Courses

class on Wilson Hall steps

Courses

This course will offer a survey of the development of sports in American society since 1945. It will focus on the major spectator sports and emphasize international, professional, collegiate, and youth sports around the themes of race, gender, economics, and culture.

Professor: Dr. Bolin

This course will analyze the historical development of the US Constitution from its inception in the late seventeenth century to the present day.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan 

A study of major political, economic, social and intellectual forces in European history, tracing their development through the past five centuries. This course is designed both to provide history majors and minors with background for work in upper-level courses and to acquaint students in other fields of study with the persons, forces and values that have created modern Western civilization.

A study of major themes and methods of exploring global history. The course focuses on approaches to understanding the world and is designed to provide background for upper-level courses as well as to acquaint students with the forces and ideas that have shaped global history.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

A thematic approach to the history of the U.S. to 1865, designed as a University Studies social science elective. Three basic themes will be included: the transplantation of European and African cultures to America and their interaction with the cultures of native American Indians; the emergence of distinctive American values and institutions and the establishment of the American nation; and the stresses that culminated in the Civil War.

A thematic approach to the history of the U.S. since 1865, designed as a University Studies social science elective. Students will examine three themes: the forces that transformed America from a predominantly rural, agricultural society to a predominantly urban, industrial one; the rising political consciousness of various American groups and the expanding regulatory role of the federal government; and the emergence of America as a world power.

Introduction to the methods by which historians study the past and present their conclusions to the public. Students will be expected to write a research paper in which the emphasis will be placed on developing research skills, organizing the results in a coherent form, and developing an effective writing style. Required for history majors as a prerequisite for 400-level courses and recommended for anyone interested in developing research and writing skills. Prerequisites:ENG 101 and 102, or ENG 105 and two of the following or transfer equivalents: HIS 201, 221, or 222.

Professor: Dr. Irvin

A study of the Near East, Greece and Rome with particular emphasis on the influences of these civilizations on modern Western civilization. Particular attention will be paid to the development of democratic and republican forms of government.

Professor: Dr. Irvin 

A survey of the major events in Western history from the Fall of Rome to the Renaissance, with special emphasis on those political, economic, social and cultural-intellectual forces and institutions that helped form the modern world outlook. (Same as RGS 302.)

Professor:  Dr. Callahan 

This course surveys primarily the political and constitutional history of England from the period of Roman Conquest to the victory of Henry VII in the War of the Roses. The development of the theme of united government will be its main emphasis.

Professor: Dr. Callahan 

A systematic investigation of the history of Ireland from first human habitation, with an emphasis on the period since 1500. The course will look at the development of, and interactions among, the various cultural/religious traditions of Ireland and the long struggle of the Irish people to attain self-government.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan 

A systematic study of the dispersal of Irish people around the world, focusing on their interaction with the various host cultures they have encountered both as settlers and in other roles. Particular attention will be given to the Irish on the European continent and in Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, South Africa, and South America, especially Argentina.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan

A survey of the development of Western Europe, emphasizing the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Crisis of the seventeenth century, the Scientific Revolution, the English Revolutions of the seventeenth century, and France under Louis XIII and XIV. (Same as RGS 306.)

An exploration of Russia’s history beginning with the establishment of an empire in the sixteenth century, to the reigns of Peter the Great and Catherine the Great, and the revolutions of 1917. Six themes will be stressed: the state’s exercise of power, dissent and rebellion, social/gender relationships, intellectual thought, cultural production, and daily life.

Professor: Dr. Hilton 

A study of the historical development of Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and other world religions, with special attention to their similarities and differences. (Same as RGS 309.)

Professor: Dr. Clardy 

Course surveys the Soviet and post-Soviet eras through the medium of film, treating films as historical documents. Several themes will be emphasized socialist revolution and revolutionary narrative, the transformation of society, the individual versus the state, communism versus capitalism, social issues, ethical and gender relations, and nostalgia for and depiction of the Soviet era.

Professor: Dr. Hilton 

This course will examine the position and contributions of women in American society from the colonial period to the present from the perspective of the major trends in American history. It will focus on significant women in each period, while emphasizing several particular themes.  

Introduction to the histories of women and gender in diverse societies. Topics include the origins of patriarchal institutions; women’s cultures; feminist philosophies and movements; the role of family, work, society, and culture in creation gender and sexual distinctions; and theories and methods in the study of women and gender. (Same as GDS 316.)

Professor: Dr. Engineer 

A survey of the history of black Americans from their African heritage to the present. Special attention will be devoted to the African background, the experiences of slavery, and the various forms of black resistance to discrimination.

Professor: Dr. Clardy 

The historical development of organized religion in America, with special attention to the relationships between religion and other features of American society. (Same as RGS 322.)

Professor: Dr. Clardy 

A survey of the westward movement from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean, beginning with the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804 and ending with the closing of the frontier in 1890. Emphasis is placed on the political and economic development of the Trans-Mississippi region; attention will also be devoted to biography, social, institutions, and folkways.  

A survey of the development of science in the Western world from Newton to the present.

This course investigates the impact of disease on human society from ancient times to the 20th century. We explore how societies of the past have responded to both epidemic and endemic diseases, including plague, cholera, leprosy, influenza, syphilis, smallpox, and HIV. We also examine the history of germ theory, the development of biological weapons, and future threats to human health.

Professor: Dr. Engineer 

Course is designed to provide undergraduates with an introduction to the historical development influences, and impact of American Roots Music. This course focuses upon early oral traditions and development of diverse recognized American musical forms, and the history of the evolution of American music as a mega-media industry and global force for social and political change.

Professor: Professor Belue 

A survey course that examines the European invasion during the contact era from the Atlantic Tidewater to the Mississippi River, the conquest and consolidation of the pre-colonial America to nationhood, and ends with Indian removal in 1830. Emphasis is place upon the frontier experience, cultural, social, and ethnic issues, population movements, the expansion of American ideals and institutions, and the history of American Indians.

Professor: Professor Belue 

A history of the Indians of North America from the earliest times until the late nineteenth century. This course focuses on the cultures, customs and traditions of the various Indian civilizations of the United States.

Professor: Professor Belue 

This course will offer a survey of the institutional development of American sports from the colonial period to the present. It will focus on the major spectator sports and emphasize the role of professional sports as an institution of social mobility, the development of race relations, the bureaucratization and professionalization of sports as an entertainment industry, and the struggle of athletes for collective bargaining rights.

Professor: Dr. Bolin 

Course is designed to provide undergraduates with an introduction to the history of the universal phenomenon of piracy and its economics and global impact upon empires from piracy’s beginnings to the present day. Particular emphasis will be given to how pirates shaped colonial economies, societies, and cultures of the U.S., Caribbean, Far East, Mediterranean, and Africa. World religions, cultural diversity, gender, and consolidation of empire are also discussed.

Professor: Professor Belue 

A consideration of American military history from colonial militias through the role of the military in Vietnam. Topics covered include the causes of war, methods of recruitment, military policies, and the effect of the industrial revolution and technology on war. (Same as MIL 333.)

Professor: Dr. Mulligan 

An exploration of the historical development of rural America from colonial times to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of different crops on regional economic growth, organizational and technological changes in farming, urban-rural relationships, the role of government in agriculture, and the rural community in modern America.

This course is designed to provide undergraduates with an introduction to the history of the major countries of the Far East. The development of modern China and Japan will be examined, with special attention given to their varying responses to both western intrusion and internal social problems, from the seventeenth century to the present.

Professor:  Dr. Beahan 

A survey of Latin American history from pre-colonial times to the present. Special attention will be given to the early Indian Civilizations, Spanish colonization, the struggles for independence and the problems of Latin American nations in the modern world.

Professor: Dr. Schell 

A history of the 20th Century world from the age of High Imperialism to the end of the Cold War, the subsequent globalization (economic, political technological, environmental) and conflicts emerging from resistance to that process.  

A survey of Near Eastern history from prehistoric times to the end of the Persian Empire. Included are the emergence and development of civilizations in Mesopotamia, Asia Minor, Syria, and the Levant; the origins and influence of Near Eastern religions including polytheistic cults, Judaism, and Zoroastrianism; and the development of societies from city-states to large territorial empires. Special attention will be given to the art, literature, philosophy, and material culture of the civilizations within the region. (Same as RGS 354.)

Professor: Dr. Irvin 

History of the Middle East from the 7th century to the 19th century. The course will examine the apostleship of Muhammad, the question of succession and the Sunni-Shi'ah schism, the government, society, and culture of the High Caliphate, the decline of Arab power and the rise of the Turks, the Islamic perspective of the Crusades, the revival of Islamic power under the Gunpowder Empires, and the decline of Islamic civilization in the face of Western expansion. (Same as RGS 355.)  

History of the Middle East from 1700 to present, emphasizing political, social, and economic development of the region. Topics include the decentralization of empires, European imperialism, nationalism, constitutionalism, secularism, and state building. (Same as POL 356.)

Professor: Dr. Mittelman 

Course compares the histories of Iran and Iraq from 1500 to the present. The two neighbor states share a majority Shi’I Muslim population, but have also developed bitter rivalries. Topics include economic, social, and political developments of the two nations.

The course examines the formation of India’s traditions, cultures, and identities from c. 2500 B.C.E. to c. 1500 C.E. and analyzes the various approaches and perspectives that have contributed to our knowledge of this ancient past. An interdisciplinary approach is emphasized to better appreciate the rich diversity in art, literature, religions, and languages that accompanies the political, economical, and social changes of this period in India’s distinctive regions and locales. Prerequisite: CIV 201 or 202.

Professor: Professor Rashid 

Course surveys the historical development of the peoples, nations and cultures of the Indian subcontinent since the seventeenth century. The course begins with the Mughal period, then examines British colonial rule, independence movements and Partition, and concludes with an analysis of the problems of post colonial nation-state building. The major themes and topics considered include representations of tradition and modernity in identity, culture and community, tensions between political and economic centralization and regionalism, and continuity and change in the organization of state, society and economy in imperial, colonial and postcolonial India. Prerequisites: CIV 201 or CIV 202.

Professor: Professor Rashid 

A course offering practical approaches for teaching history in the public schools using a concepts-and-problems approach. The course will focus on either the history of the United States or world history, and therefore could be taken twice for credit if the focus is different the second time. Does not count toward the major in history. Consult the department chair.

Professor: Dr. Humphreys 

A survey of Egyptian history from prehistoric times to the Late Period. Included are developments during the pre- and proto-dynastic periods, the formation and general history of the Old, Middle, and New Kingdoms, and the collapse of Egyptian society leading to the Persian conquest. Topics covered will include Egyptian religious beliefs, organization, daily life, and contributions to world culture. (Same as RGS 362.)

Professor: Dr. Irvin 

A survey of Greek history from prehistoric times to Alexander the Great. Included are developments during the Bronze Age Minoan and Cycladic cultures; Mycenaean civilization; the origin and formation of the Greek city-state; and the history of individual city-states such as Athens and Sparta. Special attention will be given to Greek art, literature, and philosophy, as well as the impact of Greek culture on later civilizations. (Same as RGS 363.)

Professor: Dr. Irvin 

A survey of Roman history from prehistoric times to the Third Century Crisis. Included are the origins of the city of Rome; the Roman monarchy; the origin and formation of the Roman Republic; Republican society and philosophy; the transition from Republic to Empire; and the impact of Rome on the territories and peoples it conquered. Special attention will be given to Roman artistic, literary, and philosophical influences, as well as the impact of Roman culture on later civilizations. (Same as RGS 364.)

Professor: Dr. Irvin 

A survey of the main trends in African history from the origins of man through the successes of African nationalism in the mid-twentieth century. Emphasis will be placed on the development of African civilizations, their interaction with Islamic and European civilizations, and the adaptations resulting from those contacts.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

An introduction to the various areas in which historians work outside academe, including museums, historic preservation programs, archives and special collections libraries, and oral history programs, among others.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan 

A course designed as an elective for the general student; it will cover a particular topic, period, personality or problem of the past. Specific subject matter varies from semester to semester, according to student and faculty interest. Open to history majors and minors with approval of the instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credit hours with permission.

An applied learning capstone course for history majors based on research, writing, oral forum presentation and evaluation of a senior research project, in which the student will work at least twenty-five hours on an approved project utilizing skills related to the study of history. Required for all history majors. Prerequisites: HIS 300 and senior standing or permission of the instructor or department chair.

Professor: Dr. Bolin 

This course has three main areas of emphasis: eighteenth-century French society and culture, the causes of the French Revolution, and the career of Napoleon Bonaparte. The course's main theme is that the Revolution was a watershed in history.

A social, political and cultural history of Europe's great age, the period from the French Revolution and Napoleon to the outbreak of the First World War.

A study of consequences of World War I, the emergence of bolshevism and fascism, the impact of the depression and World War II, and the transformation of Europe since 1945, together with some consideration of European thought in the twentieth century.

An advanced survey of the history, politics, and culture of post-WWII Europe. Particular attention will be given to the Cold War, the rise of the European welfare state, the formation of the European Union, and the challenges faced by an increasingly cosmopolitan Europe in the twenty-first century.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

Advanced survey of the history, politics, economics, and culture of global empires since the fifteenth century. Particular emphasis will be given to the European colonial empires in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. States such as the Ottoman, Qing, and Japanese empires will also be discussed. The course explores how modern empires were built and maintained, the ways in which colonized people sought to deal with empire, the effects of imperialism on home countries, and the reasons that empires collapsed.

This course begins with the aftermath of the Revolution of 1905. World War I and the abdication of Nicholas II receive close attention, as do the Bolshevik Revolution, the Civil War, the New Economic Policy, and the Stalin Revolution of the 1930s. We study World War II and its impact on the USSR, as well as Stalin's last years and the unsuccessful attempts to reform his system. The course ends with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 and Russia's struggle to adapt democracy and capitalism to her needs.

Professor: Dr. Hilton

A study of the molding of the English monarchy and of the eclipse of its authority by the social and political groups which came to dominate Parliament by the seventeenth century.

Professor: Dr. Callahan 

A study of Britain since the Stuarts, including its age of greatness in the nineteenth century and its decline in the twentieth century. Political and cultural history are emphasized.

Professor: Dr. Callahan 

A study of political traditions which have divided French people, challenges posed to the Third Republic, and the transformation of French society since World War II.  

A study of the political, social and intellectual causes and consequences of German unification that attempts to answer the question, Why Hitler? Includes discussion of Germany since 1945.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

A study of the Russian revolutions and first decade of communist power. This course examines the February and October revolutions of 1917, civil war, NEP era, and the turn to Stalinism. Emphasis will be placed on the Bolsheviks’ need to balance ideology and practical realities, their campaigns to transform social, economic, and cultural life, the population’s responses to these campaigns, and experimentation in arts.

Professor: Dr. Hitlon 

An introductory survey of European history from 1914 to about 1945. It will describe and analyze the events leading to both World Wars as well as some of the consequences of those wars, delineating the major military figures and the military history of the World Wars.

Professors: Dr. Callahan, Dr. Hilton and Dr. Pizzo 

An examination of the position and contributions of women in history. Topics will vary.

This course surveys the history of women in the United States from the colonial period through Reconstruction.

This course will examine the position and contributions of women in American society from 1877 to the present from the perspective of the major trends in American history. It will focus on the history of women in each period, while emphasizing several particular themes and trends.

The course will examine the origins of the course of the war that began in Manchuria in 1931, expanded to China south of the Great Wall in July of 1937, from there to Pearl Harbor, Southeast and South Asia and the Pacific Islands by late 1941, and ended at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Professor: Dr. Beahan 

An advanced survey of the history, politics, and culture of the Third Reich in Germany (1933-1945). This course will cover the rise, fall, and aftermath of the Nazi regime with a particular emphasis on the Holocaust and the Second World War. Prerequisites: HIS 300 or consent of instructor.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

The development of American society and thought from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War. Special emphasis is placed upon the forces that have shaped the daily lives of the American people: immigration, religious traditions, the frontier, economic change, ethnic diversity, slavery and war.

The development of American society and thought since the end of the Civil War. Emphasis is placed upon the forces that have shaped the daily lives of the American people: racial and ethnic diversity, industrialization and urbanization, immigration, mass media, religious traditions and modern transportation.  

An analysis of the United States' relations with other nations since 1898. Special emphasis is placed on the role of ideals and self-interest' in foreign relations.

A survey of the relationship between science and religion in Western culture from ancient Greek times to the 20th century, with particular emphasis on how science has been influenced by both religious faith and religious institutions. (Same as RGS 415.)

An explanation of the transplantation of European and African culture to the United States, the adaptation of these cultures to the New World environment, their impact upon eastern Indian cultures and the rise of distinctly American institutions and ideas. The course will emphasize the evolution of English colonial policies and the comparison of New England, Middle Atlantic and Southern colonial experiences.

Spanning the revolutionary and early national periods of American history, this course focuses upon the United States' transformation from colonies to a nation. It emphasizes the American struggle for independence, economic as well as political, and the clash of values, interests and ambitions that produced the American system of government.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan 

Covers the period from 1815 to the presidential election of 1860 and the break-up of the union. Emphasis is on the political, social and economic conditions as they related to the sectional controversy that raged during this part of the nineteenth century. Some specific topics include the rise of the common man, the Jacksonian era, slavery and the abolitionist movement.

Covers the period from the beginning of the Civil War to the presidential election of 1877. If the course has a distinguishing emphasis, it is on political history, but the course gives due attention to military, economic and social history.

A study of the transformation of the United States from an agricultural to a modern industrial nation. Topics included within this broad theme are the rise of big business and labor unions, urbanization, immigration, the closing of the frontier, reform movements, the struggles of blacks and women for equal rights, national politics and cultural changes.

Professor: Dr. Bolin 

A study of the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and the subsequent forces that have shaped contemporary American life. Emphasis is placed on the role of the United States in international relations, the civil rights movement, and domestic economic developments.

A survey of southern history from colonial times through the Civil War. Emphasis is placed on examining slavery, social life, the emergence of southern nationalism, and the South during the Civil War.

Professor: Dr. Humphreys 

A survey of southern history from the end of the Civil War to the present. Emphasis is placed on the enduring characteristics of the South as well as the process of change since World War II.

Professor: Dr. Humphreys

The process of political, economic and social evolution in Kentucky is traced from early settlement to the modern era. Geographical influences upon the patterns of Kentucky development, Kentucky's changing role within an expanding union, and the Commonwealth's participation in national movements and events are stressed.

Professor: Dr. Bolin 

Beginning with the 18th century, the course will cover reform movements, then look at Muslim responses to Western and modern influence in the Islamic world. Finally, the course will examine the rise of radical and moderate trends in Islam. The geographical reach of this course is Eurasia and Africa. Special attention will be paid to political Islam and Islamic terrorist organizations. (Same as RGS 449.)

A study of Africa since about 1880, including the transformation of African societies in contact with other cultures, the growth of nationalism and nationalist movements, and the questions of African unity and neocolonialism. (Same as POL 450.)

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

An advanced survey of the history of slavery in Africa and the African diaspora. This course closely examines the period from 1400 to 1800, as well as slavery in Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Particular emphasis will be given to the effects of slavery on the social and political fabric of Africa and the world beyond.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

Study of the historical background to the conflict between the state of Israel and the Arab states. Examines the origins of Zionism and of Arab nationalism in the 19th century, the phases of Jewish settlement in Palestine, the consequences of the First World War for Zionist and Arab nationalist movements, the British Mandate in Palestine, the Israeli war for independence in 1948, Nasserism, the Suez War, the Six-Day War, the invasion of Lebanon, the Intifada, and the possibilities for peace.

An advanced survey of the causes, course, and consequences of genocide throughout world history from the ancient world to the present. This course will explore case studies from different areas of the world across time. Special attention will also be given to the issues of memory, recollection, and justice. Prerequisites: HIS 300 or consent of instructor.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo

A study of the political, economic, social and intellectual forces in modern China from 1850 to the present. This course is designed to provide the student with an in-depth knowledge of the major civilization of East Asia.

Professor: Dr. Beahan 

A study of the last decade and collapse of the Qing dynasty and China's subsequent search for unity and political form, beginning with the Republic, proclaimed in 1912, and ending with the Tiananmen massacre of 1989.

Professor: Dr. Beahan 

The cultural and political history of Japan from its unification under the Tokugawa Shogunate to the present. Major topics examined include the Japanese success in meeting the challenge of Western imperialism in the nineteenth century, Japan's own venture into imperialism on the Asian mainland in the twentieth century, and the Japanese economic phoenix in the postwar era.

Professor: Dr. Beahan 

A survey of new directions in modern history, particularly the rise of the USA and the USSR as world powers and the end of the colonial empires of Asia and Africa. This course will discuss the Cold War through international relations, the escalation of wars in Southeast Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as rival strategies for economic and cultural development in the post-war world.

Professor: Dr. Schell 

A critical, analytical examination of the portrayal of the past in films and how movies shape popular perceptions of history.

Professor: Dr. Schell 

Comparative analysis of civilizations after 1500. The course will introduce comparative methodology and analyze values and institutions across cultural boundaries. Particular attention will be given to comparative change within Asian, African, and Western civilizations during the era of Western expansion. Prerequisites: CIV 101 and 102 or equivalent world history survey.

May be repeated for a maximum of nine credit hours with permission.

An in-depth examination of Mexico's history since 1810. Emphasis will be given to economic development and diplomacy during the Diaz regime, the role of culture and North American influence in Mexico's development, and the coming of the 1910 revolution and the one-party state.

Professor: Dr. Schell 

A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisite: permission of chair.

A meaningful, planned, and evaluated work experience related to the career and educational objectives of the student for which he/she may receive academic credit and possible financial remuneration. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours from any 488/489 courses. Prerequisite: permission of chair.

Course will offer students a direct experience of history through a study abroad program linked to a standard, semester-long co-requisite upper or lower level history course. Course will give students opportunities to travel abroad in a structured program to historic sites and museums related to the subject matter of the co-requisite course. May be repeated for up to six hours. The instructor reserves the right to admit students who have completed the co-requisite course as well as Murray State faculty/staff. Corequisite: HIS 490 must be taken with a semester-long history course designated for that purpose. Prerequisites: HIS 300 or consent of instructor.

Offers students a direct experience of history through a focused travel program linked to standard on-campus history course. This is intended to supplement normal classroom learning activities by giving students opportunities to visit historic sites and museums related to the topic or time period of the course. May be repeated for up to six hours. Co-requisite: Must be taken with a semester-long history course designated for that purpose. Prerequisite: HIS 300 or consent of instructor.

This course will provide a general overview of the different aspects of historic preservation, including downtown revitalization, neighborhood organization, historic house management, preservation legislation, preservation education and historic architecture. Much of the class is taught in a laboratory atmosphere, with students making on-site visits to a variety of historic preservation projects. Emphasis is given to the study of the development of American architectural styles, so that students can recognize historic houses and place them in a wider context.

An in-depth introduction to the care of historical materials, including archives, manuscripts, photographs and ephemeral items.

This course will provide on-the-job training in historical interpretation for museums, public or private agencies and historic sites. Each student will be placed in an internship (generally for 12 weeks in the summer) in which he or she will work in an interpretative capacity and conduct a major research project related to the historic interpretation programs of the agency. The student will present the results of this research in a formal paper to a designated advisor in the Department of History. This course will count as a part of the major, but no student will be permitted to repeat the course for credit.

A course designed as an elective for the upper level undergraduate student; it will cover a particular topic, period, personality or problem of the past. Specific subject matter varies from semester to semester, according to student and faculty interest. Repeatable with permission for total of six hours. Prerequisites: HIS 300 or consent of instructor.

This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of museum work. Topics included will be the history and philosophy of museums; the social, economic and political trends that shape museums; the staffing, management and financing of museums; and the multiple functions of museums' collection and care of objects, exhibition design and interpretation, educational programs, research activities and public relations. (Same as ARC 598.)

Individualized instruction for the exceptional student. May be repeated for a maximum of nine credit hours. Prerequisite: permission of department chair.

A reading seminar introducing students to historical problems, interpretations, and methodologies, as well as a study of the history of historical scholarship. Students generally must complete a study of a significant historian or historical problem in European, American or non-Western history. Required of first-year history graduate students.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan

This course has three main areas of emphasis: eighteenth-century French society and culture, the causes of the French Revolution, and the career of Napoleon Bonaparte. The main theme of the course is that the French Revolution represented a watershed in history.

A systematic reading of major works on selected topics in European history from 1500 to the present. May be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo

An advanced treatment of the social, political, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe from World War I to the present.

A treatment of the social, political, intellectual, and cultural history of Europe's great age, the period from the French Revolution and Napoleon to the outbreak of the First World War.

A critical examination of a major topic or selected topics in European history since 1500, using primary sources. Topics vary and the course may be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

Survey of the history, politics, and culture of post-WWII Europe. Particular attention will be given to the Cold War, the rise of the European Union, and the challenges faced by an increasingly cosmopolitan Europe in the twenty-first century.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo

Course is a graduate level survey of the history, politics, economics, and culture of global empires since the fifteenth century. Particular emphasis will be given to the European colonial empires in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. States such as the Ottoman, Qing, and Japanese empires will also be discussed. The course explores how modern empires were built and maintained, the ways in which colonized people sought to deal with empire, the effects of imperialism on home countries, and the reasons that empires collapsed.

A course beginning with the aftermath of the Revolution of 1905, which also covers the rise of the Soviet Union during World War I, after the abdication of Nicholas II. The Bolshevik Revolution and the Civil War receive close attention, as does the New Economic Policy and the rise of Stalin in the 1930s. World War II, its impact on the USSR, Stalin's last years, the Cold War, and the decline of the Soviet Union are also covered.

Professor: Dr. Hilton 

A study of the molding of the British monarchy and of the eclipse of its authority by the social and political groups which came to dominate Parliament by the seventeenth century.

Professor: Dr. Callahan

A study of Britain since the Stuarts, including its age of greatness in the nineteenth century and its decline in the twentieth century. Political and cultural history are emphasized at an advanced, graduate level.

Professor: Dr. Callahan 

An advanced survey of modern French history from the French Revolution of 1789 to the present. The course will describe and analyze the major events in French history from the time of the Revolution to the twenty-first century, covering social, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural developments of this era.

A review of the political, socioeconomic, and intellectual history of Germany from 1789 to the present, with particular attention to how the history of Germany differed from that of other Western European nations until 1945, and to Germany's new role in Europe since 1945.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo 

A study of the Russian revolutions and first decade of communist power. This course examines the February and October revolutions of 1917, civil war, NEP era, and the turn to Stalinism. Emphasis will be placed on the Bolsheviks’ need to balance ideology and practical realities, their campaigns to transform social, economic, and cultural life, the population’s responses to these campaigns, and experimentation in the arts.

Professor: Dr. Hilton

Course provides a survey of European history form about 1914 to about 1945. It will describe and analyze the events leading to both World Wars as well as some of the consequences of those wars, delineating the major military figures and the military history of the World Wars.

Professors: Dr. Pizzo, Dr. Callahan and Dr. Hilton

This advanced course examines the position and contributions of women in history. Topics will vary, but the major themes and issues relevant to the field of Women's history will be covered, and the main historiographical traditions in the field will be examined.

The course will examine the origins and course of the war that began in Manchuria in 1931, expanded to China south of the Great Wall in July of 1937, from there to Pearl Harbor, South east and South Asia and the Pacific Islands by late 1941, and ended at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Professor: Dr. Beahan

An advanced survey of the history, politics, and culture of the Third Reich in Germany (1933-1945). This course will cover the rise, fall, and aftermath of the Nazi regime with a particular emphasis on the Holocaust and the Second World War.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo

This course is a systematic exploration of the social history of the United States from the first settlement by Europeans through the Civil War.

A systematic reading of major works on selected topics in United States history from colonial times to the present. May be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan

An analysis of U.S. relations with other nations since 1898, placing special emphasis on the interplay of ideals and self-interest in foreign relations.

Professor: Dr. Clardy 

A systematic, exploration of the social history of the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present.

A systematic exploration of the United States from the first European settlement to the beginning of the American Revolution.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan 

A critical examination of a major problem in United States history to 1865 using primary sources. Topics vary and the course may be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

A systematic exploration of the events that led to the independence of the United States and the establishment of the Constitution.

Professor: Dr. Mulligan

A critical examination of a major problem in United States history since 1865, using primary sources. Topics vary and the course may be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

This offering covers the period from 1815 to the presidential election of 1877, with emphasis on political, military, social, and economic conditions as they related to the sectional controversy raging during this part of the nineteenth century.

Professor: Dr. Humphreys 

An advanced study of the transformation of the United States from an agricultural to a modern industrial nation. Topics included within this broad theme are the rise of big business and labor unions, urbanization, immigration, the closing of the frontier, reform movements, the struggles of blacks and women for equal rights, national politics, and cultural changes.

Professor: Dr. Bolin 

A study of the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, and the subsequent forces that have shaped contemporary American life. Emphasis is placed on the role of the United States in international relations, the civil rights movement, and domestic economic developments.

This course covers the period from 1815 to the presidential election of 1860 and the break-up of the Union. Emphasis is on the political, social, and economic conditions as they related to the sectional controversy that raged during this part of the nineteenth century. Some specific topics include the rise of the common man, the Jacksonian era, slavery and the abolitionist movement. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

This course is an advanced survey of southern history from colonial times through the Civil War. Emphasis will be placed on examining, among other topics, the development and changing characteristics of slavery, southern economic organization in relation to the international colonial system, women in southern society, the South and the Revolutionary War, the South and the development of the U.S. Constitution, the emergence of southern nationalism, and the coming of the Civil War.

Professor: Dr. Humphreys

A survey of southern history from the end of the Civil War to the present, emphasizing the economic, political, social, and cultural aspects of southern history. A major theme will be the juxtaposition of the enduring characteristics of the South with the process of change since World War II.

Professor: Dr. Humphreys

The process of political, economic and social evolution in Kentucky is traced from early settlement to the modern area in this graduate course. Geographical influences upon the patterns of Kentucky development, Kentucky's changing role within an expanding union, and the Commonwealth's participation in national movements and events are stressed.

Beginning with the 18th century, the course will cover Islamic reform movements, then look at Muslim responses to Western and modern influence in the Islamic world. Finally, the course will examine the rise of radical and moderate trends in Islam. The geographical reach of this course is Eurasia and Africa. Special attention will be paid to political Islam and Islamic terrorist organizations.

This course considers the causes for European colonization of Africa, the ways in which African resistance and collaboration with Europeans set the stage for the formation of new economies, societies, and policies in Africa, and the process of de-colonialization, with an emphasis upon how that process shaped modern African states.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo

Survey of the history of slavery in Africa and the African diaspora. The course closely examines the period from 1400 to 1800, as well as slavery in Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Particular emphasis will be given to the effects of slavery on the social and political fabric of Africa and the world beyond.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo

A study of the historical background to the conflict between the state of Israel and the Arab states. This course will examine the origins of Zionism and of Arab nationalism in the 19th century, the phases of Jewish settlement in Palestine, the consequences of the First World War for Zionist and Arab nationalist movements, the British Mandate in Palestine, the Israeli war for independence in 1948, Nasserism, the Suez War, the Six-Day War, the invasion of Lebanon, the Intifada, and the possibilities for peace.

A graduate survey of the causes, course, and consequences of genocide throughout world history from the ancient world to the present. This course will explore case studies from different areas of the world across time. Special attention will also be given to the issues of memory, reconciliation, and justice.

Professor: Dr. Pizzo

An examination of the social, political, and economic influences upon race relations in the United States from the colonial era to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the sources of change in race relations, the various forms of racial discrimination, and the responses to discrimination in American history.

A systematic reading of major works on selected topics in the history of Africa, Asia or Latin America. May be taken more than once for credit; consult the department chair.

Professor: Dr. Hilton

An overview of the field of public history that focuses on the historical development of the field and of Americans' thinking about their history, current professional practice in the various areas of public history, including professional ethics, and the particular skills involved in each of these areas.

A detailed, advanced consideration of the planning, development, and operation of oral history projects for colleges, libraries, museums, corporations, professional organizations, and public schools.

A comprehensive consideration of the issues involved in the administration and management of historical organizations, including museums, archives and special collections libraries, historic preservation organizations, and local historical societies.

Introduces students to the development of the museum as a cultural institution in the United States and to professional practice regarding the care of collections, the development of exhibits, and other aspects of the profession. Also addresses professional ethical standards in the museum profession. Field trips and a semester project will give students an opportunity to apply what they study.

An in-depth exploration of the field of historic preservation, with an emphasis on current professional practice and the application of historical research methods and analytical skills to the field.

A study of the last decade and collapse of the Qing dynasty and China's subsequent search for unity and political form, beginning with the Republic, proclaimed in 1912, and ending with the Tiananmen massacre of 1989 and market reforms.

Professor: Dr. Beahan

The cultural and political history of Japan from its unification under the Tokugawa Shogunate to the present are covered at an advanced level. Major topics examined include the Japanese success in meeting the challenge of Western imperialism in the nineteenth century, Japan's own venture into imperialism on the Asian mainland in the twentieth century, and the Japanese economic phoenix in the postwar era.

Professor: Dr. Beahan

A survey of new directions in modern history, particularly the rise of the USA and the USSR as world powers and the end of the colonial empires of Asia and Africa. The course will discuss the Cold War through international relations, the escalation of wars in Southeast Asia, Africa, Latin America, and the Middle East, as well as rival strategies for economic and cultural development in the post-war world.

Professor: Dr. Schell

A critical, analytical examination of how the past is depicted in films and how films shape popular perceptions of history.

Professor: Dr. Schell

An in-depth examination of Mexico's history from 1810 to the present, with emphasis on economic development and diplomacy in the era of Porfiro Diaz (1876-1911), the role of culture and North American influence in the Revolution of 1910-1920, the emergence and seventy-five-year rule of the Party of the Institutional Revolution (PRI), and the post-NAFTA resurgence of revolutionary activity.

Professor: Dr. Schell

Supervised independent or group study of a topic or topics in European, United States, or non-Western history. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: permission of department chair.

Supervised independent or group study in one or more of the following public history fields: historic preservation, historic interpretation, museum studies, and oral history. May be taken more than once for credit.

Offers students a direct experience of history through a study abroad program linked to a standard, semester-long co-requisite graduate level history course. HIS 692 will give graduate students opportunities to travel abroad in a structured program to historic sites and museums related to the subject matter of the co-requisite course. May be repeated for up to 6 hours. The instructor reserves the right to admit students who have completed the co-requisite course as well as Murray State faculty/staff. Instructors will also drop students who have dropped the co-requisite course. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

Will offer students a direct experiences of history through a focused travel program linked to a standard, semester-long graduate-level course. This course will supplement normal classroom learning activities by giving students opportunities to travel to historic sites and museums related to the topic or time period of the co-requisite course as well as Murray State faculty/staff. To receive credit, the student must remain in the co-requisite course for the duration of the semester. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

A course designed as an elective for the graduate student; it will cover a particular topic, period, personality or problem of the past. Specific subject matter varies from semester to semester, according to student and faculty interest. Repeatable with permission of the chair for a total of six hours.

Thesis Hours

Thesis Hours

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