in national movements and events are stressed.

HIS 650  Modern Africa (3). A graduate offering, this course considers the causes for European colonization of Africa, the ways in which African resistance and collaboration with Europeans set the stage for the formation of new economies, societies, and policies in Africa, and the process of decolonialization, with an emphasis upon how that process shaped modern African states. 

HIS 655 Middle East Since 1800 (3). A graduate study of the Middle East from 1800 to the present with emphasis placed on the historical and political forces that have affected and still influence the region.

HIS 656 The Arab-Israeli Conflict (3). A study of the historical background to the conflict between the state of Israel and the Arab states. This course will examine the origins of Zionism and of Arab nationalism in the 19th century, the phases of Jewish settlement in Palestine, the consequences of the First World War for Zionist and Arab nationalist movements, the British Mandate in Palestine, the Israeli war for independence in 1948, Nasserism, the Suez War, the Six-Day War, the invasion of Lebanon, the Intifada, and the possibilities for peace.

HIS 660 History of Race Relations in the U.S. (3). A graduate examination of the social, political, and economic influences upon race relations in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the sources of change in race relations, the various forms of racial discrimination, and the responses to discrimination in American history.

HIS 663 Readings in Third World History (3). A systematic reading of major works on selected topics in the history of Africa, Asia and Latin America. May be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

HIS 664 Public History:  Professional Practice (3). An overview of the field of public history that focuses on the historical development of the field and of Americans’ thinking about their history, current professional practice in the various areas of public history, including professional ethics, and the particular skills involved in each of these areas.

HIS 665 Oral History:  Project Development (3). A detailed, advanced consideration of the planning, development, and operation of oral history projects for colleges, libraries, museums, corporations, professional organizations, and public schools.

HIS 666 Administration of Historical Organizations (3). A comprehensive consideration of the issues involved in the administration and management of historical organizations, including museums, archives and special collections libraries, historic preservation organizations, and local historical societies.

HIS 668 Museum Studies:  Professional Practice (3). Introduces students to the development of the museum as a cultural institution in the United States and to professional practice regarding the care of collections, the development of exhibits, and other aspects of the profession. Also addresses professional ethical standards in the museum profession. Field trips and a semester project will give students an opportunity to apply what they study.

HIS 669 Historic Preservation:  Professional Practice (3). An in-depth exploration of the field of historic preservation, with an emphasis on current professional practice and the application of historical research methods and analytical skills to the field.

HIS 674  China in Revolution (3). A graduate study of the last decade and collapse of the Qing dynasty and China’s subsequent search for unity and political form, beginning with the Republic, proclaimed in 1912, and ending with the Tiananmen massacre of 1989 and market reforms. 

HIS 675  Modern Japan (3). The cultural and political history of Japan from its unification under the Tokugawa Shogunate to the present are covered at an advanced level.  Major topics examined include the Japanese success in meeting the challenge of Western imperialism in the nineteenth century, Japan’s own venture into imperialism on the Asian mainland in the twentieth century, and the Japanese economic phoenix in the postwar era.

HIS 676 The World Since 1945 (3). A graduate survey of new directions in modern history, particularly the rise of the USA and the USSR as world powers and the end of the colonial empires of Asia and Africa. The course will discuss the Cold War through international relations, the escalation of wars in Southeast Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as rival strategies for economic and cultural development in the post-war world.

HIS 677 Hollywood History (3). A critical, analytical examination of how the past is depicted in films and how films shape popular perceptions of history. This study is for graduate students involved in an M.A. program. 

HIS 681 Revolutionary Mexico, 1810-Present (3). An in-depth examination at the Master of Arts level of Mexico’s history from 1810 to the present, with emphasis on economic development and diplomacy in the era of Porfiro Diaz (1876-1911), the role of culture and North American influence in the Revolution of 1910-1920, the emergence and seventy-five-year rule of the Party of the Institutional Revolution (PRI), and the post-NAFTA resurgence of revolutionary activity.  

HIS 690 Directed Study and Research (3). Supervised independent or group study of a topic or topics in European, United States, or non-Western history. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite:  permission of department chair.

HIS 691 Directed Studies in Public History (3). Supervised independent or group study in one or more of the following public history fields:  historic preservation, historic interpretation, museum studies, and oral history. May be taken more than once for credit.

HIS 698 Thesis (3).

HIS 699 Thesis (3).


INDUSTRIAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY
(IET)
IET 550 Robotic Systems (4). A quantitative analysis of robotic systems that includes kinematics, actuators, drives, adaptive control, off line programming and computer simulation. Emphasizes applications in manufacturing processes. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. Prerequisites: EMT 261, 361, ENT 111, 365.

IET 551 Introduction to Electrohydraulic Motion Control (3). An introduction to the integration of the basic principles of hydraulics, electronics, controls and system dynamics as they pertain to electrohydraulic motion control.

IET 571 Problems in Industrial and Engineering Technology (3). Individual study and research pertaining to special problems in industrial and engineering technology. Prerequisite:  approval of problem before registering for course.

IET 578 Workshop in Industrial and Engineering Technology (1-4). Workshops on topics pertinent to industrial and engineering technology. May be repeated for additional credit.

IET 584 Engineering Economic Analysis (3). Economic evaluation and financial analysis of engineering alternatives to optimize the engineering decision process. Prerequisite:  ENT 393 or consent of  instructor.

IET 591 Materials Management (3). The design of an organizational and managerial system to balance the conflicting interests in the company in the considerations of quality, quantity, delivery and cost of materials with the aim of optimizing the return of the materials investment.

IET 592 Production Systems and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (4). Includes a survey of various topics in production, automation and related systems such as flow-line production, numerical control, industrial robots, computer-aided manufacturing, process monitoring, flexible manufacturing systems and computer-integrated manufacturing. Three hours lecture and two hours lab. Prerequisites:  ENT 111, EMT 261, 361.

IET 596 Industrial Relations (3). Industrial relations responsibilities, procedures, and applications in job evaluation, wage surveys, union negotiations, hiring employee counseling, and affirmative action awareness. Prerequisite:  junior standing.

IET 597 Quality Control (3). Examines the various aspects of quality control from the viewpoint that product and service quality requires managerial, technological and statistical concepts throughout all the major functions in an organization. Prerequisites:  CIS 243 or consent of instructor.

IET 619 Industrial Energy Management (3). A study of energy utilization in manufacturing environments. Through applied engineering principles and case histories, energy conversion systems are analyzed and designed. Remediation and conservation principles are discussed as are energy policies and utility rate structuring and negotiation. Prerequisite:  graduate standing.

IET 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

IET 678 Seminar in Industrial and Engineering Technology (3). The identification and study of current problems, issues and trends in the field of industrial and engineering technology with special emphasis on the philosophical and psychological assumptions underlying these areas.

IET 679 Technical Writings (3). Laboratory experimentation and research, analysis of technical data and the preparation and application of technical reports in industrial-technical fields.

IET 691 Industrial Operations (3). Quantitative analysis for planning, organizing and controlling a production/operations system. Prerequisites:  CIS 243, or consent of instructor.

IET 692 Plant Layout and Material Handling (3). A study of the arrangement of physical facilities and material handling to optimize the interrelationships among operating personnel, material flow, information flow, and the methods required in achieving enterprise objectives efficiently, economically and safely.

IET 693 Systems Management Technology (3). A course dealing with the practical applications of systems management theory to business and industrial situations.

IET 694 Research in Industry, Training and Technical Education (3). A study of techniques and procedures used in designing, conducting, interpreting and evaluating research in industrial, training, and technical education settings. Applications, advantages and limitations of various research methods are studied and explored. (Same as TTE 694)

IET 695 Industrial Supervision (3). An in-depth study of the qualities necessary in order for a frontline supervisor to be a vigorous leader, an effective leader, a source of technical know-how and a deft mediator between policy-setting management and the rank-and-file worker.

IET 696 Teamwork and the Management of Technology (3). A study of how teamwork is used to effectively increase productivity, quality and profits simultaneously in a manufacturing environment. Analysis of historical and current literature shows the evolution from Scientific Management to TQM and ISO-9000 and the advantages of team problem-solving for complex design/production problems. The fundamentals for an effective teamwork environment redeveloped through a wide variety of books and articles. Methods for implementation of a teamwork system are presented, discussed and evaluated.

IET 697 Research in Industrial and Engineering Technology (3). Independent study under the guidance of a supervising faculty member in a problem area of industrial education as selected by the student. Prerequisites:  ADM 630 or AGR 635 or BPA 605 or consent of advisor.

IET 698 Thesis (3).

IET 699 Thesis (3).


INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
(INT)
INT 510 International Student Exchange (3-15). Individual study abroad through a Murray State sponsored program as administered by the Institute for International Studies; pre-approval within specific disciplines required; pass/fail. Prerequisite:  consent of academic advisor and pre-approval by instructors prior to registration; senior and graduate level.

INT 600 Seminar in Global Studies (1-3). Course is a seminar focusing on selected topics and taught outside the United States. Topics and content will vary with instructor and course location. It may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.


INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND DESIGN
(ITD)
ITD 501 Architectural Drafting and Design-Light Commercial (4). Theory and practice in instrument and computer aided drafting and design for architectural structures. Topics will include the review and evaluation of existing designs, plans and specifications for nonresidential light commercial structures. Structures in the building code classifications of: assembly, business, and mercantile will be included. Program and design architecture will be included. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: ITD 301, ITD 104 AND ITD 401.

ITD 504 Advanced Study in Computer Aided Drafting/Design (4). An advanced course in the theory and application of computer aided systems for the drafting and design field. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites:  ITD 304 or consent of instructor.

ITD 522 Industrial Plastics (4). Materials and processes used in plastics manufacturing industries; includes mold design and construction. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITD 322 or consent of instructor.

ITD 531 Numerical Control/Computer NC Machining Systems (4). A study of automatic manufacturing by NC/CNC. Technical, social and economic aspects of NC/CNC machining systems. Laboratory work in manual and computer-assisted numerical control programming. Setup and operation of machines. Six contact hours.

ITD 532 Metallurgy (2). Structure, properties, behavior and use of metals. Laboratory analysis and research. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 533 Technology and Production Tooling (2). Machine setups, tooling and inspection procedures. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites:  ITD 531 or 532.

ITD 541 Industrial Wood Fabrication (4). Material, equipment, processes and nomenclature of the woods manufacturing industry; emphasis on design and planning for production. A study of both traditional and innovative wood processing techniques. Prerequisite:  ITD 341.

ITD 601 Advanced Engineering Drawing (4). Current and emerging theories and practices in the identification of course content and the teaching of projection theory, two- and three-dimensional representation and problem-solving techniques. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITD 305 or equivalent.

ITD 602 Technical Illustration (4). Illustration drawing, rendering and creative techniques related to illustration.

ITD 604 Advanced Computer Graphics (3). Computer graphics applications to various industrial fields, problem-solving situations, design and research. Prerequisite:  ITD 304 or 504.

ITD 606 Machine Design and Drawing (4). Functional drawing practices, design considerations and problem-solving techniques as applied to machine and tooling situations. Prerequisites:  ITD 104, ENT 287 and CET 297.

ITD 621 Plastics Technology (4). Industrial plastics with emphasis on research and experimentation. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  ITD 522 or consent of instructor.

ITD 630 Technology of Metals Processes (4). Supplementary and comprehensive instruction in the technology related to the processes of forming, shaping, fastening and finishing of metal products. Emphasis on the design, function and efficiency of the processes involved. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 631 Research in Metal Technology (3). Experience in research and experimentation related to metals and metal working processes. Research activities center around group and individual laboratory experiences. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

ITD 641 Research in Wood Technology (3). Experimentation and research in adhesives, finishes, abrasives, woods and wood products; properties and application to school and industrial usage. Lecture and laboratory.

ITD 651 Advanced Study in Manufacturing (3). The materials, processes, equipment, products and occupations relating to the manufacturing industry will be studied. The selection, design and production of typical products will be undertaken, using mass production techniques, drawing upon the experiences gained through courses in the technical specialization component. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite:  course work and/or experience as deemed appropriate.


JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATIONS
(JMC)
JMC 501 School Publications (3). Journalistic problems on the high school and college levels; methods of teaching and advising of school and college publications. Required for teacher certification.

JMC 502 Writing for the Mass Media (3). An intensive writing course covering newsgathering and reporting for print and broadcast, basic editing, advertising copy, news releases, features, columns, reviews and editorials. Open to those students who are not pursuing a major in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications; required for any JMC graduate student who does not have an undergraduate major or minor in the mass communications field. Prerequisites:  ENG 101 and 102 or JMC grammar test.

JMC 504 Writing the Nonfiction Article (3). A Jesse Stuart workshop writing course, taught only in the summer. Preparation, writing, editing and marketing the nonfiction article. Individual critique sessions conducted by a highly published journalist. For graduate and undergraduate students. Prerequisite:  permission.

JMC 505 Writing for Children (3). A Jesse Stuart workshop writing course, taught only in the summer. Analysis of the children’s literature market and preparation of fictional and nonfictional works designed for the young reader. Individual critiques by a noted editor and writer of children’s literature. For graduate and undergraduate students. Prerequisite:  permission.

JMC 515 History of U.S. Journalism and Broadcasting (3). History of journalism and broadcasting with emphasis on the role of newspaper, radio, television and other communications media in the United States.

JMC 525 Television Program Development (3). Capstone seminar in creating television programs. Topics include program concepts, target audiences, scripting, budgeting, pre-production planning, producing and marketing pilots. It is anticipated that for a successful outcome, students will commit a minimum of nine hours per week to this course plus an additional 30 hours during the semester working on special projects and productions. Work outside the studios may be required for some productions. Prerequisites: JMC 270, 336, 358, 451; senior or graduate standing with preference given to electronic media majors.

JMC 556 Advertising Campaigns (3). A seminar course designed to bring together the knowledge acquired in advertising, marketing and communications courses and apply them to a realistic problem. Students develop management ability in analysis and preparation of complete advertising campaign. Students are required to work in teams to prepare plans books and give formal ad agency presentations. Prerequisites:  JMC 394, 417, 426, and 439; MKT 360 or consent of instructor.

JMC 558 New Technologies (3). The development of technology in media industries and related businesses, such as consumer electronics and office systems. Topics include the nature of technical innovation, economic feasibility, public policy, social impact, and diffusion models.

JMC 560 Alternative Media Criticism (3). An examination of the cultural and social functions of non-mainstream on-line media, such as “e-zines”, independent film, informational websites targeting women and minorities, alternative press reviews, and “fringe” artistic mass media. While most media studies concern the product of major media conglomerates, this course encourages independent and critical thought about the paradigm of nontraditional media content, which leans toward subjectivity and counter-cultural influence. Prerequisites: senior or graduate level in JMC. The ability to write at the college level, as well as proficiency in the English language. Graduate students should have the ability to create Web material.

JMC 585 Specialized Journalism/Radio-Television I (1-3). Directed individual study. Can be a journalistic effort in areas such as science, sports, government, religion, graphics, etc., or a project in radio or television such as a major production or series, an extensive research project on paper or other approved project. Repeatable up to three hours. Prerequisites:  consent of instructor and written approved proposal required prior to registration.

JMC 586 Special Topics (3). Seminar for seniors, graduate students concerning a current topic affecting the mass media. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor, senior or graduate level standing.

JMC 590 Mass Communication Law (3). The law as it affects journalism and broadcasting. History and background of the freedom of the press and broadcast industries with emphasis on First Amendment and FCC regulations, including such areas as seditious libel, libel, obscenity, privacy, copyright, advertising and the Fairness Doctrine. Primarily a lecture and reading course. Prerequisite:  JMC 330.

JMC 591 Advanced Public Relations (3). A capstone seminar course designed to provide students an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the skills, techniques, and knowledge acquired in previous major and minor courses. Working in teams, students will research, develop, and create a public relations campaign, as well as give formal presentation of their work that includes production of all materials supporting the campaign. This semester-long project should further enhance the students public relations skills and knowledge, as well as develop their management and analytical skills. Prerequisite:  ENG 101, JMC 194, 300, 330, 391, 412, and 440.

JMC 593 Editorial and Critical Writing (3). A writing course in editorials and the editorial page; personal columns; and critical reviews of plays, TV shows, books and movies. Prerequisites:  JMC 194 and 330 or consent of instructor.

JMC 596 Internship in Advertising, Journalism, Public Relations and Radio-TV (3). Course for advanced students in journalism and radio-TV who have completed a minimum of eight weeks as an intern with the media or a public relations or advertising agency. Case studies are prepared by the students on their work experience. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

JMC 597 Public Affairs Reporting (3). Project-based advanced techniques of specialized reporting, emphasizing community-based journalism and civic journalism. Includes overview of issues concerning multiculturalism, journalistic ethics and legal concerns. Prerequisites:  JMC 397 or 466.

JMC 599 American Mass Media (3). Guided independent study in the structure of the mass media in the United States and the impact of American media content on audiences. Course cannot be used for credit for any JMC degree. Completion may be required of students as a condition for admission to the JMC graduate program. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: consent of graduate coordinator.

JMC 600 Seminar in International Mass Communication (3). Analysis of theories and research in international mass communication. Focus on transnational information flow and the role of media in facilitating international knowledge and understanding.

JMC 601 Media, Culture, Gender, and Race (3). An analysis of theories and research in mass media influences on images of culture, race, and gender in our society. Focus on the role of news, entertainment and advertising media in the construction and perpetuation of systemic views about members of these particular groups. Prerequisites: graduate standing and the permission of the instructor.

JMC 602 Seminar in Advertising (3). An in-depth study of the profession of advertising, with a focus on contemporary issues, problems, and challenges; guided discussion and analysis of case studies. Prerequisite: graduate standing; enrollment is limited, with preference to JMC graduate students.

JMC 603 Seminar in Public Relations (3). An in-depth study of the profession of public relations with a focus on contemporary issues, problems, and challenges using guided discussion and analysis of case studies. Prerequisite: graduate standing; enrollment is limited, with preference to JMC graduate students.

JMC 622 JMC Study Abroad (3). Study of current trends and practices in mass media in foreign nations; specific content will vary. Prerequisites: Admission to graduate studies, consent of supervising instructor and department chair; and acceptance in a study abroad program approved by Murray State University.

JMC 630 Theories of Mass Communications (3). The communications process in terms of definitions, characteristics, models, language and nonverbal elements, with a particular emphasis on such empirical effects as selective attention, perception and retention, functions, uses and gratifications, agenda-setting, aggressive behavior due to violent content, and effects of advertising on children.

JMC 648 Mass Media Industries (3). Basic principles of markets and economics and how they apply to media industries. Topics include ownership, convergence, regulation, market forces, and technological forces.

JMC 660 Methods of Communications Research (3). The research process in mass communication including survey, experimental and archival. Students will become familiar with the philosophy and techniques of social science research, data collection methods, sampling procedures, and statistical analysis. Students will also conduct a research project.

JMC 668 Critical Analysis of Mass Media (3). In-depth examination of the cultural and social functions of mass media, both print and electronic. Includes perspectives on media’s role as an information and entertainment source, as an agenda-setter, as a persuasive agent, and as a mode of creative and artistic expression. A readings and discussion course open to majors and non-majors. Prerequisite:  junior standing or above.

JMC 670 Philosophical and Ethical Concepts of the Mass Media (3). Lecture and seminar course in concepts of the role of the mass media in society. Philosophical background to include legal and ethical issues.

JMC 677 Directed Individual Study (3). A course designed to allow student pursuit of individual interests. Proposal must be approved by the graduate faculty instructor prior to registering for the course.

JMC 690 Comprehensive Project (3). Capstone of the mass communications degree. An individual independent research, creative, or professional project, designed by the student under the direction of the graduate coordinator and one other JMC faculty member. Prerequisites: proposal submitted to and approved by the graduate coordinator by October 15 for spring enrollment–March 15 for summer or fall enrollment; completion of 21 hours in the program; JMC 630 and 660.


JAPANESE
(JPN)
JPN 551 Directed Studies (1-3). Course work designed to meet specific needs and interests on an individual basis. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.


LIBRARY SCIENCE
(LIB)
LIB 601 (501) Learning and Libraries (3). The role of libraries and librarians in encouraging learning, and the concept of information literacy as an essential competency for the enhancement of lifelong learning.

LIB 604 Library in the School Curriculum (3). An approach to understanding the role of the library media specialist and the media center in the school curriculum, with the aim of developing the school as a learning community, stressing collaboration between administrators,   teachers, and media specialists in planning curriculum and professional development.

LIB 610 (511) Collection Management (3). Principles, standards, practices, and problems in managing and maintaining library collections, with a focus on school library media centers; examination of the major selection tools and critical evaluation of reviewing sources; integration of external sources, particularly those on the web, into the collection; and consideration of weeding techniques and principles.

LIB 617 Research in Young Adult Literature (3). An in-depth study of chosen areas of young adult literature with emphasis on electronic and print sources by and about authors, genres, and issues, which may include a field experience where students explore the pedagogical implications of their study.

LIB 620 Library Administration (3). The theories, principles and processes underlying the administration and organization of library service for a learning community; planning; organizing, staffing, directing, coordinating, evaluating, reporting, programming, scheduling, public relations/marketing, budgeting, equipping and housing. May include visits to school library media centers or other libraries for observations or to consult resources as required by course assignments.

LIB 621 Library Practicum (1-3). Observation and supervised practice work in an assigned media center upon the completion of the required course work. Students are assigned to an approved school library media center, under the supervision of a certified school media specialist as well as a university coordinator, where they must spend a minimum of 141 clock hours “on the job” to earn a total of three hours of semester credit. Prerequisites: EDU 626, LIB 620, LIB 630, and LIB 640.

LIB 625 (521) Printed and Nonprinted Media (3). The audience, content, structure, control and effects of media (audio-visuals, books, newspapers, magazines, etc.) and their relationship to today’s curricula with attention to library application for personal development.

LIB 630 Classification and Cataloging (3). Fundamental principles and methods for organizing resources, both print and electronic, through cataloging and classification, and the application of these principles and procedures in a learning context. Special emphasis on the Dewey Decimal System. May include visits to school library media centers or other libraries for observations or to consult resources as required by course assignments.

LIB 640 Information Sources and Services (3). Information sources and materials, both print and electronic, and basic skills of answering reference questions and teaching inquirers how to search for their own answers using information sources in a learning context. May include visits to school library media centers or other libraries for observations or to consult resources as required by course assignments.

LIB 670 (614) Independent Studies in Library Media (3). Independent study in subject or problem of the student’s need or interest. Periodic interaction with the supervising faculty member required. Prerequisites: LIB  620 and consent of instructor.

LIB 671 (571) Preparation and Utilization of Information Media (3). Planning and production of materials such as flat pictures, maps, charts, posters, display materials and transparencies for instructional use; analysis of elements in utilization of materials.

LIB 680 (550) Foundations of Library Media (3). Brief historical development of library media centers and library media specialist; an overview of library media centers from the standpoint of its objectives, types, organization, services, and trends; and the library media profession.

LIB 690 Seminar in Library Media (3). Survey of the objectives and procedures of library media centers with analysis of the recent development and trends as reported in professional literature. Prerequisite:  LIB 620.


LEGAL STUDIES
(LST)
LST 505 Internship (3). Independently sponsored programs which qualified students may elect to pursue for practical experience in legal activity. For juniors and seniors minoring in legal studies. Must have a 2.5 overall GPA and a 2.8 in LST courses taken for the minor. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites:  LST 240, 242, and 300.

LST 534 Court Management (3). Administrative procedures and management techniques of a unified court system. Prerequisite:  Senior standing or consent of instructor.

LST 540 Commercial Transactions (3). A study of business organizations and their commercial transactions. Topics include business organizations and relationships, contracts, the Uniform Commercial Code, sales, credit, agency, and property. Prerequisite:  LST 240.

LST 545 Constitutional Law I: Developments & Trends (3).  A political science course that surveys the development of and historic trends in selected subjects of constitutional law. (Same as POL 545.)

LST 546 Constitutional Law II: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3).  A political science course that studies the leading court decisions and their impact on the development of American Constitutional Law in the subject areas of civil liberties (Amendment I), civil rights (Amendments IV, V, VI, VIII, and IX) and the equal protection and due process clauses of the Amendment XIV.  Prerequisites: none.  (Same as POL 546.)

LST 576 Law in Public Administration (3). An examination of the role of law in the administrative process. Topics to be covered include administrative rulemaking and adjudication, enabling statutes, open records and open meetings laws, procedural due process, and civil liability and immunity for public employees and governments. (Same as POL 576.)

LST 595 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised readings or research in selected subjects designed to supplement regular course offerings. For seniors minoring in legal studies. Must have a 3.0 overall GPA and a 3.0 in LST courses taken for the minor. Prerequisites:  LST 240, 242, 300 and 310.

LST 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

LST 695 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised readings or research in selected subjects designed to supplement regular course offerings. Requires chair’s approval.


MATHEMATICS
(MAT)
MAT 500 Internship (1). Graded pass/fail.

MAT 501 Mathematical Modeling I (3). A study of mathematical models used in the social, life and management sciences and their role in explaining and predicting real world phenomena. The emphasis is on developing skills of model building. Topics include difference equations, perturbation theory and nondimensional analysis. Prerequisite:  MAT 411.

MAT 502 Mathematical Modeling II (3). A continuation of topics discussed in MAT 501. A term project consisting of a model of a non-mathematical problem is required. Prerequisite:  MAT 501.

MAT 505 Abstract Algebra I (3). An in-depth study of rings and fields. Topics will include the Isomorphism Theorems, ideals, polynomial rings, integral domains, fields, field extensions. Prerequisite:  MAT 421 or consent of instructor.

MAT 508 Introduction to Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3). Selected topics and applications from combinatorics and discrete mathematics, which can include:  enumeration, generating functions, recurrence relations, partially ordered sets, Boolean algebras, block designs, coding theory, and topics in graph theory, including trees, networks, optimization, and scheduling.  Prerequisites:  MAT 308 and either MAT 312 or MAT 335.

MAT 510 Foundations of Geometry (3). Study of postulate systems for geometry, critical examination of Euclid’s Elements, introduction to non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 or consent of instructor.

MAT 512 Partial Differential Equations (3). Partial differential equations of first and second order and applications. Prerequisites:  MAT 309 and 411.

MAT 515 Theory of Numbers (3). Divisibility, the Euclidean algorithm, mathematical induction, prime and composite numbers, Diophantine equation, Pythagorean triplets, Fermat’s Theorem, congruencies, quadratic residues, continued fractions. Prerequisite:  MAT 308 or consent of instructor.

MAT 516 Introduction to Topology (3). Set theory, topology of the real line, topological spaces, metric spaces. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 and 312.

MAT 520 Introduction to Complex Variables (3). Complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions, integration, Cauchy theorem, Taylor and Laurent expansions, and applications. Prerequisite:  MAT 309.

MAT 522 Vector Calculus (3). Operations with vectors; differentiation and integration of functions of several variables; transformation of coordinates; line and surface integrals; Green’s, Stokes’s, and the divergence theorems. Prerequisite:  MAT 309.

MAT 524 Boundary Value Problems (3). Analytic and computational techniques for linear first and second order partial differential equations, initial, and boundary value problems. Classification, Fourier series, separation of variables, finite difference and/or finite element methods. Prerequisites:  MAT 309, MAT 411, and MAT 335 or consent of instructor.

MAT 525 Advanced Calculus I (3). A rigorous development of one variable calculus including limits, continuity, differentiation, integration and sequences of functions. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 and 312.

MAT 526 Advanced Calculus II (3). A continuation of MAT 525 and functions of several variables. Prerequisite:  MAT 525.

MAT 530 Special Topics in Mathematics I (1-3). Library investigations of various lengths concerning special topics in mathematics. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites:  Six hours of mathematics courses numbered 400 and above with a mathematics GPA of at least 3.0; consent of instructor.

MAT 531 Special Topics in Mathematics II (1-3). Library investigations of various lengths concerning special topics in mathematics. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites:  Six hours of mathematics courses numbered 400 and above with a mathematics GPA of at least a 3.0; consent of instructor.

MAT 535 Linear Algebra (3). Linear transformations, matrices, quadratic and hermitian forms, eigenvalues and elementary spectral theory. Prerequisite:  MAT 335.

MAT 540 Mathematical Statistics I (4). Introduction to probability theory and statistical inference. Combinatorics, conditional probability independence. Discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions. Expected value and moments of distributions. Estimation theory and properties point estimators. Confidence intervals. Basic theory of hypothesis testing. Testing means and proportion. T-tests. Descriptive statistics. Prerequisite:  MAT 309 or consent of instructor.

MAT 541 Mathematical Statistics II  (3). Additional topics in probability theory and statistical inference. Bayes’ Theorem, functions of random variables, order statistics. Bayesian inference, F-tests, chi-square tests, contingency tables, regression and correlation. Prerequisites:  MAT 540.

MAT 542 Numerical Analysis (3). Numerical solutions of differential equations, iterative techniques for solving linear systems, discrete least-squares methods, orthogonal polynomials, and approximating eigenvalues. Prerequisites:  MAT 411 and either MAT 442 or consent of instructor. Requires knowledge of a scientific programming language.

MAT 545 Boolean Algebra with Applications to Digital Computer Design (3). Boolean algebra is developed as a model to study various physical systems, including the algebra of subsets of a set, propositional logic, and switching circuits. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 550 Teaching Mathematics (3). A study of the “whys” of mathematics with the aim of equipping future/current teachers with the ability to explain rather than merely do mathematics. Taught in the context of theories of learning and pedagogy. Involves mathematics content taught at the secondary and community college level. Credit granted toward an undergraduate major or minor in mathematics only for those students following a teacher certification program. Prerequisite:  MAT 312 or consent of instructor.

 MAT 551 Mathematics for Teachers (3). Explorations of mathematical topics from the viewpoint of future/current secondary and  community college teachers of mathematics. Gives credit toward an undergraduate major or minor in mathematics only for those students following a teacher certification program. Can be taken without MAT 550. Prerequisite:  MAT 312 or consent of instructor.

MAT 560 Statistical Methods (3). A survey course in statistical methods for advanced undergraduate students and graduate students with no prior training in statistics. The course covers techniques commonly used for data analysis in many scientific fields. Topics included are probability distributions, sampling, variance, estimation, hypothesis testing, contingency table, regression and analysis of variance. (Does not apply toward any degree in mathematics or a minor in mathematics.)

MAT 565 Applied Statistics I (4). A study of applied statistical techniques including correlation, regression, analysis of variance and non-parametric methods with a view toward applications. A statistical computer package will be used when appropriate, but no computer background is required. Prerequisite:  MAT 560 or consent of instructor.

MAT 566 Applied Statistics II (3). A continuation of MAT 565. Includes further topics in analysis and variance, non-parametrics and multivariate analysis. Prerequisite:  MAT 565.

MAT 569 Topics in Statistics (3). Selected topics in probability and statistics. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 570 Linear Programming (3). Theory and application of linear programming and the role it plays in operations research. Prerequisite:  MAT 335.

MAT 602 Integration Theory (3). Riemann integrals, continuous functions, functions of bounded variation, Riemann-Stieltjes integrals. Prerequisite:  MAT 525.

MAT 603 Real Function Theory I (3). Lebesque measure and integration theory and related topics. Prerequisite:  MAT 526.

MAT 604 Real Function Theory II (3). Functional analysis, including Classical Banach spaces and Lp spaces. Prerequisite:  MAT 603.

MAT 605 Selected Topics in Complex Analysis (3). An in-depth study of selected topics introduced in MAT 520. Prerequisite:  MAT 520.

MAT 609 Abstract Algebra II (3). An in-depth study of group theory. Topics will include Lagrange’s Theorem, Cauchy’s Theorem, the Sylow Theorems, and factor groups. Prerequisite:  MAT 505.

MAT 610 Selected Topics in Algebra (3). An in-depth study of selected topics introduced in MAT 505 and 609. Prerequisite:  MAT 609.

MAT 620 Selected Topics in Topology (3). An in-depth study of selected topics introduced in MAT 516. Prerequisite:  MAT 516.

MAT 630 Real Number System I (3). Development of the natural numbers and the integers. (This course does not offer graduate credit for those people seeking a master of science degree in mathematics, chemistry or physics, or a master of arts degree in mathematics.)  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 631 Real Number System II (3). A detailed development of the rational and real numbers. (This course does not offer graduate credit for those people seeking a master of science degree in mathematics, chemistry, or physics, or a master of arts degree in mathematics.)  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 632 Foundations of Analysis (3). A study of concepts basic to the elementary calculus, such as limits continuity, the derivative, and the integral. (This course does not offer graduate credit to those people seeking a master of science degree in mathematics, chemistry, or physics, or a master of arts degree in mathematics.)  Prerequisites:  MAT 309 and consent of instructor.

MAT 633 Probability and Statistics (3). An introduction to sample spaces, probabilities, and probability distributions, such as binomial, normal and Poisson. Measure of center, variability and applications. Statistical inference and tests of significance. (This course does not offer graduate credit for those people seeking a master of science degree in mathematics, chemistry, or physics, or a master of arts degree in mathematics.)  Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail.

MAT 690 Selected Topics in Mathematics I (1-3). Independent work on selected topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 691 Selected Topics in Mathematics II (1-3). Independent work on selected topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MAT 698 Research and Thesis (3).

MAT 699. Research and Thesis (3).


MANAGEMENT
(MGT)
MGT 550 Human Resource Management (3). Familiarizes the student with fundamental tools to effectively manage and motivate a diversified workforce. Included in this course is a study and analysis of the programs in human resource management including job analysis, job evaluation, selection and placement, testing and training, personnel services, and labor relations, as well as the current issues of globalization and the changing composition of the workforce. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 551 Organizational Behavior (3). Study of human behavior in organizations with attention to individual, small group and organization-wide issues. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the organization’s environment, managing in international settings, and the importance of ethics in management. May not be taken by M.B.A. students. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 552 Management of Operations and Technology II (3). A continued study of the operations function of organizations. Topics covered include technology management, achieving zero defects, continuous improvement, total productive maintenance and world class competition. Prerequisite:  MGT 443.

MGT 553 Human Resource Selection (3). A concentrated investigation of the methods appropriate to the development, implementation and administration of the staffing process (attracting,  selecting and placing candidates in positions) in contemporary organizations will be conducted. This will involve analyzing organizational environments and identifying the appropriate staffing strategies and policies, including an examination of the regulatory environment, cost analysis of human resources, and the statistics of personnel validation of screening devices, i.e. personnel testing, interviewing and biographical information. Prerequisite: MGT 350.

MGT 554 Managing a Diverse Workforce (3). This course involves a study of the cultural perspective and processes reflecting individual, work group, and organizational diversity in the work place. Specific issues this course will include are:  prejudice and stereotypes; group and organizational factors affecting diversity; legal issues related to diversity; and global, cross-cultural and gender issues. Prerequisite: MGT 350.

MGT 555 Training and Development (3). This course examines the needs and characteristics of adult learners and the role of training and development as part of human resources in the business setting. The role of the trainer, the learner, needs assessment, methodologies, learning objectives, and measurement and evaluation techniques will be explored and practiced. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.

MGT 557 International Management (3). Course covers two principal areas: (1) the evolution of the multinational corporation, and (2) a comparative cross-cultural study of management philosophy and practice. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 559 Compensation Management (3). A study of basic considerations for successful wage and salary administration. Areas studied include job evaluation, employee evaluation and systems and plans of compensating employees. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 570 Organization Theories (3). A study of the major contemporary theories of organization with emphasis on modern concepts that have been drawn from existing and evolving organizations. It is a systematic study of organizations that is intended to enhance a student’s ability to understand, diagnose, and respond to emerging organizational needs and problems. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 572 Organizational Development (3). Studies approaches to organization development, growth and renewal, with special emphasis on the organization’s ability to adapt to its environment. Particular attention is paid to the process of planned change, the techniques used in organization development, and the role of ethics in organization change. May not be taken by M.B.A. students. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 575 Labor-Management Relations (3). A study of labor-management relations in the United States with emphasis on the structure and role of labor organizations, the collective bargaining functions and processes, and the philosophy and approaches essential to a successful relationship between labor and management institutions. Prerequisite:  MGT 350.

MGT 577 Labor Law and Public Policy (3). Traces the development of the principles of labor law and labor legislation as well as their administration at the national, state and local levels in the United States. Uses administrative and court decisions and policy analysis to examine issues of current significance concerning labor relations. Prerequisite:  MGT 350 or consent of instructor. (Same as POL 577.)

MGT 580 Seminar in Leadership (3). Describes the nature and meaning of leadership in organizations, including the importance of effective leadership, knowledge of various leadership theories, and personal attributes associated with effective leaders. The course integrates leadership research findings with leadership application and skill development. Prerequisite: MGT 350.

MGT 590 Strategic Management (3). Course involves a study of the process of strategy formulation and implementation and the integration of the functional areas of the business into a concerted organizational effort. Case problems are used. Should be taken in the student’s last semester. May not be taken by M.B.A. students. Prerequisites:  FIN 330, MGT 350, MKT 360, and senior standing.

MGT 595 Special Problems (3). This course consists of independent study of some managerial problem area. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisite:  consent of  instructor.

MGT 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MGT 651 Seminar in Organizational Behavior (3). Studies management as a profession, with special emphasis upon behavioral and organizational issues. Examines individual, group and organizational processes in light of the environment within which the organization functions. Special attention is given to managing in non-U.S. settings and the ethical problems faced in the managerial job. Prerequisites:  MGT 350 or equivalent, and graduate standing.

MGT 652 Evolution of Management Thought (3). The evolution of management theory in the United States with emphasis on modern concepts of organization. Selected readings and study reports on each of the major stages of development are required. Prerequisites:  MGT 350 or equivalent, and graduate standing.

MGT 654 Seminar in Human Resource Management (3). Theory, policy and relevant research concerning the procurement, development, maintenance and utilization of human resources are studied. Special attention is also given to labor-management relations, with emphasis being placed upon the trilateral involvement of management, unions and government in the development and implementation of modern labor relations policy. Prerequisites:  MGT 350 or equivalent, and graduate standing.

MGT 655 Seminar in Organization Development (3). A study of the concepts, literature and implementation strategies of organization development. Emphasis is placed on the effective management of planned change, approaches to organization change, the evaluation of change efforts, and the role that organization development can play in international business. Prerequisites:  MGT 350 or equivalent, and graduate standing.

MGT 656 Seminar in Strategic Management (3). This is the capstone course in which the students must integrate all of the functional areas of business administration and analyze their impact on management policy and strategy decisions by use of the case study method. Individual, small group, and class approaches will be used to analyze the various cases selected for study. Even though each student will bring knowledge of his or her area of specialization into the classroom, it is expected that the student will perform as a generalist rather than a specialist and as a practicing manager rather than an impartial researcher in analyzing case situations. Prerequisite:  18 hours of graduate work in business.

MGT 657 Seminar in International Management (3). An interdisciplinary course examining issues in international business and management with a major focus on characteristics and challenges of international management involving business theory and practice, strategy and operations, human resource management and motivation, ethics and corporate social responsibility, workforce diversity, and cross-cultural perspectives on all these. Prerequisites:  MGT 350, MKT 360 and graduate standing.

MGT 695 Special Problems (3). This course consists of independent study of some managerial problem areas. A weekly conference will be scheduled with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisites:  18 hours of graduate work in business and consent of instructor.


MIDDLE SCHOOL EDUCATION
(MID)
MID 640 Middle School Curriculum (3). A study of the educational program designed for the middle school. Emphasis will be placed on the basic assumptions underlying modern trends.


MARKETING
(MKT)
MKT 564 Marketing Channels (3). The methods and processes used in the distribution of consumer and industrial products and services. Emphasis is on the way certain basic distribution functions are carried out in an integrated channel system. The role of a variety of manufacturers, wholesalers and retailers as parts of this system is analyzed. Prerequisite:  MKT 360.

MKT 565 Marketing Research (3). An introduction to research methods and procedures used in the marketing process. Areas given emphasis include sources of market data, sampling, surveys, interpretation of data and the relationship of market research to the policies and functions of the business enterprise. Prerequisites:  MKT 360 and senior standing.

MKT 566 Marketing Management (3). A problems course dealing with specialized marketing strategies for consumers as well as industrial markets, new product development, sales promotion, sales organization, and prices and pricing. Attention is given to marketing research as a determinant of policy. Cases are used extensively to emphasize analysis and decision-making. Prerequisites:  MKT 360 and senior standing.

MKT 567 Marketing Planning and Strategy (3). This course is designed to develop a comprehensive integrated knowledge of the broad field of marketing. The course will synthesize material presented in basic marketing; however, the major emphasis will be on systematic analytical problem-solving, and the dynamics of decision-making as faced by marketing management. Prerequisite:  MKT 360.

MKT 568 Global Marketing Management (3). This is the undergraduate capstone marketing course. It covers the practice of marketing in a global economy. Major topics include (1) multi-national environmental scanning, (2) marketing planning and strategy in a global context, (3) tactical international marketing decisions, (4) assessment of international market opportunities, and (5) ethical considerations in global marketing. Prerequisite:  MKT 360.

MKT 569 Promotional Management (3). A study of the relationship of promotional activities to other marketing activities of business and non-profit organizations. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships and activities of promotional devices such as advertising, personal selling, publicity and sales promotion. Prerequisite: MKT 360.

MKT 595 Special Problems (1-3). This course consists of independent study in some area of marketing. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

MKT 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MKT 663 Advanced Consumer Behavior (3). This course provides an overall view of some of the basic perspectives of consumer behavior, and the consumer decision process. Emphasis is placed on the contributions made to the understanding of consumer behavior from the behavior sciences of economics, sociology, psychology and anthropology. Prerequisites:  MKT 360 and graduate standing. Not open to students who have completed MKT 463.

MKT 667 Marketing Planning and Application (3). This course is a study of marketing as the firm’s strategic link with its customers in a global competitive environment. Major topics include (1) the development of marketing strategy, (2) the formulation of marketing plans, (3) the selection and implementation of marketing tactics, and (4) ethical considerations in marketing. Prerequisites:  MKT 360 and graduate standing.

MKT 669 Seminar in Global Marketing (3). This course covers the practice of marketing in the global economy. It develops students’ abilities to engage in global marketing strategic planning, select appropriate entry strategies and develop responsive marketing tactics. It also enhances students’ skills in using information technology resources, assessing world markets, analyzing ethical issues and communicating orally and in writing. Prerequisite:  MKT 360 and graduate standing. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed MKT 568.

MKT 675 Marketing Applications in E-Business (3). Electronic commerce is an essential component of corporate strategies for firms in business-to-business and business-to-consumer markets. This course focuses on marketing applications in e-Business, with an emphasis on developing operational e-Commerce sites in entrepreneurial enterprises with widely available applications software. Prerequisite:  MKT 360 or consent of instructor.

MKT 685 Business Geographics for Managers (3). Business geographics (BG) refers to the specialized application of geographic information systems (GIS) concepts and tools to the analysis of business problems. As these tools become integrated into corporate information systems, managers in all fields must learn to apply them effectively in business decision making. In this course, students will develop these skills by learning the basic operations of GIS software and by completing several business geographics projects using this software and a variety of data sources. Prerequisites:  MKT 667 or consent of instructor.

MKT 695 Special Problems (3). This course consists of independent study in some area of marketing. Periodic conferences will be arranged with the supervising faculty member on an individual basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.


MODERN LANGUAGES
(MLA)
MLA 510 Applied Linguistics for Second Language Teaching (3). An overview of the basic concepts, scope, and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects, including topics and issues in current linguistic studies. The primary systems of language, psycholinguistics, and comparative phonology are treated in depth. Prerequisite: ENG 310. Junior standing or above. (Same as ENG/TSL 510.)

MLA 514 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages (3). Designed to prepare students for the teaching of foreign languages in the public school. Current teaching philosophies, techniques and materials, curriculum innovation, and extracurricular activities discussed. Limited observation and performance in a language classroom. Prerequisite:  EDU 303. Junior standing or above.

MLA 520 Computer Assisted Language Learning (3). An introduction to computer assisted language learning (CALL), an overview of its specialized vocabulary, and a review of research regarding its effectiveness. (Same as TSL 520.) Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

MLA 523 Testing and Evaluation in Second Language Teaching (3). A review of a number of current methods for classroom/standardized language testing and evaluation. Prerequisite:  junior standing or above. (Same as TSL 523).

MLA 533 Language and Culture (3). A study of the relationship among language, society, and the individual’s concept of reality. The course examines a variety of anthropological and ethnographic concepts and findings as they relate to language and language learning in its broadest context. The course will also examine socio- and comparative linguistics, the relationship between culture and language, and the implications for second language teaching. (Same as ENG/TSL 533.) Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

MLA 551 Directed Study in Modern Language I (1-3). Independent work in areas of language, culture, or literature designed to meet the needs and interests of individual students. Prerequisite:  two years in college of the same foreign language or the equivalent. Junior standing or above.

MLA 623 Testing and Evaluation in Second Language Teaching (3). A review of a number of current methods for classroom/standardized language testing and evaluation. (Same as TSL 623)

MLA 630 Developing Intercultural Competence (3). An overview of diverse world views, ethnic heritages, and historical contributions of peoples from broadly defined regions of the world and the implications for an intercultural/international classroom setting. Prerequisite:  junior standing or above. (Same as TSL 630.)


MUSIC
(MUS)
MUS 510 Pedagogy of Theory (2). An examination of current materials and practices in the teaching of theory; discussion and research of the problems of theory teaching, with particular emphasis on application to and place in the secondary school and the junior college. (On demand)

MUS 511 Techniques of Twentieth-Century Music (3). Looks at elements of tonal theory to understand how music progressed toward new trends in the twentieth century. Compositional techniques in the music of selected twentieth-century composers will be studied and a determination of theoretical practices will be made. Standards of judgment, justification of practices and current trends in musical composition will be evaluated. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MUS 273 and 274.

MUS 512 Counterpoint (3). Contrapuntal practices from the 16th century to the modern era. There will be particular emphasis on contrapuntal writing of the 18th century as exemplified in the works of J.S. Bach. Study of species counterpoint, analysis of representative composition, and writing of contrapuntal works. Required of B.M. (performance) majors. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in MUS 273 and 274.

MUS 513 Form and Analysis (3). A study in harmonic analysis and the forms of composition throughout the history of music. Prerequisites:  A grade of C or better in MUS 273 and 274.

MUS 514 Applied Music Study—Percussion Instruments (1-3). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of 400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 515 Applied Music Study—Wind Instruments  (1-3). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of 400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 516 Applied Music Study—Organ (1-3). One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 517 Applied Music Study—Piano (1-3) One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 518 Applied Music Study—String Instruments (1-3) One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MUS 519 Applied Music Study—Voice (1-3) One 25-minute or one 50-minute individual instruction period per week. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Open to junior and senior classification and graduate students. Prerequisites: completion of  400-level of applied study or the equivalent, and permission of instructor.
 
MUS 520 Keyboard Literature and Performance Practice (2). Keyboard literature from the pre-Baroque era through the 20th century. Stylistic considerations, performance practices, ornamentation, etc., for each period researched and discussed. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. (On demand)

MUS 530 Special Topics (3). A study of selected musical topics:  composers, genres, etc. The course will allow students to study topics in a concentrated, in-depth manner. Specific topics will vary by semester according to student and faculty advisor interests. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite:  instructor approval.

MUS 533 String Techniques (2). Techniques of teaching stringed instruments through participation. Special reports and discussions on the development of string programs in schools required. Open to advanced undergraduates with permission of department chair. Prerequisite:  MUS 133 or equivalent. (On demand)

MUS 535 Double Reed Techniques (2). Course designed to acquaint the student with idiomatic problems related to the construction and use of bassoon, oboe, and English horn reeds; study includes reed construction with observation of characteristics and relationship of the reed to tone production and quality. Prerequisite:  MUS 132 or equivalent. (On demand)

MUS 540 Piano Pedagogy (2). Piano teaching, including the examination and evaluation of beginning and intermediate teaching methods, analysis of technical approaches, research into the history of piano pedagogy. Observations and supervised practice teaching required. Prerequisite:  consent of the instructor. (On demand)

MUS 541 Vocal Pedagogy (2). Techniques, practices and materials used in the teaching of singing. Discussion of psychological and physical developmental growth principles applied to individual and group performance. (On demand)

MUS 550 Independent Study in Music (1-3). Independent study for selected students. Topics, methodology, and evaluation procedures to be approved in advance by the instructor. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite:  consent of department chair and instructor.

MUS 593 Workshop in Music for Teachers (1-3). A variable credit workshop with selected topics appropriate to music educators. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 600 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Music Education (3). Historical and philosophical foundations of music education; lecture and discussion with attention to aesthetics, aesthetic education, and the relationship of music and art to these in forming a philosophy of music education.

MUS 601 Psychological Foundations of Music Education (3). Psychological foundations of music education through readings, lecture, and discussion of educational learning theories. A survey of current trends in learning theories and their implications for teaching, supervision, administration, and evaluation in music education.

MUS 610 Advanced Music Theory and Analysis (3). Selected composers from the Common Practice period to the present will be studied in depth. Complete movements of works will be studied, and proper analytical procedures and systems will be determined and implemented. A comprehensive look at a variety of styles and genres will be of particular importance, and emphasis will be placed on understanding 20th- century music.

MUS 612 Advanced Choral Arranging Techniques (3). Students arrange selected songs in a wide range of styles for various types of choral groups (women’s voices, men’s voices, mixed voices and changing voices). Some arrangements to be a cappella and others with accompaniment. (On demand)

MUS 613 Advanced Instrumental Arranging Techniques (3). Characteristics and accepted scoring for all instrumental families (including strings) studied. Creative procedures, preparation of the condensed score, symphonic full score, duplication of parts and advanced methods of transcription studied. Prerequisite:  MUS 313 or successful professional experience required. (On demand)

MUS 614 Percussion (1-3). Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 615 Wind Instruments (1-3). Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 616 Organ (1-3). Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 617 Piano (1-3). Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 618 Strings (1-3). Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 619 Voice (1-3). Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken.

MUS 624 Choral Techniques and Repertoire (3). Literature, materials and methods for teaching choral music. Score analysis will center on developing the ability to perceive conducting, teaching and performance problems. (On demand)

MUS 625 Marching Band Techniques (3). Contemporary marching band practices and techniques. (On demand)

MUS 626 Instrumental Techniques and Repertoire (3). Literature, materials and methods for teaching instrumental music. Score analysis will center on developing the ability to perceive conducting, teaching and performance problems. (On demand)

MUS 627 The Elementary Music Program (3). Administration of the elementary school music program, including curriculum, assessment, KERA standards, mainstreaming, gifted/talented students, 20th-century approaches to music education, and professional development. Prerequisites:  MUS 600 and 601.

MUS 628  The Secondary Music Program (3). This course is directed towards music planning in the secondary school, including curriculum development and evaluation, evaluation tools, scheduling strategies, budget and inventory control, summer program development, community relations, faculty development and in-service planning, and working relationships with school administrators. Prerequisites:  MUS 600 and 601.

MUS 629 Contemporary Instructional Practices in Music Education (3). Contemporary music education practices, with the implications of current research upon those practices. Prerequisites:  MUS 600 and 601.

MUS 639 Methods of Research in Music Education (3). A study of procedures used to locate sources of information, organize and interpret collected data, and apply results of published research in music. A variety of research methods is studied and utilized.

MUS 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

MUS 650 Problems and Projects in Music (1-4). Course designed to accommodate individual projects for selected students. Project reports will be presented orally and/or in writing. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisites:  consent of departmental chair and instructor.

MUS 651 University Orchestra (1). The ensemble will study and perform symphonic literature from a variety of style periods. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Audition required.

MUS 652 Marching Band (1). The marching band develops an understanding of musical styles and skills through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Audition required.

MUS 654 Symphonic Wind Ensemble (1). The ensemble develops an understanding of representative wind band literature through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Audition required.

MUS 655 Jazz Ensemble (1). The ensemble develops an understanding of representative jazz styles and skills through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Audition required.

MUS 657 Symphonic Band (1). The symphonic band develops an understanding of musical styles and skills through study and performance. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Audition required.

MUS 659 Advanced Music History and Literature (3). The student will explore in further depth the development of music in history through stylistic elements as found in the standard repertoire. Each of these musical elements will be traced from plainchant through music of the 20th century, with special emphasis on innovative trends, perspectives, and genres.

MUS 660 University Chorale (1). Course dedicated to the study and performance of a wide variety of choral literature from all major style periods and genres. The development of basic musical skills and vocal function is emphasized.

MUS 661 Concert Choir (1). Course dedicated to the study and performance of a wide variety of choral literature from all major style periods and genres. The continued development of musical skills and vocal function is emphasized. Audition required.

MUS 662 Chamber Singers (1). The group will study and perform a wide variety of choral literature from all major style periods and genres, with special attention to that body of work composed specifically for small vocal ensembles. Audition required. Requires concurrent enrollment in MUS 660 or 661.

MUS 664 Opera Workshop (1-2). Provides experiences for singers to gain experience in opera/music theatre repertoire through participation in full performances or staged scenes. Only students with major roles may take MUS 664 for two credits with permission of the instructor. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Audition required.

MUS 670 Chamber Ensembles (1). Small ensembles concentrating on chamber music literature. Emphasis will be placed on developing chamber ensemble skills. Credit will be given for as many semesters as taken. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MUS 698 Music Thesis I (3). The initial preparation of a significant study of a topic deemed appropriate by the student’s research director and research committee. This topic could be an outgrowth of an idea from previous coursework or may emanate from discussion with faculty and peers. Prerequisites:  MUS 600, 601, 610, 639 and 659.

MUS 699 Music Thesis II (3). The continuation of a significant study of a topic deemed appropriate by the student’s research director and research committee. Prerequisite:  MUS 698.


NUTRITION
(NTN)
NTN 531 Food Economics (3). A study of the economical, legislative, physical and microbiological factors that affect the food supply during processing, packaging and distribution. Lecture, three hours; laboratory, arranged.

NTN 532 Advanced Nutrition (3). Advanced study of nutrition and human metabolism with emphasis on recent research. Diet pattern inter-relationship in physical health; research procedures and interpretation used in an individual project. The field of dietetics, its professional roles and responsibilities. Lecture, three hours. Prerequisites:  FCS 230, chemistry and biology.

NTN 535 Medical Nutrition Therapy and Disease (3). Understanding the role of nutrition in the pathophysiology of disease:  developing therapeutic diets in the treatment of common medical condition.  Prerequisites:  BIO 199, CHE 105, NTN 230 and 233.

NTN 536 Methods in Medical Nutrition Therapy (3). Understanding medical nutrition therapies involving diseases of carbohydrate metabolism and protein metabolism.  Comprehensive approaches to nutrition therapy via oral, enteral and parenteral methods. Prerequisites:  BIO 199, CHE 105, NTN 230 and 233.

NTN 597 Trends and Issues in Nutrition and Foods (1-3). Topics may differ from semester to semester depending on program needs. Investigation of current problems, issues and topics in food, nutrition and dietetics. May be repeated when topic differs.

NTN 632 Nutritional Aspects of Cultures (3). An exploration and in-depth study of the origin and development of nutritional patterns of regional and ethnic cultural groups in the United States. Research projects are required. Students will gain understanding of the nutritional aspects of various cultural food ways through library research, interview techniques, and hands-on experiences.

NTN 640 Dietetics Clinical Training Primer (2). An intensive assessment and review course preparing student clinicians for the hospital dietetics clinical training program. Includes assessment of student competency, rules of general conduct, and review of principles of clinical nutrition and food service management. Prerequisite: admission to the Clinical Training Program in Dietetics.

NTN 641 Nutrition Therapy I (2). A combined didactic and clinical practice course on nutrition therapy encompassing classroom instruction and planned work experiences in a pre-approved hospital training site. Students have the opportunity to apply principles of nutrition therapy in a functional setting. Prerequisite: NTN 640.

NTN 642 Foodservice Management (3). A combined didactic and clinical practice course on foodservice management encompassing classroom instruction and planned work experiences in a pre-approved hospital training site. Students have the opportunity to apply principles of foodservice management in a functional setting. Prerequisite: NTN 640.
 
NTN 643 Community Nutrition (2). A combined didactic and clinical practice course on community nutrition encompassing classroom
instruction and planned work experiences in a pre-approved hospital training site. Students have the opportunity to apply principles of
nutrition therapy in a functional setting. Prerequisite: NTN 640.

NTN 650 Dietetics Clinical Training Primer II (2). An intensive course preparing student clinicians for the second semester of the Clinical Training Program in Dietetics. Includes review of principles of advanced clinical nutrition and foodservice management. Prerequisites: NTN 640, 641, 642 and 643.

NTN 651 Nutrition Therapy II (4). A combined didactic and clinical practice course on advanced medical nutrition therapies encompassing classroom instruction and planned work experiences in a pre-approved hospital training sites. Students have the opportunity to apply principles of advanced nutrition therapies in a functional setting. Prerequisite: NTN 650.

NTN 652 Business Entrepreneur (1). A combined didactic and clinical practice course on principles of business development and business management encompassing classroom instruction and planned work experiences in a pre-approved hospital training sites. Students have the opportunity to develop a business plan in their area of interest. Prerequisites: NTN 650, 651.

NTN 653 Culminating Experience (2). A combined didactic and clinical practice course on professional development, professional practice and supervised practice in the dietetics profession. Prerequisites: NTN 650, 651, 652.

NTN 656 Nutrition Research Literature Review (1-2). Course enables the student to complete an in-depth literature review on a nutrition research focus area in preparation for NTN 660. The research focus area must be approved by the student’s graduate program advisor.

NTN 660 Research Project in Nutrition (4). An advanced nutrition research focusing upon the student’s area of research interest, enabling the student to survey and review the research literature, collect and analyze research data and prepare the research paper. Prerequisites: NTN 650.

NTN 680 Independent Study in Nutrition (1-3). Course designed to permit independent graduate study in selected areas of nutrition, dietetics, and food management. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair or graduate coordinator.


NURSING
(NUR)
NUR 515 Medical Ethics (3). Study of moral issues in medical ethics such as the rights of patients (truth-telling, confidentiality), the duties of health professionals, the allocation of scarce medical resources, and euthanasia. (Same as PHI 515.)

NUR 520 Critical Care Concepts and Application (3). A theoretical course which presents physiological and psychological concepts and their application relevant to critical care nursing practice. Theory focuses on the nursing process during phases of common major dysfunction. The application of theory is addressed through a case study format with use of simulated clinical lab experiences. For graduate credit, three credit hours distributed as two credit hours theory; one credit hour clinical practicum. This is to meet clinical hour requirement for certification for advanced practice.

NUR 537 Complementary Healing Modalities (3). A combined theory/clinical course which explores complementary healing modalities as therapeutic nursing interventions that can be used with traditional medical practices or when traditional medical practices offer no cure or relief. A specific complementary healing modality (therapeutic touch) will be fully examined and practiced in the field setting. Prerequisites:  NUR 204 or R.N. status; both must meet clinical requirements.

NUR 540 Directed Study (1-3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

NUR 550 Independent Study (1-3). Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

NUR 603 (503) Concepts and Theories in Nursing (3). Introduction to the nature and uses of theory and the process of theory construction. Major theories of nursing and concepts and theories from the sciences basic to nursing are analyzed with emphasis on implications for nursing practices. Prerequisite:  Admission to MSN program or approval of instructor.

NUR 605 (505) Issues in Rural Health Care (3). Examines similarities and differences between rural and urban residents as they relate to health and the health care system. Compares ethical theories and implications for decision-making. Explores the evolution of our present health care system, initiatives for change and issues related to rural health care agencies. Examines the existing and future roles for nursing in rural America and impact on health. Prerequisite:  Admission to MSN program or approval of instructor.

NUR 606 Scientific Foundations in Anesthesia I (3). This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of physiological principles as they apply to normal, pathological and clinical alterations in the respiratory system. In addition, the principles of chemistry and physics as applied to clinical nurse anesthesia will be presented. Prerequisites: Admission to nurse anesthesia program and NUR 673.

NUR 607 Scientific Foundations in Anesthesia II (4). This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of physiological principles as they apply to normal, pathological and clinical alterations in cellular and neurophysiology. In addition, this course emphasizes the general principles of pharmacology as applied to the administration of anesthesia. Prerequisites:  NUR 606 and 632.

NUR 608 Scientific Foundations in Anesthesia III (5). This course emphasizes the general principles of pharmacology as applied to the administration of adjunct drugs utilized during anesthesia. In addition, this course will present an in-depth understanding of physiological principles as they apply to normal, pathological and clinical alterations in endocrine, renal and hepatic physiology. Prerequisites:  NUR 606, 607, 632 and 633.

NUR 609 Scientific Foundations in Anesthesia IV (4). This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of physiological principles as they apply to normal, pathological and clinical alterations in cardiovascular physiology. The last component of this course will consist of the completion of general principles of adjunct drugs utilized during anesthesia. Prerequisites:  NUR 606, 607, 608, 632, 633 and 634.

NUR 622 Diagnosis and Management of Adult Health Problems (3). Course designed to provide the CNS student the foundation necessary for the diagnosis and management of episodic illness and/or acute exacerbation of chronic illness in acutely or critically ill adult patients. Emphasis is placed on patient care problems organized by systems in the context of the nursing process, the CNS spheres of influence and advanced standards of practice and professional performance. Three credit hours distributed as two credit hours theory; one credit hour clinical practicum. This is to meet clinical hour requirement for certification for advanced practice. Prerequisites: NUR 520, 603, 605, 641, 642, and 673.

NUR 623 Advanced Adult Nursing-Acute Care (4). Course focuses on the essential characteristics and role development of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in adult health, theory-based practice and interrelationships among concepts, phenomena, human responses, and nursing therapeutics. Values, beliefs, and attitudes about advanced nursing, health, and holism are explored within the rural setting. Emphasis is on competencies and outcomes within the spheres of influence in acute care settings.  Prerequisites:  NUR 603, 605, 641, 642, and 673.

NUR 624 Advanced Adult Nursing-Chronic Rehabilitation (4). Course focuses on the essential characteristics and  role development of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in adult health, theory-based practice and interrelationships among concepts, phenomena, human responses, and nursing therapeutics. Values, beliefs, and attitudes about advanced nursing, health, and holism are explored within the rural setting. Emphasis is on competencies and outcomes within the spheres of influence in chronic/rehabilitation care settings.  Prerequisite: NUR 603, 605, 641, 642, and 673.

NUR 630 Research in Nursing (3). The examination and analysis of the methods and processes of systematic investigation of nursing phenomena. Critical analysis of nursing research studies is emphasized. Formulation of a researchable nursing problem and the strategy for its investigation is expected. Corequisite or prerequisite:  NUR 603.

NUR 631 Research Applications in Nursing (3). Builds on NUR 630 and NUR 695. Provides the student with the opportunity to synthesize knowledge of the conduct of research and building of the body of scientific knowledge in nursing. The focus is on the management and interpretation of data and application and dissemination of findings. Prerequisite: NUR 630.

NUR 632 Principles of Anesthesia Practice I (4). This course introduces the student to those concepts necessary to plan and execute an anesthetic individualized for the patient which ensures a margin of patient safety while meeting the surgical requirements. Prerequisite: Admission to nurse anesthesia program.

NUR 633 Principles of Anesthesia Practice II (2). Focuses on the role of the nurse anesthetist during the perioperative period. This course describes agents, techniques, indications, contra-indications and complications relevant to regional anesthesia practice. Case management strategies are developed for the care of the obstetric patient undergoing anesthetic intervention. Prerequisites: NUR 606 and 632.

NUR 634 Principles of Anesthesia Practice III (2). Case management strategies are developed for the care of the pediatric patient; the patient requiring general, genitourinary or orthopedic surgical procedures; and patients undergoing anesthetic intervention due to traumatic injuries. Prerequisites: NUR 606, 607, 632, and 633.

NUR 635 Principles of Anesthesia Practice IV (3). Case management strategies are developed for the care of patients as they relate to specialty procedures such as open heart surgery, neurological anesthesia, thoracic surgery and endocrine surgery. This course will conclude with the specific anesthetic implications of outpatient anesthesia. Prerequisites: NUR 606, 607, 608, 609, 632, 633, and 634.

NUR 641 Advance Nursing Assessment (4).  A combined theory/practicum course which introduces advanced assessment of patients in a variety of settings across the lifespan. Emphasis will be placed on advanced health assessment, growth and development across the lifespan, and health promotion and maintenance. Content will include techniques for comprehensive, holistic health assessment as well as focused assessment for common health problems. Corequisite: NUR 673.

NUR 642 Advanced Pharmacology (3). This course is designed to provide the advanced practice nurse with the theoretical and scientific basis for utilizing pharmacotherapeutics in advanced nursing practice. Throughout the course the role of clinical protocols and the privileges and responsibilities of prescription are emphasized. Prerequisites:  admission to M.S.N. program. Corequisite: NUR 673.

NUR 644 Primary Care of the Family I (6). This is the first of a two-course sequence designed to provide advanced knowledge of acute and chronic health problems of individuals and families of various age groups in rural settings. Emphasis is placed on pathology, assessments, diagnoses, therapeutic modalities and evaluations related to specific health problems of various age groups, including high-risk pregnancy, perinatal health care and geriatric health care. Additional role parameters of the family nurse practitioner will be included. A practicum is included in this course. Prerequisites: NUR 603, 605, 641, and 673. Corequisites:  NUR 630, 642.

NUR 645 Primary Care of the Family II (7). This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to provide advanced knowledge of acute and chronic health care problems of individuals and families of various age groups in rural settings. Emphasis is placed on pathology, assessments, diagnoses, therapeutic modalities and evaluations related to management of acute and chronic problems within the context of the family including special problems related to the aged. Additional role parameters of the family nurse practitioner will be included. A practicum is included in this course. Prerequisite:  NUR 644.

NUR 650 Advanced Clinical Nurse Specialist Integration Practicum II (4). This integration practicum is the capstone experience designed to provide the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the CNS role. Prerequisites: NUR 623 and 624. Corequisite: NUR 622.

NUR 651 Clinical Practicum I (3). Provides the student opportunity to apply the theories of nurse anesthesiology practice in the functional setting. Involves supervised experience in the role of the nurse anesthetist. Prerequisites: NUR 606, 607, 608, 609, 632, 633 and 634.

NUR 652 Clinical Practicum II (3). Offers practical experience and daily participation in anesthetic administration and related patient care. Designed to comprehensively promote growth, awareness and competence in the skills and experiences required prior to readiness for independent practice and certification process. Prerequisites: NUR 606, 607, 608, 609, 632, 633, 634, 635 and 651.

NUR 653 Clinical Practicum III (3). Offers practical experience and daily participation in anesthetic administration and related patient care. Designed to comprehensively promote growth, awareness and competence in the skills and experiences required prior to readiness for independent practice and certification process. Prerequisites: NUR 606, 607, 608, 609, 632, 633, 634, 635, 651 and 652.

NUR 654 Advanced Family Nurse Practitioner Integration Practicum (9). This practicum offers experience in integrating and synthesizing components of theory, practice and research. Focus is on role development of the family nurse practitioner in the rural setting. Through comprehensive, holistic health assessment the focus is on the development of therapeutic plans and health promotion and maintenance activities for the family as a whole as well as individual members. Emphasis will be on integrating all previous course work and assimilating the nurse practitioner role. Prerequisite: NUR 645. Corequisite: NUR 631.

NUR 655 Seminar in Nurse Anesthesia I (3). Focuses on pertinent didactic information necessary for integration into clinical practice. Students participate in the development of strategies to manage critical and/or infrequent clinical anesthesia related problems. Prerequisites: NUR 605 and 651. Corequisites: NUR 635 and 652.

NUR 656 Seminar in Nurse Anesthesia II (3). This course builds/expands on NUR 655. Students participate in the development of strategies to manage critical and/or infrequent clinical anesthesia related problems. Prerequisites: NUR 635, 652, and 655. Corequisite: NUR 653.

NUR 660 Special Topics (3). This course is designed to assist students in expanding their knowledge base and developing additional skills in the field of nursing. May be repeated twice for credit. Courses taught as special topics may have a field or clinical component (two hours lecture plus three hours lab). These will be further defined within the particular course. Prerequisite is permission of instructor.

NUR 673 Pathophysiology in Advanced Nursing Practice (3). Course designed to provide an introduction to pathophysiology with applications for advanced registered nursing (ARNP) practice. Prerequisite: admission to graduate nursing program.

NUR 695 Research Project (3). The research project is one of the research options within the Department of Nursing. Students choose a research project director who then assists in the development of the research topic and the conduct of the study. Students must follow the Department of Nursing’s Research Project Guidelines. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  NUR 630.

NUR 698 Thesis (3).

NUR 699 Thesis (3).


OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
(OSH)
OSH 511 Hazardous Waste Site Operations (3). This course will train the student to become a hazardous materials specialist. The course will explore the various aspects of the hazardous waste site (especially Superfund Sites), including rights and responsibilities, hazard recognition and monitoring.

OSH 523 Occupational Diseases (3). Survey of occupational diseases covering routes of entry and modes of action. In particular, the pathogenicity, epidemiology and diagnosis of occupational diseases will be stressed as they relate to chemical, biological and radiological hazards, dermatoses, airway diseases, plant and wood hazards, chemical carcinogens, and pesticides. Prerequisite:  CHE 106 or CHE 210.

OSH 527 Air Contaminants and Industrial Ventilation (3). A course examining air contaminant problems, gas calculations, and industrial ventilation. This course covers the EPA laws and regulations, and the scientific principles and controls of classical air pollution problems. It also focuses on the engineering evaluation and design of industrial ventilation systems. Prerequisite:  OSH 320 or consent of instructor. (Same as CET 527.)

OSH 536 Motor Fleet Safety (3). A basic introduction to problems and practices of motor fleet safety programming with emphasis on regulatory requirements.

OSH 545 Loss Control Measurement and Management (3). An analysis of actual or potential exposures to hazards and their resultant losses posed by agents, energy forms, forces and substances in the workplace; measuring the loss exposures created by those hazards; and managing the appropriate counter-measuring to compensate for perils presented by those losses. Prerequisite:  OSH 192, 287, 353, and 420.

OSH 546 Fundamentals of Risk Control (3). An analysis of risk control as a component of risk management, the systematic process of managing an organization’s risk exposures to achieve its business objectives in a manner consistent with public interest, human safety, environmental factors, and the law. Risk control consists of the administrative, procedural and engineering activities undertaken with the intent of preventing accidental or unplanned loss consistent with the organization’s overall risk management plan.

OSH 550 Safety and Health Program Management and Training (3). The concepts, relationships and principles of managing the occupational safety and health function and the development of training procedures and practices to integrate that function into the organization. Prerequisite:  OSH 192 and 287.

OSH 571 Problems in Safety and Health (1-3). Individual study and research relating to safety and health. May be repeated for a maximum credit of six hours. Prerequisites:  approval of problem before registering for course and junior standing.

OSH 578 Workshop in Safety and Health (1-3). Workshops on topics pertinent to industry and technology. May be repeated for a maximum credit of six hours.

OSH 591 Engineering and Technical Aspects of Safety (3). A study of the properties and applications of industrial materials, manufacturing processes, engineering graphics, electricity, materials testing, selected plant facilities and other aspects of the work environment. Emphasis is placed on the application of this information to safety practices, hazard mitigation and loss control. Prerequisites:  OSH 192 and ITD 120.

OSH 621 Industrial Hygiene II (3). Advanced, in-depth study of harmful chemical, biological and physical agents found in the workplace. Emphasis is on analytical methods, control measures, and monitoring and surveillance techniques. Prerequisite:  OSH 420.

OSH 622 Toxicology of Industrial Materials (3). A study of the environmental and occupational health effects and hazards associated with the exposure to industrial chemicals and contaminants. Emphasis is given to laboratory animal and statistical risk toxicological studies and case histories, compliance testing and engineering controls. Prerequisite:  OSH 420.

OSH 626 Industrial Hygiene Sampling Strategies (3). Advanced in-depth study of the approaches to workplace sampling. Emphasis is on statistical sampling methods, passive monitoring, colorimetric devices, breathing zone and area sampling strategies. Course work will include laboratory exercises and field experience. Prerequisites:  OSH 420, PHY 120 and PSY 200.

OSH 637 Biostatistics and Probability (3). The study and application of biostatistics and probability distributions in environmental and health-related sampling. Emphasis is given to hypothesis testing and graphical determination of confidence intervals. This course will also cover the use and application of log scales and their application in log-normal distributions. Prerequisite:  MAT 135.

OSH 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite:  permission of chair. Graded pass/fail.

OSH 650 OSH Organizational Leadership and Management (3). An overview of the safety and health leader’s role in accomplishing organizational objectives emphasizing leadership and management. Concepts covered include safety and health-related leadership issues, implementation of codes and standards, integration of leadership with safety engineering and management principles as well as leadership skills including communication, motivation, initiating change, team building, delegation, and credibility. Prerequisite: graduate status.

OSH 654 Philosophy of Safety and Health (3). Examination of past and current philosophical beliefs, practices and approaches to controlling safety and health hazards, risks exposure, accidents and loss.

OSH 655 Legal Aspects of Safety and Health (3). An analysis of legislation, liability and litigation in safety and health.

OSH 656 Ergonomics and Biomechanics (3). This course is concerned with the health, behavioral and technical sciences and their role in the reduction of worker stress. These factors are thus related to the neuro-muscular and skeletal systems and the mechanics involved in efficient workplace design.

OSH 657 Current Literature and Research in Safety and Health (3). Survey of current literature and research in safety and health, including accident causation and prevention, hazard abatement, risk management, and loss control. Prerequisite:  graduate standing.

OSH 658 Introduction to Occupational Epidemiology (3). This course will give the students an overview of biostatistics which relate to occupational field investigations, including rates, ratios and proportions, charts, tables and graphs; the 2x2 table; measures of central tendency; and significance testing. Basic principles of epidemiology necessary to understand scientific literature, monitor data in industry, and/or to conduct scientific investigations or surveillance activities will be taught. The major types of epidemiologic study (cohort, case referent and cross-sectional) will be described. Students will learn how to calculate rate ratios, odds radio and attributable risk. Epidemiologic principles of reliability, validity, bias, screening, and surveillance will be discussed.

OSH 663 Applied Workplace Ergonomics (3). This course is designed to provide the student the opportunity to apply the principles of ergonomics to the work environment. It is intended to offer students practical experience in applying ergonomics through the development of an industrial case study.

OSH 670 Internship in Safety and Health (3). Supervised work experience in safety and health-related operations focusing on the career objectives and educational objectives of the student. Evaluation of the experience made by the department. Graded pass/fail.

OSH 680 Graduate Seminar in Occupational Safety and Health (3). This course involves on-site analysis of safety and health programs of area industries. Students are exposed to a variety of industrial settings and have the opportunity to interact with practicing safety and health professionals. Extensive weekly travel is required. Students also organize and present a seminar related to occupational safety and health.

OSH 687 (587) Wastewater Treatment (3). A study of the operation and process design of wastewater treatment systems. This course focuses on aerobic biological treatment and process control for the activated sludge system. Topics will include treatment evaluations, trouble shooting, system design, and operational control strategies. Prerequisites:  OSH 320 or consent of instructor.

OSH 689 (589) Solid and Hazardous Waste Treatment (3). A study of the engineering related principles and practices utilized in the solid and hazardous waste treatment and disposal field. Topics include sludge treatment and dewatering, RCRA hazardous waste regulations, waste minimization, incineration, landfills, and groundwater monitoring and modeling. Prerequisites:  OSH 320 or consent of instructor.

OSH 697 Research in Environmental Health and Safety (3). Designed to address issues and problems related to the environment and to scientifically reach solutions to existing and potential problems and hazards that threaten the health and safety in any industrial/environmental setting. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

OSH 698 Thesis (3).

OSH 699 Thesis (3).


PHYSICAL EDUCATION
(PHE)
PHE 530 Intramurals and Interscholastic Athletics (3). A study of the administration policies and problems of intramurals and athletic programs on the high school and collegiate level. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work.

PHE 601 School and Community Recreation (3). Study of the role of public education in the total recreation program of the community.

PHE 602 Legal Issues in Sport and Physical Activity (3). This course is designed to help the student develop knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the law and legal issues as related to sport and physical activities. (Same as REC 602.)

PHE 605 Curriculum in Health and Physical Education (3). A course designed to acquaint the student with the aims and objectives of curriculum design; to alert the student to innovations, new techniques and research in this area; and to equip the student with guidelines for good curriculum construction. (Same as HEA 605.)

PHE 615 Model Physical Education Programs (3). This course is designed to help teachers and administrators identify exemplary transferrable models of teaching and programming which they can adapt or adopt for their own professional use.

PHE 620 Current Trends and Issues in Health and Physical Education  (3). A review of the current research in the fields of health and physical education.

PHE 630 Special Topics (3). Seminar for graduate students relating to a current topic in the fields of health and physical education. May be repeated once for credit.

PHE 680 Independent Study in Health and Physical Education (1-3). Prerequisite:  permission of program coordinator.

PHE 698 Thesis (3).

PHE 699 Thesis (3).


PHILOSOPHY
(PHI)
PHI 540 Seminar (3). Study of selected topics or the thought of a particular philosopher. This course may be repeated for credit.

PHI 550 Directed Study (1-3). Readings or other study in advanced topics. This course may be repeated for credit.

PHI 640 Special Topics (3). An examination of a traditional or contemporary topic in philosophy. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites:  permission of philosophy program coordinator.

PHI 650 Directed Study (1-3). Supervised independent work in philosophy. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: permission of philosophy program coordinator.


PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING
(PHY)
PHY 505 Meteorology (3). Descriptive treatment of weather phenomena. Course covers weather changes, air masses and fronts; collection and use of meteorological data; study of maps and weather forecasting. Not applicable toward master of science degree. Graduate credit for M.A.T. candidates only.

PHY 513 Principles of Astronomy and Meteorology (3). An examination of the principal objects of the solar system and the stellar universe and the fundamental theories concerning them. Examination and discussion of the composition and structure of the earth’s atmosphere. Atmospheric motions, weather systems and weather forecasting. Graduate credit for M.A.T. candidates only.

PHY 515 Special Topics (3). Topics of current interest in physics and engineering. Delivery methods may include lecture, seminar, directed study, and laboratory. May be repeated for credit as different topics are featured. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PHY 520 Independent Study (1-3). Supervised reading course in specialized topics for upper-division students of high standing. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours. Prerequisites:  major and consent of instructor.

PHY 530 Mechanics I (3). Dynamics of particles, coordinate transformation, and non-inertial reference systems. Celestial mechanics. Dynamics of systems of particles. Prerequisites:  PHY 255 and MAT 411 (or concurrent registration).

PHY 531 Mechanics II (3). General motion of rigid bodies. Lagrangian mechanics, theory of small vibrations and special theory of relativity. Prerequisite:  PHY 530.

PHY 535 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3). Fundamental course in non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Prerequisite:  PHY 580 or concurrent registration.

PHY 565 AC and DC Circuit Analysis (4). Kirchoff’s laws, Thevenin and Norton’s theorems, super-position and reciprocity theorems, properties of L, C, R circuits, filters and resonance. Graduate credit for M.A.T. candidates only.

PHY 567 Communications Systems (4). Filtering and signal bandwidth. Introduction to information theory, encoding and decoding, linear and digital electronic implementation. Two hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 366.

PHY 568 Digital Memory Systems (4). Memory hierarchy. Automatic error detection and correction. Shared and multiport memory systems. Interprocessor communications. Introduction to computer networking. Prerequisite:  CSC 405 or PHY 378.

PHY 569 Microprocessor Techniques (3). Architecture of various microprocessors, assembly of useful microcomputers using one or more of the popular microprocessors, technique of interfacing to microcomputers, programming microcomputers, importance of microcomputers in logic design. Prerequisite:  PHY 378.

PHY 570 Introduction to Modern Physics (3). Concepts of atomic, nuclear, solid state and particle physics. Philosophical, historical and cultural aspects are discussed. Prerequisite:  PHY 255 or 121. Open to graduate, non-physics students only. Restriction:  A student cannot receive credit for PHY 570 if the student has credit for PHY 370.

PHY 575 Solid State Physics (3). Fundamental physical properties of the solid state of matter. Prerequisite:  PHY 460.

PHY 580 Modern Physics I  (3). An investigation of the physical phenomena explained since 1900 by the introduction of the discreteness of nature and the wave-particle duality, leading to the development of wave mechanics. Topics include Planck radiation, photoelectric and Compton effects, pair production and annihilation, the nuclear atom and Bohr theory, the deBroglie hypothesis, the Schroedinger equation and applications to atomic physics. Prerequisites:  PHY 460 or 530.

PHY 581 Modern Physics II (3). Continuation of PHY 580 including angular momentum theory, perturbation theory, L-S coupling, Zeeman effects, nuclear properties, reactions and structures, particle accelerators and elementary particle physics. Prerequisite:  PHY 580.

PHY 583 Applied Optics (3). Fresnel diffraction, polarization, Maxwell’s equations, laser theory and application, holography, spatial filtering and applications. Prerequisites:  PHY 350 and 460.

PHY 590 Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering I (3). Applications of mathematics to physical and engineering problems, curvilinear coordinates, analytic functions, transform theory, convolutions, Fourier series. Prerequisites:  MAT 411, PHY 330 or 530 or consent of instructor.

PHY 591 Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering II (3). Solutions of partial differential equations, special functions, Green’s function. Prerequisite:  PHY 590 or consent of instructor.

PHY 592 Problems in Advanced Physics and Engineering I (3). An applied course for advanced students in physics and engineering. The problems will be planned on an individual basis with topics including Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, fluidized-bed and numerical fluid dynamics, surface physics, cloud and aerosol physics, crystal growth and analog modeling of experiments. Students will be required to design, implement and test appropriate strategies for the solution of the chosen problem using their knowledge and understanding of basic physics and engineering principles. Prerequisite:  CSC 420 or MAT 442 or consent of instructor.

PHY 593 Problems in Advanced Physics and Engineering II (3). A continuation of PHY 592. Prerequisites:  PHY 592 or consent of instructor.

PHY 595 Advanced Laboratory II (1-2). A continuation of PHY 495. Two to four hours laboratory per week. May be repeated for a maximum of two hours. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PHY 596 The History of Modern Physics (3). A detailed examination of the origin of quantum theory. Consideration is given to the notable works of Planck, Lorentz, Einstein, Stark, Haas, Sommerfeld, Nernst, Bohr and others. Senior standing in physics with a 3.25 average in major. Lectures and conferences.

PHY 599 Senior Research (1-3). Introduction to research practices, periodicals and literature of physics. Problems arranged individually with staff members. Formal, scientific report of work required. Prerequisites:  senior standing and permission of staff.

PHY 620 Independent Study (1-3). Supervised reading course in advanced topics for graduate students. May be repeated for a maximum of three hours. Prerequisites:  major and consent of instructor.

PHY 630 Theoretical Mechanics (3). Advanced mechanics of particles, systems of particles, and continuous media. Prerequisite:  PHY 530 or equivalent.

PHY 635 Quantum Mechanics I (3). Matrix and wave mechanical methods for problems in the structure of matter. Prerequisite:  PHY 535 or equivalent.

PHY 636 Quantum Mechanics II (3). Continuation of PHY 635. Prerequisite:  PHY 635.

PHY 640 Statistical Mechanics (3). Statistical study of the thermal properties of matter. Prerequisite:  PHY 580 or equivalent.

PHY 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PHY 660 Electromagnetic Theory I (3). Advanced treatment of electric and magnetic fields. Prerequisite:  PHY 461 or equivalent.

PHY 661 Electromagnetic Theory II (3). Continuation of PHY 660. Prerequisite:  PHY 660.

PHY 675 Theory of Solid State (3). Selected advanced topics in solid state physics. Prerequisite:  PHY 575 or equivalent.

PHY 680 Spectroscopy (3). Study of various aspects of atomic and molecular spectra. Prerequisite:  PHY 580 or concurrent registration.

PHY 681 Spectroscopy Laboratory (1). Laboratory course to accompany PHY 680. Two hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite:  PHY 680 or concurrent registration.

PHY 682 Nuclear Theory I (3). Theories of the structure of nuclei and their interactions. Prerequisite:  PHY 581 or equivalent.

PHY 683 Nuclear Theory II (3). Continuation of PHY 682. Prerequisite:  PHY 682.

PHY 697 Seminar (1). Weekly meeting of staff and advanced students for reports and discussion of recent developments in physics and of research in progress in the department. Attendance is required for two semesters. Credit is given for only one semester.

PHY 698 Research and Thesis (3). Problems and hours arranged individually with student’s research advisor. Prerequisites:  major and consent of instructor.

PHY 699 Research and Thesis (3). Problems and hours arranged individually with student’s research advisor. Credit in accordance with work accomplished. Prerequisites:  major and consent of instructor.


PLANNING, URBAN AND REGIONAL
(PLN)
PLN 500 Recreation Geography and Planning (3). Practical application of problem-solving techniques and processes to recreational management and planning. Focus placed on site planning and development. (Same as GSC 500.)

PLN 507 Land Use Planning (3). Analyze the principles and techniques utilized in the planning process. Emphasis is placed on the practical aspects of planning — the needs, problems and proposed solutions. (Same as GSC 507.)

PLN 521 Geographic Information Systems (4). Techniques course that introduces digital georeferenced information systems, including data capture, editing and encoding techniques, data storage structures, database  management systems, data analysis and model development, and information display methods. (Same as GSC 521.)

PLN 523 Problems in Urban Geography and Urban Planning (3). Theories, techniques and research in urban geography and planning. Focus placed on the designs and strategies addressing present day urban problems. (Same as GSC 523.)

PLN 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PLN 693 Special Problems in Urban Planning (3).


POLITICAL SCIENCE
(POL)
POL 542 Government and Business (3). The role of government and politics in the regulation of business activities and the administration of major legislative enactments.

POL 545 Constitutional Law I: Developments & Trends (3).  A political science course that surveys the development of and historic trends in selected subjects of constitutional law. (Same as LST 545.)

POL 546 Constitutional Law II: Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3).  A political science course that studies the leading court decisions and their impact on the development of American Constitutional Law in the subject areas of civil liberties (Amendment I), civil rights (Amendments IV, V, VI, VIII, and IX), and the equal protection and due process clauses of  Amendment XIV.  Prerequisites: none.  (Same as LST 546.)

POL 551 Government and Politics of Western Europe (3). The governmental institutions and political processes of Western European powers, with primary emphasis given to the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany.

POL 552 Government and Politics of the Soviet Union (3). The governmental institutions and political processes of the former Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, with a special emphasis upon the Russian nation.

POL 553 Government and Politics of Latin America (3). The dynamics of change in the political systems of Latin America, focusing on the problems and patterns of political and economic development.

POL 554 Government and Politics of Asia (3). The governmental institutions and political processes of China, Japan, and other selected states in Asia.

POL 556 American Foreign Policy (3). The formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy.

POL 557 International Law and Organizations (3). The origin and development of international law and international organizations.

POL 558 The United States in Indochina (Vietnam) (3). An examination of the United States’ experience in Indochina, with special emphasis on Vietnam. With reference to national self-interest and the relationship of Indochina to world affairs, the course will examine the extent of American involvement from the end of World War II to the present.

POL 571 Contemporary Public Policy Issues (3). Consideration of social, economic, and political influences on the formation, direction, and implementation of public policy, with special emphasis on current issues.

POL 572 Public Planning and Evaluation (3). An examination of major planning and evaluation techniques of governmental programs.

POL 573 Public Budgeting and Finance (3). This course examines budgeting as a tool of governmental economic and political policy. Specifically, the course considers the evolution and purposes of budgeting, with special attention given to recent efforts to improve government resource allocation. Required of all M.P.A. students.

POL 575 Human Resource Administration (3). An intensive examination of personnel administration in federal, state, and local governments, including such topics as merit systems, recruitment, testing, selection, and equal employment opportunity.

POL 576 Law in Public Administration (3). An examination of the role of law in the administrative process. Topics to be covered include administrative rulemaking and adjudication, enabling statutes, open records and open meetings laws, procedural due process, and civil liability and immunity for public employees and governments. (Same as LST 576.)

POL 577 Labor Law and Public Policy (3). Traces the development of the principles of labor law and labor legislation as well as their administration at the national, state, and local levels in the United States. Uses administrative and court decisions and policy analysis to examine issues of current significance concerning labor relations. Prerequisite:  MGT 350 or consent of instructor. (Same as MGT 577.)

POL 590 Internship (3). Independently sponsored programs to which qualified students are assigned for practical experience in public administration and the legislative process at the federal, state, or local level. For juniors and seniors majoring or minoring in political science. Must have a 2.5 overall GPA and a 2.8 in POL courses taken for the major or minor. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  POL 140 and two courses from:  POL 240, 250, 252, 260, 370.

POL 595 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised readings or research in selected subjects designed to supplement regular course offerings. Requires chair’s approval. Restricted to junior and senior students. May be repeated up to six hours. Only three hours may count toward major. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of POL courses with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GPA of 3.25 for POL courses taken for the major or minor, and chair’s approval.

POL 641 Seminar in American Government (3). An advanced examination of one or more selected problems in American government.

POL 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Cannot be used to meet M.B.A., M.P.A. or M.S. degree requirements. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

POL 651 Seminar in International Relations (3). An in-depth analysis of problems of international relations and foreign policy.

POL 652 Seminar in Comparative Government (3). An advanced analysis of different political systems in the world, with emphasis upon the comparative approach.

POL 660 Research Methods (3). Examines the process of research in public affairs, with an emphasis on quantitative methods and techniques. Required of all M.P.A. students. Prerequisites:  MAT 135 or 560 or their equivalent.

POL 661 Seminar in Political Theory (3). An intensive examination of major political theories and ideologies.

POL 670 Foundations of Public Administration (3). A graduate-level introduction to the study of public administration, covering substantive topics in the field as well as the political dimensions of public service and the ethical issues faced by government practitioners. Emphasis is placed on the development of the discipline as a field of inquiry. Required of all M.P.A. students. Must be taken in the first semester of coursework in the MPA program.

POL 671 Public Policy Analysis (3). Problems and methods in perception of public problems, determination of goals, generation and evaluation of alternatives, and policy choices. Emphasis on political and analytical methods of policymaking. Required of all M.P.A. students.

POL 674 Public Organizations (3). An analysis of governmental bureaucracy as a formal organization, with emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of and the constraints on the public executive in a political environment. Required of all M.P.A. students.

POL 675 Intergovernmental Relations (3). A seminar on the evolution, growth, and present nature of federal, state, and local interrelationships, with an emphasis on grants-in-aid and their implementation.

POL 677 Local Government Administration (3). An intensive study of the economic, political, and social environments of cities and other forms of local governments and the impact those environments have on local government administration. The roles and tasks of local government management, as affected by metropolitan conditions and state, regional, and federal governments, are also examined.

POL 678 State and Regional Government, Politics and Administration (3). Comparative study of state and regional governments, administration, policies, and problems. Empirical research concerning structures, institutions, and political processes and the relationship between them and the policy outputs is examined and analyzed. Contemporary issues are examined from a comparative perspective to determine explanations for the variation among executives, legislatures, and bureaucracies in addressing or resolving these issues.

POL 679 Seminar in Public Sector Labor Relations (3). An intensive examination of the emergence and impact of unionization and collective bargaining in the public service, with emphasis on the role of the public administrator as bargaining agent. The course concludes with a simulation exercise.

POL 680 Topical Seminar in Public Administration (3). Inquiry into selected topics and problems in the field of public administration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours provided topics vary.

POL 685 Public Administration Capstone (3). A course integrating the theories and methods of public administration in a major research project related to a substantive management or analytic problem in the public sector. Students must propose, execute, and publicly defend their project after completing a major review of public administration literature. Normally this course shall be taken in the last semester of graduate work with the M.P.A. program. Required for all MPA students. Prerequisite: POL 573, 575, 660, 670, 671, and 674.

POL 690 Administrative Internship (1-6). A full-semester directed internship with an agency concerned with the administration of public affairs. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: completion of nine hours from the following: POL 573, 575, 660, 670, 671, or 674; 3.0 GPA in all graduate work, and permission of chair.

POL 695 Special Problems (1-3). Supervised readings or research in selected subjects designed to supplement regular course offerings. Prerequisite: completion of nine hours from the following: POL 573, 575, 660, 670, 671, or 674; 3.25 minimum GPA, and permission of chair.


PSYCHOLOGY
(PSY)
PSY 503 Psychology of Small Group Behavior (3). A survey of current theory and research regarding the behavior of individuals in groups. Topics addressed include group formation and development, physical environment, personal characteristics of group members, group composition, group structure, leadership and group tasks. Students enrolled for graduate credit will have additional requirements to fulfill in this course. Prerequisite:  PSY 303.

PSY 540 Drugs, Alcohol and Behavior (3). This course provides a survey of the social, biological and psychological aspects of substance abuse, chemical dependency and addictive disorders. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 545 Behavior Modification (3). This course presents assumptions, concepts and methods of behavior modification. Emphasis is on broad psychological theory and application to human problems. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisites:  PSY 180 and consent of instructor.

PSY 570 Applied Research Design and Analysis (4). An advanced course designed to develop a comprehensive, integrated, and applied knowledge of issues surrounding the design, implementation, analysis, and evaluation of psychological research. Topics covered include research ethics, reliability and validity, descriptive and experimental design issues, and advanced statistical techniques. Students will be expected to design, conduct, and report the results of an original research project. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisites:  PSY 300 and 301 or  consent of instructor.

PSY 581 Abnormal Psychology (3). Introduction to the definition, classification, causes and treatment of abnormal behavior. Research methodologies and findings receive emphasis equal to that of “clinical” or applied considerations. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 584 Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3). A survey of current theory and research regarding human behavior in industrial and organizational settings. Topics addressed include selection and placement, training and development, motivation, job satisfaction and performance, leadership, work environment, human factors, engineering and safety. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 589 Personality (3). The organization of the psychological characteristics which contribute to the uniqueness of the individual. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 591 Statistics (3). Basic concepts of statistics are stressed. Specific topics include techniques dealing with single distributions, some correlational methods, probability, and an introduction to inferential statistics. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisite:  PSY 180.

PSY 595 Culture, Language and Personality (3). Roles of culture and language, personality-language, and personality-culture. Students enrolled for graduate credit will be required to fulfill additional requirements. Prerequisites:  PSY 180.

PSY 602 Graduate Seminar (1-3). Topical seminars in psychology. May be repeated to a maximum of three hours. Prerequisites:  graduate standing in psychology and consent of instructor.

PSY 620 Graduate Seminar in Professional and Ethical Issues (1). A survey and discussion of the professional aspects of clinical psychology and the ethical standards of the field. Emphasis is placed on the ethical principles and statements of the American Psychological Association in regard to the practice of psychology, the conduct of research, and the use of psychological tests. Prerequisites:  graduate standing in psychology and consent of instructor.

PSY 621 Biological Bases of Behavior (3). An advanced-level survey of the biological processes that underlie behavior. Prerequisites:  graduate standing in psychology and consent of instructor.

PSY 622 Cognitive Bases of Behavior (3). An advanced-level survey of the cognitive processes that underlie behavior. Prerequisites:  graduate standing in psychology and consent of instructor.

PSY 623 Social Bases of Behavior (3). An advanced-level survey of the social processes that underlie behavior. Prerequisites:  graduate standing in psychology and consent of instructor.

PSY 624 Developmental Bases of Behavior (3). An advanced-level survey of the developmental processes that underlie behavior. Prerequisites:  graduate standing in psychology and consent of instructor.

PSY 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

PSY 645 Clinical Measurement and Evaluation I (3). Emphasis is placed on administration, scoring and clinical interpretation of a variety of intelligence tests. Report writing and research underlying intelligence tests and psychological evaluations are presented. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PSY 650 Psychometric Theory (2). The theory, statistical methods and ethical considerations involved in the construction and evaluation of scales and other devices for measurement.

PSY 652 Univariate Research Design and Statistics (3). Advanced experimental design and research methodology is combined with a detailed treatment of analysis of variance. Prerequisites:  PSY 200 or 591, or consent of instructor.

PSY 654 Evaluation Research (2). Emphasis on quasi-experimental research designs, sequential and nonparametric statistics, and the use of research methodology in summative and formative evaluation of social programs.

PSY 661 Psycholinguistics (3). Emphasis on language and cognition, measurement of meaning, language disorders, communication, theory and language, and behavior. Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

PSY 664 Psychopathology (3). Theories and research pertaining to the etiologies, symptoms and prognosis of various behavior disorders are discussed. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PSY 665 Clinical Measurement and Evaluation II (3). Emphasis on the theory and application of personality tests used in clinical settings. Practice in the administration, scoring and interpretation of various clinical instruments will be afforded. Prerequisites:  PSY 645 and consent of instructor.

PSY 666 Advanced Clinical and Ethics Seminar (1-2). This course provides group discussion of active clinical cases, with attention paid to increasing diagnostic accuracy and sophistication, learning varied therapeutic approaches and becoming proficient in clinical interventions with demonstrated empirical support. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and resolution of legal and ethical issues that arise in clinical work. This course may be repeated for a maximum of four hours of credit. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: PSY 620, 645, 664, 665, 670 and concurrent enrollment in PSY 667. This course is limited to students currently enrolled in the MSU master’s degree program in clinical psychology.

PSY 667 Practicum in Psychology (3). The student will work under close supervision in a clinical installation. Problems concerning psychopathology, diagnostics and psychotherapy will form the core of the work. This course may be repeated for a maximum six semester hours of credit. Prerequisites:  PSY 645, 664, 665, and 670 with a 3.0 GPA in those four courses; plus at least two of PSY 621, 622, 623, 624, 650, 652, 654 or 688; and consent of instructor.

PSY 668 Advanced Practicum (1-3). The student will work under supervision of a licensed psychologist in a mental health facility. Emphasis is placed on the application of assessment and psychotherapy techniques with families, adults and children. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six hours of credit. Prerequisites: PSY 645, 664, 665, 667 and 670, with a minimum GPA of 3.0; at least two of the following: PSY 671, 672, 682 or 686; and consent of the instructor. Limited to students enrolled in the MSU master’s degree program in clinical psychology.

PSY 670 Psychotherapeutic Procedures (3). Theories, practice and research are reviewed, with special emphasis on therapeutic procedures. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PSY 671 Behavior Therapy (3). An exploration of the learning foundations of behavior therapy together with a review of the methods, applications and research concerning behavior therapy. Prerequisites:  graduate standing in psychology and consent of instructor.

PSY 672 Family Therapy (3). An advanced clinical course with emphasis on the major family therapy theories, ethical issues, and consideration of cultural factors in working with families. Practice will be afforded for students in the application of assessment and therapeutic procedures with families. Prerequisites: PSY 664, 670, previous or concurrent enrollment in PSY 667, and consent of instructor.

PSY 680 Advanced Child Psychology (3). Analysis and appraisal of scientific studies dealing with the problems characteristic of the childhood period. Observations and library research projects supplement class assignments.

PSY 681 Advanced Adolescent Psychology (3). Analysis and appraisal of scientific studies dealing with the problems characteristic of the adolescent period. Observations and library research projects supplement class assignments.

PSY 682 Child Clinical Psychology (3). An advanced course with emphasis in developmental theories in relation to childhood psychopathology, therapeutic procedures with children, and specialized assessment techniques. Prerequisites:  PSY 664, 670 and consent of instructor.

PSY 683 Tests and Measurements (3). The selection, administration and uses of psychological tests are discussed, with emphasis on application in educational settings. (Same as GUI 683.)

PSY 684 Directed Individual Study (1-3). Individual programs involving readings or conducting a research project in psychology. Note:  Arrangements for faculty supervision are required prior to enrolling. Prerequisites:  approval by a faculty sponsor and the departmental chair.


PSY 686 Group Psychotherapy Techniques (3). Emphasis on theory and application of the therapeutic techniques with groups. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

PSY 688 Multivariate Research Design and Statistics (3). A survey of multivariate statistical techniques, including multiple correlation and regression, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, discriminant function analysis, and factor analysis. Computer-based techniques of statistical analysis are emphasized. Prerequisite:  PSY 652 or consent of instructor.

PSY 691 Principles of Learning (3). Techniques and principles of human and animal learning behavior, and an introduction to theories. Experimental evidence will be stressed.

PSY 698 Thesis (3).

PSY 699 Thesis (3).


READING
(REA)
REA 527 Teaching Reading in the Secondary School (3). Designed to help the secondary school teacher teach reading in the content areas. Topics covered are reading process, word recognition skills, comprehension, diagnostic prescriptive instruction and reading in the content areas.

REA 612 Foundations of Literacy (3). An advanced course in reading and writing instruction designed to enable classroom teachers to model and implement a variety of research-based instructional strategies and activities in an authentic instructional context. Prerequisite:  REA 306 or REA 527.

REA 618 Content Area Reading/Writing 3-12 (3). This course builds upon theoretical perspectives and strategies for developing the reading/writing abilities of students in grades three and above in the content area. Attention is given to ways of making the most effective use of textual materials across the curriculum. A component of the course includes projects and/or activities which relate to an academic area of study or instructional responsibility. Prerequisites: REA 612.

REA 623 (523) Enrichment in Reading (1-3). Provides an opportunity for advanced study of topics not covered in depth in other reading courses. Each topic involves work completed prior to class sessions, and the completion of a product appropriate to the topic’s content. Check with instructor before enrolling for specific dates of activities.

REA 624 (524) Special Problems in Reading (1-3). Selected projects and workshops in reading.

REA 628 Literacy Assessment (3). Designed to enable classroom teachers and reading specialists to implement a variety of assessment strategies to facilitate learning; make language learners aware of their own strengths and needs as readers and writers; and enhance teacher and curriculum development. Assessment strategies include authentic assessment techniques, miscue analysis, and KIRIS testing. Prerequisites: REA 612.

REA 638 Assessment and Instruction of Children with Reading Difficulties (3). A supervised reading practicum that addresses assessment strategies and instructional procedures used to support students with reading difficulties. Approaches reading difficulty from a holistic view. Prerequisites: REA 612.

REA 639 Supervised Practicum in Reading (3). Designed for teachers, clinicians, literacy coaches, and reading specialists. Emphasis will be placed on designing and supervising a reading program in a public or private setting. Repeatable for up to six hours of credit. Prerequisites:  REA 612, 628, 638.

REA 648 Research in Reading (3). Independent study, under the guidance of a supervising faculty member, which addresses an issue, problem or question pertinent to reading/literacy development. The issue, problem or question is to be selected by the student and approved by the instructor prior to the study. Prerequisites: REA 612 and 628 or REA 638.

REA 698 Thesis (3)  Repeatable to six hours.


RECREATION
(REC)
REC 510 Sociology of Sport and Exercise (3). A critical study of the sociological factors affecting sport, performance, and exercise. Students will learn about the social, cultural, environmental, and racial dynamics involved in sport and exercise. This course will also study the effects sport and exercise have on the social structure of society. (Same as EXS/HEA 510.)

REC 515 Leisure Education in Therapeutic Recreation Services (3). Concepts of leisure functioning and methods of leisure assessment, attitudinal changes, and skill development that enhance successful leisure participation.

REC 520 Leisure and Aging (3). Introduction to the physiological, sexual and recreational aspects of aging in American society; exploration of the role of recreation with the aging; emphasis on planning leisure programs with the elderly. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be required to do additional work. (Same as EXS/GTY 520.)

REC 600 Leisure in Society:  A Global Perspective (3). Course is designed for recreation majors, as well as other students interested in studying society’s use of its free time and leisure. Course will undertake a historical and comparative study of leisure throughout the world, looking at its role and impact upon various cultures.

REC 609 Evaluation in Exercise and Leisure Studies  (3). This course is designed to give students a basic knowledge in descriptive and inferential statistics commonly used in exercise science and recreation/leisure research. Statistical procedures covered include correlation and linear regression, t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and two-way ANOVA. Emphasis is placed on understanding and using a statistical package through computer analysis. Recommended prerequisite:  EXS 400. (Same as EXS 609.)

REC 620 Current Trends and Issues in Health, Physical Education and Recreation (3). A review of the current research in the fields of health, physical education and recreation.

REC 621 Advanced Professional Experience (3). This course provides a comprehensive practical experience in a selected leisure environment and enables the student to develop practical skills through on-the-job experience on an advanced level.

REC 630 Special Topics (3). Seminar for graduate students relating to a current topic in the fields of exercise science and recreation/leisure studies. May be repeated once for credit. (Same as EXS 630.)

REC 640 Techniques of Research in Exercise and Leisure Studies (3). This course is designed to familiarize the student with the various procedures involved in conducting different types of research common in exercise science and recreation/leisure studies. This class builds on previously learned techniques in EXS/REC 609. Students are guided through the process of performing research from the design stage through writing of the research report.  Prerequisite:  REC 609 or consent of the instructor. (Same as EXS 640.)

REC 650 Seminar in Exercise and Leisure Studies (1). (Same as EXS 650.)

REC 680 Independent Study in Recreation and Leisure Services (1-3). Prerequisite:  permission of the chair of the department or departmental graduate coordinator.

REC 698 Thesis (3).

REC 699 Thesis (3).


RELIGIOUS STUDIES
(RGS)
RGS 500 Seminar (3). Selected topics. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  advanced undergraduate standing or consent of instructor.

RGS 510 Directed Study (1-3). Readings or other study in advanced topics. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

RGS 511 Milton (3). A study of Milton’s works and their historical and critical contexts. (Same as ENG 501.)


SECONDARY EDUCATION
(SEC)
SEC 528 Teaching Social Studies in the Secondary School (3). A study of the processes of teaching social studies, including methods, procedures, materials and research in the field.

SEC 529 Teaching Science in the Secondary School (3). A study of teaching science in junior high and high school, including materials and procedures, organizations and operation of laboratories, research and curriculum innovations.

SEC 620 Practicum in Secondary Schools (2). A concentrated practicum experience for students enrolled in the Career and Technical Education master’s degree leading toward initial certification which will include planned and supervised mini-teaching experiences with middle and/or senior high students as well as laboratory experiences in the development of teaching strategies and curriculum materials. (20 hours of field placement in a public school classroom included.) Credit cannot be earned for both SEC 420 and SEC 620. Prerequisites: CTE 503.

SEC 641 Building the Curriculum of the Secondary School (3). A study of the modern secondary school curriculum including the usual fields, the core curriculum and activities included in the total program. An introduction to the processes of curriculum-building.

SEC 670 Research in Secondary Education (3). Designed to provide the student with the opportunity to engage in research in instruction, curriculum, or teaching/learning styles. Students will also engage in extensive critical analysis of current research. Prerequisite:  ADM 630.


SPECIAL EDUCATION
(SED)
SED 504 Parent-Professional Relationships (1). Course content will focus on the characteristics and roles of parents and other professionals in the education of exceptional children. Skills in interpersonal relations with parents and other professionals will be a major component within the course.

SED 505 Special Education Procedures and Strategies for IECE (3). Students will develop skills in writing Individual Education Programs and Individualized Family Service Plans. Students will be introduced to relevant special education legislation, laws and policies. Students will develop skills in matching intervention strategies to the strengths and needs of young children with disabilities and their families. Students will acquire skills in the development and implementation of the Individual Education Program and the Individualized Family Service Plan in a variety of settings. Prerequisites:  EDP 260, EDU 103, FCS 310, 311 and SED 300, or permission of instructor.

SED 526 Education of Young Children with Severe Disabilities (3). Study of young children with disabilities or who are at risk for disability in terms of their personal, family and educational needs. Prerequisites:  SED 230 or equivalent.

SED 530 Education of Exceptional Children (3). An introduction to and a survey of the characteristics and educational needs of exceptional children. This course is an overview to give teachers and personnel in related fields an overall concept of the educational implications of the exceptional child as well as of special education as a profession. (Can be taken for credit only by students who have not completed SED 230.)

SED 531 Nature and Needs of Individuals with Moderate to Severe Disabilities (3). Survey of classification, identification, diagnostic techniques and intervention procedures used in the education and training of individuals with moderate to severe disabilities.

SED 535 Field Study in Special Education (1-3). A practicum for students majoring or minoring in special education. Supervised practicum in a school, community and/or residential program. May be repeated up to six hours. Prerequisite:  consent of instructor.

SED 537 Diagnostic Methods (3). Instruction which leads to demonstrated competence with instruments utilized in assessment and programming. Field hours are required.

SED 540 Procedures for Classroom Management and Discipline (3). The content of this course provides educators with the information and skills needed to increase their knowledge of advanced methods, and techniques of classroom management procedures. Field hours are required.

SED 551 Transdisciplinary Assessment of Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities (3). This course involves procedures for assessment of the behavioral and educational performance of individuals with moderate to severe disabilities, task analysis, sequencing behavioral skills and designing individual instructional programs. Students will be provided experience in conducting assessments, developing individual education plans and use of program evaluation techniques related to individuals with moderate to severe disabilities.

SED 552 Functional Behavior Analysis (3). The content of this course provides the student experience in understanding why individuals behave the way they do and how behavior may be taught, changed, and modified. Topics will include behavior management, training strategies, implementation, data-based programming, and field-based teacher research methods. Field hours are required. Prerequisites:  SED 300.

SED 553 Special Methods for Children and Youth with Phys/Sensory Disabilities (3). This course involves preparation in the use of special methods needed to teach children and youth with physical and sensory disabilities. Adaptations, prosthetic devices and technology used in educational programming as well as communication systems and self-care techniques will be included.

SED 554 Classroom Management of Individuals with Mod/Sev Disabilities (3). Study of the techniques and methods necessary for the organization and operation of educational programs for individuals with moderate to severe disabilities. Included are specialized teaching techniques such as precision teaching and behavior management applied to the learning environment as well as scheduling approaches, curriculum models and commercially available materials.

SED 601 Technological Strategies and Professional Planning in Special Education (3). Prepares the students with the expertise in technology and professional organization to be successful at the graduate level. This course also gives student expertise in accessing special education information and resources. Student is taught the policies and procedures required for program completion and for securing a certificate. Students are required to develop professional growth plan focusing on the utilization of productivity software. Student is also required to initiate a professional portfolio including artifacts constituting evidence of competency relative to the Kentucky Experienced Teacher Standards. Internet access is required.

SED 602 Family-Professional Partnerships (3). The course content will focus on the family as an aid in the program or education of their child. Family characteristics will be investigated and related to the implications for meaningful inclusion of the family in the education of a child with a disability. Differential programs for families will be overviewed. Field hours are required.

SED 603 Special Education Law and Procedures (3). Course is designed to familiarize graduate students with the laws and procedures that are required in the process of determining eligibility and delivery of special education services. Students will learn the roles of participants in “Admissions and Release Committee” (ARC), the procedural safeguards, and the order of events in the special education process as determined by federal and state law and procedures. Appropriate for all certified teachers, school psychologists, and administrators serving students with disabilities.

SED 605 Characteristics and Needs of Children and Youth with Mild Disabilities (3). This course surveys the etiologies, characteristics, and learning styles of children and youth with mild disabilities. State and federal definitions for each category of disabilities under the learning/behavior disability certification will be examined. This course should proceed SED 625. Prerequisite: SED 603.

SED 613 Advanced Behavior Support (3). This course is designed to provide an in-depth study of the field of educating children and youth with emotional disturbances and behavioral disorders. The course will include extensive examinations of disability etiologies, theoretical educational approaches, screening and assessment instruments and techniques, educational placement considerations, program development considerations, and ongoing evaluation based on student performance.

SED 614 Advanced Instructional Technology (3). This course includes instruction in technology that is requisite for the Individual Education Program (IEP) for student with mild disabilities. This includes, but is not limited to, assistive technology, technology as a means to meet the needs of different learner types, and students as users of technology.

SED 615 Collaboration Skills for Educators (3). Designed to develop knowledge, skills and abilities relative to collaboration and teamwork. Provides educators with information and skills necessary to collaborate and consult with other professionals, families and support agencies regarding the design and implementation of educational programs for students with and without disabilities. Field hours are required. Prerequisite: SED 603.

SED 625 Instructional Techniques for Children and Youth with Mild Disabilities (3). Course content focuses on instructional techniques requisite for the development of an individualized educational program (IEP) for children and youth with mild disabilities. Specific methods, media and materials in the areas of reading, writing, math and problem solving will be examined. Students will learn to develop a sequence of instruction from the student’s present level of performance to annual goals matching instruction to the student’s learning style. Prerequisites: SED 603 and 605.

SED 636 Issues and Trends in Special Education (3). Individual programs of study on current issues and trends in special education.

SED 637 Advanced Diagnostic Procedures (3). A study of the educational diagnosis of learning and emotional-behavior disorders. Includes interviewing, test administration, performance-based assessment, data interpretation and program development.

SED 640 Practicum (4-6). Makes provisions for students to participate in all activities and duties generally expected of a special education teacher. Specific supervision will be provided. Seminars to evaluate progress in methods, procedures and overall performance will coincide with the experience. This course is designed for students with at least one year of teaching experience (regular or special education) and seeking a new certificate. (Students with less than one year must take ELE 421.) Graded pass/fail.

SED 642 Advanced Curriculum for Children and Youth with Disabilities (3). Advanced study of methods, techniques, curriculum, research and the application of technology for meeting the learning needs of children and youth with disabilities.

SED 644 Graduate Cooperative Education (3). May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite:  permission of chair.

SED 646 Survey of Research Applied to Special Populations (3). A review of studies from a variety of disciplines that have relevance to special education populations. Special emphasis will be given to those skills (understanding assumptions, reading and abstracting articles, interpreting data, and evaluating results) needed to understand the relationship between research strategies and problem-solving in special education.

SED 649 Special Education Leadership (3). This course provides the student with knowledge and skills regarding the roles and responsibilities of special education leadership personnel:  procedures and techniques to develop effectiveness in relationships, school and community activities, public relations and consulting. Other areas discussed are:  procedures for recruitment, selection, role definition, assignment, scheduling, monitoring, supervising and evaluation of personnel with emphasis placed on in-service training procedures and organizational change.

SED 650 Administration of Special Education Programs (3). This course provides an overview of the history and current status of the organization, administration and supervision of special education programs. Emphasis is on the tasks of organization, administration and supervision, focusing on program planning and development, fiscal management, cooperating agencies, specialized facilities and equipment, legislative provisions, problems of supervision, and instruction in the development, adaptation and evaluation of instruction, curricula, methods, materials and resources.

SED 651 Social Competence for Safe Environments (3). This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of the priority role that social competence should take in the school and post-school success of children and youth with severe behavior problems. Theories underlying social skills acquisition and practical approaches for implementation will be emphasized. Training strategies discussed will be applicable to a variety of educational environments, including residential, day-treatment, alternative education programs, public, and private schools. Field hours are required.

SED 652 Assessment and Program Planning for Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers with Disabilities and Their Families (3). This course is designed to acquaint students with the field of special education for children with developmental delay. Students will learn to observe children and to educationally evaluate them using developmental evaluations. From the results of the evaluation, students will learn to plan individual prescriptive programs and to monitor progress made by exceptional children who are chronologically birth to six years old. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of home-based, home-center and center-based instruction.

SED 653 Methods and Materials for Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers (3). This course explores the importance of understanding the nature of young children (birth to five years) and how they learn. The course will emphasize adaptation of curriculum and intervention approaches. The course includes teaching strategies and materials selection and use.

SED 655 Special Education Transition (3). The focus of this course is to support successful transition from school to community life. This includes transitions from different grade levels as well as from public schools to private life.

SED 656 The Consultation/Collaboration Process in Programs for Children and Youth with Disabilities (3). A study of the consultation/collaboration process used in providing services to children and youth with disabilities. Content includes theoretical as well as research-based strategies for effecting change with individuals and services.

SED 657 School Safety and Classroom Management (3). Course provides educators with the information and skills needed to create conditions that promote and maintain positive, safe, and healthy school culture, climate, and environments. Educators will also increase their knowledge of advanced strategies and techniques for classroom, school-wide, and district level, positive behavior management procedures. Field hours are required.

SED 660 Problems in Special Education (3). This is an advanced seminar dealing with special topics. Course may be repeated as additional topics are offered.

SED 690 Exit Seminar in Special Education (1). Provides opportunity for students to conduct a self-analysis of knowledge, skills and abilities relative to the graduate program completed. This is accomplished by a review of past textbooks and notes, small group discussions, simulations, role-playing as well as finalizing of the eligibility portfolio. Prerequisite: SED 605 and be within six hours or less of completing the program.

SED 695 Independent Study (3-6). The independent study is available for selected students who desire to investigate an area not covered in the course work in special education. A final written paper will be submitted to the faculty member directing the study. Prerequisite:  advance written proposal approved by the faculty member directing the study.

SED 698 Thesis (3).

SED 699. Thesis (3).


SOCIOLOGY
(SOC)
SOC 500 Directed Studies (1-3). Selected topics in sociology as arranged by the students and a professor. Prerequisites:  at least twelve hours of sociology and permission of departmental chair.

SOC 521 Issues in Social Gerontology (3). A study of theory and research on aging and policies and programs related to nutrition, retirement, health and housing of the elderly. Prerequisite:  SOC/GTY 341 or consent of instructor. (Same as GTY 521.)

SOC 532 Collective Behavior and Social Movements (3). The analysis of collective behavior and movements and the consequent social change generated by this type of human behavior. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 533 Juvenile Delinquency (3). Nature and extent of delinquency; competing explanatory theories; evaluation of programs for prevention and control; role of police, detention, juvenile courts and corrections. Prerequisites:  nine hours in sociology or criminology and corrections, and consent of instructor. (Same as CRJ 533.)

SOC 535 Sociology of Work (3). This course will examine the nature of work in contemporary societies by focusing upon the impact of specialization and bureaucratization; it will examine the different types of work; workers’ response to the workplace; impact of work on family, health; role of age, gender, race in the workplace; and finally, the future of work. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 536 Sociology of Sport (3). Theories, methods and substantive issues in a sociological approach to sports. Prerequisites:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 538 Sociology of Deviant Behavior (3). Sociological frame of reference for studying deviant behavior, with emphasis placed upon problems of definition, social processing and evaluation of significant theory and research in deviant behavior. Prerequisite:  six hours of sociology or consent of instructor.

SOC 555 Environment and Social Policy (3). Examines the effects of population and economic growth on the environment. The course will focus on factors related to population and economic growth, as well as public measures designed to mitigate the impact of this growth on the natural environment. Population and economic growth and policies as they pertain to industrial and developing countries will be emphasized. Prerequisite:  SOC 334 or consent of instructor.

SOC 623 Educational Sociology (3). A review of the major sociological forces which condition education; the structure of society, major social trends and social instructions. (Same as EDU 623.)

SOC 639 Seminar in Rural Sociology (3). An analysis of rural life in contemporary American society with specific emphasis on the structure and functions of rural social institutions and on the delivery of health and social services to rural Americans.


SPANISH
(SPA)
SPA 503 Golden Age Literature (3). Spanish literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 504 Don Quixote (3). Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 505 Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature (3). Romanticism through Naturalism. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 507 Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature (3). A survey of representative authors. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 511 Spanish-American Short Story (3). The origin and development of the short story in Spanish America, with emphasis placed upon the twentieth century. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 512 Spanish-American Novel (3). Representative works from the major literary movements and most regional types will be studied. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 521 Topics in Spanish Literature (3). Topics will vary according to the needs and interests of students. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 522 Topics in Spanish-American Literature (3). Topics will vary. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 531 Advanced Grammar (3). A specialized study contrasting Spanish and English grammatical structures and usage. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 532 Phonetics (3). A study of the vocal apparatus, phonetic transcription, and analysis of the contrast between Spanish and English phonology, with individual work designed to improve pronunciation. Prepares prospective teachers to teach correct pronunciation effectively. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 551 Directed Study I (1-3). Coursework designed to meet specific needs and interests on an individual basis. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 552 Directed Study II (1-3). Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

SPA 555 Study Abroad (3-9). Credit given to students for approved travel and study in Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisite: junior standing or above.


SOCIAL WORK
(SWK)
SWK 500 Independent Study (3). Faculty supervised independent study and investigation of selected topics related to the student’s academic and/or career goals. Prerequisites:  social work major with advanced standing and consent of instructor. This course cannot be used as a social work elective.

SWK 520 Interdisciplinary Palliative Care (3). This course is designed to give graduate and undergraduate student in the College of Health Sciences and Human Services an understanding of both the philosophy and practice of palliative care. The course includes content on symptom assessment and management, spiritual care, psychological support, and special patient populations. This course is also suitable for students from other colleges who have an interest in evidence-based end-of-life care.

SWK 525 Case Management: Theory and Practice (3). This course will address the theory and practice of effective case management and the skills necessary to assess the client situation and to optimize client functioning. This course will focus on a diverse population of vulnerable clients across various practice settings. The settings emphasized include medical/health, educational, psychiatric and services to the elderly. Policy issues will be addressed, as they relate to advocacy, service planning, and program design. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Same as HCA 525)


THEATRE AND DANCE
(THD)
THD 590 Directed Independent Study in Theatre Arts (3). Individual projects of special interest under the direct supervision of a theatre or dance faculty member. Prerequisites: graduate or senior standing and consent of the chair of the department.


TEACHING ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS OF OTHER LANGUAGES
(TSL)
TSL 510 Applied Linguistics for Second Language Teaching (3). An overview of the basic concepts, scope, and methodology of the science of language in its historical and descriptive aspects, including topics and issues in current linguistic studies. The primary systems of language, psycholinguistics and comparative phonology are treated in depth. Prerequisite: ENG 310. (Same as ENG/MLA 510.)

TSL 520 Computer Assisted Language Learning (3). An introduction to computer assisted language learning (CALL), an overview of its specialized vocabulary and a review of research regarding its effectiveness. (Same as MLA 520.)

TSL 530 Methods and Materials for Teaching ESL (3). Knowledge derived from the linguistic sciences about the nature of language and how it is learned serves as the basis for the exploration and evaluation of various methods, techniques and approaches to the teaching of English as a Second Language.

TSL 533 Language and Culture (3). A study of the relationship among language, society and the individual’s concept of reality. The course examines a variety of anthropological and ethnographic concepts and findings as they relate to language and language learning in its broadest context. The course will also examine socio- and comparative linguistics, the relationship between culture and language, and the implications for second language teaching. (Same as ENG/MLA 533.)

TSL 580 Practicum (3). An intensive teaching/learning experience in which participants work in a classroom setting under the supervision of a master teacher. Prerequisite:  TSL 530.

TSL 610 Applied Linguistics and Professional Practices (3). A specialized application of subareas of linguistics with emphasis on the impact of theories of linguistics on ESL/EFL pedagogy. Topics of focus include issues in research design and methodology, the ethics of teaching, and skills needed to participate as an active ESL/EFL professional. Prerequisite: TSL 510.

TSL 615 Course and Syllabus Design in ESL (3). Building on concepts in TSL 530, the course examines differing viewpoints of the global objectives of language programs and courses. Prerequisite: TSL 530.

TSL 623 Testing and Evaluation in Second Language Teaching (3). A review of a number of current methods for classroom/standardized language testing and evaluation. (Same as MLA 623.)

TSL 630 Developing Intercultural Competence (3). An overview of diverse world views, ethnic heritages and historical contributions of peoples from broadly defined regions of the world and the implications for an intercultural/international classroom setting. (Same as MLA 630.)

TSL 653 Integrated ESL Skills Seminar (4). An exploration of advanced methods of teaching ESL integrating all language production and reception skills and linguistic structural knowledge within a content/theme-based pedagogical framework, specifically addressing how grammar is incorporated within a multidimensional model of ESL instruction. A field experience is required. Prerequisites: TSL 510, 530, and 580.

TSL 690 Internship (3). A supervised teaching position in an educational institution or industry in the United States or abroad which allows the intern to gain experience over a period of at least four weeks. The employer participates in formal evaluation of the intern’s performance. Prerequisites: completion of all other course requirements for the M.A. in TESOL.


TELECOMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
(TSM)
TSM 601 Telecommunications Principles (3). A graduate level introduction to the underlying principles of telecommunications. This course presents the problems and solutions involved in communicating over extended distances. Topics include: fundamental physical and electronic concepts; information theory; types of media; requirements and capacity calculations; modulation and multiplexing methods; standards and architectures; modern applications and issues. Throughout the presentation of the technical fundamentals, discussion will focus on relevant management issues such as cost, infrastructure, support, and business advantage.

TSM 602 Telecommunications Systems (3).   A graduate level introduction to modern telecommunication systems. This course presents systems oriented approaches for rapid and reliable communication over extended distances. Topics include: local area network topology, structure, and operating systems; backbone architectures; wide area networks; telephony; the Internet; security and privacy issues. Throughout the presentation of telecommunications hardware and software systems, discussion will focus on relevant management issues such as cost, efficiency, and business models. Prerequisite: TSM 601.

TSM 603 Telecommunications Project Management (3). Introductory course where students acquire key project management competencies. Students will learn how to apply the competencies to implement project management processes established by the Project Management Institute Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide). Corequisite: TSM 601 or permission of instructor.

TSM 610 Telecommunication Networks Management (3). An overview of fundamentals of daily telecommunication design, operations, management, and a survey of technologies and applications of telecommunications systems. Prerequisite: TSM 601. Corequisite: TSM 602.

TSM 615 Information System Security (3). Graduate-level study of modern computer, network, and information systems security. This course presents systems oriented approaches to network defense, malicious software, and data encryption. Topics include network intrusion prevention and detection; incident response; computer forensics; worms; viruses; Trojan horses; public key encryption; message authentication; and privacy issues. Throughout the presentation of security issues, discussion will focus on the cost of security to business and society at large.

TSM 630 Telecommunications Legal Environment:  Law, Policy, and Regulation (3). Law, policy and regulation as they affect telecommunications technologies and telecommunications business strategies. Emphasis will be placed on an examination of the FCC, the Telecommunications Act of 1996, and the telecommunications business environment, including licensing, divestiture and antitrust. Primarily a lecture, readings and discussion course.

TSM 670 Developing E-Commerce Applications (3). A study of programming languages and operating systems used in Internet applications as well as the technologies available for the implementation of customer transactions using Internet technology. Prerequisites: High-level programming language and CIS 307 (or equivalent).

TSM 680 Telecommunications Solution Development (3). A capstone course for the M.S. in TSM that requires students to use project management techniques involving the technical, financial and managerial aspects of developing an integrated communications network solution meeting voice, data and video requirements. Major emphasis in the proposed solution is on requirement analysis, solution design, solution implementation and solution management. Oral communication skills are required for presentation of proposed solution. Prerequisite: 18 hours of graduate work toward the M.S. including ACC 604, FIN 612, TSM 602, 603, and 610.

TSM 688 Telecommunications Systems Practicum (3). Application of knowledge and skills developed in core courses in an organizational environment to solve telecommunication management problems. Emphasizes practical industry experience. A report is submitted to the Graduate Committee at the end of the project period. Prerequisite: permission of program director.


TECHNOLOGY TEACHER EDUCATION
(TTE)
TTE 512 Instructional Materials and Equipment (3). A study of the psychological, physiological and pedagogical justification of the uses of audiovisual aids in teaching. Through experiences in the preparation and use of various audiovisual media, the student will develop proficiency in the application and operation of current instructional technology equipment and software as well as skill in the preparation of instructional materials for use in the technology education classroom and laboratory.

TTE 550 Advanced Study in Construction (3). A directed study of selected areas within the fields of residential, civil and light commercial construction. Prerequisite:  approved course work and/or experience.

TTE 554 Teaching in the Modular and Systems Environment (3). This course is designed to be the capstone course for pre-service technology education teachers. Emphasis is placed on teaching technical content using both the systems and modular approaches to develop technical understanding, rudimentary technical skills and problem solving expertise in the technology education classroom/laboratory setting.

TTE 575 Managing Instruction for Learners with Special Needs (3). A study of the basic ideas, perspectives and techniques critical to the planning, management and evaluation of instruction for special needs learners. Classroom situations involving diverse populations and handicaps will be examined. A student-generated field experience is required. (Same as CTE 575.)

TTE 671 Philosophy of Technology and Vocational Education (3). A study of the social, historical and philosophical development and current philosophical beliefs of technology-based studies. Exploring the various philosophies of technology education and vocational education, the student will develop a philosophy and understanding of technology or vocational education, then apply that philosophy and understanding to technology-based education about the technological attitudes and skills to understanding new or different past-present-future technology systems. The meaning of technology-based education to the individual and society, as well as the nature and impacts of technology on the individual and society will be introduced and explored. (Same as CTE 671.)

TTE 672 Vocational Guidance (3). Problems and procedures involved in assisting individuals to choose, prepare for, enter upon and become adjusted in their vocations. Students will develop skills which enhance their ability to teach identification and clarification of values, as well as enhancement of decision-making, career planning and job acquisition skills. Technology education teachers, vocational education teachers and counselors will develop insight into the principles involved in evaluating occupational outlooks and the skills and traits required for success in selected careers. (Same as CTE 672.)

TTE 673 Supervision of Technology and Vocational Industrial Education (3). A study of the competencies needed to supervise and develop effective techniques of working with technology and vocational education teachers. Problems and methods of orientation, communication and supervision of teachers and instruction are discussed. (Same as CTE 673.)

TTE 676 Organization and Administration of Industrial Education (3). A study of the organization and administration of technology, vocational and technical education programs on the various school levels and the development and coordination of external advisory boards. The students will experience development of a strategic plan that includes a mission statement, rationale for change, goals and objectives, action steps, as well as a program evaluation strategy. State and national legislation affecting technology and vocational education will be studied. (Same as CTE 676.)

TTE 677 Experiential Technology-Based Activities for Elementary Teachers (3). A study of techniques involved in the incorporation of technology-based experiential classroom activities into the elementary classroom. Designed to assist elementary teachers in developing the professional and technical competencies needed to enrich and strengthen existing programs of instruction through the inclusion of hands-on, technology-based classroom activities. Lecture and laboratory.


WATER SCIENCE
(WSC)
WSC 690 Seminar (1). Graduate students who anticipate completing the thesis must register for Seminar and defend their research before the college faculty and fellow graduate students.

WSC 698 Thesis I (3).

WSC 699 Thesis II (3).


YOUTH AND NONPROFIT LEADERSHIP
(YNL)
YNL 501 Seminar on Youth and Human Service Organizations (3). An introductory survey course on the nonprofit/voluntary human service organization. Agency governance, policy, board relations, planning cycles, programs, problems, staffing, volunteer management and personnel issues are treated using a case-study approach. Extra assignments required of graduate students.

YNL 502 Workshop in Financial Resource Development (3). Currently successful methods of finance management are examined including United Way, sustaining membership enrollment, endowment development, special events and accounting. Emphasis is placed on identifying and cultivating prospective contributors, capital campaigns, financial support systems and trends of philanthropy. Extra assignments required of graduate students.

YNL 580 Special Problems in Youth and Human Service Organizations (1-3). Prerequisite:  prior consent of instructor.

YNL 698 Thesis (3).

YNL 699 Thesis (3).